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ISSUE 41.

UPDATE 57 WOLGYE-RO 45GA-G I L , NOWO N- G U, S EO UL , 0 1 87 4 , KOREA

IN THIS ISSUE:

■ Elementary Field Day ■ Pacific Pencil Celebrations ■ End-of-Year Concerts

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■ F. 0 2 .9 0 7 .2 7 4 2

■ WWW. A PIS .O RG

IN THIS ISSUE:

■ ■Director's Awards Elementary Chinese & Japanese ■ ■Graduation and Moving Up Faculty Retreat ■ Thank You Messages


MAY/JUNE 2016

E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L N E W S & E V E N T S

Pacific Pencil: Making Memories

Secondary students lead an art activity with elementary students at the Pacific Pencil publishing party.

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s inspiration for the annual Pacific Pencil event, elementary art teacher Anna Sea says, “I remember my first art exhibition back in elementary school and I got to invite my parents. We had so much fun taking pictures in front of my artwork with balloons and flowers. I treasure that memory. I wanted to give such memories to ALL of our elementary students so they will get the experience of presenting their artworks in a public setting.” The Pacific Pencil publishing party held May 12 was a day of memorable experiences, from the opening ceremony, which featured invited guest — author/illustrator Darren Farrell — to classroom visits with Mr. Farrell, and culminating with an art exhibit, curated and hosted by APIS secondary students with elementary parents pitching in to prepare and serve food to the young artists and writers. Mr. Farrell reinforced what Mrs. Sea and elementary classroom teachers regularly share with students ... art is a process. Artists and writers build layer upon layer when they work, adding details as they go. Mr. Farrell’s book covers alone go through up to 10 iterations before the final design is approved, he said. “I spend a lot of time doing what you did for Pacific Pencil. A lot of hard work,” Mr. Farrell said to the students. Research for his first three books included visiting boats, learning about fashion design to figure out how his characters should dress, and careful study of the NYC skyline, the backdrop for his second book, “Thank you, Octopus.” When grade 2 student Gillian Kern asked Mr. Farrell why he wanted to become an author, he answered, “I like to make people laugh.”

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Laughter filled the school on the day of Mr. Farrell’s visit. After the event, he said, “So many times, I just stood back and watched smiles bubble forth as students showed their parents their work. As an educator that's really what it's all about — giving children confidence to go out there in the world and share their gifts. I could certainly see that in action at the Pacific Pencil event.”


Pacific Pencil Publishing Party Pacific Pencil planning begins before the school year even starts. Grade 3 teacher and co-facilitator of the event, Judy Park, said, “I am extremely proud of our students' continual growth in English and Korean writing. Mrs. Sea is the founder of the Pacific Pencil magazine, and she has worked countless hours and labored in prayers for this event so that every student will enjoy and feel proud of his/her achievement.” High School Art I students turned into curators and activity coordinators to prepare the Pacific Pencil exhibition this year. Mrs. Sea observed that students were nervous about teaching little children, “but they all did a great job, and because of these arts and crafts activities, ES students could continue to enjoy being artists all day long.” The older students created activity tables where younger students could try origami, working with clay, and more. Janice Kim (Grade 9) said, "It was really interesting to see everything come together ... I loved seeing the kids smile when they actually enjoyed the activities we had prepared for them, and the parents taking pictures of the display boards we made to emphasize their kids' artworks." Mrs. Sea wants to thank the administration, teachers, staff, parents, and PTO for their support. “All the hard work brings joy to our APIS children. I hope this beautiful memory will stay throughout their lives."

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E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L N E W S & E V E N T S

Experiential Learning Alive By Jeff Underhill, Grade 5 Teacher

On day 2, the campers gather together around a campfire and learn about God.

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e learned how to be in nature. Then we hiked up all over that nature,” says Claire Park (Grade 5). Claire and her classmates were bold adventurers during the Grade 5 GCP trip. On May 23, 13 eager fifth graders and three chaperones, Ms. Sherry Cheng, Mr. Ward Milligan, and Mr. Jeff Underhill, set off for four days and three nights in Pocheon, north of Seoul. The fifth graders were bound to find challenges to overcome and learn from, and journaled all about it. “I will try new things,” wrote Joyce. The experiential learning began on the back of a horse. “I did well riding my horse. I did well being calm.” And there was a lot of fun to be had. Jeannette mused, “I really had fun horseback riding. The horse I rode on was called Louis and he seemed to enjoy me.” Somang agreed, “It was awesome, the horseback riding.” At the campsite, the campers settled in and confronted being out of their comfort zones. Jeannette reflected in her journal, “I’m struggling a little to take care of my stuff. I learned to double check and organize.” Sharing and caring for living space was a lesson in and of itself. “Tomorrow, I will expect my tent to get way cleaner,” wrote Christine. “Today was a soggy day,” wrote Christine. The first night brought rain, lasting into late morning and filling the nearby stream. The campers took advantage of the wet conditions, learning how to warm up with layers of clothes and enjoy a long, outdoor breakfast. “I took care of the hot chocolate, Claire, the scrambled eggs, and Jaeho, the pancakes,” wrote Jeannette. We enjoyed the simple pleasure of waiting out the rain, discovering bright green frog friends, and taking time in nature. “I miss my mom but I like the nature in the mountains,” wrote Jaeho. “The mountains that looked like a cliff were so cool.”

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Grade 5 GCP The trip was not without challenge. “I expect myself to have enough stamina for the hike,” wrote Rin. The campers hiked to a waterfall above Sanjeong Lake. Christine reflected, “It was kind of a sweat problem. And an energy problem.” “We didn’t give up when we were tired,” remarked Jacob. Successes in overcoming struggle were like the stars in the night sky. “The accomplishment was that I could go to the bathroom when there was a super big water bug,” said Christine. Joanna was impressed when she and her team “made a campfire by ourselves without a teacher to help.” “Even though it was hard catching up with Mr. Underhill, I still kept up.” enthused Ethan. Self-discovery was the hallmark of the trip. “At the beginning, I felt overwhelmed. Now I feel in control,” reflected Somang. “In the beginning, I felt really upset because of insects. Now I feel okay with them. Except spiders,” wrote Claire. Jeannette agreed. “I now know I should live and enjoy the old nature much more often.” “I was in my comfort zone and too scared about nature,” Joyce realized. And Ethan discovered, “Now I know that I can sit in nature and not worry about anything. I LOVE IT. I believe that I could sleep over anywhere!”

Day 2

Day 3 “I’m struggling to be friendly

MAY/JUNE 2016

E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L N E W S & E V E N T S

with the spiders.”

-Jeannette

Day 1 Day 4

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E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L N E W S & E V E N T S

It’s a Fun-Filled ES Field Day!

Yes!

No~

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KIMEA Solo & Ensemble Festival

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By the Music Department

f you were around APIS on April 30, you definitely heard music all around. On that Saturday morning and afternoon, the APIS Music Department welcomed students from eight schools to participate in the KIMEA Solo & Ensemble Festival. Many students spent hours preparing for this event, hoping to earn a Gold or Platinum rating from the judges. Students from KIS, YISS, CMIS, Dwight, KIS-Jeju, SIS, APIS, SFS, GSIS, and SAHS/SAMS came to Nowon-gu to perform in small groups or as a soloist. Between 9:30 a.m. and 3 p.m. the judges worked with 151 different solos or ensembles. Our judges were members of the Seoul Philharmonic Orchestra and the 8th Army Band, as well as music teachers from other international schools. The following students participated in Solo & Ensemble Festival 2016: Sumin Chae (G12) - Platinum, Sophie Yoo (G10) and Johanna Shima (G11) – Platinum, Rachel Cho (G10) - Gold, Jennifer Kang (G10) – Gold, Harry Park (G11) – Gold, Julie Son (G10) – Gold, Jenna Chung (G11) – comments only, Brandon Sohn (G11) – Gold, Chris H Kim (G12) – Gold, Christopher Kim (G10) – Bronze, Claire Park (G11) – Platinum, Eddie Kim (G12) – Gold, Esther Kim (G10) – Gold, Eugenie Kwon (G10) – Platinum, Grace Lee (G10) – Silver, Jenny Jun (G10) – Silver, Jocelyn Kim (G10) – Bronze, Johanna Shima (G11), Michelle Choi (G10) – Bronze, Shinyoung Lee (G11) – Gold, Sophia Cho (G10) – Gold, Tommy Lee (G10) – Bronze, Bryan Jung (G7) – Gold, Cullen Webster (G5) – Silver, Josephine Oh (G10) – Bronze, Huck Jun Hong (G10) – Silver. So many students helped make this day a success, including Tommy Lee (G10), Julie Son (G10), Ryan Hwang (G11), Janice Kim (G9), Esther Kim (G10), Jocelyn Kim (G10), Sophie Yoo (G10), Sarah Choi (G9), Sarah Choi (G12), Andrew Kang (G11), Brandon Sohn (G11), Chris Kim (G9), Josh Nahm (G9), Seojung Park (G9), Leo Rho (G9), Aaron Kang (G9), Johanna Shima (G11), Josephine Oh (G10), Sophia Shin (G10), and Paul Han (G12). The day couldn't have run successfully without Mr. Weller and Mr. Webster, as well as our wonderful maintenance department, office staff, and tech support. What a wonderful music making opportunity. Mrs. Baum, Ms. Porter, and Ms. Johnson were so glad to see all the music making and learning going on at APIS!

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MAY/JUNE 2016

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

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Midnight in Milan


Two Different Seouls Made by Fifty Million Souls By Shannon Songwon Yi (Grade 11)

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Shannon Yi poses next to a portrait of Gojong, the first emperor of the Joseon dynasty.

n May 24, the APIS junior class went on a field trip to the Seoul Museum of History. One set of photos notably, took away my attention. One photo showed the 1950s Seoul right after the Korean War, and another photo underneath, Seoul in 2010. The two photos demonstrated the marked difference in Seoul’s modernisation and development between a short span of roughly sixty years, and I was especially astounded by the opportunities that it brought to its citizens.

I was proud that my country — the once destructed Korean nation — had now become the centre of media, modern culture, and even the economy, solely through the efforts of its people. Through this experience, I will commemorate and treasure the historical feats that South Korea has achieved. To explore the lifestyles of our ancestors, acknowledge their legacies, and recognize the pains and conflicts that they fought through is extremely crucial. By learning about the goals that they strived to reach, we have come to appreciate their hard work, and not take anything we have for granted. We, as the people of a country of more than five thousand years of history, we must continue learning that even the commonplace parts of our lives serve as significant historical evidence, left for our future generations to uncover. 2016년 5월 24일 화요일, APIS 11학년 전체는 광화문에 위치한 서울역사박물관으로 견학을 갔다. 흐린 날씨에도 불구하고 역사 시간에 배운 내용을 직접 확인할 수 있는 뜻깊은 시간이었다. 많은 역사적 사료들을 보았지만, 대한민국의 현대화를 한 눈에 볼 수 있는 두 장의 긴 사진이 나에겐 너무나 인상적이었다. 1950년 6.25전 쟁 직후의 서울과 60년이 지난 2010년의 서울의 대조적 모습이 내 마 음을 사로잡았다. 경제적으로 힘들고 정치적으로 불안했던 나라가 반세 기 이후 놀라운 변화를 이뤄내며 오히려 기회의 땅이 되었다는 사실 은 기적 같았다. 무너졌던 대한민국이 국민들의 끊임없는 열정과 단합 된 노력을 통하여 오늘날 세계의 관심이 집중되는 나라로 바뀌었다는 점이 무척 자랑스러웠다. 이번 체험 학습을 통해 한국 역사 수업에서 배웠던 것 뿐만 아니라 앞으로의 대한민국의 발전 방향과 가능성을 더욱 기대하게 되었다. 그 리고 우리 선조들이 과거에 어떻게 살아왔는지, 그리고 어떠한 업적들 을 남겼으며 동시에 얼마만큼의 아픔들을 겪어 냈는지를 반드시 알아야 한다고 생각했다. 과거 어르신들이 무엇을 위해 힘을 썼는지 배움으로 써 오늘날 우리에게 주어진 기회들을 당연하게 여기지 않고 오히려 감 사할 수 있어야 한다고 느꼈다. 그리고, 우리가 대한민국의 역사를 올바 르게 이해해야 하는 또 다른 이유는 오늘날 세계 무대의 치열한 경쟁에 서도 흔들리지 않을 정체성을 지녀야 하기 때문이다. 오천년의 역사를 이어오는 대한민국의 국민으로서 우리는 역사적 주체로서의 그 자부심 을 키워가기 위해 평범한 일상이 곧 역사임을 알고, 배우고, 또 책임감 있게 이어가야 할 것이다.

MAY/JUNE 2016

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

Students point at photos of old Seoul and new Seoul. The top photo shows Seoul in the 1950s and below, Seoul in 2010.

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2016 Athletic Awards Banquet KAIAC Scholar-Athlete of the Year for APIS: Grace J. Kim (G11), Chris Sun (G11) Middle School Student Athlete of the Year: Mei-Mei Timpson (G8), Soo Yoon Hwang (G8) Middle School Athlete of the Year: Clara Park (G8), Justin Lee (G8) High School Student Athlete of the Year: Jocelyn Kim (G10), Daniel Bae (G11) High School Athlete of the Year: Johanna Kang (G11), Chris Choi (G12)

Thank you Mr. Bleecker

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Student Artist Flies Solo

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ustin Um (Grade 11) chalks it up to coincidence. He said his work was featured in a solo art exhibition, Flip Side, held from May 5 to 8 in Mullae Station, because his mother’s best friend’s younger brother owns a studio there. Knowing someone with a studio is a fortunate connection for an aspiring artist. However, the exhibition still wouldn’t have happened if the quality of Justin’s artwork hadn’t justified it, said Justin’s art teacher at APIS, Meg Pendleton. “A solo exhibition is a really big deal for any artist but to have one while still in high school is practically unheard of,” she said. “Justin clearly has the breadth of work to merit such a show and the drive to make it happen.” Close to 20 of Justin’s pieces, most of which were 3D sculptures created at the APIS art studio, were on display for four days during the Flip Side exhibition. Justin said putting together the exhibition was a lot of work. But it was worth it. “It was fun,” he said, sitting in his art classroom the week after the exhibit. “It felt nice having other people enjoying works I put hard effort in.” His aim as an artist is to make people think about issues, he said. “I want to be very provocative.” So, for instance, one of his favorite pieces in the exhibition, Whac-A-Baby, is intended to make viewers think about abortion. Another, which featured a mirror, is meant to get viewers to consider the idea of beauty and whether people can really hide their true selves behind their appearance. The exhibit was just the beginning for Justin. His future goals include attending art school in the United States and then creating “monumental” sculptures with metals, wood, and plastic as well as design products, he said.

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SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

Justin’s class schedule at APIS reflects his interest in art and the creative process. In addition to his math and language classes, he takes AP Studio Art 3D, STEAM, and digital film production. “I think [APIS] has a stronger art program than any other international school,” Justin said. “Justin is a very talented artist and I was very proud of him for having his first solo show.” said Jeff Woodrow, his digital film production teacher. “Justin is one of the most driven students I have encountered,” Ms. Pendleton said. “I particularly marvel at his abilities to create artwork in 3D, which is much harder than it looks. Justin works independently and takes criticism well. He seeks a deeper understanding of the human experience than your average high school student and his work articulates his personal interpretation of this.” w w w. a p i s . o r g

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Ready?

Action!

Students Shine in Directorial Debuts

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ina Kim (Grade 12) and Jeho Hahm (Grade 12) are familiar faces in APIS drama productions. They both have taken lead roles in past productions like “The Jingle Bell Mystery” and “The Brothers Grimm Spectaculathon.” The drama department’s most recent production on May 25, however, was extra special for these thespians as Lina and Jeho took their involvement one step further. Not only were they acting in the productions. They each took a turn directing. “They picked the play. They picked the cast. They designed the sets. They picked all the sound cues,” drama teacher Sarah McRoberts said about Lina and Jeho in her introduction before the two, student-directed one-acts were presented at the school. Jeho chose and directed “13 Ways to Screw Up Your College Interview” by Ian McWethy. Lina directed “The Seussification of Romeo and Juliet” by Peter Bloedel. Jeho’s play revolves around a series of disastrous college interviews, as two college admissions officers struggle to find just one more student that is fit to be admitted into their university. The play choice was particularly relevant, with college just a couple of months away for the school’s seniors. And the play’s multiple quirky characters gave the school’s drama students a chance to show off their comedic skills. Jeho said that as he and the other actors worked on this play, he had a very clear picture in his head of how he wanted each scene to look and sound. Turning that vision into reality “was harder than I expected,” he said after the performance. But it was worth it. During the second presentation of the play, Jeho said he stood backstage and watched the audience’s reaction. Whenever they laughed at a funny line, Jeho celebrated. “It’s an awesome feeling,” he said. Lina’s selection, “The Seussification of Romeo and Juliet,” takes the basic plot of Shakespeare’s classic and combines it with the silliness and wordplay that are hallmarks of Dr. Seuss books. Lina noted that she wasn’t sure how it would work, to be directing her peers and telling them what to do. But she said she was surprised at how responsive the other students were. “I didn’t expect them to listen to me so well.”

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Cast for both one-act plays: (students played multiple roles)

Jeho Hahm (G12) Lina Kim (G12) Nick Yu (G12) Andrew Kim (G11) Alvin Jo (G11) Sophia Shin (G10) Rachel Cho (G10) Rose Lee (G10) Julie Son (G10)


Arts Night 2016 By Meg Pendleton, Secondary Arts

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elodies traveled between different floors, and individuals were not only observing but also actively participating in the activities being offered. The purpose of Arts Night resides in celebrating and exhibiting the talents that APIS students have as well as promoting a hope in engaging more people in the arts culture. In fact, the latter plays a greater importance as such yearning dwells within the artists communally, as they wish to have people at least experience and understand the motives of their passion and hopefully learn to appreciate them. Art may seem inaccessible to many individuals, and events like Arts Night encourage those undiscovered art lovers to embrace the culture.

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Personally, I recall being a part of Arts Night last year and feeling the want to create art pieces like the students from the AP Studio Art class. The experience allowed me to realize that I had a greater passion for art than I had anticipated. Some changes in this year’s Arts Night included many more art pieces being created and exhibited and more opportunities to observe the verbal arts, like debate. - James Chung (Grade 12)

The 2nd Annual Arts Night was a rousing success. The event saw over 120 students display their talents in the realm of visual, musical, and spoken word art forms. Parents, teachers, families, and friends attended the event and were impressed by the great efforts on the part of the students of APIS. From the vocal performances alongside the art show in the gymnasium to the orchestral ensembles accompanying the community mural-making in the Art Studio, the arts came together as one beautiful and unique union, celebrating the power of the arts and the talent of our students. - Ms. Pendleton, Secondary Arts

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MAY/JUNE 2016

S C H O O LW I D E

Principal’s Note: Endings & Beginnings

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hen seasons end we soon forget the joy with which they came The budding leaves, the fall of snow, the dusk, the falling rain. Our thoughts drag out behind us as we contemplate what’s gone But endings are beginnings, the refrain of a new song. We’ve travelled quite a journey and we’ve realised many goals We’ve struggled with the learning, we’ve struggled to behold The quiet revelations as understanding grows But through the smiles and laughter, the joy of learning shows. With this ending comes beginning, one more step along the path And where that path will lead us is a question we all ask In faith we trust the answer will be revealed as we go For the more we understand we realise there’s so much we don’t know.

PTO Update

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ay was a busy month for the PTO! The PTO provided food and/or sponsored the Pacific Pencil publishing party (5/12), Teachers’ Day (5/13), and the Secondary Arts Night (5/13). On May 31, APIS parents and APIS Principal Bruce Knox met in the faculty lounge for the final PTO coffee hour of the year. APIS Director Dr. Euysung Kim also stopped by to welcome parents and say hello. Parents relayed questions and feedback around tuition increases; the process for hiring short- and long-term substitute teachers; and the need for a consistent communication platform as a means for communicating with the school, other parents, and directly with teachers. The school continues to discuss the best way to issue written follow-up after meetings so parents can see if there are answers to any unresolved questions brought up at meetings, and families unable to attend meetings can be kept in the loop. Parents in attendance also expressed thanks to Mr. Knox for the digital parenting seminar he held in January, and asked if other themed parent workshops could be planned for next year. Mr. Knox welcomed the suggestion and said he looks forward to parent input around future seminars. The APIS leadership team continues to welcome communication from parents and encourages families to bring all questions, comments, concerns, and feedback forward to APIS teachers, staff, and school administration. Mr. Bruce Knox concluded the meeting with a heartfelt "thank you" to APIS parents and PTO members for their involvement and investment in APIS. Parent contributions benefit the school and students in myriad ways, and APIS leadership and faculty look forward to continued collaboration.

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Summer School Starts!

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he weekend after the 2015-2016 school year came to a close, summer school started with new excitement. The 4-week elementry program this year is a handson, theme-based approach to learning.Our students had a chance to study art history inside out during literacy, math, art, and IT classes. For example, during the first week, students studied a unit on Stone Ages in literacy class (which was taught by the expert Ms. Lee, who majored in art history) and then went inside a “cave” set up in the Art Studio and drew murals just like cavemen! As they were completing their unit, students also took part in a Stone Age themed cooking activity. Anna Sea, art teacher said, “The students are having so much fun studying art history spanning from the Stone Ages, Egyptian, Greek, and Roman period! This is not something that we often get a chance to study during the semester.” Secondary students have various options to choose from this summer. Whether it is a Reach Ahead course that allows them to earn a credit over the summer to pursue advanced level courses in the fall, a basketball camp, or a college essay writing course, the secondary summer school program is designed to help students gain more confidence with their academics and sports skills. In the college essay writing course, students learned practical ways to shape personal experience into the compelling prose that admission officers are looking for. The class began with a thorough analysis of the common application. Students will read and evaluate a wide variety of applications essays, and then start writing and sharing their essays with the hopes of producing outstanding application essays ready to go before the start of senior year.

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End-of-Year Concerts

"The end-of-year concerts are always exciting events. I love celebrating all the students have learned and seeing the secondary students shine in a different way by playing more contemporary and popular music. I am so proud of the music we've made together this year and look forward to what they'll achieve in the future - at APIS and beyond!" - Emmalee Johnson

“Wow! I was so happy to be at the concerts and to hear the wonderful music from the students. It is obvious to me that everyone has been working hard and improving their musical skills. As always, I am very proud of my students and their efforts in making music. Have a great summer and don't forget to practice so that you're ready for next year!� - Sophie Holbrook

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End-of-Year Concerts

MAY/JUNE 2016

S C H O O LW I D E

“The elementary end-of-year concert was a showcase of the learning that took place in the music classrooms this year. The building blocks of music education were displayed as the kindergarten students sang songs and played games on stage while the grade one students kept a steady beat and sense of tonality on the Orff instruments. As the grades increased, the musicianship increased. Grades 3, 4, and 5 played and sang four part canons. They performed in mixed meter and used modes beyond the pentatonic using their voices, Orff instruments as well as the soprano and alto recorder. I am so very proud of them and look forward to our time together next year! The secondary end-of-year concert is always a very special concert. One of the unique features is the celebration of our departing seniors. If you asked the high school chorus what song they enjoyed singing the most at the concert, it would be “Omnia Sol.” Omnia Sol means “everlasting light.” Metaphorically speaking, that light is our everlasting kinship with the people that we meet throughout life. Our four senior choir members, have been important members of our team. They have left their imprint on the APIS High School Choir.” - Melinda Baum

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S C H O O LW I D E

Director's Awards

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spire Award Jensen Lee (K5) Eliot Kim (K5) Arianna Kim (K4) Aaradhya Bhaskar (K4) Sze Ki Park (G1) Yin Choi (G1) Jin Ryoo (G2) David Jeong (G3) Grace Kern (G4)

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ersevere Award Ria Sackett (K5) Janice Oh (K5) Lynnette Chung (K4) Frank Li (G1) Sunon Jones (G1) Connor Lee (G2) Justin Chan (G3) Jean Ho Lee (G4)

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ntegrity Award Jubin Park (K4) Collin Lee (K5) Yurina Kimura (G1) Peyton Webster (G2) Bhavya Patel (G2) Jason Kim (G3) Samantha Kim (G4)

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piritual Growth Abigail Mazalu (K5) Nicole Mazalu (G1) Esther Kim (G3) Joanna Kim (G4) Noa Lee (G4)

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Adelia Kwak (G4) Joanna Kim (G5) Angela Lee (G6) Bryan Jung (G7) Sooyoon Hwang (G8) Henry Kim (G9) Tim Lee (G10) Grace Youngeun Kim (G11) Michelle Suh (G11) Jeho Hahm (G12)

Ethan Ho (G5) Sunny Choi (G6) Rian Kwak (G7) Jaewoo Lee (G8) Chris Kim (G9) Soo Bin Park (G10) Charity McClure (G10) Sumin Chae (G12) James Ha-An Choi (G12) Joyce Kim (G5) Jei Moon (G6) Charissa Kim (G7) Justin Jang (G8) Claire Lee (G9) Noah Kim (G10) Shinyoung Lee (G11) Martin Kim (G11) Paul Hee Woong Lee (G11) Lynn Kim (G12)

Rin Choi (G5) Eunice Kwak (G6) Helen Kim (G7) Clara Park (G8) Sarah Choi (G9) Jennifer Lee (G10) Johanna Kang (G11) Lina Kim (G12)


APIS Has Got Talent! Elementary Talent Show Winners

1st

2nd

3rd

“Stereo Hearts”

“Beethoven Virus”

“Millionaire’s Hoedown”

by Yin Choi (G1)

by Edric Yoon (G5)

by Cullen Webster (G5)

and Claire Park (G5)

Secondary Talent Show Winners

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1st

2nd

3rd

“Running Man”

“Gakkeum” (가끔)

by Eddie Kim (G12), Sean Hong (G10),

by Christine Choe (G11)

Elliot Kim (G10), Jae Kim (G10),

and Yeakyoung Lee (G11)

“Can’t Help Falling in Love with You, Thinking Out Loud”

and Kevin Kim (G12)

by Donna Kim (G10) and Richard Jo (G10)

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An Ending, a Beginning

The graduated students celebrate by tossing their caps in the air at the end of the June 4 ceremony.

I

t was a time to look back and remember. And it was a time to look forward. But, mostly, it was a chance to celebrate a pivotal point in the lives of the students in the APIS Class of 2016. They graduated! Family, friends, and fellow students gathered at the school June 4 to see awards distributed, take hundreds of photos, hear speeches, watch a student-produced video, see parents and teachers honored and thanked, and applaud as 33 seniors each walked across the stage and accepted a diploma. Director Dr. Euysung Kim welcomed students and guests and noted that this commencement season was special for APIS because members of the school’s first graduating class were on schedule to graduate from college this spring. He told a story about Sunna Mo (Class of 2012), who is graduating from college this year. Her story of working in a company in Japan demonstrated that our graduates are already accomplishing great things, bridging the gap between the East and the West. Encouraging the soon-to-be graduates to endeavor to do the same, he said, “You are an important part of the APIS legacy.” “I look forward to hearing many more APIS stories in which you are the star.” In the commencement address, Scott Paulin, deputy head of academics, advised the seniors to consider what is most important in life as they prepare to move out into the wider world. “How will you choose to live your life?” he asked. He urged them to focus on the most important things. “Don’t spend your life on things that just don’t matter,” he said. “Love God. Love others … That’s how you get an ‘A’ in life.” David Jinsoo Lee is valedictorian for the Class of 2016, and Jeho Hahm is salutatorian. Jeho, an APIS student since the school opened in 2007, recalled in his speech how as a fourth grader he had been excited about coming to a school where there wasn’t homework in the summer and where they would wear uniforms “just like Harry Potter.” He reviewed how the school had changed since then, remembering when the soccer field was a dirt field and how the school’s fifth floor seemed to be built directly over them as students attended classes. Jeho noted that

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High School Graduation as a new entity, APIS had defied the law of the conservation of matter. APIS was created. It was something from nothing. He encouraged his fellow graduates to do the same as they move on in their lives — be creative, make something from nothing. David talked about his memories of high school and notable classes. He thanked teachers, as well as his parents and his sister (Jennifer Lee, Class of 2015). He said he regretted the ending that graduation represents, calling it “bittersweet.” But he encouraged his fellow graduates to look forward and consider how they will approach the years to come. “We will each leave our mark on the world,” he said. “I urge you all to make your mark count.”

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What to Know Before You Go?

D

uring the last weeks of school, faculty were keenly aware that their time with the Class of 2016 was coming to an end. For this edition’s Faculty Forum, we gave teachers the chance to squeeze in their last bits of advice to the seniors about how to approach college and, for those who are attending university abroad, how to navigate culture shock and living away from Korea.

My advice is to immediately get involved with some volunteering, usually most beneficially in a position related to your field. By doing this, not only will it make your courses more meaningful and applicable, but you will be building a resume that demonstrates reality, developing skills that are useful in your present and future, and may change the entire direction of your professional life in a way that makes your life radically more meaningful and fulfilling.

- Don Kirkwood, computer science teacher

Get to know classmates and professors. Many of the research and scholarship opportunities I had in college were because of my relationships with professors, and it is so beneficial to study in groups. Even if you do not need extra help, visit your professor’s office hours and introduce yourself! - Carly Shinners, mathematics teacher

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Irish playwright George Bernard Shaw said “Life isn't about finding yourself. Life is about creating yourself.” You seniors are about to leave much of what you have known for the past 18 years. My advice is to create the beginning of a life that you will enjoy living and that will bring a positive impact to the world. If all that you create is 16-hour study days, hanging out with people the same as yourself, and never thinking of or acting for others, then you have failed. Go out and win some small victory for humanity. Also, learn to do your own laundry and cleaning before you leave home.

Find a grounding hobby, something to do outside of class that allows you time to recharge. Go to a yoga class, join a pottery co-op, or check out a local art museum. These are all excellent ways to release stress and make new friends.

- Meg Pendleton, art teacher

- Derek O’Malley, social studies teacher An important part of transitioning to a new place is leaving well. Leaving your school, home, and friends well involves having said goodbye and mending any problems that you had with these relationships as best you can. Also, take time to acknowledge individuals and places important to you; thank people and spend time at favorite places. Think realistically about where you are going and acknowledge that even in exciting new places there will be challenges. When you arrive in a new place, take care of your physical and mental health. Healthy eating, rest, and exercise is important, as well as making new friends. Forgive yourself and others when you make mistakes; some of these can be because of the new culture of a place. Get involved in groups and clubs at your college; connections outside of class help you balance your life. Last of all, take time to stop, breathe, and reflect on things you are grateful for.

- Jodi Nielsen, K-12 counselor


College is such a fun experience! Be careful to make good friends and good choices. Enjoy your freedom, but continue to study and do your best. Keep your eyes on Jesus and spend time reading the Bible and praying. Relax and enjoy the next stage of your life. It will take time to adjust to a new country and culture but over time you will begin to feel comfortable. - Kim House, second grade teacher

I went to a huge university and two things my dorm director always told me were, first, to keep my door open. People like to stop by and say hi. It's a great way to make friends! Second, become friends with someone who's nothing like you. They're the ones who tend to stick around.

- Jillian Iwanuk, literacy specialist

1) Try new things! One of the best parts of college comes from the opportunity to try activities, join clubs, and meet people that come from different walks of life than you. 2) Get to know your professors! If you have a question about a paper or an assignment, make an appointment and see your professors during office hours. They really want to help you! Plus, these are the people who will help you get scholarships, write letters of recommendation, get you into classes you need, or help during emergencies. 3) Ask for help! Figure out where the campus Writing Center is and make [an appointment] for your first paper. Make sure your writing is up to the standard that the campus expects and/or the professor. If you are struggling with a class, request a tutor right away.

- Sarah McRoberts, ELA teacher

Here is my advice: EAT NEW STUFF! TRY DIFFERENT FOODS!

- Megan Vosk, ELA/social studies teacher

Decide who you want to be. Then seek out mentors who exemplify who you want to be.

- Jeff Underhill, fifth grade teacher

Visit your professors during their office hours. Ask them questions, show them your work, and ask for feedback!

- Carly Althauser, ELA/social studies teacher

Remember that college isn't just about learning from textbooks — it's about learning how to cooperate with your classmates, who may or may not be your age (just like future coworkers), about learning how to communicate effectively with your professors (and, thus, future bosses), about problem solving, about self-reliance, about learning to balance your life on your own for the first time. Most importantly, it is about learning your own strengths and weaknesses and starting to discover who you really are and what you want out of this life. When adults reflect on what they learned in college, the conversation rarely involves what grades they received or what papers they wrote, but rather what LIFE SKILLS they picked up. Don't forget that! And have fun! - Courtney Murfield, ELA/social studies teacher

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Take some habits and hobbies with you, and don't be afraid to ask for help. If you play basketball now for stress relief, keep that up in college. If you play in band now for fun, keep that up in college! Every university has ways to participate in low-pressure ways, and keeping that consistent will help you to feel more like yourself. If you don't feel like you can handle something, ask for help. Every university has counseling centers and student support services to help you handle the stress of this major transition. I guess overall, I'd say go to class — there's this rumor that college professors don't take attendance but that definitely wasn't true in ANY of my undergraduate classes — so wake up and go to class! - Emmalee Johnson, orchestra teacher

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Marking Milestones KINDERGARTEN Teacher Landy Hwang began the kindergarten moving-up ceremony on June 7 with a message for her class. “Kindergarteners, you are one special group.” She thanked them for being so excited about learning during the past school year. Those students then had the chance to show how special they are as they sang and performed movements to two songs for the other elementary school students who attended the event, along with parents and friends who filled the CLC. Guests watched a slideshow made up of photos from the kindergarteners’ year. Principal Bruce Knox offered remarks about how kindergarten is foundational to the rest of a student’s learning. Director Dr. Euysung Kim presented awards. And then each kindergartener who is moving up to first grade next year received an APIS teddy bear and a certificate. Photo op!

GRADE 5 The fifth-graders at APIS shared some of their thoughts about school, friendship, and the past school year as well as their musical talents during the class’ moving-up ceremony June 7 in the auditorium. Director Dr. Euysung Kim described the students’ presentations and performances as “just incredible,” and he remarked on the energy and confidence of the students in the class. Principal Bruce Knox discussed the value of noting life transitions in his speech to the fifth graders, as they prepare to start middle school this fall. The ceremony included awards, thank-yous to special faculty and parents, a video of the students’ year, and prayer, all of which was followed up by an impressive reception put together by the parents in the CLC.

GRADE 8 APIS eighth graders filed into the gym June 8 with graduation gowns on, but no caps yet, in the student-run middle school graduation ceremony. In their speeches, students noted the work ahead of them and particularly the looming SATS, ACTS, and AP tests. During the ceremony, the students thanked their teachers, parents, and peers for helping them get to this point in their education. Mei-Mei Timpson (Grade 8) led the group in a prayer where she asked God to keep the rising ninth graders “motivated in their studies through high school.” The event featured a video of advice to the students, as well as a video of candid shots of the students’ school life. “Here we are, standing at the threshold of high school,” said Clara Park (Grade 8) in her closing remarks for the middle school graduation ceremony on June 8. “I know we are ready.”

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Field Trip: Future Career?

Snap

Peyton Webster (Grade 2) and Syl Sackett (Grade 2) participate in a chocolate making demonstration during the K/G2 field trip to Kidzannia May 19.

Shots Seniors: Clapped Out! APIS honors the departing seniors with a clap out Thursday afternoon. The entire school lines the stairwell and applauds the members of the Class of 2016 as they finish their rehearsal for graduation that Saturday.

30 Hour Famine: Hungry to Help Thirteen middle school students, led by 19 high school leaders, participate in this year’s 30-Hour Famine, held May 20 and 21 at APIS. Jeho Hahm (Grade 12), center, who served as the main high school leader, confers with Chaplain Zach Luginbill during the event.

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MS presentation: Getting Green in Grade 8 Students in Megan Vosk’s social studies class present their projects on environmental issues like air and water pollution and climate change as students from other grades, teachers, and parents listen and then provide feedback on the presentation May 31.

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THANK YOU ! APIS PARENTS

T

he APIS Update staff asked teachers to send in thank-yous to parents who helped out in extra special ways during the second semester of the school year. The responses flooded in. A hearty thank-you goes out to all these parents mentioned below and to the many others who helped also!

an, G4 (G2 Gilli rn e K y d g an an ) for bein ou to M m y o m k n ’s a e h T ter ell ne Webs G6 Gabri li d ro n a a C , r; e Grac d teache haperparent an om) for c d m e ’s lv n o e v ll d in u class; an and G5 C in n g to in y e lp P e (G2 and h Suh’s field trips 6 Justin G n o d g n a in t n o oes (G2 Ellio at she d im K th a rk ir o M w Ms. anizing ome. r the org feel welc mom) fo le lsen p o e p -Jodi Nie king a m r fo and

Ms. A t of tw suko Sh ima o 11 , sixth th g rad mother grad e r s an er hum d an w , is hea ven- a out. ho a sent She lway dr s he wife lps to th ove me and e bir 3:30 my th c a.m e n . son so th ter a coul a t t my d co worl new me i d. O nto n to is al this p of way t s h posi a how t , s tive ever and he ythi asks ng i s go ing. -Der ek O ’Mal ley

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No amount of "thank s" can show our appr eciation to the P TO for pro viding d i nner for all of our s t u d ents and teac hers inv o l v ed in Ar As the s ts Nigh tudents t. have bee the even n r e fl ecting o ing, one n of the p ments fr ositive om many c o m of them food to is, "Hav start th ing e evening energy t gave me o perfor t he m well." tom of O From the UR heart b ots, "Than k you!"

Ms. Yo Pres u Jung K iden t), M im (G11 Ms. s. E Hyu un M Louis K n So Ms. oo’ i Kim o n Miny L (G11 s mom/P oung ee (G11 Ms. TO Pau Su Se Paik (G11 ngjae P l H. Lee mom ong Hy ), ar eo ), Sha nnon k’s mom mom Ms. You n Park ) , ng H ), Y ( ee J G11 Mic i’s mom PTO Ms. Con ung ), helle nie L Vice (G11 e Pres woo Sara Suh’s iden e (G8 P Suz h t), M hilip uki’s Han s. Ei Yoon Pak’s mom (G8 k ’s m oS /PTO Ella (G8 Kim’ Ann Trea uzuki (G om/ s a s 8 Ja mom ury), F (G5 eJaco rankl’s Ms. mom ), Ms. S b, G J i sook ung 8 Ja ), Ms y, an I d G1 . Myoun m Kwon g He 0 Se an H e Le e ong’ - Me s mo linda m) Bau m, M eg P endl eton


Thank You! APIS Parents

Thank

you to all the ents wh paro prepa red the and PT food O for th eir fina suppor ncial t for th is year ’s Pacific Penc il publ ishing event. -Anna

Sea

In seventh grade, Ms. Yi Hyun L Jung's moth ee (Bryan er) frequen tl y helped/co in meaning ntributed ful ways to the seventh dle school e grade/midvents. -Brett Askin

as

Grade 1 would like to thank Ms. Kyung Hee Song (Yin Choi's mom). She worked hard as a class parent this year. She prepared and handed out snacks during the Pacific Pencil event. She prepared all the snacks for classroom publishing parties. When I needed to ask parents to organize things, I contacted Yin's mom and she arranged things with other parents. -Soo Lee

Arithalie a N . s M mom han's t E , e m adn ur roo and o been t, has n e r. r a p is yea ng th d i z a a in te am coord s uding l a c h s, in She t n e v g Up, ny e Movin , l so ma i c n tions. c Pe lebra e c Pacifi y l onth and m ill nderh -Jeff U

arese p ma h t o you t hool dra hank sc t stuy a high o s ring e t p h s t e k e i g h I'd l or helpin ady for t e f r s t t ge en ts. tment ne-ac mom) depar rected o im’s K a n i d hang Li dent(G12 . Jumi C m i K Helen m and Ms eeun h a H . k Ha ts) rts Ms aihar m’s paren cRobe h M C h . a h r M Ha -Sar Jeho (G12

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I want to thank Ab igail (K5) Mazalu's and Nic mom, M ole (G1) s . Mi Kyo (K5) and ung Ha; Joshua (G Janice 2) Oh's Jeong Lim mom, M ; Arianna s. Se(K4) and Kim's mo Samanth m, Ms. H a (G4) yeYoung and supp Kwon; fo orting ou r helping r class th roughout the year! -Landy H wang w w w. a p i s . o r g

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Librarian's Pick: Books for Your Sunny Summer Season

S

ummer is a perfect time to enjoy the sun and beach, travel, and relax, all with a good book in your hand! Here are some books that include ways to enjoy the season. Also, APIS has more than 1,000 new ebooks available now. Check out one for the summer break!

A Couple of Boys Have the Best Week Ever

L E V E L: K - G2

This book starts with a story of two boys, James and Eamon, who are staying with Eamon’s grandparents so they can attend a nature day-camp together. But, instead of enjoying nature, the boys have computer-game marathons; create tents from their mattresses; and enjoy other kinds of indoor fun, ignoring the great outdoors. The book features funny text and comic illustrations, with speech balloons, for example, that describe James as "very sad" when his mother drives away, while a cartoon shows him brightly waving “Bye!” All of these funny descriptions allow the reader to get the boys’-eye view of "the best week ever.” This intergenerational story ends, however, with the boys ultimately discovering the fun of nature and the outdoors.

Lawn Boy

L E V E L: G4 - G7

Every Day

L E V E L: G9 - U P

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By Marla Frazee

By Gary Paulsen The author of three Newbery Honor titles, Gary Paulsen presents in this book the summer vacation story of a 12-year-old boy. This boy receives an unexpected birthday present from his grandmother — his late grandfather's riding lawn mower. Since the boy has little to do over the summer, he starts mowing lawns to earn a few bucks, just for fun. Unexpectedly, with the help of Arnold, a home-based stockbroker who becomes his business manager, the lawn business grows. This lawn boy ends up with a partner, 15 employees, and money invested in the market. Lessons about economics are a natural part of this young adult story.

By David Levithan How would you feel if you woke up every morning in a different body, with a different personality, and a different life? This is real for 16-year-old A, who experiences a new beginning every day of his life, waking every morning and having to adjust to different characteristics, family, school, and friends. He has his own guidelines to survive this unusual life. It was all fine until A wakes up in the body of Justin and meets Justin’s girlfriend, Rhiannon. After that, every day A is in love with the same girl, Rhiannon. Levithan's book questions identity, love, and relationships.

ww ww w.. aa pp ii ss..oorrgg w EDITORIAL TEAM: ■ Euysung Kim Director ■ Nicole Suh Art & Design Editor ■ Josephine Shim Communications & PR Team Leader ■ Susan Craton Writing / Editing Staff ■ Caroline Webster Writing / Editing Staff

Issue 41 APIS Online Update May/June 2016  

Issue 41 APIS Online Update May/June 2016

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