Page 1

Online

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 5

ISSUE 31.

UPDATE 5 7 WO LGYE-RO 45GA-GI L , NOWO N- G U, S EO UL , 1 3 9 - 8 5 2 , KOREA ■ T. 0 2 .9 0 7 .2 7 4 7 ■ F. 0 2 .9 0 7 .2 7 4 2 ■ WWW. APIS .S EO U L.KR

IN THIS ISSUE:

■ Talent Show ■ Pacific Pencil's 5th Edition ■ Year-End Concerts

IN THIS ISSUE:

■ Arts Night ■ Elementary Chinese & Japanese ■ ■Moving Up & Graduation Faculty Retreat

■ Summer Reading


MAY/JUNE 2015

E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L N E W S & E V E N T S

Fairy Tale Characters Teach Good Manners

Grade 1 and 2 pose for a group picture after their musical, "Character Matters II."

W

hat would it be like if all your favorite book characters got together one day? What would they talk about? On April 3, APIS students, family, and staff got a chance to meet Snow White and the seven dwarfs, the Billy Goats Gruff and the troll, Hansel and Gretel, and a dozen other stars and villains of fairy tales. Elementary students from Grades 1 and 2 presented the musical “Character Matters II.” The musical featured these fairy tale characters learning how to treat others with respect. In the musical, three members of the fairy tale advice council — Rapunzel, Cinderella, and Humpty Dumpty — dealt with complaints from their fairy tale fellows. Why didn’t Snow White ever thank the seven dwarfs? Can the troll stop bullying and become a friend to the Billy Goats Gruff? How about the witch who is only interested in eating Hansel and Gretel? Is she able to become a good neighbor? The advice council and neighbors of the fairy tale town answered those questions with songs in chorus: to be thankful, to be polite, and to be a good neighbor. The message of “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you” (Luke 6:31) reverberated in the APIS auditorium. The musical this year is the sequel to “Character Matters I,” which was presented in 2011. With this series of the character-building musicals, “kids are able to learn about the importance of good character by acting, talking and even thinking from the character’s point of view,” said Judy Park, teacher of grade 1.

2

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R


Grade 1& 2 Musical: Character Matters II

Gillian Kern, right, as princess in Princess and the Pea.

Matthew Jeon, the troll!

Benjamin Choi-Schattle as Rumpelstiltskin.

William Yoo and Teddy Russell were the dwarfs. The witch (Jenny Kim), Cinderella (Katrien Knox-Nielsen), Humpty Dumpty (David Jeong), and Rapunzel (Jacklyn Veri).

The rangers, Jiwoo Jung and Heumjae Cho.

Jimin Jung and Joshua Oh played the rats.

Jason Kim, the Pied Piper.

e Little im as th Ianna S

Snow White, Zofia Kowal.

Hansel & Gretel by Louie Park and Yeonsue Arata.

MAY/JUNE 2015

E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L N E W S & E V E N T S

The Ducklings by Elliot Suh and Juney Go.

d. ing Hoo Red Rid

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

3


MAY/JUNE 2015

E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L N E W S & E V E N T S

ter

Smar

Are You

than an APIS First Grader?

In the spirit of the U.S. television game show “Are You Smarter than a Fifth Grader?,” previous issues of the APIS Update have included test questions from some of the elementary grades here at the school. For this edition, readers get to take a look at some of the more-difficult-than-you-might-expect material that first graders are tackling at APIS. These questions come from Judy Park, grade 1 teacher, along with music teacher Melinda Baum, art teacher Anna Sea, Chaplain Zach Luginbill, guidance counselor Kirstan Beatty, and PE teacher Ryan Williams. How many questions can you answer correctly? 1. Which author wrote “Oh, the Places You’ll Go!”? 2. What writing strategies can be used to make your ending strong? 3. How many eyes do bees have? 4. What type of rocks are tuff, scoria, and basalt? 5. We have learned from Pastor Zach, “Proving you care more about each other than winning an argument.” Which fruit of the spirit or character is this? 6. Marnie is folding her family’s laundry. She has 10 socks to fold. How many pairs of socks are there altogether? 7. How do you kick a soccer ball so it goes in the air? 8. What is a burpee? 9. Name at least three cool colors and warm colors. 10. How do you divide an artwork into three different spaces? 11. When you are upset about a problem, what is the first thing you need to do before you solve it? 12. What are three ways to calm down? 13. What is the name of the giant that had slobbery teeth because he never brushed them? 14. How did the boy and his father make the giant disappear?

Me!

A N S W E R S 4

1. Dr.Seuss: 2. End with sound words, use strong feeling statement, lesson learned, or end with hope or wish; 3. Five eyes; 4. Volcanic rocks; 5. Peace; 6. Five; 7. Lean back and make contact under the ball; 8. Start standing up straight, drop all the way to the floor (chest and stomach hit the floor), then pop back up; 9. Cool colors — green, blue, sky blue, purple; Warm colors — red, yellow, orange, brown, pink; 10. Foreground, middle ground, background; 11. Calm down; 12. Belly breath, positive self-talk, counting; 13. Abiyoyo; 14.They sang to him until he was out of breath and fell down!

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R


F ield Day F un

Students and parents enjoy a game of tug of war during elementary field day on May 25.

L

et’s get ready for some field day fun! Who is excited?!” asked Jenn Hisko, physical education teacher, in a microphone, as she kicked off this year’s elementary field day event on May 25. For the next several hours, students in kindergarten through fifth grade, along with their parents, siblings, and teachers, enjoyed the much-deserved break from usual school routines. With a steady stream of upbeat songs playing over the loudspeaker, participating adults and students together Duck, duck, duck.......duck..... goose! played capture the flag, monster ball, cross the river, tug of war, duck-duck-goose! and over-under during the summerlike day. There were dances, a hamburger lunch outside and an ice-cream snack later. The day’s outdoor activities ended with an epic water-gun battle, after which the students had a chance to see a film presentation of “Mary Poppins” inside in the school auditorium.

MAY/JUNE 2015

E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L N E W S & E V E N T S

“Field day is a wonderful opportunity to connect parents, teachers, and students. Each year, we continue to get more and more parents participating and the students really enjoy that,” Ms. Hisko said. “It is a fun way to celebrate a successful school year.”

A delicious hamburger lunch was served. W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

5


MAY/JUNE 2015

E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L N E W S & E V E N T S

Pacific Pencil’s 5th Anniversary

S

Joanna Kim (Grade 4) enjoys the student artworks on display.

ince its first edition in 2011, the Pacific Pencil has been serving as “a channel for every elementary student at APIS to share their voice in a multitude of creative ways,” says Anna Sea, art teacher, who initiated the annual student literary art magazine project. Because it has been an ongoing project, “some of our current fifth-grade students who have been at APIS since first grade will be able to see the development of their artwork and writing over the past five years.”

With this year marking the publication’s fifth anniversary, students and teachers were pumped up with excitement from early in the school year. “Five” was always on the students’ minds as it was the theme for the Pacific Pencil cover design contest and also for Korean language class assignments, which were all included in this year’s edition. The celebration culminated on May 15 at the publishing party and art exhibition, which was packed with events. In a ceremony held in the auditorium, Principal Bruce Knox praised students’ achievement and hard work over the six months. He encouraged students to continue to “create,” as they did in the process of publishing Pacific Pencil. During the guest presentation, Elvira Kim, a fashion designer who had worked for True Religion and Guess, talked about the creative process of making clothes. With a sample of a gray-colored polo T-shirt, she explained the stages of sketch and illustration, technical packet including sewing instructions in computer, and garment prototype (a paper-pattern guideline to cut fabric). Students were able to learn about the fashion design process before the final garment made its way onto the shelf of retail stores. This year’s Pacific Pencil publishing party could not have been so successful without the collaboration of staff, teachers, parents, and administration. Elementary teachers worked hard with students on Korean and English writings and artwork. Elementary SRC members volunteered for the sale of cards featuring student artwork at the exhibition. High school students also dedicated their time for the younger students’ publishing party. Not only singing in choir at the ceremony, they helped moms set up the display area and decorate art displays with balloons. Last but not least, the mothers of students in the fifth grade were amazing in their fundraising efforts for next year’s Pacific Pencil.

6

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R


Pacific Pencil’s 5th Anniversary

Grades 3 to 5 pose for a picture after the ceremony, while the lower elementary students were enjoying the Pacific Pencil art exhibition.

Fashion designer, Ms. Elvira Kim.

Students join in on the cake-cutting ceremony.

HS choir sings for the audience.

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

MAY/JUNE 2015

E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L N E W S & E V E N T S

7


MAY/JUNE 2015

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

Seeking Answers to Science Questions

H

ow does music or different additives affect plant growth? What is an efficient way to purify water or to deal with food waste? How does amount of sleep affect a teenager’s ability to learn? Fifth-graders through 10th-graders at APIS presented their findings on these and other questions during the science fair held April 9 in the school gym.

Sung Jae Park (Grade 10) presents his research during the Science Fair.

Rows and rows of science fair projects were set up on long tables for the event. Students waited by their projects and reviewed their notes, while groups of judges moved from exhibit to exhibit, giving each student at least two chances to formally present their hypothesis, experiment design, results and conclusions — the culmination of months of work.

Louis Koo (Grade 10) was the top winner of the high school contestants in the fair. His project, “Effect of Coil-coiling on Efficiency of Wireless Powering Through Electromagnetic Resonance,” was praised by judges for being strong in every adjudication area. Louis said it was the third year he had participated in a science fair. The highest he had placed before was a third-place win in a science fair in California. He said he has learned from his science fair experience that “you can actually achieve something if you try … if you try and you’re into a project you’re researching.” What made some presentations stand out from the others? — “Articulations of their facts,” said Andy Murphy, dean of students, who judged as a team with Ha-an Choi (Grade 11). “Their hypothesis and experimental design … and, of course, having a nice, well-organized poster.” “Creativity,” Ha-an said. And both judges agreed that they were impressed when presenters were able to correctly use scientific terminology to answer follow-up questions. This was the first year that the fifth-graders were allowed to participate in the APIS science fair. The judges noted that the fifth-graders’ entries were well done. Middle School Science Fair Results

High school overall winners.

High School Science Fair Results High school overall winners 1st: Louis Koo 2nd: Edwin Lee 3rd: Grace Kim Chemistry 1st: Martin Kim 2nd: Gloria Lee 3rd: Kevin Jang Biology 1st: Edwin Lee 2nd: Jeonghwan Sul 3rd: Joonwoo Kang

8

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

Physics 1st: Jaemo Koo 2nd: Jennifer Kang Earth/Environment 1st: Grace Kim 2nd: Noah Kim 3rd: Cathy Lim Computer Science /Engineering 1st: Max Park

Middle school overall winners 1st: Eric Lee 2nd: Hee Won Seo 3rd: Grace Kim Chemistry 1st: Grace Kim 2nd: Henry Kim 3rd: Jasmine Um Biology 1st: Seojung Park 2nd: Clara Park 3rd: Sophia Jung

Physics 1st: Jane Kim 1st: Sunny Park 2nd: Charissa Kim Earth Science /Environment 1st: Hee won Seo 2nd: Sunny Choi Computer Science /Engineering 1st: Eric Lee 2nd: Jay Hong 3rd: Joyce Yoon

Fifth Grade Science Fair Results Fifth grade overall winners 1st: Jeremy Kim and David Lee 2nd: Sunny Choi 3rd: Min Seok Koo and Justin Suh


Middle School Speech Contest

O

MAY/JUNE 2015

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

n May 8, the APIS auditorium was charged with tension and excitement created by the middle school speech contest. With nervous looks, 23 finalists bravely took to the stage and showed off their public speaking skills. Students really “walked out of their comfort zone and took risks of standing in front of the public,” said Tammi Wenzig, one of the three judges for the event. This year, for the first time, a first-place award went to a sixth-grade team, Phuc An Duong and Edward Kim, in the duo category, which is known to be the most competitive among all other categories.

“All the participants showed a high level of public speaking abilities in the criteria of delivering emotions, adjusting volume variation in voice, using hand motions, and making an eye contact with the audience,” said middle school teacher Chris Stapleton, who trained students during the eight weeks of preparation. Congratulations to all the finalists of the middle school speech contest! Original Oratory

Congratulations!

Daniel Suh (Grade 8):Limits in Life (1st Place)

Oral Interpretation

Helen Kim (Grade 6): The Choice is up to You Joseph Yi (Grade 8): Bribing Students

Clara Park (Grade 7): To This Day (1st Place) Brian Lim (Grade 8): Minecraft End poem Cassandra Park (Grade 7): Shake the Dust Chris Kim (Grade 8): Loser John Kim (Grade 6): All Summer in a Day

Monologue Gerry Hwang (Grade 8):The King's Speech (1st Place) Sarah Choi (Grade 8): Grow up, Humanity Justin Kim (Grade 8): Barbie

Duo Acting Phuc An Duong & Edward Kim (Grade 6): Time, what is it? (1st Place) Grace Kim & Seojung Park (Grade 8): Dr. Horrible's Sing Along Blog Jacob Kim & Eric Lee (Grade 7): Abbott and Costello – Captain Jonah and the Whale routine Joshua Park & Jakin Jeong (Grade 8): What Watt Where Ware Rian Kwak & Bryan Jung (Grade 6): To This Day Sophia Jung & Heewon Seo (Grade8): Dissecting the Chicken Joke W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

9


MAY/JUNE 2015

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

A ll the A rts, A ll at Once By Sophie Holbrook, Music Department Chair and Meg Pendleton, Art Teacher

Listening to live music played by band students, students and teachers paint large-scale mural portraits of composers as part of the community art project.

T

he inaugural Arts Night was held at APIS on May 15 when the school building became a colorful blend of art, drama, and music. Visitors enjoyed artwork while drama and music performances provided a coffeehouse atmosphere. The community art project was particularly wonderful in uniting all participants in the creation of large-scale mural portraits of composers. APIS clearly has a deep trove of talent. Hana Kim (Grade 12) said, “Arts Night was a great opportunity to take a look at other people’s artwork and musical talent. As an AP Studio Art student, I appreciated the amazing talents of the students from Art I, STEAM, Art History, and middle school art classes. Emotional messages were conveyed through different techniques." It is no surprise that APIS students are talented in many genres; it was inspiring to see the artistry of the secondary students come together in this mass collaboration of the arts. Visitors at Arts Night could see and hear how the students cultivate their art form through great care, practice, precision, and joy. The evening concluded with spirited performances by the jazz band and drama students and the teachers paid tribute to the contributors of the evening. Congratulations and thank you to all involved for a spectacular first Arts Night! This is sure to be a continued event in the years to come.

10

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R


Arts Night

Ensembles

Art Exhibition

Jazz Band

Digital Media Art

MAY/JUNE 2015

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

Speech & Drama

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

11


MAY/JUNE 2015

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

APIS Hosts Music Festival

A

By Emmalee Johnson, Orchestra Teacher PIS was full of beautiful sounds and lively students on May 9 as we hosted the Korea International Music Education Association (KIMEA) Solo and Ensemble festival! Students from all over Korea came to our campus to perform solos and ensembles (six or fewer students) for a judge and received a rating (Merit, Bronze, Silver, Gold, Platinum). This year our judges were current international school music teachers, Seoul Philharmonic Orchestra musicians, and a former APIS orchestra teacher, Ji Sung Park. The judges listened for musical elements and gave constructive criticism and feedback to all, helping students to learn from their performance.

APIS sixth- through 12th-grade students used class time to prepare solos or small ensembles in a chamber music setting, an integral and sometimes overlooked facet of music making. Ha-an Choi (Grade 11) reflected on what he learned in preparing his violin trio, “The importance of a leader should not be diminished and its presence is what remains essential for all activities, including music. While an individual can thrive in certain skills, it is a leader that can integrate those individuals to a harmony.” Another student stated, “I like how I could concentrate on my music and my part. In band, I depend on my peers and learn my music with them. However, through the chamber music unit, I was able to control my dynamics and emotions on my own with my friends! I loved it. I am so thankful I was able to participate in Solo & Ensemble Festival this year.” This is the third year APIS has hosted this event and it has remained a popular KIMEA event. There were nearly 200 performances scheduled involving students from 11 international schools. The festival has continued to grow in size and quality – this year the festival registration and judging was paperless and ran entirely online. It was great to hear the building full of eager musicians, practicing and discussing their performances. This festival is open to all musicians grades 6 to 12 who are enrolled in an APIS music class. What will you perform next year? Here is how APIS students did at Solo & Ensemble Festival 2015:

12

PLATINUM

GOLD

SILVER

Eugenie Kwon (G9), Claire Park (G10), Mei-Mei Timpson (G7), Eric Lee (G7), Sophia Cho (G9), Esther Kim (G9), Jeho Hahm (G11), Jeonghwan Sul (G10), Kelly Oh (G11), Sandra Kim (G11), Crystal Cho (G10), Johanna Kang (G10), Jennifer Kang (G9), Lia Kim (G10)

Jenny Jeon (G12), Jackie Lee (G12), Harry Park (G10), Andrew Kang (G10), Robin Chae (G11), Bryan Jung (G6), Philip Yoon (G7), Eddie Kim (G11), Haley Kim (G12), Eric Joh (G10), Jack Song (G6), Jacob Kim (G7), Jenny Jun (G9), Grace Lee (G9), Michelle Choi (G9), Claire Shin (G9), Dayeon Kim (G10), Sally Oh (G10), Cathy Lim (G10), Erin Oh (G10), Min Kim (G12), Haejung Yoon (G12), Sophia Jung (G8), Cindy Rah (G8), Jasmine Um (G8), Amelia Tang (G8), Clara Park (G7), Janice Kim (G8), Sally Pak (G6), Joan Kim (G6), Chris Choi (G11), Charles Cho (G11), Chris Kim (G11)

Kyle Park (G12), Chris Choi (G11), Scott Choi (G12), June Hyun Kim (G10), Noah Kim (G9), Gyu Young Lee (G9), Jae Kim (G9), Mingi Woo (G9), Julie Son (G9), Rachel Cho (G9), Yejin Chung (G9), Grace Kim (G9), Soo Bin Park (G9), Gabby Ravin (G10), Jocelyn Kim (G9), Clara Oh (G6), Irene Kim (G6), Max Park (G9), Eric Park (G12)

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

BRONZE Cole Park (G7), Jin Lee (G7), Andy Oh (G7), Paul Han (G11), Tommy Lee (G9), Alex Woo (G8), James Park (G9), Louis Koo (G10), Ellen Lee (G11), Sarah Choi (G11), Minji Park (G12)


Celebrating our Student Athletes

A

thletes and forensics team members gathered at the gym on June 2 to celebrate another exciting year of sports and forensics. Every student who participated in an athlete team or forensics team was recognized by the teachers, friends, and families through this event. Though there were some sad goodbyes to the seniors who will be leaving school next year, everyone had fun guessing the student athletes of the year and were especially touched when the athletic video was shown on screen, wrapping up the whole ceremony with expectations for the next year. Middle School Student Athlete of the Year: Grace Kim (G8), Soo Yoon Hwang (G7) Middle School Athlete of the Year: Clara Park (G7), Daniel Suh (G8) Varsity Student Athlete of the Year: Catherine Kim (G12), Dave Moon (G12) Varsity Athlete of the Year: Sarah Choi (G11), Kevin Lee (G12) The Athletics Director Award: Eric Park (G12)

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

MAY/JUNE 2015

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

13


MAY/JUNE 2015

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

National Merit Finalist Offers Tips for the Test

J

ohn Kim (Grade 12) has been named a National Merit Finalist for 2015. It is a tremendous honor that is based primarily on John’s outstanding PSAT score, which he earned as a junior at APIS. With the idea that other APIS students might want to benefit from John’s experience, the APIS Update asked him to share his PSAT/SAT prep and test-taking tips. His advice is a mixture of working hard before the exam, along with being diligent about double-checking answers while taking the test. “I tried to take advantage of all of the SAT preparation materials available to me,” John said. “I bought SAT prep books of every brand, took the practice tests, and tried to improve my weak areas.” He said the official study guide created by the College Board was the most helpful prep book. “I saved those exams for last, because they were the most accurate indicator of what I should expect on both the SAT and PSAT. I didn’t prepare for the PSAT specifically, but studying for the SAT really helped me get a grasp of what to expect. The PSAT questions tend to be easier than SAT questions, but getting just one question wrong on the PSAT could drastically affect your score.” Finally, he suggested that future students hoping to excel on their SAT should study consistently up until the exam and not attempt to cram it all in one week. “While taking the exam, I would recommend students to avoid making any careless errors. Even if you feel confident you got 100 percent of the questions right, go over them two or three times (if you have the time) because you will almost certainly notice something wrong.” Being a National Merit Finalist looks mighty good on a college application and it also opens up scholarship opportunities. “The award I received is the $2,500 National Merit Scholarship, money that will cover the student contribution portion of my college tuition,” John said. “Being a National Merit Scholar, however, can help much more if a student were to attend a college that sponsors the National Merit program such as the University of Southern California, where they award as much as half-tuition to National Merit winners.” John will attend Columbia University in New York City this fall and plans to study economicspolitical science and sustainable development. “I dream of going to law school and pursuing a career as a diplomat for the U.S. Department of State, perhaps as an ambassador to the United Nations Headquarters in New York,” he said. The National Merit Finalist honor (available only to permanent residents of the United States or U.S. citizens) is conferred on fewer than 1 percent of the approximately 1.5 million students who take the PSAT. In addition to unusually high PSAT scores, National Merit Finalists selections are based on high school transcripts, extracurricular activities, recommendations, and an essay.

14

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R


APIS Senior Steps into Research Position

M

ost students aren’t thinking about participating in any serious research as they begin their college career. That is for professors and maybe some graduate students. It is something to hope for in the future. But Sarang Yang (Grade 12) has been given the opportunity to work on a research project this fall at Colby College in Waterville, Maine, in the United States. When Sarang steps onto campus as a freshman, she will already be a research assistant and will be assigned a paid position. Sarang was named to Colby’s Presidential Scholars Program, which offers several benefits to the top students in the college’s admitted classes. One of those benefits is the opportunity to conduct research alongside a professor. In addition, as a Presidential Scholar, Sarang will have access to grants if she wants to design her own project, free music lessons, priority in class registrations, and other benefits. Sarang won’t know until this summer to what project she will be assigned. “I was able to apply for my three top research choices (in the fields of anthropology, government/politics, and economy),” Sarang said. Her top choice is related to anthropology, “Global Immigration Controls,” followed by “International Criminal Justice and Conflict Resolution” and “Statistical Abstracts for the Greater Waterville Area.” “Each research follows a different timeframe/task/schedule according to what the professor in charge wants, and continues for the whole year, sometimes even goes for a couple of years,” she said in an email.

MAY/JUNE 2015

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

Shana Russell, director of college counseling, said she is hoping that APIS students and parents pay attention to Sarang’s opportunities at Colby so that “more people can see the wonderful opportunities afforded by small liberal arts colleges and that freshman can be given the opportunity to do research — and be paid for it!” Sarang hasn’t settled on what she wants to study at college yet, but she plans to start her college career focusing on anthropology. She chose to attend Colby because it “was not only a prestigious institution, but also offered me an extremely generous grant — an almost unprecedented amount for an international student — plus the Presidential Scholar opportunity was was just too good to turn down. Its abroad programs are also very extensive, so I also thought that was a very attractive feature.”

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

15


MAY/JUNE 2015

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

16

Prom Bows to Tradition

H

igh school students were amazed by the cherry blossom decorations set up at Gangnam Novotel on May 29, a day that they have all been waiting for — prom. Though the prom theme “Chosun Dynasty” came out as a half-joke at first, it proceeded to be the official theme through a majority vote, and made this year’s prom unique and special, setting it apart from any other APIS proms. There were Korean traditional accessories, students wearing hanbok, and even activities that would fit along with the theme such as the yoot-nol-ee event. All the decorations were made by the students and teachers. It was a fun and a “traditional” night.

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R


Drama Class Takes the Stage

The high school drama class put on a full-length play, "The Brothers Grimm Spectaculathon" on May 28.

“ We’re going to attempt to do all the major fairy tales in about two hours and 20 minutes,”

announced drama teacher Sarah McRoberts, as her fledgling APIS drama class began the presentation of its first full-length production, “The Brothers Grimm Spectaculathon” by Don Zolidis on May 28. The well-received, comedic romp featured two narrators, played by Lina Kim (Grade 11) and Rose Lee (Grade 9). The narrators were on stage for the entire play, while other members of the cast each wore several hats — literally and figuratively — as they played multiple roles from multiple fairy tales and tackled “one enormous super-story that will rock your world!” (as Narrator 2, played by Rose, described it). This play had everything — classic characters ranging from Rumpelstiltskin to Snow White and less well-known fairy tale folks like crab people and a game-show host and story themes like love at first sight and making deals with supernatural entities. To knit all those stories together, the actors were required to keep a frenetic pace, pulling on and off costumes as they assumed one role after the other, taking the stage to act out a list of fairy-tale characters as the narrators explained the story connections. For instance, Donna Kim (Grade 9) moved from playing the Devil, to the Cobbler Elf, to the Devil’s Grandmother, to Cinderella. And all those parts had to be reprised at the end of the play as a “lightning round of recaps” quickly reviewed the play’s spin on the fairytale world.

MAY/JUNE 2015

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

“What I am the most impressed with about this production was how much students improved in their craft since the beginning of the year,” Ms. McRoberts said. “In August, we were learning the fundamentals of acting; in May, we put t s on a full-length play. This would not have a C been possible if the faculty was not supLina Kim ... Narrator 1 portive and if the cast and crew were not Rose Lee ... Narrator 2 willing to work hard, take direction, and Jeho Hahm ... Enchanter, King, Dwarf 1, Actor 2 Donna Kim ... Devil 1, Cobbler Elf, be willing to take risks. I am so proud of Devil's Grandmother, Cinderella what these students acClaire Shin ... Girl, Fishergirl, Grandma, Prince Charming complished, and I'm Jenna Lee ... Hansel, Talking Fish, already looking Snow White, Woodcutter forward to next Richard Jo ... Rumpelstiltskin, Frog Prince, Dwarf 2, Wolf year.” Gia Kim ... Prince 2, Princess, Little Red Riding Hood, Mac Julie Son ... Rapunzel, Walt, Wicked Stepsister 2 Sophia Shin ... Witch 1, Host, Devil 2, Wicked Stepmother Grace Kim ... Actor 1, Girl Without Hands, Crab Person 1, Wicked Stepsister 1 Ji Hee Suh ... Prince 1, Crab Person 2, Witch 2 Ellen Lee ... Gretel, Giant, Doctor, Herald Jeff Hwang ... Dirt Merchant, Father, Prince 3, God

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

17


MAY/JUNE 2015

SCHOOL-WIDE

Principal’s Note: Giving Students a Real Audience

A

number of weeks ago I had the great pleasure of accompanying two of our students to the TBS eFM Radio Station, where they were both competing in the “Steve Hatherly Show Creative Speech Competition” against two students from Dwight International School and one from YISS. Given a list of five keywords three days before the recording, the students were tasked with preparing a speech that would be judged across a number of criteria. As we discussed what they might expect on our way to the studio in Myeongdong, the students were excited. Neither had ever had an opportunity to be on radio or had ever stepped inside a broadcast studio. They weren't exactly sure what to expect from the judges but had listened to the previous speech competition recordings and were ready for something similar. When we arrived and were ushered into the somewhat intimidating live broadcast room, that excitement became nervousness as the red "on air" sign lit up and the show began recording. Our APIS students pulled the numbers 1 and 2 out of the hat and had the unenviable task of starting the show with their speeches. Nervously, but with growing confidence, they spoke into the microphone to the judges and a possible audience of millions across Seoul! As the rest of the show unfolded and the remaining three students presented their speeches it became clear that all five students were nervous, and yet, were giving it their absolute best shot. Claire Shin (Grade 9) and Jennifer Lee (Grade 12) at the TBS eFM radio station to take part in a speech contest.

As I reflected later that night, this experience could be looked upon as the almost perfect example of what we should be aiming for in the classrooms at APIS.

The students were given clear expectations, samples of what was expected, clear criteria upon which they would be judged, and time to prepare. The task put them outside of their comfort zone. Immediately after presenting they were given clear, specific feedback. And most importantly of all, their task was for a very, very real audience! While we cannot hope to set up a potential audience equal to the population of Australia for our assessments here at APIS, our teachers are encouraged to look for other opportunities to find real audiences for the assessment tasks they set for their students. If you, as a parent, work in an organisation or business that our students at APIS could connect with, then please contact your child’s teacher to suggest your idea. If you work in a bank, maybe the economics students could present to your office. If you work as an architect, maybe the architecture class could design something for you to judge. If you work in advertising, maybe the art or English class could prepare a poster or presentation that your office could critique. As I have reminded our teachers, If you want to see what students are REALLY capable of, give them a REAL audience! You, as parents, can really help us with finding those audiences!

18

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R


Encore! Encore!

S

tudents clapped and cheered wildly while other students leaned closer eager to get a better view. April 17 was the day our elementary and secondary students got to show off their talents at the APIS Talent Show organized by the elementary and high school student representative councils. While there were winners from the 25 acts — ranging from a song/dance performance to a Rubik’s cubes performance — it was clearly the kindergarteners in their tutus who stole the show.

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

MAY/JUNE 2015

SCHOOL-WIDE

19


MAY/JUNE 2015

SCHOOL-WIDE

Celebrating Global Connections Through Language

P

rincipal Bruce Knox opened the second annual APIS Asian Language Speech Contest on April 30 with a short talk about the value of getting up in front of an audience, noting that the first step onto a stage is the hardest. Close to two dozen APIS students took that scary first step at the event, taking their turn to demonstrate their foreign language skills for an auditorium filled with fellow students, faculty, and family members. It was a celebration of the multi-language emphasis at APIS and an opportunity to honor students from kindergarten through high school who were selected to participate. Participating students spoke in a non-native language — Korean, Japanese, or Chinese — about topics like connecting through literature, pollution, cultural and culinary connections, and global leadership. Grace Gao, Chinese teacher, commended her students from all levels who participated. “It is their first time to speak Chinese in front of the whole school. But they all have done a great job,” she said. The level 1 and level 2 presenters acted out a short play with what they learned in class. “The level 3 and level 4 presenters gave a wonderful speech showing how Korean food and other traditions influence other countries and at the same time other cultures also are influencing Korean people's lives. I am very proud that they can express their ideas clearly in Chinese.” Six students of Japanese, all girls in high school, gave speeches. “They memorized their speech perfectly,” said Naomi Anno, Japanese teacher. In addition, “the middle school and K to G2 students danced and sang a Japanese animation song 'Youkai Watch.’ It was fantastic, too. We are proud of our excellent students.” The schoolwide foreign language contest arose from what used to be an in-class activity in the Korean language classes, according to Emily Kim, Korean teacher. “I am unable to express how proud I am of our students as I see them improving year after year,” Ms. Kim said. “This event strengthened my belief that the ability to speak a foreign language is key to understanding and accepting other cultures.” “It takes a considerable amount of courage to stand up in a large crowd and to present a speech, but I imagine that it took even more for the Korean language presenters, against an audience whose majority was Korean,” Ms. Kim said. “I would like to recognize these presenters for demonstrating perseverance and bravery, and congratulate their splendid performance.”

20

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R


2nd Annual APIS Asian Language Speech Contest

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

MAY/JUNE 2015

SCHOOL-WIDE

21


MAY/JUNE 2015

SCHOOL-WIDE

Graduates Look Back Before Moving On

I

t was a time to publicly thank parents and relatives for their encouragement and support. It was a time to say thank-you to that special teacher. It was a time to trade jokes and hugs and take selfies with favorite school friends. It was a time to pray for the future. The APIS Class of 2015 Graduation ceremony on June 6 had its share of both tears and laughter as the 36 members of the class looked back on their years together at the school and spoke about what from those years they would take with them as they prepare to go on to college. Director Dr. Euysung Kim and Principal Bruce Knox both addressed the soon-to-be graduates about their own hopes for what the students would take with them as they leave the halls of APIS. “I hope you will live a life with highest aspirations,” Dr. Kim said. “Hold on to your integrity.” Mr. Knox encouraged the students to make big mistakes. “Fail boldly. That’s when you will learn the most,” he said. “Without the willingness to make mistakes, you will be afraid to act.” Class Valedictorian John Kim wished a spirit of perseverance on his classmates. He said it was the most important thing he has learned in high school — “Work hard and never give up.” Co-salutatorians Albert Cho and Jennifer Lee both spoke about the value of their years at APIS. Chaplain Zach Luginbill shared several portions of scripture with the seniors. “Each of you should use whatever gift you have received to serve others, as faithful stewards of God’s grace in its various forms.” (I Peter 4:10 NIV) The Directors Awards were presented. The graduating seniors honored teachers and family members with roses. The audience watched an emotional video featuring each senior sharing their thoughts and memories as photos of them growing up flashed on the screen. Photographers moved into high gear as the diplomas were finally distributed. The high school choir sang. The band played. And high school was over for the graduates. “We’ve done it! And I couldn’t be prouder!” said Jennifer during her address.

22

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R


2015 High School Graduation

s of Clas ! 2015

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

MAY/JUNE 2015

SCHOOL-WIDE

23


MAY/JUNE 2015

SCHOOL-WIDE

Moving Up Ceremonies KINDERGARTEN

F

amily, friends, and APIS faculty members gathered in the CLC on June 9 to congratulate the K5 students who will be moving up to first grade next year. The students danced, demonstrated sign language skills, and sang a song to show their growth during the past year. The “graduates” were each given a certificate, APIS teddy bear and bouquets of flowers before enjoying a party in their classroom. “We look forward to more singing, dancing, and learning next year,” said Principal Bruce Knox in his remarks to the students. GRADE 5

o

n June 9, the fifth grade moving up ceremony was filled with thankfulness. To God. To the teachers. To the fellow classmates. And to the families for their endless support. The fifth graders had a chance to reflect on their elementary years, and at the same time, look forward to their middle school days. One of the highlights of this year’s 5th grade moving up celebration was the reception prepared by the moms. Every student had a cupcake that looked like them with their name written on it!

A

GRADE 8

s the 8th grade students stepped into the gym on June 11, everyone clapped to congratulate the students on their transition to high school. Middle school teacher Chris Stapleton, who taught the students from grade 6, gave a speech reminding the 8th graders of some of the memories they had together in middle school. Parents and teachers received roses from the students for their endless love and support. It was a touching moment — but the excitement on the students’ faces showed that they were already for their next journey in high school. 24

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R


End-of-year Concerts the E n d in g

y e a r with music

O

n May 29, elementary students had a chance to perform in front of their families, friends, and teachers to show how much they have grown during the past year. While it was filled with cute performances and familiar songs, it was also a time to say goodbye to the fifth-grade student musicians who will be moving up to middle school next fall.

S e c o n d a ry

take s n a i c i mus

a s e n t i mental jour

ney

MAY/JUNE 2015

SCHOOL-WIDE

T

he 2015 Secondary End-of-Year Concert on June 4 was a sentimental event. Not only were senior musicians performing together for their last time at APIS before graduation, but the music presented was largely a mix of recognizable favorites selected by students and accessible pop songs from past years. “I truly thank you for teaching us the joy of music,” said Sarang Yang (Grade 12), as she spoke on behalf of the seniors in band in their presentation of a new conducting baton as a farewell gift to their teacher, Band Director Sophie Holbrook. Gifts and flowers hugs and tearful speeches were also offered to Emmalee Johnson, the orchestra director, and to Melinda Baum, the choir director. Students who earned varsity music letters were honored at the concert, and seniors wore corsages for the event. Seniors in choir were featured in choral solos that were introduced with emotional comments by their teacher. “I am always overwhelmed at how attached I get to the students,” Ms. Baum said tearfully to the audience.

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

25


MAY/JUNE 2015

SCHOOL-WIDE

THANK YOU ! APIS PARENTS

The 2014-15 APIS Culture Fair is a celebration of the families and cultures they represent at our school. A sincere thank you for all parents who participated! Not only were these parents excited to showcase the wonders of their chosen culture but many helped their children (and a number of teachers as well) present individual booths. Thank you for allowing us to learn more about you and your family. We look forward to allowing this event showcase the rich diversity that APIS represents. — Kirstan Beatty, Culture Fair Chair The following parents assisted with this year’s annual Culture Fair by manning a booth, working on decorations, cooking regional foods, or assisting students. Mr. Hans Schattle and Mrs. Yun Kyung Choi (G1 Ben Choi-Schattle’s parents) Mr. Grzegorz Kowal (G1 Zofia Kowal’s dad) Ms. Kazumi Akita (G1 Heumjae Cho’s mom) Ms. Tomoko Arata (G2 Yeonsue Arata’s mom) Ms. Jodi Nielsen (G1 Katrien Knox-Nielsen’s mom) Ms. Jung Yeon Won and Mr. Scott Shin (K5 Hannah Shin and G3 Johan Shin’s parents) Ms. Julien Solien-Veri (G2 Jacklyn Veri and G6 Jardine Veri’s mom) Ms. Hye Jin Baek (G4 Joanna Kim and G7 Danny Kim’s mom) Ms. Kirstan Beatty (G3 Webb Beatty and G5 Davis Beatty’s mom) Ms. Ji Eun Baik (G5 Sarah Koo and G9 Daniel Koo’s mom) Mrs. Grace Gao (G2 David Jeong’s mom) Ms. Judy Park (G4 Claire Park’s mom) Ms. Marika Ravin (G10 Gabby Ravin’s mom) Ms. Atsuko Shima (G5 Matthew Kang, G10 Johanna and Andrew Kang’s mom) Ms. Sonomi Torii (G2 Louie Park’s mom) Ms. Shana Russell and Mr. Mike Russell (G1 Teddy Russell’s parents) Ms. Mandy Kern and Mr. Matt Kern (G1 Gillian, G3 Grace, and G5 Gabby Kern’s parents)

We would like to thank Ms. Jung Sun Lee (G9 Grace Lee's mom) for the delicious sandwiches she brought in for the entire faculty and staff on May 11. Thank you for also sharing the great news about David's acceptance to college! - The School Office

26

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R


Thank You! APIS Parents

I would like to than k all the room moms who organized the fo reception for Pacifi od c Pencil. Thank you for taking your tim prepare the food fo e to r our students. They felt so special and fe like an real artist be lt cause of the great re ception at the exhibi t. I also would like to th ank Ms. Min Ju Kim (G5 Jeremy Kim’s m for donating Nestle om) coffee machine for Pacific Pencil fundra ing event. Special th isanks go to Ms. Bu Ja Lee (G5 Neo Le mom), Ms. Ji Eun Ba e’s ik (G5 Sarah Koo’s mom), Ms. Heena Ba (G5 Sophia Park’s m ek om), Ms. Yun Jung Kim (G5 Eunice Kw mom), and Ms. Jae ak’s Hee Lee (G5 Sunny Pak’s mom) for dona all the capsules for tin g coffee sale fundra ising. All fifth grad mom were so genero er s us to prepare the co ffee sale booth durin Pacific Pencil event. g - Anna Sea, Elemen tary Art Teacher

ee’s mom) 2 Rachel L 1 (G e e L n Soo IS prom. for the AP Ms. Kyung s e to g u f the night. a o rs y o k c n Tha elegance o onating e d th in to s s d e e n d d for her kin tiful and ad istwere beau rs e w m) for ass o fl The e Kim’s mo c ring ra e G rd 0 o 1 Paik (G upplies, s g n r u fo o Y g n in pp pirit! to Ms. Ji ays — sho Prom Committee in s w le Thank you b a lu a m in inv porting the ing the pro nerally sup e g d n a , s m needed ite dvisor ! ool SRC A h c S Thank you h ig H Teacher/ dleton, Art —Meg Pen

We would like to thank you for your supp ort during the Donation D rive for the victims of th e recent earthquake in Nep al. A total of 1,061,511 wo n was raised, which will be sent to a fellow intern ational school in the affe cted area, Lincol n Sc of Kathmandu. Th hool rough its earthq uake relief fund, Lincoln plans to assist in rebuilding homes and prov ide medical assist ance and support to its com munity. Once agai n, thanks for your support for this very wort hy cause! —APIS Christian Life Department

. Schattle (G1 I would like to thank Mr d) for setting Ben Choi-Schattle’s da p for the first up a fantastic field tri to Arirang TV grade class on May 12 e show “Money to see a recording of th e is the lead reMatters.” Mr. Schattl m. I would also porter for that progra Ra Kim (G1 Ellike to thank Mrs. Mi e with us as a liot Suh’s mom) who cam nts learned a lot chaperone. The stude and had a great time. e Teacher —Judy Park, First Grad

Special th anks to M s. Jumi Ch (G11 Jeho ang Hahm’s m om) for s porting th upe drama class’ pro tion of duc“The Br others G Spectacu rimm lathon” by brin treats an ging d water for the painters. set Thank yo u so mu for your th ch oughtfuln ess! —Sarah M cRoberts, English/ Drama Te acher

MAY/JUNE 2015

SCHOOL-WIDE

I would like to thank Ms. Young Sook An (G12 Kevin Lee’s mom) and Ms. Shin Hee Kim (G12 Kyle & Eric Park’s mom) and Ms. Sang Mi Ji (G11 Sarah Choi’s mom) for the sports bag they purchased for the entire boys and girls basketball teams. - Ryan Williams, Athletic Director

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

27


MAY/JUNE 2015

SCHOOL-WIDE

Librarian's Pick: Summer Reading!

I

t’s summertime and summer vacation is just around the corner! You may already have hundreds of ideas flowing in your mind about what to do during summer. One of the best things to do this summer can be lying on a hammock at a beach with one of your favorite books in your hand. Reading many good books is a great way to spend summer, and it will also prepare you for the school year ahead. If you don’t know where to start, why not start with these books?

By Jeanne Birdsall

THE PENDERWICKS

The Penderwicks family, a botanist father and four teenage daughters (Rosalind, Sky, Jane, and Batty), go off to spend summer holiday at an estate in the Berkshire Mountains. Their adventure slowly unfolds as they discover gardens, a treasure-filled attic, and the best discovery of all, Jeffrey, the son of the estate owner. This is an exciting bedtime story for kids and a great book for adults as well.

L E V E L: E L E M E N TA RY A G E S LIFE AS WE KNEW IT

By Susan Beth Pfeffer

Have you ever imagined what you would do in a sudden disaster? The life of a teenage girl, Miranda, dramatically changes when an asteroid knocks the moon closer to Earth. In her struggle to stay warm and find enough food to eat, Miranda slowly discovers that the strength to overcome the situation lies in her family and herself. Though the story may be a bit overwhelming, you will be completely absorbed in her secret to survival. This book will remind you of the power of nature, family love, and also to never take what you have for granted.

L E V E L: M I D D L E S C H O O L A G E S By John Green

THE FAULT IN OUR STARS

Hazel, 16, meets Augustus, 17. It’s not a typical boy-meets-girl story as the two first meet as a terminally ill teen and a cancer survivor. Together, they explore what it means to depart this world — Hazel shares her concerns about how much her death will hurt her loved ones while Augustus pictures how he will be remembered by others. This beautiful novel offers us a chance to think about life, death, and love. The story was also adapted into a movie in 2014.

L E V E L: H I G H S C H O O L A G E S 28

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R EDITORIAL TEAM: ■ Euysung Kim Director ■ Nicole Suh Art & Design Editor ■ Josephine Shim Communications & PR Team Leader ■ Susan Craton Writing / Editing Staff ■ Soora Koh Communication Officer ■ Ranhee Cho Communications Intern

Issue 31 APIS Update May June 2015  

Issue 31 APIS Update May June 2015

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you