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S E PT E M B E R 2 0 1 4

ISSUE 24.

UPDATE 5 7 WO LGYE-RO 45GA-GI L , NOWO N- G U, S EO UL , 1 3 9 - 8 5 2 , KOREA ■ T. 0 2 .9 0 7 .2 7 4 7 ■ F. 0 2 .9 0 7 .2 7 4 2 ■ WWW. APIS .S EO U L.KR

IN THIS ISSUE:

■ What's New in Violin Class? ■ Reading Buddies ■ Art Portfolios Reviewed

IN THIS ISSUE:

■ Volleyball Season ■ Elementary Chinese & Japanese ■ Fall Afterschool Activities ■ Faculty Retreat ■ ALS Ice Bucket Challenge


SEPTEMBER 2014

E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L N E W S & E V E N T S

Critters in the Classroom

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hey are the main attraction at recess. Charlie and Lucy are carefully placed in a white basket and then carried out from the kindergarten classroom into the sunshine. Students squeal and laugh as Charlie and Lucy lumber through the grass, heading off to explore. It is time to walk the turtles. Landy Hwang, kindergarten teacher, watches as her students devise games that include the quick-moving turtles, believed to be peninsula cooters. The students stand in front of one another, creating an archway with their legs for the turtles to pass through, and then showing them flowers or other plants to see how the two turtles react. Ms. Hwang said the turtles, who are named after Charles Schulz’s comic strip characters, Charlie Brown and Lucy van Pelt, are a welcome addition Sunon Jones and Hannah Shin create an to her classroom this year. Ms. Hwang’s class is also Kindergarteners archway for their classroom pet turtle to pass through. home to five African snails—Cutesie and Pretty and three unnamed ones—as well as a guppy and a red ramshorn snail. “The students learn to care,” Ms. Hwang said. “They learn all living things need food and shelter. It helps with life science, teaching about different diets.” The students make sure that the turtles’ water is kept clean, washing their tank once a week. They supply Charlie and Lucy with plenty of turtle food and dry shrimp to eat, along with the occasional piece of lettuce or cucumber. Every other day, the students take Charlie and Lucy out for a walk so the turtles can stretch their legs and soak in some much-needed sunshine, which brings out the freshwater turtles’ vivid yellow and orange colors. Other lower elementary classes also keep classroom pets. Though the grade 1 class doesn’t keep any animals year-round, in the spring, during the class’ insect unit, grade 1 teacher Judy Park brings crickets, beetle larvae, ants and butterflies into the classroom for the students to study. Jillian Iwanuk, grade 3 teacher, also sees the values of critters in the classroom. She has three bess beetles and a crayfish named “Cray Cray” in her room. She designates a different student each week to be the “zookeeper” to have the coveted job of feeding the beetles a kind of applescented jelly food and feeding Cray Cray a special kind of tablet from the pet supply store. “It excites the kids,” Ms. Iwanuk said of having animals in the classroom. “They love having something to take care of. It builds a sense of responsibility.”

The African snail in the kindergarten classroom loves lettuce.

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What’s New in Grade 2 Violin Class?

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omething exciting is happening in the second grade music class this year! As part of APIS curriculum, all grade 2 students learn the violin to better develop their musical strengths from an early age. This year, Emmalee Johnson, orchestra teacher, has taken a step forward and incorporated individual violin lessons into the music program so that students can learn music as a class and, at the same time, receive undivided individual attention. Beginning August 25, each second grader has been meeting Ms. Johnson once a week for 20 minutes of instruction. The purpose of this addition, Ms. Johnson says, is to better follow the teachings of Shinichi Suzuki, violinist and inventor of Suzuki music education, who emphasized the importance of providing both group and individual instruction. As parent involvement is considered a crucial element in music education as well, grade 2 parents are also invited to attend and observe their child’s individual violin classes each week.

SEPTEMBER 2014

E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L N E W S & E V E N T S

During the individual lessons, Ms. Johnson teaches each student from the very basics—how to hold the bow, finger positioning, the way to move one’s arm, etc. Each one-on-one lesson allows her to identify each student’s growth areas and strong points and encourage each student accordingly. Proud with the progress that the second graders are making, Ms. Johnson says “It is a heart-warming experience to work individually with the grade 2 students and their parents on a weekly basis. I am honored to see them grow and make music every week. We have so much fun together while we make progress. Adding individual violin lessons has been such a positive change in the music curriculum; I get to know the students more and our music-making as a group has improved. APIS is a truly unique place, giving these young students a high quality musical experience at such a young age!”

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SEPTEMBER 2014

E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L N E W S & E V E N T S

R eading is B etter Together

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lutching favorite picture books that they thought a first-grade student might enjoy, students in Jillian Iwanuk’s third-grade class lined up the afternoon of September 19 and then headed across the hall to the first-grade classroom, as the Reading Buddies program kicked off for the year between the two grades. As Judy Park, teacher for the first grade, read off the names of the third-grade students and their assigned first-grade reading buddies, the student groups of two or three each selected a table or a comfortable place on the carpet and got to work. First the older students read to their younger reading buddy, and then, the younger student had the chance to read one of their own books to their older mentors. The program is designed to improve literacy in all participants. “They enjoy being the one who knows how to pronounce words like the teacher,” Mrs. Iwanuk said of her third graders. “Plus, it gives them excellent practice on reading fluently and with emotion.” Mrs. Park agreed. “It gives opportunity for the readers to develop reading community outside of their own classrooms and gives extra motivation to share their favorite stories in a safe and comfortable environment,” Mrs. Park said. “As for the first graders, they love getting to know the older students and it challenges them to become stronger readers.” The plan is for Reading Buddies to meet twice a month for the rest of the year.

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Field Trip to Yonsei University’s Underwood Int’l College by Jeff Underhill, Grade 5 Teacher

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hat will my life be like? On Monday, September 22, students of grade 5 journeyed outside the confines of APIS to explore the wider world of education at the beautiful campus of Yonsei University's Underwood International College. Educators and parents may choose to be directors of education for children, or choose to give students the tools to direct their own education and act as guides, asking, "How can students take ownership of their education?" Through their university visit, fifth graders gathered tools needed to think about the future they are currently working toward. Credits. Freshman. Dorm. Campus. Lecture. Degree. One needed tool is vocabulary to conceptualize and talk about university. Arriving at Underwood, fifth graders viewed a presentation about university life, given by Underwood students, took a tour of the campus and visited the library to witness real-life university students studying ("shhhhh..."), enjoyed lunch in the food court surrounded by university students, and sat down for a lecture by Dr. Hans Schattle, chair of the political science department. Joined by Dr. Michael Kim, associate dean, and three Underwood students, the fifth graders had the chance to talk through their thoughts. "What is university?" one fifth grader asked. "Do college students have homework?" asked another.

SEPTEMBER 2014

E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L N E W S & E V E N T S

The fifth graders returned to APIS with new seeds planted and new ideas brewing. In their time at Underwood, the boys and girls of fifth grade laughed through misunderstandings and made new understandings, and enjoyed spending time with students and teachers of a future variety in a place full of history and possibility.

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SEPTEMBER 2014

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

Passing on Her Enthusiasm

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race Kim (Grade 8) says she loves to try new things. And this year, one of the new things she is trying is the position of president for the middle school SRC (Student Representative Council). She served as an SRC class representative in both third and sixth grade, and last year she served as the secretary for the middle school council. But this is the first year she has tried the top job. She says she is excited about the challenge. “When I was in third grade [in SRC], I really didn’t know what I was doing,” Grace said. “But being secretary last year, I learned a lot watching Jinny.” Jinny Choi was last year’s middle school SRC president. And Grace is hoping that, like Jinny, she will set a good example to others who wonder if they would like to step up and take a job with a lot of responsibility. “Being president is hard, but it is fun,” Grace said. “You should try it … It gives you a lot of pressure, but it makes you improve as a leader.” Emmalee Johnson and Kirstan Beatty, faculty co-sponsors for the council, say they have confidence that Grace will do well as president. "Grace is a clear leader who allows the strengths of other SRC [participants] to shine through also," Ms. Beatty said. Grace’s chief goal as president is to help all APIS students enjoy events that are sponsored by the council, like the carnival and lock-in, and to run the middle school council in a way that makes it an enjoyable job for the other SRC members. “I really want to be a good example,” she said. A special challenge for the council this year is the change in plans for the annual retreat. Grace said she thinks the council may need to create additional activities this year to make up for the change. Outside of serving on the SRC, Grace keeps busy with sports. “I love all kinds of sports. Right now, I’m on the soccer team,” she said. As far as academics go, she says math is her favorite subject. “I really enjoy attending school because there are so many new things you can try,” she said. Grace was born in New Jersey in the United States, where her father was studying at an American university. When she was 3, her family moved back to Korea. She has attended APIS since the second grade. However, Grace has begun dreaming of going back to the United States to attend college herself once she graduates from APIS. She hopes to someday work as a lawyer. This is the second in a series of stories about the three SRC presidents and their plans and goals for the 20142015 school year at APIS.

Middle School SRC President Grace Kim

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Volleyball Season 2014-2015 by Chris Stapleton, Varsity Boy’s Volleyball Coach

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t’s that time of year again. The high school men’s and women’s varsity volleyball season started the day after school began. The men’s team is packed full of seniors who aim to lead APIS to their best season in years. The ladies’ team is loaded with young talent, who hope to grow and improve throughout the season. The first game of the year was against Chadwick on August 27. A great home crowd came to support the Greenhawks as they took center court. The ladies fought hard, but were unable to pull out a victory. The men defeated Chadwick in four sets. The next game wasn’t until September 18, when the lady Greenhawks swept ICSU at home in three straight sets. The men, also, were able to pull out a victory in five sets. Since then, the Greenhawk teams have played both KIS and SIS. The ladies continue to grow as a team, and played hard against both very difficult programs. The men lost a five-set heartbreaker to KIS, but swept the SIS team. Varsity sports at APIS are about more than just wins and losses. They are about building family and developing camaraderie, while pushing physical limits. If you head up to the gym Monday through Friday from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m., you will see the dedication and commitment of these varsity athletes. Coach Hisko and Coach Hayne, as well Coach Woodrow and Coach Stapleton, not only encourage their athletes to become the best physical competitors, but also teach them how to work together and cope with adversity. Many of the lessons learned and accomplishments achieved by the end of the two-month season can’t be written on paper, or even caught on film. Leadership, friendship, endurance, and teamwork are just a few of these intangibles that will forever change these varsity athletes. If you do decide to come support the Greenhawks at home, don’t forget to give a loud cheer! Because APIS is proud to have these athletes represent us on the floor.

SEPTEMBER 2014

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

List of the Upcoming Games Oct. 1 (Wed): @ SIS 1:55 p.m. Oct. 8 (Wed): @ KIS 1:55 p.m. Oct. 13 (Mon): Home vs. ICSU 3:30 p.m. Oct. 15 (Wed): Home vs. GSIS 3:30 p.m. Oct. 22 (Wed): @ CI 1:55 p.m. Oct. 25 (Sat): Tournament @ GSIS

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SEPTEMBER 2014

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

Aspiring Student Artists Have Their Portfolios Reviewed

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very year, many seniors at APIS seek to continue their studies in the field of fine arts. With a large number of students who have shown great talent in art and design, APIS tries to provide opportunities for students to show their artwork and receive feedback from art colleges. September 26 was a special day for AP Studio Art students as Rhode Island School of Design Ms. Kim from Otis College is introducing the admissions process to AP Studio Art students. (RISD) came to review the works of APIS’ future artists. As one of the best art and design colleges from the United States, RISD’s visit to APIS was so much more than learning about the application process. The assistant director of admissions at RISD, Becky Fong, looked through the students’ artwork and gave feedback on what will be crucial to win the entrance ticket to RISD. On September 27, there was another great opportunity for juniors and seniors considering art schools. The 3rd Korea Portfolio Day (KPD) 2014, held in Seoul, gave students the opportunity to present their portfolio and receive reviews from the admission advisers of some of the most well-known art schools in the United States and Canada. Korea Portfolio Day is an art event hosted by the non-profit organization Korea Art Education Promotion Association, and KPD follows the example of the National Portfolio Day, an annual event hosted in the U.S. Eleven AP Studio Art students participated with the secondary art teacher, Megan Pendleton. As an advocate for these art events, Ms. Pendleton said, “I love events like this because the students don’t even realize all they are learning, taking it in without realizing it.” At the event, 19 art schools from the U.S. and Canada were present and APIS students scheduled reviews with over a dozen art schools, including Parsons The New School for Design, School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and many others. Of course, the admission officers at each school had different standards on the work they expected, but overall, they emphasized the importance of having a strong sense of self in the artist’s work, and using a variety of mediums and series. The feedback our students received was very encouraging — there were recommendations to participate in a CalArts pre-college summer program and compliments on how excellent their realistic works are. But these compliments were not the best thing that happened in this event: four of our students received acceptances to some schools and merit scholarships totaling between $28,000 and $40,000! This was not the end. Otis College of Art and Design visited APIS on September 30 to review the portfolios of our students. Assistant director of admissions, Rebekah Kim, provided general information on college admissions and answered questions. Then, the AP class students had a chance to show their portfolios to Ms. Kim, and she reviewed each student’s portfolio specifically according to the student’s area of interest. The series of portfolio review sessions by art colleges allowed juniors to learn what they need to work on to improve their work for next year, and gave seniors the opportunity to double check and make sure they were fully ready for the admissions.

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Aspiring Student Artists Have Their Portfolios Reviewed

SEPTEMBER 2014

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

Otis Assistant Director of Admissions Ms. Kim explains to Dave Moon (Grade 12) on what can be improved in his artwork.

ge tt i n

RISD Assistant Director of Admissions Ms. Fong explains about the courses a student will be taking once accepted to RISD.

iew rev

o rt sch

ol advisers at KPD.

Jeff Jeo n

(Gr

ad

e1 1) is

Richard Cho (Grade 12) and Wally Kim (Grade 12) show their portfolios to admission officers at the KPD.

g

o yf ad e r

is rh

a with

Ms. Fong from RISD takes a good look at the artwork of Richard Cho (Grade 12) and gives him her feedback.

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SEPTEMBER 2014

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

Moon Festival Fun!

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ust before the Chuseok holidays, on September 5 our first-grade students had a chance to learn about the Moon Festival, a Chinese harvest festival which is similar to Chuseok. Grade 10 students in Chinese teacher Grace Gao’s class presented two plays and a poem to help the first graders understand how China celebrates the festival. The first play was based on the myth of the moon goddess, Chang’e. It explained how her husband Houyi shot down nine suns to save the world and was rewarded with a magic pill of immortality. Chang’e stole this pill and flew to the moon to become the spirit of the moon forever. The second play was about a family reunion during the Moon Festival where the family members share mooncakes (traditional food that the Chinese eat during Moon Festival) and watch the moon together. The first graders laughed at the actors, who were boys dressed up in traditional Chinese women’s clothes. Then, a student stepped in front of the class and recited a poem about people who cannot go home during the festival and who miss their family:

Before the bed, the moon was shining bright I took it for frost on the ground I lifted up and looked at the moon I lowered my head and thought of home

At the end of the show, high school students prepared quizzes on the plays. Grade 1 students who got the answer right received handmade lanterns and, of course, everyone had a piece of a mooncake! 10

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A Peek into Fall Season’s Afterschool Activities

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hough the Chuseok break ended, students had something to look forward to when they returned to school — the afterschool activities of the fall season! Some of the popular activities this time includes the Culture Exploration Club, Elementary Art, and Elementary Soccer. Students who did not register for the activities are automatically signed up for the Learning Center, a center where students can do their homework and receive individual academic assistance. The fall after school program runs until November 26. Here are some of the activities that are offered.

LOWER ELEMENTARY ART

TABLE TENNIS CLUB

ELEMENTARY LEGO

E

FORENSICS SPEECH AND DEBATE

N TA R Y S O ME

CC ER

EL

MATHEMATICAL OLYMPICS

M

MS G IR L

SEPTEMBER 2014

SCHOOL-WIDE

S

SO

CCER

ELEMENTARY CULTURE EXPLORATION CLUB

SB R OYS SOCC E

A CAPPELLA

CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

JAZZ BAND

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SEPTEMBER 2014

SCHOOL-WIDE

,

Little Pull Tab

Big Difference

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he awful smell. That smell was the strongest memory Pat Hallinan retained from a visit several years ago to a dump in Manila where hundreds of people lived in squalor, surviving just by what they could glean from the mountains of trash. Ms. Hallinan, an APIS teacher, new to the school this year, was distressed by what she saw. “It was rotting rubbish. They live in it,” she said. She remembers there was mud up to her knees. And she remembers seeing a child about 4 years old, naked and “just shivering” in that mud. That memory has remained fresh to her as Ms. Hallinan has sought in all the years since to support a charity, the Philippine Community Fund, that works to prevent and end child labor and the desperate poverty in the Philippines, like that experienced by those who dwell and work in the dumps. PCF provides an education and meals for children, as well as health care and livelihood training for adults, among other efforts. As a teacher then at the International School Manila, Ms. Hallinan became aware of PCF when Jane Walker MBE, the CEO and founder of PCF, spoke at the International School Manila. “Just hearing [Ms. Walker’s] story to start with and then seeing the work she was doing for kids, to try to break that cycle of poverty, really impressed me,” Ms. Hallinan said. One of PCF’s projects is to teach mothers of the PCF students livelihood skills, like how to create items and sellable products using recycled materials such as soda can ring pull tabs. Participants in the program were turning out beautiful handbags, placemats, bracelets, iPad covers — all created from the tabs saved from the top of soda cans. Ms. Hallinan decided that collecting and donating those ring pull tabs was a way she could assist PCF’s work. The International School Manila set up a collection box for the ring pull tabs. In support of that effort, “everywhere I go, I ask people to collect ring pulls for me,” Ms. Hallinan said, adding that many of her relatives back in her native Australia are also collecting for her now. Over the years, Ms. Hallinan estimates she has collected and then delivered to Manila thousands of the pull tabs for PCF.

A close-up of one of the Philippine Community Fund bags shows how hundreds of ring pull tabs are incorporated in the design.

Ms. Hallinan wears a shoulder bag made from ring pull tabs by the Philippine Community Fund artisans.

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Little Pull Tab, Big Difference Now, she is hoping that students, faculty and staff at Asia Pacific International School can also get behind the effort. She believes that people here with a heart for the situation in Manila will also be moved to help. “It’s amazing how something like that — so small — can help someone in a major way,” Ms. Hallinan said. PCF is aware of Ms. Hallinan’s collection efforts at APIS. "The PCF livelihood project started using recycled ring pull tabs to make beautiful handbags and accessories and provided an income for the most disadvantaged mothers who are living on a dump site. All the profits from the sales of the products are invested into the PCF school where the mother's children attend,” Walker wrote in an email. “In 2009, PCF secured its first major customer, and we started supplying three department stores with ring pulls products. And in 2010, we were asked to supply the Coca Cola Company with corporate gifts. Now, the demand of our products means that we often run out of ring pulls, and so we are extremely grateful to all the students at the Asia Pacific International School for collecting ring pulls tabs for our livelihood project in Manila, Philippines."

Photo credit: PCF A mother and daughter pick through trash at a dump in Manila.

Ms. Hallinan will be traveling to Manila at the end of November and plans to bring her latest donation of ring pull tabs with her. She invites the APIS family to start their only collection, even if it is very small, and drop it off at her office next to the cafeteria on the lower floor. For more information about PCF and its projects, visit http://www.p-c-f.org. To shop for some of the items created with the ring pull tabs and other recycled materials through PCF programs, see http://ringpull.org/shop.

SEPTEMBER 2014

SCHOOL-WIDE

Photo credit: PCF The Cleo bag (right) created by artisans trained through the PCF uses 778 ring pulls in its design.

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SEPTEMBER 2014

SCHOOL-WIDE

Accepting a Chilly Challenge

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he ALS Ice Bucket Challenge looks like pure fun. A person who accepts the challenge allows a bucket of icy water to be dumped on their head and they may also pledge to donate funds to the ALS Association, an organization that works to increase research funding and advocacy, as well as provide support to those with Lou Gehrig's disease and their families. As the bucket is turned over, there are screams and laughter and lots of photo opportunities. The movement has been a public awareness dream for the ALS Association, as well as a financial windfall. Near the end of August, the association announced it had received $94.3 million in donations compared to $2.7 million during the same time period last year (July 29 to August 27). Soon after, it was announced that donations had exceeded $100 million. The challenge is fun, but the disease in question is deadly serious. ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord, according to the ALS Association. Patients in the later stages of the disease may become totally paralyzed. The APIS Update team sent out an email asking faculty members if they had participated in the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge and why. There were numerous responses. Some were painfully personal.

I completed the Ice Bucket Challenge on August 22 in the English Science Park between See & Me and Brownstone. Meg Hayne, Jenn Hisko and I did it together. I was challenged by my longtime friend in Kansas City (technically, her dog challenged me....) and felt compelled to participate and continue this trend as I have had one aunt and one uncle die from ALS — my Uncle Dick in 2005 and my Aunt Joyce in 2011. It's a terrifying disease that has greatly impacted me and people I love. I tried to get the ALS Ice bucket challenge to keep going global, so I challenged another international teacher in Tokyo, my mom (in Minnesota), and an APIS alumni (hoping he would challenge current APIS students). I know that my uncle, who lost his wife, was warmed by the social media flurry regarding a large hardship in his life. So often we go through struggles silently or independently — the public acknowledgement and education that occurred was inspiring to me and a comfort to many. -Emmalee Johnson, orchestra teacher

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I partook the ice bucket challenge in honour of my dad (Tom) who passed away from ALS (LouGehrigs) five years ago. At the time of his diagnosis, I had no awareness of the disease and needless to say, the more research I did, the more difficult the reality became. It was a very difficult struggle for my mom, brother and I, but we felt the love and support from our amazing (and large) extended family. I remember feeling very sad after attending my first ALS fundraiser (The "Walk for ALS") where they posted several posters about the devastating effects of ALS on the patients. I remember thinking that there had to be a better way to spread awareness and to make it less depressing. The ALS Ice Bucket challenge achieved this goal for me ...Although the ice bucket challenge stirred up several very raw emotions, I am grateful that people are more aware of the disease. I hope that this campaign will help people be more aware and accepting of the physical and emotional changes that affect a person with ALS and, in turn, show greater compassion and tolerance. -Jenn Hisko, physical education teacher

Webb Beatty (Grade 3) and I did the ALS challenge on the roof of Luceen Apartment building. We were invited by my older brother to take part and we agreed to do it — in large part because we were riding the wave of excitement created by the worldwide movement. We also wanted to take part in something that would help benefit the lives of people who are suffering through a terrible disease. It was an opportunity for us to present a teachable moment and raise awareness with our children.

SEPTEMBER 2014

SCHOOL-WIDE

-Brian Beatty, CLC communications and audio/visual support

I did the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge in my bathtub with my kids. Grace Kern (Grade 3) and I did it together, then my other two [daughters, Gabby Kern (Grade 5) and Gillian Kern (Grade 1)] decided they wanted to do it, too. I was challenged by two of my friends, and I decided to do it because I am always looking for worthy causes, and it is a very worthy cause. -Mandy Kern, math/science teacher

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SEPTEMBER 2014

SCHOOL-WIDE

2014 Capital Campaign

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e would like to thank all the parents for their continued support in the 2014 Capital Campaign to furnish a woodshop and a new cooking/multipurpose lab. Here is an updated list of all the donors as of September.

Platinum Level Donations

Gold Level Donations

Silver Level Donations

Bronze Level Donations

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W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R EDITORIAL TEAM: ■ Euysung Kim Director ■ Nicole Suh Art & Design Editor ■ Josephine Shim Communications & PR Team Leader ■ Susan Craton Writing / Editing Staff ■ Soora Koh Communication Officer

APIS Update (online) September 2014  

Issue 24 APIS Update (online) September 2014

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