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D EC E M B E R / JA N UA RY 2 0 1 6

ISSUE 36.

UPDATE 57 WOLGYE-RO 45GA-G I L , NOWO N- G U, S EO UL , 0 1 87 4 , KOREA

IN THIS ISSUE:

■ New Mentoring Program ■ Lower ES Poetry Cafe ■ Giving to the Orphanage

■ T. 0 2 .9 0 7 .2 7 4 7

■ F. 0 2 .9 0 7 .2 7 4 2

■ WWW. A PIS .O RG

IN THIS ISSUE:

■ ■Christmas Concerts Elementary Chinese & Japanese ■ ■Field Trips Faculty Retreat ■ Librarian's Pick


DEC/JAN 2016

E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L N E W S & E V E N T S

Have a Problem? Fifth Graders Can Help

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t could be a dispute over a soccer game during recess. It could be that a classmate is calling you names you don’t like. You might be feeling excluded from a friend’s game. Are you experiencing a conflict like this? The fifth-grade students at APIS are ready to help. Starting at the beginning of the second semester, two fifth graders will be on duty on a rotating basis during recess and lunch break to act as peer mediators for the younger students at APIS. These mediators will be easy to identify because they will be wearing red and white Superman hats. “If you have a problem, you can come to us,” said Jacob Hong (Grade 5), as he and two of his classmates explained the mediation program to second-grade students on Dec. 7. “We’ll sit down with you and talk about things.” Jacob and the other two presenters, Joanna Kim (Grade 5) and Joyce Kim (Grade 5), noted that physical conflict like punching or kicking will still need to be referred to a teacher. However, the fifth graders are prepared to assist with all other areas of disagreement and misunderstanding. During the Dec. 7 presentation, the younger students had numerous questions for the fifth graders about how the new program would work. What is a peer? Where did you get those hats? The fifth graders visited each of the lower elementary classrooms in December to present the new program, answer questions, and explain how the students could benefit. “We all have problems sometimes,” said Jeff Underhill, fifth grade teacher, during one of these presentations. “The thing about fifth graders is they know how to solve their problems. That’s why they can help you with yours.” The new program came about as a response to Peace Day, which was celebrated Sept. 21 at APIS. On Peace Day, students in third, fourth, and fifth grade performed a Peace Day drama that taught about conflict and peace through a series of skits. The young peacemakers then led activities for younger students, playing games, reading books on peace, and creating peace-related crafts. However, after Peace Day, the fifth graders were interested in taking the idea further, said Jodi Nielsen, guidance counselor. “Grade 5 was posed the question ‘How can you be a peacemaker at APIS?’ We looked at lots of examples of other schools, observed the interactions at break times, and Grade 5 decided to try being peer mediators,” Ms. Nielsen said. The students in fifth grade prepared and trained for the start of their peer mediation program, which was officially launched Jan. 12. “They have been hard at work building their skills and understanding about problem-solving and listening to others,” Ms. Nielsen said. “It’s going to be awesome,” Mr. Underhill said.

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Promoting Peace Through Art

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he fourth graders at APIS also participated last month in a follow-up activity to the school’s recognition of Peace Day, Sept. 21. Using illustrations like people holding hands around the globe, smiling faces, hearts, and peace signs, the students worked alone and in groups creating large, colorful murals that feature messages of peace. Guidance counselor Jodi Nielsen noted that working together on the murals, which requires cooperation, negotiation, and sharing resources, was a way for the students to practice peace together, as well as a way to create compelling messages for the rest of the school. The murals, along with the student artists’ thoughts on peace, are on display in the guidance counseling department.

Amber Lee (Grade 4) created this mural called “Sunny Rainbow Peace!” “I want people to look at my mural because I want you guys to think happy!” she said.

Samantha Kim (Grade 4) and Adelia Kwak (Grade 4) worked together on this mural called “Express Your Inner Peace.” “I want people to look at it and think of ways to make peace like using kind words, sharing, and the other things they think of when they see our mural,” Samantha said.

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E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L N E W S & E V E N T S

Erica Shim (Grade 4), Margaret Cheon (Grade 4), and Grace Kern (Grade 4) collaborated on this mural. “I think peace is important because if there wasn’t we wouldn’t have friends,” Erica said. This mural is called ‘Happy Land.’ I want people to look at it and feel happy. This picture shows peace and happiness.”

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DEC/JAN 2016

E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L N E W S & E V E N T S

Grades 2/3 Poetry Café

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s culmination to a combined grades two and three poetry unit, APIS second and third graders read before a packed auditorium on Dec. 17. Family members, along with APIS students and faculty, filled the room and sat with rapt attention as APIS lower elementary school students recited memorized poems they had penned themselves alongside published poems. The students took to the stage with poise and read with enthusiasm. “I was enchanted by how well each poet read their poem with expression and with how honest and from the heart these poems seemed to be. Thank you so much. You brightened my day!" said Mrs. Kirkwood. Students reported many positives from partaking in this special unit of study. Grade 2 student Peyton Webster shared, “It was fun reading my poem in front of an audience.” Grade 3 student David Jeong said, "I liked that everyone was brave and confident at Poetry Café.” Alexander Han (Grade 3) added, "I liked working with second grade so we can tell about our poems and learn from each other." Student-written poems covered many topics, including clocks, a soccer ball, Jupiter, diamonds, God, brothers, shoes, Tuesday, a hiccup, family, a snowman, and a hungry book. Published poems included ones written by Jack Prelutsky, Susan Katz, Tim Myers, Shel Silverstein, and others. "This was an awesome event! The students did an amazing job and the older students (and staff) loved it! I hope they felt very proud and affirmed," said Mr. Milligan, chaplain and counselor.

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Exploring Beliefs By Jeff Underhill, Grade 5 Teacher

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here did we come from? Where are we going? What is right and wrong? What is our purpose?

With the goal of practicing a global mindset, the fifth graders are studying our world's major religions using four questions as a lens to see the perspective of others’ beliefs. For Buddhism, Christianity, and Islam, we asked what each religion believes about where we come from, where we are going, what is right and wrong, and what our purpose is. "Nothing ever becomes real 'til it is experienced."

-John Keats

One sunny winter Tuesday morning (Dec. 8), grade five students went looking for answers. It is good, hard work to compare and contrast our world's major faiths, and the fifth graders were invited to step outside their comfort zones in search of learning. Their questions ranged from innocent to in-depth, including: Why do Buddhists think they will come back alive? What does Muhammad mean? How long do you meditate? Did anybody see Muhammad? Why was Buddha Hindu at first?

What happens if you don't visit Mecca? Who was Buddha's father? Why do Muslim people pray five times a day? Why do monks shave their heads and go to the mountains? Why are Buddha statues so big?

The fifth graders ventured to a mosque and a temple to study Islam and Buddhism. Seoul Central Mosque, situated in Itaewon, is one of a handful of mosques in Korea, and the only mosque in Seoul. Jogye Buddhist Temple, in Jongno, is the center of Zen Buddhism in Korea. "Experience is the teacher of all things." -Julius Caesar

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To further experience the Islamic culture, the fifth graders enjoyed Turkish food at Mr. Kebab's. The flavors were enticing and the Turkish ice cream was not to be passed up, even in the chilly winter air! The field trip was planned in detail by fifth graders Claire Park and Joanna Kim during the summer prior to fifth grade, and the girls acted as tour guides at the mosque and temple. The young guides worked together to plan transportation, bus partner seating, budget, activities, timeline, behavior expectations, and lunch, creating a class presentation and providing their peers with a well-designed learning experience. In addition, students completed a field trip reflection packet. In the comfort of friends, students practiced a global mindset. Answers led to new understandings and more questions.

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DEC/JAN 2016

E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L N E W S & E V E N T S

The Most Wonderful Time of the Year

First and third graders take the stage as part of the Korean children song, elementary school Christmas concert.

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n Dec. 17, APIS elementary students, alongside friends, family, and APIS faculty gathered to celebrate the season with the annual APIS Elementary Christmas concert extravaganza. Showcasing the skills of students and faculty, the concert was a treat for the eyes and ears of all those in attendance. “All elementary students should be so proud of themselves. They definitely spread Christmas cheer and shared their musical skills! I was so impressed to see all the different kinds of music making going on — improvising, partner songs, singing, dancing, clapping, and playing instruments! What a great morning of sharing music!” said Ms. Emmalee Johnson, orchestra director. Spanning the globe, with featured songs from China, Japan, Korea, Australia, and the U.S., students showcased their myriad talents, expressing themselves musically through dance and song, as well as through string and band instruments. Korean Music Director Mrs. Suk Ja Kwon, along with the assistance of fellow Korean language department teachers, led students through a colorful, magical performance of several beloved songs, including some penned by Mrs. Kwon herself. To open the concert, students lit up the stage with their bright traditional attire and LED tealights. "It is always a joy to watch my elementary students light up the stage and share their music with an audience. They take responsibility seriously and show joy as they perform. I am extremely proud of each and every one of them," said Ms. Melinda Baum, chorus director. APIS second graders are introduced to the violin as part of the second grade music curriculum. For many students, it is their first time learning a musical instrument. Under the direction of Ms. Johnson, students performed “Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star” and “Forest Walk.”

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Elementary Christmas Concert At APIS, grade 5 students choose either orchestra or band to focus on, in addition to general music. This year’s grade 5 orchestra featured two students, on violin and viola, accompanied by Ms. Johnson on cello. Audience members applauded the tremendous growth of these new strings players, demonstrated by their performance of a Suite of Christmas Carols that highlighted several holiday favorites. The grade 5 band students wowed audience members with their performance of “First Winter’s Sleigh Ride,” and brought laughter with the narrated musical performance, “Diary of a Grumpy Elf.” Band director Mrs. Sophie Holbrook said, "I am extremely proud of the grade 5 band after their great performance of Christmas music. It is amazing to watch the young musicians grow from the start of the year when they didn't know anything about their instruments, to their first concert when they perform music in front of an audience. Keep up the amazing work, fifth graders!" The APIS music department and Korean language department extend a heartfelt thanks to faculty members, APIS parents, and secondary students who contributed to the performance, and to all those in attendance who support our students in all their musical endeavors. A special thanks goes to parents, faculty members, and APIS secondary students who accompanied the performances: Mrs. Chris Kirkwood, Mrs. Yunhee Shin, Mr. Zachary Luginbill, Mr. Ryan Murfield, Mrs. Landy Hwang, lower ES parents who participated in the parents song portion, James Park (G10 violin), David Kim (G10 cello), Sophia Cho (G10 flute), and Joseph Chang (G10 drum).

Parents sing "Pioneer" and "Jingle Bells."

Mrs. Holbrook claps as grade 5 band ends its performance.

General music students play holiday favorites.

Grade 2 delights the audience with their strings performance. W W W. A P I S . O R G

DEC/JAN 2016

E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L N E W S & E V E N T S

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DEC/JAN 2016

E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L N E W S & E V E N T S

APIS Students Reach Out to Community

Members of the APIS Community Service Club visit with Sister Cecilia while dropping off donations at the Children's Home of Our Lady of Mercy.

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he APIS Community Service Club is a small group (seven members) with a big heart. During the first semester of the school year, the fledgling group had already assisted the community by conducting neighborhood litter pick-up drives; writing encouraging notes to faculty, students, and bus drivers; and collecting school supplies for families in a farming community in Vietnam. But the students wanted to do something extra special for the Christmas season. Ultimately, they selected a nearby charity to assist — the Children’s Home of Our Lady of Mercy (http://www. jahaewon.or.kr/), located in Nowon. The children’s home cares for approximately 70 children ranging in age from infants to 18-year-olds. Some of the children in care are orphans and were referred from the Baby Box project, while others are from families going through difficulties that don’t allow them to care for their children at this time. Teacher Judy Park approached the home about how APIS students could help. The response was swift and enthusiastic, Ms. Park said. “They said they have 36-month-old and younger babies who desperately need diapers, wipes, and formula.” So the community service class got to work. In early December, club members organized a bake sale during lunch period at the school, selling cookies and hot chocolate that they helped prepare. That effort raised 175,000 won. Club members used those funds to purchase the specific kinds of formula and diapers needed by the home. Then, Ms. Park announced in elementary chapel about what the club was doing, and encouraged the other elementary students to bring in baby wipes that could be donated toward the cause. Over the winter break, Ms. Park and some of the club members delivered all the diapers, wipes, and formula to the home. “Sister Cecilia was very appreciative and made us tea,” Ms. Park said. “She answered questions about the group home and encouraged our students to study hard and help the people in need in the future.”

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Field Trip to the Japan Foundation

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By Junko Furusawa & Naomi Anno, Japanese language teachers

n Dec. 7, Japanese class high school students went on a field trip to the Japan Foundation to learn about and experience sadou, the Japanese tea ceremony, and wear yukata, traditional Japanese summer clothing. The Japanese tea ceremony is a cultural activity involving the ceremonial preparation and presentation of matcha — powdered green tea. Students learned about the tools and manners for the ceremony, along with Japanese words used for the ceremony. After watching a tea ceremony demonstration conducted by the tea master, students tried the tea with the proper manners. All of the students were very surprised by the detailed manners required to conduct a tea ceremony and those specific to drinking the tea. It was hard for the students to sit straight on tatami, the Japanese flooring. They got permission to sit at ease for a few minutes. Some students had the opportunity to learn how to prepare the tea from the tea master. Another activity the students enjoyed was wearing the yukata. Firstly, the students gained knowledge about the yukata through games the Japan Foundation staff had prepared. Next, students had the chance to try on yukata with the assistance of Japanese staff members, as the students were unfamiliar with dressing in this way. Students looked quite different from how they normally appear in uniform, and they enjoyed posing for photos with friends. For most of the students, it was their first time experiencing the sadou and the yukata. After time with the Japanese Foundation, the students went to a buffet restaurant, “Lettuce Shabu-Shabu,” to enjoy Japanese shabu-shabu. They all enjoyed eating authentic Japanese food. “It was very interesting to learn how Japan’s sadou is similar to Korea’s traditional dado, and how yukata is similar to hanbok. I really enjoyed eating shabu-shabu, too. I want to learn more about Japan through fun experiences!” said Jinny Choi (Grade 10).

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DEC/JAN 2016

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

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DEC/JAN 2016

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

Speech/Debate Continues Stellar Year

Members of the APIS Debate team celebrate their wins at the KAIAC forensics event on Nov. 21.

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ack in October, the speech and debate students at APIS kicked off the year with a remarkably high finish as they competed against schools at the KAIAC Forensics Tournament. APIS earned third place sweepstakes points (out of nine schools) at the largest tournament that KAIAC had ever hosted. APIS students continued to compete at a high level at the second of the three competitive events held during the year — the forensics tournament held Nov. 20 and 21. At this tournament, on Nov. 20, APIS students competed for Speech in Prose Interpretation and Poetry Interpretation. Shannon Yi (Grade 11) earned second place in Prose Interpretation for her reading of "Goodnight Mister Tom" by Michelle Magorian. On Nov. 21, APIS students competed for Debate in Parliamentary Debate, Lincoln-Douglas Debate, and Public Forum Debate. Charles Cho (Grade 12) and David Lee (Grade 12) made it to the semifinalist round and earned fourth place in Parliamentary Debate. APIS also earned top speaker awards for David and Kenny Jang (Grade 12) in Parliamentary Debate, Angelina Ahn (Grade 11) and Sophie Yoo (Grade 10) in Public Forum Debate, and Kayley Suk (Grade 10) and Seunghyun Chung (Grade 11) in Lincoln-Douglas Debate. The APIS debate team had a combined total of 15 wins throughout the day and also had two teams that were the next team to make it to the semi-finalist round. “I am personally very proud of the growth that our students showed at the tournament,” said Sarah McRoberts, ELA teacher and APIS debate coach. The final KAIAC tournament of the school year will be in April.

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Celebrating the Season’s Theme of Peace

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Students in the middle school fundamentals class take the stage during the concert.

he APIS Secondary Christmas Concert on Dec. 16 celebrated the sounds of the season, featuring Christmas carols and other holiday songs like “Let it Snow! Let it Snow! Let it Snow!” by Jule Styne and “It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year” by E. Pola and G. Wyle.

In addition to adding to the audience’s festive spirit, the concert also highlighted how much middle and high school choir, orchestra, band, and general music students have improved during the first semester at APIS and the challenging level of music they are working on in class. “I’ve never had middle schoolers sing four-part harmony and learn their parts in three weeks and do it so well,” said Melinda Baum, choir director, of the middle school fundamentals students’ performance of a medley of carols. “I was very proud of how the students performed — they focused to prepare some very challenging music and really persevered to perform at a high level during finals week,” said Emmalee Johnson, orchestra director. “I am so thankful for all they poured into the music in order to share some special moments with the APIS community.” “The secondary band musicians shined brightly at the Christmas Concert!” said Sophie Holbrook, band director. “The students demonstrated their abilities to play difficult yet festive holiday music that the audience enjoyed. Favorites were the soundtrack from ‘Home Alone’ and ‘All I Want For Christmas Is You.’ Congratulations to all band members, especially trumpet soloists Chris Hyungchul Kim (Grade 12) and Shinyoung Lee (Grade 12).”

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SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

More than once during the event, a director noted the timeliness of the Christmas message this year. “Peace is always a theme of the Christmas season,” Ms. Baum said. “When choosing ‘Et in Terra Pax,’ [a song by John Purifoy where the title translates to ‘And on earth, peace to all people’] we didn’t know the relevance and the impact it would have after the recent traumatic world events. The students conveyed their message of peace eloquently.” Continuing a school tradition, the concert featured the show-stopping “Hallelujah” chorus from Handel’s “Messiah,” where the stage was packed with student singers, as well as members of the school faculty, with students on instruments in front, as they all finished out the concert singing and performing together.

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DEC/JAN 2016

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

Junior Joins Effort to Cure Cancer

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ia Kim (Grade 11, Hawaii campus) says she loves all of her school subjects. But, when asked to limit those interests to a list of favorites, her eclectic tally includes biology, statistics, modern world history (of science), art, and music. While wide-ranging, there’s nothing casual about Lia’s engagement with those subject areas. For instance, her interest in music has led her to work with a producer in Korea to write lyrics and sing a song that is set to be released to music distributors like Melon and iTunes. And when it comes to her fascination with science, she also goes beyond classroom study and maintains a Facebook/ Wordpress blog about news in the world of microbiology (https://pdsci.wordpress.com).

Lia Kim (Grade 11) works in the lab at Windward Community College.

It was while Lia was reading research papers and news articles to find new material for that blog that she learned about the Emperor Science Awards — a new program associated with Genentech, Stand Up To Cancer, and PBS Learning Media. The program provides opportunities for high school students in 10th and 11th grades to work alongside a university-level mentoring scientist and potentially become part of the next generation of cancer researchers (www.emperorscienceaward.com). It turns out that cancer research is another thing that intrigues Lia. So, she applied, along with close to 1,200 students across the United States, and it was publicly announced in January that Lia was one of the 100 students selected as awardees. In addition to the chance to work with a scientist, Lia will also be given a Google Chrome Notebook and a stipend for expenses as she participates in the program. Students applied by writing an essay. “I wrote about my passion of learning more about microbes (especially bacteria) and the potential connection of microbiology and cancer,” Lia said. “Specifically, I expressed my curiosity in the research of possible symbiotic relationships of lactobacillus acidophilus and the human intestinal epithelial cells. I expressed my passion to know more about gastric cancer … I shared how my ingrained captivation with microbes has grown bigger into a dream of becoming a research microbiologist that studies the connects between the human gut microbiota and gastric cancer.” As an Emperor Science Award winner, Lia is scheduled to participate in both virtual and face-toface research this summer with Dr. Lisa M. Coussens at Oregon Health and Science University, associate director for basic research at Knight Cancer Institute. To better prepare for this opportunity and develop her lab skills, Lia is now taking community college courses in phytobiotechnology, microbiology, and a microbiology lab. Participating as an Emperor Science Award winner aligns with Lia’s future career plans, she said. “Currently, I hope to become a research microbiologist that studies the connections between the environment, the microbiome, and humans.”

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Students Take the Stage

Jasper, the gardener, played by Nick Yu (Grade 12), leads the rest of the cast in a toast near the end of the performance.

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t is an APIS tradition. The all-school chapel held on the last afternoon of school before winter vacation is a chance for the Christian Life Department to present one more message to the whole student body before the break. The event has also become an opportunity for the drama students to contribute both to that message and to the school’s celebration of the season with a special performance. This year’s all-school chapel was held Dec. 18, and the drama presentation, “The Jingle Bell Mystery” by Dean Balanger, featured students from Sarah McRoberts’ drama class. The play is about two sisters and a hefty inheritance. Main characters Lillian Callahan (played by Lina Kim, Grade 12) and her sister, Molly Cobden (played by Julie Son, Grade 10), are called to the family home during Christmas to hear the reading of their wealthy father’s will. According to the will, one of the sisters will receive $1 million, but unexpected events, intervention by house staff, and a variety of visitors create a mystery about the money’s whereabouts. With many of the APIS drama students taking on more than one part, the students ably presented the story that included plenty of comedy, but ended with a serious message when one of the sisters gets a life-changing lesson. The play reinforced chapel teachings about love, peace, and charity.

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SCHOOL-WIDE

“The APIS drama class picked ‘Jingle Bell Mystery’ because it incorporated an important message about the true meaning of Christmas in a fun and comedic way,” Ms. McRoberts said. “This script required more physical comedy, different accents, and quicker character and costume changes by the actors than we have done in previous plays. What I enjoyed the most as the director was seeing how much every cast member improved in their stage presence and acting skills since last year.” Cast Lillian Callahan.................. Lina Kim (G12) Frederick Callahan........... Alvin Jo (G11) Pamela Hornsby................ Sophia Shin (G10) Molly Cobden.................... Julie Son (G10) Sasha.................................. Rose Lee (G10) Cleo.................................... Rose Lee (G10) Jasper................................. Nick Yu (G12) Marvin................................. Nick Yu (G12) Davie.................................. Sophia Shin (G10) Bonnie Stammers............... Julie Son (G10) Guest appearance by Andrew Yoo (G9) W W W. A P I S . O R G

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Principal’s Note: Want to Improve Your Grades? Sleep More!

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ith Semester 1 just ended and students now focusing on working through a successful second semester, teachers and I have been talking to students and parents about changes they can make to see greater improvement in student learning. Usually that conversation starts with studying more, but recent research suggests that sleeping more is just as important. The study titled “Sacrificing sleep to study can lead to academic problems,” showed that “across the years of high school, the trade-off between daily study time and sleep becomes increasingly associated with academic problems” (pp. 139). The study also found “that the reduced sleep that tends to occur on nights of extra studying is what accounts for the increase in academic problems that occurs the next day.” This is not to say that students should not study! The research also acknowledges that there is a link between high achievement and more study, but cautions that the extra study should not be at the expense of sleep. Nine hours of sleep per night is the recommendation for adolescents. In an ongoing survey I have been conducting, after 75 responses, 5.7 hours per night is the average for APIS high school students. So, if you want to improve your learning and, as a consequence, your grades, consider the following … develop a routine that allows you to sleep nine hours each night. Spread your study out across all nights of the week, and if you need to put in some extra hours of study, don’t sacrifice your sleep — instead, give up something else that is not as important. As this study suggests (and other studies confirm), “sleep is a key restorative process during which consolidation of learning takes place.” Reference: Society for Research in Child Development. "Sacrificing sleep to study can lead to academic problems." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 August 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120821094350.htm>.

The latest with the PTO

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n Jan. 26, close to 30 parents gathered in the CLC for our second coffee meeting of the year. APIS Principal Bruce Knox presented an informative seminar on Digital Parenting. Topics discussed included setting screen time limits, viewing the Internet as a public physical space and knowing where your kids are, establishing clear guidelines for screen time, and a parent’s role in modeling healthy screen habits. For additional resources and discussions, please see the links below. Also discussed at the meeting were questions around lunch options, winter uniform, and the GCP. The PTO plans to provide refreshments for an elementary school musical on Feb. 26, and also the secondary school National History Day presentation on Feb. 4. Thank you for your continuing support. https://goo.gl/c3h3ZG

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https://www.fosi.org/good-digital-parenting/seven-steps-good-digital-parenting

PLEASE JOIN US! NEXT COFFEE MEETING DATES: March 22, May 24, at 2 p.m. in the CLC. W W W. A P I S . O R G


APIS Celebrates the Season ‘Twas the week before Christmas and all through the school, folks were SO busy, but it was all really cool. Classrooms were decorated with trees festooned with lights, and holiday-themed art projects were turned out, left and right. The auditorium and gym were full with last-minute rehearsals as the bands shined up their music and the choirs their carols. Elementary students in colorful hanbok practiced their songs and their steps, as they danced and they danced ‘til Mrs. Kwon finally said they were set. And the drama students rushed to get ready for their first play of the year, “The Jingle Bell Mystery.” They painted sets, they stapled, and glued. They practiced their parts and moved furniture, too. In the midst of this merriment, one can’t forget that the students were studying extra hard so semester grades would be set. The seniors applied to colleges and nervously waited to learn if the news that they’d get would leave them elated. The staff Christmas dinner featured wine, ham, and turkey. Everyone received a gift and then ate ‘til 8:30. Carols were sung with the music that was played led by staff on guitars, violin, and banjo — the tunes that they made! Finally! The concerts were presented. The music was played. The songs were all sung. The actors said their say.

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And the last day of school, the last possible morning, Santa stopped by, and the students started coming. One by one they had their turn on his lap. Smile! Get a photo. All had a good laugh. Travel plans, gift-giving, eating so much! The holiday season raised spirits up, up, up, up! The first semester ended with much fun and festivity. APIS now looks to the new year with hope and new energy.

Ho, ho, ho!

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Who Would You Pick?

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PIS middle school students are currently preparing to participate in Korea's upcoming National History Day. In keeping with this history theme, if you could go back in time and meet a historical figure and have some one-on-one time to talk and ask questions, whom would you choose?

I think I would like to sit down with a famous artist like Pablo Picasso. It would be interesting to talk about the creative process and where ideas come from. And Picasso worked until he was in his 90s, so I'd also like to ask him the secret to a long, productive, and successful life. -Megan Vosk, ELA/social studies teacher

If I am going for educational purposes, I would probably choose to meet Elizabeth I of England. I have always looked up to her as a role model â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a strong female leader who navigated a world inherently set against her, transformed a nation tearing itself apart into a worldwide empire, and eventually gained the respect of the entire global community. She's an inspiration. If I am going for entertainment purposes, Oscar Wilde would be a hilarious companion for afternoon tea and muffins. My maternal grandfather,

Cornelus Bleyerveld. He was a Dutch prisoner of war with the Germans in World War II and very little is known about his experiences during that period of his life. I would love to know what he suffered through and how that came to influence his life and his decision to move his entire family to Australia and never speak of Holland ever again. -Bruce Knox, principal

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-Courtney Murfield, ELA/social studies teacher


Given the chance, I would speak with my greatgrandmother, Elizabeth Sarah Goode. Fearless and independent, she rode bareback in Panama in her 20s. She homesteaded with my great-grandfather in rural Oregon in the 1930s. She served in the U.S. Women's Army Corps (WACs) during the London Blitz. She sailed to India on a steamer in 1965, accompanied only by her small Scottie dog. Nana was truly one of a kind and I greatly admire her spirit for adventure. She passed away when I was 7 years old, but I would give anything to have the chance to talk to her today. -Megan Pendleton, art teacher

I would very much like to meet Johnny Appleseed. The American folk hero's real name was John Chapman, and he is my uncle, sixth removed. Six generations before me and from my paternal grandmother's side of the family, Johnny Appleseed is my distant relative. (Lee Chapman was my grandma, and, though not an historical figure, very good to talk to and ask questions of.) If the tales are to be believed, Mr. Johnny Chapman had a wanderlust I share and a caring heart I seek. I would like to talk with my great-great-great-great-great-greatuncle. I would find the shade of an apple tree on a steamy summer day and invite him to sit and chat, I would. -Jeff Underhill, fifth-grade teacher

N ODVEECM / JBAEN R 2015 6

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I would love to sit down and talk with Abraham Lincoln. Obviously, as such an important historical figure presiding over an immensely important event, there would be many questions to ask. However, it would also be nice just to hear him talk and listen to his stories. He was both a great storyteller and a man of great humor. Sitting in front of a fireplace, a cup of coffee in hand, listening to Abraham Lincoln speak his mind . . that would be perfect. -Jason Webster, social studies teacher

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DEC/JAN 2016

SCHOOL-WIDE

Librarian's Pick: New Library Books Especially for You!

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as the cold spell left you feeling unmotivated? Read on for one way to survive the winter blues. Our school library purchased around 140 books last semester, including titles from many different genres, like classic novels, fantasy, mystery, and historical fiction. All this new reading material will give you something to do when it’s too cold to step outside! Four new titles are highlighted below — please stop by the library and check one out today! Bogart and Vinnie : A Completely Made-Up Story of True Friendship by Audrey Vernick The story starts with Vinnie, an "always-bright-happy" dog, having his lucky chance to get lost at the zoo. Vinnie is excited to make many new friends. However, unexpectedly, Bogart, the solitude-loving rhino, becomes Vinnie’s best friend. Before long , Vinnie's boy, Ethan, and Vinnie are reunited, but nobody wants to split up the animal friendship. Guess what happens? Read to find out. L E V E L: K - G 2

Greenglass House by Kate Milford Twelve-year-old Milo is looking forward to quiet time over Christmas break. He does not like surprises. When a crowd of unusual guests unexpectedly arrive at the inn, his Christmas gets ruined. As belongings begin disappearing, Milo decides to team up with the cook's daughter, Meddy, to solve the mystery. L E V E L: G 3 - G 6

The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind by William Kamkwamba & Bryan Mealer This junior version of a best-selling true story describes how 14-year-old William Kamkwamba saved his drought-suffering Malawi village. Because of social and environmental circumstances, Kamkwamba wasn’t able to afford school fees. Instead, he discovered a local library where he taught himself how to engineer a windmill. Kamkwamba successfully harnessed the wild wind, managing to generate electricity and pump water. His desperate study and experiment saved the grown-up world! L E V E L: G 6 - G8

I'll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson This book received the 2015 Michael L. Printz Award for Excellence in Young Adult Literature, Bank Street's Josette Frank Award, and a Stonewall Honor Book Award. It is about fraternal twins, Jude and Noah. The story is told through the twins' alternating voices from different points in time. Thirteen-year-old Noah narrates the story's beginning, the later story is revealed from 16-year-old Jude's point of view. Both are artistically gifted and once dreamed of entering California School of the Arts. However, when a tragedy devastates their lives, the twins seem to switch personalities and everything unravels. The varying voices make for a richly plotted novel.

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L E V E L: G9 & U P W W W. A P I S . O R G EDITORIAL TEAM: ■ Euysung Kim Director ■ Nicole Suh Art & Design Editor ■ Josephine Shim Communications & PR Team Leader ■ Susan Craton Writing / Editing Staff ■ Caroline Webster Writing / Editing Staff

Issue 36 APIS Update Dec Jan 2016  

Issue 36 APIS Update Dec Jan 2016 (online)

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