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ISSUE 43.

UPDATE 57 WOLGYE-RO 45GA-G I L , NOWO N- G U, S EO UL , 0 1 87 4 , KOREA

IN THIS ISSUE:

■ High School Retreat ■ Assessment and Learning Expo ■ Field Day

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■ WWW. A PIS .O RG

IN THIS ISSUE:

■ Chinese Mid-Autumn Festival Elementary Chinese & Japanese ■ ■National Honor Society ■ Faculty Retreat ■ Student Spotlights


SEPTEMBER 2016

E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L N E W S & E V E N T S

Elementary School Field Day Fun in the Sun!

"We had a BALL at Field Day!! So many smiles and wonderful sportsmanship from all of our students, teachers, and parents!! Be ready to get WET 'N' WILD for the next field day in spring!" Athletic Coordinator/Physical Education Teacher Jay Leroy

"Field Day was good. All the games were fun!" Luca Magnone (Grade 2)

It was fun and super hot!" Esther Kim (Grade 4)

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"Tug of War was the most fun part." Adelia Kwak (Grade 5)

"Field Day was a good day! So fun!" Jensen Lee (Grade 1)

What a fantastic day! It was great to see all the parents joining in the games with their kids! Even though there was no water, I think this was the best Field Day I’ve been a part of! I can’t wait for May 3 next year for the Spring Field Day! Elementary School Principal Bruce Knox


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Summer Reading Celebration By Judy Park, Grade 3 Teacher and ES Literacy Coordinator

The following students in grades kindergarten through sixth who read 1,000 minutes or more this summer, and tracked their reading, were awarded a certificate and Summer Reading Program T-shirt at Chapel on Sept. 20, to celebrate their learning: Kindergarten – Aaradhya Bhaskar, Jubin Park; Grade 1 – Eliot Kim, Jensen Lee, Janice Oh ; Grade 2 – Suki Park; Grade 3 – Juney Go, Jimin Jung, Katrien Knox-Nielsen, Jin Ryoo, Elliot Suh, Peyton Webster; Grade 4 – Yeonsue Arata, Matthew Jeon, David Jeong, Jiwoo Jung, Esther Kim, Chloe Ryu, Ianna, Sim, William Yoo; Grade 5 – Margaret Chung, Adelia Kwak, Noa Lee, Erica Shim, LuLu Timpson. (Not pictured: Grade 6 – Christine Jeong and Claire Park)

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t APIS, we care about student learning even during summer vacation. Our APIS Summer Reading Program is an annual program to encourage our students to become lifelong readers. Benefits of the APIS Summer Reading Program, to name a few: • Foster a love of reading • Improve reading and language skills • Prevent “summer slide,” a decline in academic performance and/or reading skills • Advance literacy and academic performance About 60 percent of our elementary school students participated in the Summer Reading Club this year. We hope this number will grow every year. It was exciting to see the improvement in our students’ reading ability for those students who read over the summer. Most of their reading levels moved up one to two levels. This shows that the students were applying the skills they have learned during the academic year and can use them independently. How exciting is that? Thanks to all the parents, administrators, and especially teachers for their continued support; without you, we would not see such growth. Congratulations to all our participants for reading 1,000 minutes or more and submitting your evidence of reading!

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月饼 中秋节 Chinese Mooncakes, Mid-Autumn Festival

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he Mid-Autumn Festival, one of the most-celebrated holidays on the Chinese lunar calendar, occurs on the 15th day of the eighth lunar month. Historically, it was a time to pray to the moon for good luck and a bountiful harvest. In more recent years, similar to Chuseok, it is a time to share feasts with loved ones. Mooncakes (yuè bing), a traditional celebration food that can be sweet or savory, are enjoyed with family and/or gifted to others. They symbolize happiness, togetherness, and, as their shape indicates, the moon. On Sept. 6 and 7, elementary students enrolled in Chinese language classes had the opportunity to share in this special Chinese holiday tradition and taste the moon. Through rolling squishy, oily dough into a ball, flattening the ball into a pancake, then gently wrapping the dough outer around a red bean interior, students could directly “see, touch, taste, feel, and experience” an important piece of Chinese culture, Chinese language teacher Iris Zheng shared. “Sometimes students forget the word, but they still remember that feeling [what mooncake tasted like]. Language is not only a thing that you memorize and write on paper. It’s a thing you can directly experience.” Exploring cultural traditions is one way to lead students toward a deeper understanding of the rich history behind the language they are learning. Appreciating a language within its cultural context also invites connections to one’s own native culture/background. Students are invited to consider similarities and differences. As Connor Lee (Grade 3) observed, "The mooncake tasted like Korean walnut cookie (호두과자)." “In elementary school, students are uniquely curious and open to experiencing,”“ observed Chinese Language Department Chair Grace Gao. Hence, the foreign language teachers seek to “nurture a passion for lifelong learning” in their students, added Chinese teacher Sherry Cheng. “If a student is interested, they’ll be motivated to meet the standard,” said Ms. Gao. Student comments indicate they are hungry for more cultural experiences. "I was eating the moon! I like it!" – Jubin Park (Kindergarten) .

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Elementary Officers Prepare to Lead I wanted to run for SRC president because I wanted to make our school events more fun and exciting. I believe that since I am a strong, independent, responsible, and caring person, I can help make some fabulous things happen in our school. This was my first time participating in SRC and I thought that it was important for me to take the risk of running for office because I love APIS. I want to devote my time to help out as much as I can.

President Erica Shim (G5) I want to be a leader because I like to make friends and help everyone see how wonderful APIS can be. I personally want to try my best at being a leader of our elementary school. I would like all of the students to have fun in school and at events. I am proud to represent the students in our school and will work hard.

Secretary Adrian Yamanea (G5)

Vice President Henry Kuo (G5)

Over the last couple of months in APIS, I have learned a lot in math, art, science, and literature. But, when I was learning, I realized that I have good handwriting, listening skills, and am also excellent at taking notes. I didn't want to run for the elementary school SRC secretary but my classmates and my teacher, Ms. Wilson, supported me, so I said to myself, maybe I should give it a try. I am not going to promise I will do a better job than other people, but I will try my hardest to make this year memorable and fun. I will give great ideas to the SRC president so that we can all enjoy this year together. To be honest, I have no experience as a secretary in any club before, but I'll try my best.

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I wanted to be the SRC Treasurer because I am a responsible honest person, full of integrity and always true to myself. SRC is for helping the school get better. I will contribute to the school by being the best role model for my classmates. I would like the talent show to continue because I like seeing my friends enjoying each other's company and seeing their special talents. I would work to use the SRC funds for things the kids actually want.

Treasurer William Yoo (G4)

Class Representatives Kindergarten

Grade 1

Grade 2

Jubin Park

Janice Oh

Yin Choi

Grade 3

Grade 4

Grade 5

Elliot Suh

Esther Kim

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Grade 9 Student Matthew Choi Awarded Excellent Student Award by the Korea Herald Insight

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n July 31, Matthew Choi (Grade 9) was awarded the Excellent Student Reporter Award from the Korea Herald Insight. Out of a field of 67 participants, his work was recognized as one of two Excellent Student Reporter awards for articles he submitted during the February – July 2016 reporting season. Award recipients were selected based on the integrity, novelty, and quality of their articles. Three of Matthew’s articles, in particular, were recognized in announcing his award. To date, Matthew has had a total of eight articles published through Korea Herald online platforms, and continues to submit articles. Once selected as student reporters, the Korea Herald gives reporters a rubric, which includes formatting guidelines, word counts (600-word limit), and some guidance on approved topics (reporters were advised to stay away from anything too political). Matthew said that it is often “quite hard” to come up with ideas for articles, but that one solution he has developed is to spend the first two weeks of each month generating ideas, and the next two weeks writing as much as possible, pursuing ideas until the best article takes shape. He credits the quantity of content he generated with helping him win the award, and cites the entertainment industry as his favorite topic to cover. Megan Vosk, Matthew’s writing teacher from eighth grade, writes, “Matthew Choi is a writer with a unique voice. He is not afraid to share his opinions and ideas. He is a creative thinker who always has something interesting and different to say.” Asked what advice he might offer other students thinking of becoming student reporters for the Korea Herald, Matthew said, “Relax, and think of ideas that people wouldn’t exactly think of. Don’t be too frustrated if your article doesn’t get accepted. It is a little bit competitive.” Read Matthew’s award-winning articles (Korea-Costa Rica share tech "Know-how's"; Two Legends in One League, Rival Debate in NBA; Why 2016 is the climax of the movie industry), and more at http://www.heraldinsight.co.kr/news/articleList.html (search "Matthew Choi").

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V lleyball Season Outlook While it is certainly important what these ladies do in the game of volleyball, it is more important what the game does in these ladies lives. The game of volleyball is an opportunity for them to develop their character through aspiring to be the best that they can be, by persevering through difficult times and losses, modelling integrity in their conduct in practices and games, and helping them to grow spiritually through service to others in a team environment. It is an absolute delight for us to work with such an awesome group of young ladies.

Ward & Leslie Milligan,

girls varsity volleyball coaches

The boys varsity volleyball team has been a great group of young men to coach. We are a young team working hard every day to grow in our knowledge, skill, and love for the game. We aspire for trust and true teamwork, persevere with great hearts that never give up, display our integrity through our sportsmanship, and are reminded to find our spiritual grounding in Christ when we falter. We are improving with every match and our best volleyball is still to come.

Roger Tu,

boys varsity volleyball coach

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SEPTEMBER 2016

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Masterpieces in the Making High School Retreat

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By Jennifer Lee, Grade 11 Class President

n Sept. 7-9, the high school went on a retreat to the Women’s Retreat Center in Gangwon Do, Every year, students await this retreat which mainly consist of events the SRC has been preparing since the beginning of the school year. The main theme of this year’s retreat was “Masterpiece in the Making.” Pastor John wanted to share with the students the fact that God’s love is overwhelming and that He created each individual for some great purpose. Pastor John wanted to convey how each individual's “image” is yet unclear or yet to be finished, especially in the context of being just regular high school students. “But” he says, “That’s what I was thinking at first, however, … I felt that the masterpiece God was actually making and would bring to completion is – perfect love. God has invited and continues to invite us into this perfect love.” With this invitation, APIS students were eager to kick off the 2016 High School Retreat. On the first night of retreat, the main SRC event was the bonfire and lanterns. All high school students wrote little notes and thoughtful hopes they had for this year on the lanterns. Although a few lanterns burned before their eyes instead of floating into the night sky, the most important part was that everyone bonded throughout the night and made memories they would remember when looking back into their high school years. Right after lanterns, the bonfire took place – an exciting time of warmth for all teachers, staff, and students. For the second day, SRC prepared an escape room where homerooms were assigned certain rooms full of hidden clues they had to use in order to unlock the “secret code.” Despite the fact that students were overwhelmed with this mystery, they soon learned that teamwork was the most crucial factor in helping to find all the hidden clues. Afterward, students went on a railroad biking trip that took them along a scenic coastline with stunning views of both mountains and beaches. The bikes also passed through several tunnels decorated with neon lights. To end the day, SRC prepared the last night with multiple exhilarating activities. Students were able to choose between a karaoke room, a dance, and a game room. Daniel Oh, freshman and a new student to APIS, said, “The best part of retreat was just hanging around doing the various SRC activities because it was immensely fun to play with people with similar interests.” Furthermore, Sophie Yoo (Grade 11) thinks the retreat is important because “it gives opportunities for students to get to know each other, especially the new students. It helps them adjust and find their place at school.” When asked about the overall impression of the retreat, Daniel Bae (Grade 12) said, “The best one yet—SRC really stepped up the game.” Although there is room for more improvements, it seems as if the SRC’s hard work has clearly paid off.

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SEPTEMBER 2016

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College Counseling Column Considerations When Making the College List

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he college list is comprised of the schools you at one point had simply heard about and were intrigued by, the schools you were considering, and, finally, the schools where you are applying. In this article, the focus is on the list that you’re considering applying to. There are five criteria that go into considering and then placing on a college list. They are: location, academic programs, extracurricular activities, access, and intangibles. A few words on each: Location: Location itself can be broken up into two different though mutually defining categories. First, there is location in terms of where in the country the school is located. And second, there is location according to three rubrics: urban, suburban, and rural. As you consider your school, you will want to ascertain where in the country you want to be and what kind of school you want to attend in terms of its overall setting.

Director of College Counseling

Dr. Erik Brodnax

Academic Programs: Pretty straightforward ... does the school have the major you’re interested in? But, again, a few nuances: does it have courses in it so you will be satisfied even if you decide against majoring. Second, does it have majors/minors/double majors, so that all of your interests can be met? And, third, are there people with whom you are excited to work with? Key professors can influence your choice. Pick wisely, as this will shape a lot of your experience on campus. Extracurriculars: What do kids do outside of the classroom? Are there clubs, sports, sporting clubs, and other ways of participating, such as societies (e.g., University of San Diego has a prelaw society, a pre-med society, etc.)? This one is nuanced, too; you should also ask yourself: are there things you can attend that you will enjoy? Sporting events, concerts, renowned guest speakers? It’s always fun to watch a good soccer match! Access: This one has to do with access to and from campus. Two questions: what are the closest ways of getting to and going off campus? Is there an airport nearby? And, if so, is there a way to get to and from campus? For example, a shuttle, limousine service, and/or taxis, which are dependable? Cornell, for example, can be difficult to get to from the airport around Christmas break. Just think two words: snowed in. The ways to get to and from the airport can be inaccessible in inclement weather. Intangibles: Like the Blue Devil at Duke? Or the Bull Dog at Yale? Like NYU’s fight song? Like those school colors? Like that school’s baseball caps and hoodies? Like the pictures on the website of the campus in fall? These are the intangibles. You can’t explain why, but there is something that you like about it. Conclusion: When you’re making your college list, focus also on what bracket the school falls into in terms of your likelihood of getting in. Reach, target, and safety. Those designations should also significantly shape where you apply.

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College Information Night On Friday, Sept. 23, 2016, Dr. Brodnax hosted a college information night to review the U.S. college admissions process. Dr. Brodnax defined the holistic review process most U.S.-based universities and colleges apply when reviewing applications. This review attempts to consider the applicant as a whole, relying on a variety of factors to determine admission; these factors include transcript, essays, boards (e.g., SAT, ACT, SAT subject tests, AP, IB, etc.), extracurricular activities, GPA, and letters of recommendation. Dr. Brodnax emphasized that universities consider rigor (difficulty of courses a student takes), breadth (range of classes taken – i.e., across disciplines), and depth (how far a student progresses in different subject areas) when reviewing applications. To conclude, Dr. Brodnax shared, “While variable, discriminatory, and arbitrary, U.S. admissions works in part because of its holistic commitments. Have your child pay careful attention to their college choices. Transcripts are important, and so are test scores. But, they are NOT the end-all, be-all. Explore who you are and be honest. That will get you in quicker than trying to impress them with who you are not.” Dr. Bodnax set a mid-October deadline for seniors to finalize their college lists. The lists must be signed off on by parents.

Upcoming College Visits 1. University at Albany SUNY Oct. 4, 2016 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. 2. Lincoln University - New Zealand Oct. 5, 2016 1 p.m. – 2 p.m. 3. Kalamazoo and Wheaton College Oct. 6, 2016 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. 4. Case Western Reserve University Oct. 6, 2016 3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. 5. Gustavus Adolphus College Oct. 10, 2016 9 a.m. – 10 a.m. 6. Hult International Business Oct. 10, 2016 11:30 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. 7. Columbus College of Art & Design Oct. 11, 2016 11:30 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. 8. Boston University Oct. 11, 2016 2:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. 9. St. John's NYC Oct. 12, 2016 11:30 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. 10. California State Polytechnic Oct. 12, 2016 3:40 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. 11. Biola University Oct. 14, 2016 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. 12. Temple University Oct. 18, 2016 3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. 13. Drexel University Oct. 19, 2016 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. 14. Utah State Oct. 21, 2016 3:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

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SEPTEMBER 2016

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

Grade 11 Student Richard Shim Jo Awarded Bronze Prize at the 12th English-Speaking Union KOREA Public Speaking Competition

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hen the school year began, students focused on navigating their new schedules and getting the year off to a good start. Grade 11 student Richard Shim Jo focused on this, too, while also preparing for the 12th English-Speaking Union KOREA Public Speaking Competition (held August 27 at Ajou University in Suwon, Gyeonggi), a biannual contest hosted by the Korea JoongAng Daily and the British Embassy. Participating was a risk. How would he perform? Would he have time to balance speech preparation time with the demands of the new school year and multiple AP classes? Richard had less than a month to prepare. As the clock ticked, he submitted a 3-minute recording of part of his speech, which was reviewed and selected as a finalist, out of close to 1,100 submissions. Richard’s speech teacher, Tyler Sgrignoli, observed, "When Richard first came to me for help ... he seemed intimidated by the sheer number and acclaim of the other speakers competing; however, during our many sessions together, it became quite clear that Richard's aspirations of a successful speech delivery would soon become a reality. One indication of this was Richard's willingness to accept criticism ... Together, we must have edited over 12 drafts, cutting here and adding there until the speech reflected Richard's vision and intentions perfectly. In the end, what resulted was not only a cleverly-worded and comically-appealing piece, but also a mature and confident student." Working off the theme for the contest, “when you don’t risk, you risk even more,” Richard decided to give a personal name to a feeling familiar to many – the inner critic that can make one feel small, the negative self-talk that diminishes one’s potential before one even tries. Richard named this detractor “Frank.”

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If You Don't Risk, You Risk Even More Richard opened his speech, “I would like to introduce you to my friend Frank. Frank often isolates himself from his friends and family. Frank is afraid to commit and is afraid of rejection.” While preparing his speech, Richard remained open to inspiration, which one day arrived in a National Geographic article about cutting-edge technology in development to combat mosquitos. Just as scientists must often test new, as-yet-unproven technologies, where the outcome is uncertain, so must individuals take risks in order to foster personal development. As Richard shared in his speech, “In the end, our willingness to explore new things allows us to develop as individuals. Thomas Edison once stated, ‘I didn’t fail 1,000 times. The light bulb was an invention with 1,000 steps.’” “His dedication and perseverance are admirable,” shared Social Studies Teacher Jason Webster. “Especially impressive is Richard's willingness to seek out constructive criticism ... He is open to receiving feedback and thoughtful in his responses, rare and important qualities. Richard can appear to be a natural speechwriter/speaker, but to assume so diminishes all of the hard work he puts in behind the scenes to write, polish, and deliver such quality material.” For others interested in participating in a similar competition, Richard recommends, “First, you have to think about how you’ll perform it. Then, you make the structure of the speech. Fix the grammatical errors. And, look at the flow. Creating an outline was a key part of it that my teachers introduced to me.” Richard credits the support of his teachers, Mr. Sgrignoli and Mr. Webster, with helping him through the process of writing his speech and preparing to deliver it. In addition to being awarded the bronze prize, one of the top honors, Richard said, “The writing process really helped me with my English,” and the entire experience boosted his confidence and willingness to take new risks, including participating in the upcoming IYF speech competition (Oct. 29) and the KAIAC speech competition (Oct. 14). In concluding his speech, Richard shared, “The truth is, I am Frank … You are Frank ... Frank is the crippling fear of the world around us... If you take anything away from this speech today, please take the notion that fear is not the outcome of our lives, but the obstacle that keeps us from advancing in our visions.”

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APIS National Honor Society Welcomes New Members By Meg Hayne, Curriculum Coordinator, and Carly Shinners, Secondary Math Teacher

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n Sept. 26, the APIS chapter of the National Honor Society (NHS) welcomed its new members at the official induction ceremony. Each year, high school students who are accomplished in the areas of scholarship, leadership, service, and character are able to apply for admission into the national organization. Since the establishment of a national network of honor societies in 1921, there have been four pillars that form the path for each organization: “to create enthusiasm for scholarship; to stimulate a desire to render service; to promote leadership; and to develop character in the students of secondary schools.¹” Each year, students who are accomplished in the areas of scholarship, leadership, service, and character are able to apply for admission into the organization. The foundation of our chapter is to serve both APIS and the local community. The students partner with local charities and organizations to raise money as well as assist programs that improve the lives of those in our area. In the past, the NHS has raised money for three different charities, prepared Christmas boxes for underprivileged children, conducted food and clothing drives, and helped North Korean refugees. This year, the chapter plans to partner with an elderly assisted living home to spend time with the residents and help raise money to purchase needed items for the organization that runs the home. Ms. Shinners and Ms. Hayne are very proud of this year’s officer team who have been very dedicated in organizing a schedule of fundraisers, setting up the tutoring program, as well as planning the service projects. They are excited to welcome the new members and look forward to a great year of serving our community.

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"National Honor Society | NHS." <https://www.nhs.us/>


APIS Assessment and Learning Expo

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n Friday, Sept. 2, APIS welcomed family members to Back to School Night: Assessment and Learning Expo. In subschool sessions (elementary, middle, and high school), families had the opportunity to hear from APIS Director Euysung Kim, Chaplain John Choi, Director of Christian Life Department and School Counselor Ward Milligan, and each principal. After each welcome session, parents could visit grade level classrooms and learn about assessment and classroombased learning. Afterward, there were open sessions to visit with foreign language, music, art, and physical education department members. Early in the evening, Dr. Erik Brodnax, joined by admissions' team members, Dr. Kim & Suzie Chung, offered a college information session aimed at seniors. Topics discussed included our mission to help students be proactive about getting into college and the best use of the admissions' office resources. Students were encouraged to apply early and the Common App (the application clearinghouse for most United States universities) was discussed, along with its link to the Naviance platform, which is the agency responsible for making sure the Common App is delivered and complete. "We laughed and perhaps some cried, but it was clear that we are going to enjoy working together in a God-fearing way on getting our kids into their dream schools," said Dr. Brodnax.

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The evening concluded with a well-attended New Pacific Century (NPC) Academy information session led by APIS Director Dr. Kim, APIS Hawaii Deputy Head of Academics Scott Paulin, and Middle School Principal Jillian Iwanuk. This year, the NPC Academy, which will take place in November, invites all APIS Seoul middle school students to the APIS Hawaii campus for a project based learning (PBL) experience that takes advantage of Hawaii’s rich resources. “Education must reach beyond the boundaries of the classroom,” emphasized Dr. Kim, in order to best meet students’ needs and 21st century learning goals. Throughout the evening, Dr. Kim encouraged parents to, “Always reach out to us. We need your input, both positive and negative, for us to improve ourselves. We are a growth-mindset school. We believe in your children’s potential, and we will put every effort possible toward successful learning opportunities.”

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Principal's Note: Learn as if You Were to Live Forever

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By Bruce Knox, Elementary School Principal

he doors opened on the first day of the new school year and I was positioned in the lobby with my camera, lens polished and battery charged. As each elementary student entered the building I framed their first-day smile against the new bright elementary hallway and took their photo. 44 faces. Some smiling. Some with a cheeky grin. Some looking a little bit scared! New beginnings are like that! Not sure what’s to come, we face up to them with a mixture of confidence and wariness, eagerness and hesitation, waiting to see what the future looks like. Now, in September, we have begun to get a sense of what the year Elementary School Principal Bruce Knox holds for us. Our students have begun to find the rhythm of their classes, their homework, their sleep and recreation routines. Our teachers have a much better understanding of who their students are, what they respond well to, what challenges them, and how the rest of the year might be best prepared. Our school leadership team, having spent many weeks planning for the beginning of the year, has had a chance to work through the beginning and is now in full swing coordinating everything that needs coordinating. And all of it – all the student routines, the teacher planning, and the leadership coordination – is to facilitate one thing. Learning. Sometimes it is easy to lose sight of this one, critical, all-important word! Sometimes we lose sight of it amidst all the other words: deadlines, grades, college, AP classes, homework, assignments, retakes, assessment, etc, etc. So before we get too much further, let’s take a moment to refocus on that all-important, critical word – learning. Mahatma Gandhi summed it up very well when he said, “Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.” It is easy to forget this is the reason schools exist. APIS is not here to get your son or daughter to college. APIS is here to inspire your sons and daughters to learn, and, through this learning, ensure they are ready for whatever awaits them beyond APIS. College is one of those “beyond APIS” options. As we inspire our students to learn, we challenge them with courses and subjects that we know will prepare them for that next step. We consider the best practices in education and teaching and incorporate them where appropriate and feasible, again, to prepare them for that next step. But, in the end, and all the way through the middle, and at the start, it is all about learning. Not grades. Not college. Not GPAs. Learning. Focus on learning, and the grades, GPAs, and college take care of themselves. Those photos I snapped on day one are now showing on the large display screen in the elementary hallway. Big smiles, hesitant looks, cheeky eyes. They all have many years of learning ahead of them – and APIS looks forward to helping them through that process all the way!

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An Invitation to Taste and See that God is Good

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By John Choi, Chaplain

ow, it’s been almost two months since I stepped into this role as Chaplain for APIS. In a lot of ways, I’m still trying to figure things out, but I am both excited and humbled to have this opportunity to be here and serve the school through the Christian Life Department. The main thing I believe I have been placed at this school to do, and that I will continue to strive to do, is simply to connect with students in a meaningful way. I believe it is God’s heart and desire to connect with His children. He proved this in Jesus Christ, who came to serve and not be served, to show the Father’s love, School Chaplain and to give His life as a ransom for many. My hope is to connect John Choi with students and to point to Jesus; that they might “taste and see” that He is good. My confidence in this hope is not in my ability, but in knowing that God is faithful and knows the way to every heart. I know that many of our students, parents, and staff at APIS are not Christian, but I see the Christian Life Department to have a unique opportunity and responsibility, especially in this day and age, to present the Good News of Jesus Christ in the context of our everyday lives. If there is one thing I would love every person that comes through the doors of APIS to understand, it would be that Christianity is not a religion or set of morals but is a relationship with Jesus. We continue to explore different ways of exercising this opportunity and responsibility and strive to do so with authenticity, conviction, and humility.

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Librarian's Pick: Poetry and Lyrical Books to Read This Fall

f you are overwhelmed by extra-long books and looking for something shorter, poetry might be a fantastic choice! Poetry is just as wonderfully diverse as novels, including various viewpoints and settings. These four options might be a good start. Hope you all fall in love with poetry!

Come to the Great World: Poems from Around the Globe I believe That it is possible For all people To live in peace. “Good hope,” Benjamin Zephaniah

L E V E L: K – G3 Selected by Wendy Cooling A collection of poetry which celebrates the diverse experiences of children all over the world.

Song of the Water Boatman and Other Pond Poems All red-winged generals desert us. Courage clumps and fluffs like bursting pillows. “The Season’s Campaign”

L E V E L: K – G5 Joyce Sidman A collection of poems that provide a look at some of the animals, insects, and plants that are found in ponds, with accompanying information about each.

Love that Dog

Love that dog, like a bird loves to fly I said I love that dog like a bird loves to fly

L E V E L: G 3 – G 6

Sharon Creech A young student, who comes to love poetry through a personal understanding of what different famous poems mean to him, surprises himself by writing his own inspired poem.

SEPTEMBER 2016

S C H O O LW I D E N E W S & E V E N T S

Honeybee: Poens & Short Prose Where would we be without them? Where would we be Without one another?

L E V E L: G7 U P

Naomi Shihab Nye A collection of poems and short prose pieces in which Naomi Shihab Nye reflects on the topics that are most important to people, including love, memories, war, and the planet.

w w w. a p i s . o r g

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Issue 43 APIS Update September 2016  
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