Page 1

F E B R UA RY 2 0 1 6

Online

ISSUE 37.

UPDATE 57 WOLGYE-RO 45GA-G I L , NOWO N- G U, S EO UL , 0 1 87 4 , KOREA

IN THIS ISSUE:

■ Geology Rocks! ■ ES Digital Logic Club ■ 100 Days of School

■ T. 0 2 .9 0 7 .2 7 4 7

■ F. 0 2 .9 0 7 .2 7 4 2

■ WWW. A PIS .O RG

IN THIS ISSUE:

■ ■KIMEA/KAIAC Festivals Elementary Chinese & Japanese ■ ■Scholastic Art Awards Faculty Retreat ■ American Math Contest


FEBRUARY 2016

E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L N E W S & E V E N T S

Geology Rocks!

"Our Professor Rock (Cullen Webster, Grade 5) has reappeared!"

O

n Friday, Feb. 26, APIS first and fifth graders, under the direction of Grade 5 teacher Jeff Underhill and Grade 1 teacher Soo Lee, took to the stage and rocked their performance of the musical, “Geology Rocks!” Written by Ron Fink and John Heath, the musical is a story about the search for two students’ missing geology professor, Professor Rock. As the character Earth, played by Rin Choi (Grade 5), says, “You’ve got to look below the surface” to find what’s really going on. And look below the surface the students do, leading the audience on a journey that spans millions of years and covers plate tectonics, rock cycles, volcanoes, land formations, and more. Comprised of 10 songs, including solos and choral performances, the musical is a fast-paced, rollicking journey that incorporates a crash course in earth science. Introducing the production, Mr. Underhill said, “Grade 1 and Grade 5 students learn about earth science, including rocks and tectonics. Ms. Lee and I thought it would be a great opportunity for young and very young students to collaborate and enjoy creating a musical together. This musical experience has been wonderful for naturally learning speaking skills, such as reading with expression, pronunciation, speaking clearly, and speaking before an audience.” Somang Yang (Grade 5), who played Mountain #1, shared “It was special because we collaborated with first graders. [We] worked together to make a better musical.” Speaking on how he acted as a mentor with his co-mountain, Sunon Jones (Grade 1), Somang said, “I kind of encouraged him to do hand motions [with the song]. I did it and then he followed me.” APIS affords its students unique opportunities for multi-age social and educational experiences. Rin Choi said the production included “new experiences for all of us. Our relationship got better with the first graders; we worked together every day of the week [to get ready].”

2

Claire Park (Grade 5), who played the Canyon, added, “I never hung out with little kids — it was a chance to see how little kids act. They know more things than I thought they did.” W W W. A P I S . O R G


Grade 1 & 5 Musical

Asked about what it was like to work alongside the fifth graders, Frank Li (Grade 1), Volcano #2, shared, “Jaeho [Choi] helped me by practicing.” To prepare for the performance, Ms. Lee and Mr. Underhill led students through rehearsal after rehearsal. Sometimes, in practice, students were uncomfortable with singing or dancing, or forgot a line. But, through perseverance and encouragement, all the practice paid off. When the big day came, the performers wowed the audience with their dynamic, energy-filled performance.

FEBRUARY 2016

E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L N E W S & E V E N T S

Grade 5 student, Jaeho Choi, Volcano #1, said after the performance, “We weren’t shy. [We were] just having fun. We didn’t know the others were there.” Matthew Shima (Grade 6), who was part of the same performance as a fifth grader, said the show was, "A huge accomplishment! The most amazing and hilarious (and loud) show!" At curtain call the musical was met with thundering applause, and the 20-member crew headed off to enjoy a cast party with their teachers, and family and friends who attended the performance. The directors thanked all who contributed to the musical’s success, from the students themselves, to teachers and staff who supported them, and parents and other family members. Jeannette Kim (Grade 5), who played Jenn, one of the students, said “I really liked the singing and the rhythm of the music and the joy that we all had.”

Silence! My aston-

ishing powers of deduction have led me to a clue right here in this rock!

W W W. A P I S . O R G

3


FEBRUARY 2016

E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L N E W S & E V E N T S

ES Digital Logic Club: Where (binary) 2=10

HS Computer Science teacher Don Kirkwood introduces binary code to elementary students in Digital Logic Club.

H

ow do computers communicate? How can we talk to computers? What did people of the past predict computers of today might be like? And, what technological predictions can we make today for what the future might hold? These questions and more are up for discussion in Don Kirkwood’s ninth period Digital Logic Club, which began running on Dec. 11 and goes through March 11. Mr. Kirkwood, high school computer science teacher, created the club, aimed at fourth and fifth graders, to give younger students a chance to develop their digital logic IQ. He enjoys this age, he said, because “younger students have so much energy and that is definitely infectious.” Energy levels were high and productive at a club meeting on a recent Friday afternoon. Mr. Kirkwood shared how the 10-digit decimal system that students are familiar with is most likely based off the fact that humans have 10 digits (fingers). The base-2 (binary) system, on the other hand, used by computers is built off digital electronic circuitry and the simple option of on or off. If a computer only has zeroes and ones to communicate, though, how does it express and understand other numbers, and how did we get to today ... where we can interact with computers in seemingly constantly expanding ways? As with many things, understanding the basics is key to unlocking more advanced con-

4

W W W. A P I S . O R G


ES Digital Logic Club cepts, so students were tasked with writing numbers they are familiar with, such as 2, in binary form, which would be 10. For the remaining class time, Mr. Kirkwood presented other numbers for students to translate and students worked independently or in small groups to crack the code; high school students were also on hand to assist students as questions arose. For students who are passionate about computers, Mr. Kirkwood offered advice for outside of school work/play to help them better understand and apply digital logic. “Learn to read, think, and take intellectual risks. This could be in a wide variety of ways: LEGO or other robotics, computer languages (LOGO, Alice, BYOB, Processing), or graphic arts/music ... The key is to challenge yourself and then look for someone who can help you discipline your thought process by thinking about effectiveness and efficiency of solutions and new areas that you don't know about that can be explored. Although the Web is okay for this, there is a lot of trash out there and many sites/tutorials teach bad habits that are very hard to correct; therefore, getting advice from someone you trust is a good idea.”

“For me, teaching computer science is an astonishing way to help students push themselves to a higher level. The fact that computers are immediately reinforcing (a programmer knows if a solution works or doesn't with a click of the enter key), can take any topic and work horizontally as well as vertically, have connections to all other curriculum areas, and can be applied directly to work and university fields sets the field apart. Computer science can be used to teach students how to problem solve at the same level as calculus and physics and at a much earlier intellectual and chronological age.”

FEBRUARY 2016

E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L N E W S & E V E N T S

– Mr. Kirkwood

W W W. A P I S . O R G

5


FEBRUARY 2016

E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L N E W S & E V E N T S

Field Trip to Face the Fish

First-grade students get an up-close look at some sea creatures.

A

t the beginning of February, students in first grade were asked to draw a picture of sea animals and sea plants. But something wasn’t right. The students’ drawings reflected a lack of experience with underwater creatures. The fish were cartoonish with eyes that were too large and the shapes and details weren’t right, said Soo Lee, first grade teacher. So, Ms. Lee and Anna Sea, art teacher, decided the students needed a face-to-face encounter with the real thing. They organized a field trip to the COEX Aquarium in Gangnam. On Feb. 11, the two teachers and their students, laden with clipboards, paper, and other drawing materials, loaded up an APIS school bus and set off. The trip was very exciting for her class, Ms. Lee said, with her students enjoying just the process of getting to their destination. And, then, once at the aquarium, what caught their eye? “The sharks!” said Yin Choi (Grade 1). “The colors,” said Yurina Kimura (Grade 1). “The fish were black and white.” “And pink!” Yin added.

6

W W W. A P I S . O R G


Field Trip to the Aquarium

In addition to sharks, the students saw sea turtles, starfish, rays, schools of sardines, octopus, and a multitude of other sea creatures. They had the chance to observe movement, colors, texture, and patterns, said Mrs. Sea. “I think it was amazing for them to see,” said Ms. Lee. “There are so many different kinds [of underwater creatures]. The whole experience was really fun.” Other visitors to the aquarium watched the young artists stand by the aquarium tanks and draw the life contained within. The visitors “were amazed that the student drawings were so good,” Mrs. Sea said. Mrs. Sea was also pleased Let's see what changed with the more realistic drawings her young artafter encountering sea ists were able to create as a result of the trip. In addition to helping with their art lessons, Ms. Lee is also using the field trip experience to help the students with their writing. The first grade is currently working on a realistic fiction unit. Ms. Lee asked the students to come up with a character who is like themselves and then imagine a problem that could happen on a field trip. The students’ stories will be about solving that problem.

animals in real life.

Turtle

FEBRUARY 2016

E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L N E W S & E V E N T S

Octopus

W W W. A P I S . O R G

7


FEBRUARY 2016

E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L N E W S & E V E N T S

Days of School Celebration

T

o celebrate the 100th day of school, APIS elementary students gathered together for a variety of themed activities. Divided into four multi-aged groups, the students rotated through stations that included literacy and movement; fine motor; science and math; and technology.

How do popcorn kernels change in size once popped? Students predicted how many cups 100 kernels of corn (1/8 cup’s worth prior to popping) would equal once popped.

Counting to 100 with Cheerios and Fruit Loops. Did you make a pattern? Can you count by 10s?

IMAGINE • If I had 100 cats . . . • If I had 100 bags of LEGOs . . . • If I had 100 scoops of ice cream . . . • If I had 100 brothers and sisters . . . • If I had 100 dollars, I would . . . 8

W W W. A P I S . O R G

100 things to do with Google docs


Identifying With Art

(Kindergarten)

Eliot Kim

Yin Choi (Grade 1)

Juney Go (Grade 2)

Louie Park (Grade 3)

Amber Lee (Grade 4)

Joanna Kim (Grade 5)

E

lementary students at APIS like strawberries, ice cream, and pizza. They also enjoy a variety of activities, including soccer, piano, ballet, swimming, and going to the movies. They love their families, and they go on trips with them to the beach and to visit other countries. Those are just a few things one learns when looking at the 36 colorful pictures submitted for this year’s Pacific Pencil cover art contest. Following the theme of “Who Am I?,” the entries feature a self-portrait by each student artist that is surrounded by illustrations of the student’s hobbies, family, favorite foods, and home. Emily Kim, a teacher of Korean and a member of the Pacific Pencil committee, said, “I love these [entries] not only for their personal interesting perspective, but also for their reflection on [the world of elementary school] kids.” Ms. Kim described the pictures as “even more beautiful than what I had imagined.”

FEBRUARY 2016

E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L N E W S & E V E N T S

“I love the way they all look different,” said Anna Sea, art teacher and chair of the Pacific Pencil committee, as she viewed the six winning cover designs — one from each elementary grade — spread out on a table in the art room one morning in early February. The three art teachers along with the members of the Pacific Pencil committee selected the winners from a blind showing, without knowing who the artists were. The following students’ entries were selected for the Pacific Pencil cover: Eliot Kim (Kindergarten), Yin Choi (Grade 1), Juney Go (Grade 2), Louie Park (Grade 3), Amber Lee (Grade 4), and Joanna Kim (Grade 5). These six designs will be used together to illustrate the front cover of this year’s Pacific Pencil, and all 36 entries will be celebrated and put on display during the May 19 publication party for the literary and art journal. On that day, every elementary school student will get a copy of the magazine. This is the sixth year for the school to publish the Pacific Pencil, which is designed “to celebrate all the elementary school students’ artwork and writing,” Mrs. Sea said. “I want everyone to be highlighted and their hard work.” She noted that all art is valuable and pitting one piece of art against another isn’t ideal. But she acknowledges that “due to the nature of competition, it makes students push themselves.” She commended the 36 students who participated in the contest and “took the risk.” “I can tell that the participants worked hard and showed their best work that they did on their own.” W W W. A P I S . O R G

9


FEBRUARY 2016

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

Starting Off the Year Making Music By Sophie Holbrook, Music Department Chair

T

hirteen middle school choir students returned to APIS after the winter break and spent many hours preparing music that was rehearsed and performed on Jan. 28 at GSIS. Sarah Koo, Allison Lee, Grace Lee (all Grade 6) and Helen Kim and Kimberly Ho (both Grade 7) National Honor Choir sings during the concert held at the end of the NHF. joined their voices with 40 young ladies to form the first ever KIMEA Middle School Girls Honor Choir. Anna Frankl (Grade 8), Mei-Mei Timpson (Grade 8), Matthew Lee (Grade 6), Matthew Shima (Grade 6), Jacob Kim (Grade 8), Danny Kim (Grade 8), Jin Lee (Grade 8), and Bryan Jung (Grade 7) blended their voices with 80 others to form the KIMEA Middle School Mixed Honor Choir. After a full day of rehearsing, the day concluded with a concert. It was truly a joy to watch and hear our APIS students as they celebrated their hard work through song. Middle school band students were also given the opportunity to participate in an honor group. On Feb. 2, 26 eager middle school students boarded the bus for SFS to participate in the annual KIMEA Middle School Honor Band. Students acted as delegates from APIS and joined more than 150 other students from international schools around Korea to comprise three bands: Blue, Red, and Gold. Students had rehearsals in the morning and afternoon and performed in a final concert for parents and other community members in the Lyso Center for Performing Arts. Hearing the students perform work that they had only started rehearsing hours earlier was a reminder how music can bring us all together regardless of age, school, or instrument.

Grade 8

Grade 7

Clara Park, flute Philip Yoon, flute Danny Kim, clarinet Cole Park, tenor saxophone Jin Lee, baritone Mei-Mei Timpson, flute Jacob Kim, clarinet Eric Lee, alto saxophone Andy Oh, trombone

Justine Kim, clarinet Irene Kim, alto saxophone Joan Kim, trumpet Edward Kim, percussion John Kim, percussion Jack Song, clarinet Bryan Jung, trumpet Sally Pak, trumpet

Grade 6 Jane Kim, clarinet Eunice Kwak, clarinet Namee Kim, alto saxophone Junho Son, tenor saxophone Sunny Pak, trumpet Gabby Kern, percussion Matthew Shima, percussion Justin Suh, bass clarinet Matthew Lee, French horn

High school musicians have also been busy at APIS. Beginning each year in August, all high school musicians are given audition music for the National Honor Festival (NHF). The music is challenging, demanding, and requires dedicated practice. All students must complete the task of making a final recording in October, and some elect to submit their recording to a panel of judges for acceptance to the NHF. Congratulations to the following students who were this year’s acceptees: 10

W W W. A P I S . O R G


KIMEA Music Festivals Grade 12

Grade 11

Sandra Kim, alto Kelly Oh, alto Robin Chae, bass Jeewon Kim, clarinet Chris Kim, trumpet Jeho Hahm, percussion

Andrew Shima, tenor Johanna Shima, soprano Sarah Yoon, soprano Grace Y. Kim, clarinet Shinyoung Lee, trumpet

Grade 10

Grade 9

Jennifer Kang, soprano Sophie Yoo, soprano Rachel Cho, alto Noah Kim, bass Gyu Young Lee, bass Eugenie Kwon, flute Jocelyn Kim, French horn Michelle Choi, tuba

Andrew Yoo, bass

KIMEA Middle School Band

Upon acceptance, students traveled to CI on Feb. 19 to participate in a two-day festival, working with guest conductors from university positions at music schools in the United States. Our 20 APIS students joined 250 students from 12 other international schools to comprise the National Honor Band, Choir, and Orchestra. After a total of 11 hours of rehearsals and thousands of notes practiced, the students were physically and mentally exhausted; however, all the hard work was evident in the spectacular concert held at the end of the festival. Principal trumpet player Shinyoung Lee (Grade 11) said, “The two days were extremely fun and valuable. I had a chance to make music with very skilled and dedicated musicians, which inspired me to play better. Also, being first chair in a larger ensemble boosted my confidence and passion for music!” Three seniors were recognized for a special honor, having been in the NHF for all four years of their high school musical career: Sandra Kim, Chris Kim, and Jeho Hahm. “As a senior who has participated in all four years of NHF, I can say that this year's NHF was one that was really memorable for my last year. The songs we sang, the choir members, and our guest conductor Dr. Eychaner, were all just so brilliant and wonderful! It will truly be an unforgettable experience that I will miss!” said Sandra Kim. Especially notable is that there were only nine students total given this distinction, and a third of them were from APIS.

FEBRUARY 2016

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

Mrs. Baum, Ms. Johnson, and Mrs. Holbrook, all of whom are on the KIMEA Board of Directors, have already begun planning next year’s NHF. “The amount of detail that goes into coordinating an event of this magnitude takes nearly a year to organize. We are so happy to work on behalf of our students who have shown us that they are also willing to put in the time and effort to make these festivals a reality. It is a pleasure to teach these kids and to see them reach their musical goals,” said Mrs. Holbrook. “We encourage all students to audition because it will be the experience of a lifetime!”

KIMEA Middle School Choir

W W W. A P I S . O R G

11


FEBRUARY 2016

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

Students Shine in Art Contest

T

he following AP Studio Art students have been honored as recipients of Scholastic Art and Writing Awards for 2016:

James Chung (Grade 12) • Silver Key • 2 Honorable Mentions

Martin Kim (Grade 11) • 2 Silver Keys

Jeff Jeon (Grade 12) • Gold Key • 2 Honorable Mentions

Andy Lee (Grade 12) • Honorable Mention

Youna Jeong (Grade 12) • Silver Key • Honorable Mention

Justin Um (Grade 11) • Gold Key

"Self Portrait" Lauren Kim (G11)

"Embracing Hope" Lia Kim (G11)

12

W W W. A P I S . O R G

Lauren Kim (Grade 11) • Honorable Mention

Lia Kim (Grade 11) Hawaii campus

• Gold Key

"Martin" Justin Um (G11)

The Scholastic Art and Writing Awards are the longest running, most prestigious competition and largest source of scholarships for teenagers in the United States and at international schools abroad. The awards are open to all students in grades 7 through 12. Artworks are judged on originality, technical skill, and emergence of personal voice/vision.


X Me! Me! I Want More Math!

+%

Teacher Adella Woo passes out the AMC booklets.

I

t wasn’t a test they were required to take. Nevertheless, 38 high school students took a seat in the Christian Life Center the morning of Feb. 17 to voluntarily start off their day with a math test. Adella Woo, math teacher and high school contest manager, welcomed the students, reminded them of the test rules (no calculators, no pencil cases out) and passed out this year’s American Math Contest (AMC) booklets. For the next 75 minutes, the students worked quietly and intently on the 25-question, multiple-choice test. The AMC is actually divided into two tests. Some students took the AMC 10, which requires an understanding of algebra and geometry. The AMC 12 requires the same skills, plus an understanding of pre-calculus. “The problems on the contest are difficult, but designed to be within the reach of students,” according to information provided by the Mathematical Association of America, which runs the annual testing program.

FEBRUARY 2016

=

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

More than 350,000 students in roughly 6,000 schools participate in the annual testing program. A certificate of distinction is given to all students whose scores from this first test qualify them to take the American Invitational Mathematics Examination, which is held in March. There are also awards for the student with the highest score, and certificates for outstanding achievement will be issued to the top three students in each school. The main purpose of the AMC 10/12 is to spur interest in mathematics and to develop talent through the excitement of solving challenging problems in a timed, multiple-choice format. In addition, the program is designed to recognize, encourage, and develop the very best young mathematicians. Results from the test, which were released at the end of February, indicated that Erin Oh (Grade 11) had qualified to move on to take the American Invitational Mathematics Examination on March 16. Other APIS students who were awarded honors for their scores included Daniel Bae (Grade 11), Leo Jo (Grade 11), and Aaron Kang (Grade 9), Jinny Choi (Grade 10), and Jeff Kim (Grade 10). Ms. Woo noted that the number of APIS students participating in the AMC was up from last year. “Mathematics is increasingly important in our life,” Ms. Woo said. “I hope to see [even] more students taking this opportunity and continue to challenge themselves.” W W W. A P I S . O R G

13


FEBRUARY 2016

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

14

I

Students Focus on Exploration, Encounter, Exchange

t requires poise, public speaking skills, and a thorough grasp of a subject. For a student to present a National History Day (NHD) project, they also need to learn all about the research process — how to choose a topic, how to find and use primary and secondary sources, how to summarize/paraphrase and quote sources, how to write an annotated bibliography, how to write a process paper, how to prepare a presentation for a real audience, and how to work collaboratively. “It’s a lot,” said teacher Meg Vosk. On Feb. 4, APIS seventh- and eighth-grade students had the chance to experience all those benefits and flex their new and improved research skills as they presented their projects to peers, members of the faculty, and other visitors to school during APIS Middle School History Day. “The event … was meant to mirror a real historical conference,” said teacher Carly Althauser. “The purpose was to give students a chance to view each other’s work and to ask each other questions, similar to how historians might in real life.” Starting work in September, students chose to work on a research paper, exhibit, performance, documentary, or website that featured a topic related to this year’s NHD theme, which is “Exploration, Encounter, Exchange in History.” Selected topics were wide-ranging and included students’ angles on video games, the technology portrayed in Star Wars movies, antibiotics, radiation, how the car changed the world, the impact of Coca-Cola, the roots of imperialism in Taiwan, hanoks, Japanese imperialism, Sejong the Great, and Korea’s turtle ship. “The students really used a range of primary and secondary sources to gather information about their topic, and they were able to draw upon their knowledge learned from these sources to draw conclusions about the historical significance of their topic,” Ms. Vosk said. “All members participated and took turns answering questions.” Most of the APIS students who presented on Feb. 4 plan to present their project again at Korea’s national NHD event, which will be held at Korea International School on Feb. 27. About 80 percent of the seventh and eighth graders chose to do so,” Ms. Althauser said. “Also, two 11th graders from APIS will participate this year as well.” At the Feb. 27 event, the projects are judged, awards are given, and some students will be invited to continue on to the final NHD event of the year, which is held in the United States from June 12 to 16.

W W W. A P I S . O R G


Tips From Other Teachers

T

he music that the classes worked on was the same — pieces by Vivaldi and Stroope. But the directors were different. When students in the middle school and high school choral classes and high school orchestra walked into their practice rooms Feb. 17, guest directors stood in the place of the students’ regular teachers. Dr. Frank Eychaner, director of choral and vocal studies at the University of Texas of the Permian Basin, was at APIS just for Dr. Frank Eychaner leads the students through singing exercises. the day to lead two choral classes, and Dr. Louis Bergonzi, professor of music education (strings) and orchestral conducting at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, led the high school orchestra class. The two music professors were in Seoul as guest conductors for the KAIAC National Honor Music Festival, which featured a Feb. 20 concert in Incheon that included audition-selected music students from all the international schools in Korea. And, while in Seoul, the two men were able to spend some time at APIS to listen to the students perform and then offer some thoughts on the music they’ve been learning. Dr. Eychaner spent a great deal of time working with the APIS students on breathing exercises and physical movement. He asked the students to rock from foot to foot, to stand on one foot, to bend at the waist. “It might feel a little funny, but we’re waking up the muscles we use to sing,” he said. “He expressed the importance of expressing music in oral as well as physical ways,” said Melinda Baum, chorus teacher. “He was very encouraged by the singers in Korea and the choir program at APIS.”

FEBRUARY 2016

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

Dr. Bergonzi listened to the orchestra perform and then offered some ideas on variations of how the student musicians used their bows. He also emphasized the dynamics in certain sections of the music. "It was inspiring to watch Dr. Bergonzi work with the APIS sixth- through 12th-grade orchestra students,” said Emmalee Johnson, orchestra teacher. “I saw a different side of our musicians come out. Many students were challenged by his questions and learned how to further manipulate their bows. Dr. Bergonzi left APIS saying that he learned a lot from APIS students and loved working with them!" Ms. Baum believes that music students at APIS benefit from classroom time with music professionals like Dr. Eychaner and Dr. Bergonzi. “The more interaction they have with other professional directors, the more their eyes are open to the possibilities,” she said. Dr. Louis Bergonzi conducts the high school orchestra.

W W W. A P I S . O R G

15


FEBRUARY 2016

SCHOOL-WIDE

Principal’s Note: On Digital Parenting

o

n January 26 I had the pleasure of presenting to a group of parents on the topic of digital parenting. Having been the technology director of a large IB international school in the Middle East, graduating with a master’s degree in educational technology, and having worked as a teacher in that field for the last 20 years, it is a particular area of interest for me. And in that 20 years haven’t we seen some changes!

In 2007 my daughter was born, five months after the “birth” of the iPhone, a device that would come to define the smartphone category and forever change how we interact with the Internet. My daughter has grown up with access to a screen that she can hold in her hand, that gives her access to the Internet and everything (and I mean EVERYTHING!) that it contains! Now that my daughter is an 8-year-old, there are some serious concerns I have as a parent about that capability. Just as I don’t want my daughter roaming the streets alone late at night, so too, I do not wish her to be roaming the “streets” of the Internet alone at night. I have a role as a parent in both these scenarios. So, as a parent, what can I do? My message to parents over the past six years as I have been leading digital parenting seminars should be considered with this focus. As parents, it is our responsibility to guide/help our child develop the ability to make responsible choices when using technology. I suggest five main points to consider:

1. Understand the technology your child is using, the websites they visit, the games they play, the social networks they live in, the online friends they communicate with.

2. Develop rules (and consequences) for technology use in your family. E.g., no devices at

the kitchen table, no devices behind closed doors, passwords must be shared with mom/ dad, no devices in bedrooms overnight, etc.

3. Balance the amount of time using a device and not using a device. E.g., after all the

homework and study is completed, if your child wishes to use the device for recreation/enjoyment, have them earn time on the device by doing something without a device. Thirty minutes of exercising earns 30 minutes of device time.

4. Model good choices. As a parent, your child watches you and does what you do. Maybe you will need to adjust your device usage behaviours at home. The message is, demonstrate responsible device usage to your child.

5. Communicate with your child, early and always. Develop a relationship that allows you

and your child to talk freely about what they are experiencing online. Begin those conversations before problems arise, and keep them very honest. For more resources on being a digital parent, please do not hesitate to come and chat with me further, or visit http://commonsensemedia.org. 16

W W W. A P I S . O R G


Feb. SNAP

FEBRUARY 2016

SCHOOL-WIDE

SHOTS

Say Cheese !

W W W. A P I S . O R G

17


FEBRUARY 2016

SCHOOL-WIDE

Remember When You Were a Student?

A

PIS teachers are masters of their subject and need to manage a classroom of students. But we asked APIS staff and faculty to reminisce a little, to think back to their own school days when they weren’t the ones in charge. Funny, embarrassing, seemingly insignificant, or life-changing, we asked to hear about a memory from their K-12 years. When I was 3, I ran away to kindergarten. Yes. I ran away to school. I wanted to go so much that I packed my bag and ran off. It was just at the end of the street. Unfortunately I had run away on a Saturday, and it was closed. I stood at the gates crying, wondering where everyone was. - Jodi Nielsen, K-12 counselor

When I was in kindergarten our behavior system was happy faces and sad faces. When we did something wrong, our teacher would tell us to go put a sad face by our name. One time I got in trouble and had to get a sad face. I was so sad and started crying. I really thought it was the end of the world! In third grade we had a "huge" mammal project to work on. I was so worried about it and did not know how to do it. So instead of asking for help or working on it, I just put it off. I was too overwhelmed. So the day it was due I pretty much made myself sick so I didn't have to go to school. Then after school my teacher called my mom because they were good friends. She asked how I was doing and if I had the animal project done. My mom didn't know what she was talking about. She asked me about it and I told her that I didn't even start on it! So, I got in trouble and had to stay inside and work on it and wasn't allowed to go outside and play in the snow. It was a sad day! I remember looking out my bedroom window at my whole family playing in the snow and I had to stay inside and finally do the mammal project! - Kim House, Grade 2 teacher Growing up, I greatly disliked school and did not connect with it. In seventh grade, Mr. Markowski taught us about the European Dark Ages and the rise of Charlemagne in the mid-700s. He made an offhand comment that one of the reasons behind the Dark Ages was that education had come to a near halt, and that Charlemagne was so revolutionary because he reestablished schools within his empire. As a 13-year-old, it suddenly hit me: education keeps me in the light and out of the dark. After that lesson, I started applying myself to my studies with a greater zeal.

- Derek O’Malley, social studies teach18

W W W. A P I S . O R G


I always blinked my eyes in photos when I was young. So in all the photos I have from that time, my eyes are closed. I even closed my eyes in my kindergarten graduation picture and elementary graduation picture, so the school (after trying more than 15 times) had to take out my picture from the yearbook. Instead, my mom took me to the private photo studio and finally got my picture with my eyes open. So, we made a sticker out of that picture and distributed to all my friends so they can stick it on their yearbook. - Anna Sea, art teacher

I was in a gymnastics demonstration when I was in elementary school, either fifth or sixth grade. One of the things we did was to jump between the legs of a kid who was standing on their head and then we did a somersault. A bunch of kids did it with only one person standing on their head. Then somewhat fewer did it with two people standing on their heads. Finally, only a few kids could do it with three people standing on their heads. I was one of those few. However, when it was my turn to go, I mistimed my jump, jumped too late, and knocked all three of the other kids over. I was devastated! So embarrassing!

- Karl Craton, social studies teacher

I remember my first day of school way back 50+ years ago. My mum was in hospital having just given birth to my youngest brother. My dad was a teacher at another school in the same town. Way back then there was no such thing as paternity leave, so Dad had to drop me off at the school gate and run to his school, which was also having its first day. I wandered into the school by myself but full of glee. Because dad was a teacher, I'd spent many days at his school when I was younger and this, along with the fact that Dad had taken me to the school a couple of times before the first day, I knew where to go. I was so excited. Not only was I starting school but I also had a new baby brother — what more could a 5-year-old want!

The first singing performance I can actually remember was in Grade 3 in 1979. I took the stage in the school talent show, dressed as a little Dutch boy and sang a Dutch song (in Dutch) that my mother had taught me. Thirty-seven years later I can still sing the first verse!

FEBRUARY 2016

SCHOOL-WIDE

- Bruce Knox, principal

- Pat Hallinan, instructional coordinator

W W W. A P I S . O R G

19


FEBRUARY 2016

SCHOOL-WIDE

Librarian's Pick: Celebrating Love and Friendship

O

n Feb.14, people exchange chocolates, gifts, and celebrate love and friendship. Valentine's Day celebrations developed in early modern England and have spread throughout the world. It is a great opportunity to talk about those we love and discover the meaning of Valentine’s Day. These are a selection of some sweet and heartwarming Valentine-themed books for students. Olive, My Love by Vivian Walsh Olive’s adventure starts with Dexter, a winged dog, dropping a giant red heart (which is labeled “all of my love”) on her doorstep. Believing that he lost it, Olive sets out on an adventure to return it, and meets with a squirrel and a spider who accompany to help her. When Olive meets Dexter and tries to return the heart, Dexter tells her that it was meant as a gift! The silly characters gather around and open the big red heart-shaped candy box to enjoy a picnic. Readers will enjoy every page, each decorated with at least one big red heart. L E V E L: K - G 3

Saffy's Angel by Hilary McKay Bill and Eve Casson and their four children live outside of London. Saffron (or Saffy), the second oldest child, sometimes thinks that she might be adopted, since all the other Casson children are named after colors (Cadmium, Indigo, and Rose). She is upset when she discovers that this is true — her mom died in a car crash, and she was adopted by her mom’s sister, Eve. When her grandfather dies, his will mentions a stone angel that triggers Saffy’s memory of her early childhood in Italy. She undertakes a journey to find not only “her angel” but also her identity. What Saffy finds renews her love for her family and home. L E V E L: M I D D L E S C H O O L

Beastkeeper by Cat Hellisen Thirteen-year-old Sarah hears an argument between her parents, after which her mother leaves. As time passes, Sarah's father becomes stranger and stranger, eventually insisting that Sarah go live with grandparents. There she learns the story behind her mother's disappearance and the odd history of her estranged family. That story includes witches and curses and a disastrous family legacy that has been passed down to the current generation — the first time Sarah falls in love, she will transform into a beast. Sarah is determined to end the curse. This story of jealousy and revenge retells the classic “Beauty and the Beast” story, but with a twist. L E V E L: G7 A N D U P

20

W W W. A P I S . O R G EDITORIAL TEAM: ■ Euysung Kim Director ■ Nicole Suh Art & Design Editor ■ Josephine Shim Communications & PR Team Leader ■ Susan Craton Writing / Editing Staff ■ Caroline Webster Writing / Editing Staff

Issue 37 APIS Update February 2016  

Issue 37 APIS Update February 2016 (online)

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you