Page 1

official publication of junior league of charleston, inc.

volume 3 number 3

Once known for having the highest number of children living in poverty, one North Charleston neighborhood is changing directions thanks to Metanoia.

Catalyst Local classroom volunteers promote independence by teaching financial responsibility in the Junior Achievement programs

Goodwill Alcoa has a strong presence in aluminum‌and education in the Lowcountry

12

Change from Within

Pay It Forward Reading, writing and the power to be me. Award-winning after school program focuses on social and emotional education

Motivated Local reading incentive program encourages students by utilizing registered therapy dogs


CAUSE volume 3, number 3

from the president

Dear Friends,

Letters to the president about this issue of Cause are both accepted and encouraged. If you would like to write the president about this publication or its contents, feel free to submit letters, Attn: Cause Letter to the President, by email to causeeditor@jlcharleston.org or by mail to 51 Folly Road, Charleston, SC 29407.

The Holidays are upon us and, with them, comes another opportunity to remember those in our community who may not be so fortunate as to celebrate hearth and home. Although this issue of CAUSE is dedicated to those working to empower students with the ability, resources, and drive necessary to succeed in education and later in life, the effects of poverty and homelessness upon a child’s ability to function at his or her full potential cannot be ignored. The membership of the Junior League of Charleston recently had the opportunity to meet at the Lowcountry Food Bank Charleston Distribution Center and to hear Executive Director Jermaine Husser speak about the impact that feeding a hungry child can have on educational outcomes. To me, the impact of hunger on a child’s ability to concentrate and learn seems obvious; how can a little one possibly focus when there has been no recent meal, or perhaps, no roof over his head? Still, the immediate impact that proper nutrition has on a hungry child’s ability to learn and achieve made an impression on us all. Without a doubt, hunger and inadequate nutrition affect cognitive and psychosocial development, but I was surprised to learn how significant and immediate the effects of improved diet on behavior, concentration, cognitive ability, and the immune system can be. The elimination of food insecurity for a child rapidly results in dramatically improved test scores, fewer disciplinary problems, and decreased absenteeism. Thankfully, the programs recognized in this issue provide the resources necessary to help children succeed in school and in life - - with documented results. So, please join me in thanking of all of those in our community who work to enrich the lives of students in the Lowcountry – whether it be through mentoring, tutoring, teaching financial literacy, building communities, reading with a furry friend, or making sure that children don’t go to school hungry.

51 Folly Road, Charleston, SC 29407 Stephanie McDonald, JLC President Liane Ziel, JLC President Elect Cause editors: Selena Kaufman, Co-Editor Kelly Nix, Co-Editor Heather Crosby-Bedenbaugh, Assistant Editor Cause Committee: Courtney Barber, Rebecca Gass Mary Hightower, Emily Holland Margaret McCall, Lisa Marie Rehm Christy Reid, Meredith Siemens Ann Ward, Mary Willing Catherine Yaw Cause Editorial Board: Emily Abedon, Charleston Magazine, Contributor Leigh Yarbrough, JLC Community Project Development Richard Hendry, Coastal Community Foundation, Vice President of Programs Kristin Cummings, JLC Director of Marketing Chris Kerrigan, Trident United Way, President Allison Leggett, JLC Former President Kitty Robinson, JLC Former President and Historic Charleston Foundation, Executive Director Colleen Troy, Touchpoint Communications Shelley Grant Julian, JLC Former President A very special thanks to Jennifer Rader

Publishing & Design by:

I hope that you all have a wonderful Holiday Season.

Sincerely, Parkshore Centre 1 Poston Road, Suite 190 Charleston, SC 29407 843-747-0025

Stephanie Pendarvis McDonald President Junior League of Charleston, Inc.

Richard Barry, President Sis Reda, Director of Marketing & Business Development Bob Durand, Senior Art Director Maggie Barry, Financial Services Director For information on advertising opportunities please call Richard Barry at 843-746-2246

Editorial Mission: In carrying out its mission to promote voluntarism and to serve as a catalyst for positive change, the Junior League of Charleston, Inc., is pleased to offer this comprehensive view of our community’s needs, organizations working to meet those needs, businesses and individuals supporting charitable endeavors and opportunities for area residents to get involved and to maximize their volunteer experience.

CAUSE

official publication of junior league of charleston, inc.

Copyright 2010 by the Junior League of Charleston, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without the express written permission of the Junior League of Charleston, Inc.


official publication of junior league of charleston, inc.

volume 3 number 3

10

18

Change from Within

Feeding Young Minds

b y A n n W ard a n d C h r i s t y R e i d

b y M o ll i e W i ll i n g

Metanoia is helping residents of a North Charleston neighborhood help themselves through education, home building and repair, and economic development.

Lowcountry Food Bank and BackPack Buddies nourish Charleston’s youth.

Depart men t s

2

Letter from the Junior League President

6

Cause for Celebration

6

Catalyst - Junior Achievement of Coastal South

14

encourages students by utilizing registered therapy dogs b y c at h er i n e yaw

16

Carolina ignites the entrepreneurial spirit of lowcountry students while helping young business minds grow

Goodwill - The Mt. Holly division of global aluminum

8

22

school enrichment program takes children to new heights with its proven social and emotional education focus

Groundwork - A strong foundation to build on... 

producer Alcoa keeps a charitable eye on the Lowcountry

Experts in our community discuss the importance of literacy

by He athe r Cr osby-Be denb augh and Marg aret Mc Call

b y m olli e w ill i n g , c hri s ty re id , an d m er e di t h h . s i e m e n s

26

CAUSE

Pay It Forward - The one of a kind WINGS after b y m er e di t h h . s i e m e n s

by he athe r c r osby-be denb augh



Motivated - Local reading incentive program

official publication of junior league of charleston, inc.

Engage - Calendar of Events


Picture by Jim Franco, Southern Living Magazine

have you tried?

Benne Brittle 2 cups granulated sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 cups parches benne seed Melt the sugar in a heavy frying pan or saucepan over a low heat, stirring constantly. When sugar is melted, remove from stove and add benne seed and vanilla quickly. Pour into a well-buttered pan to about ¼ inch depth. Mark into squares while warm and break along lines when cold.

Featured in Charleston Receipts

See the Inside Back Cover to learn more about our fabulous cookbooks!

Please recycle this publication

Spicy Pickled Shrimp 2 pounds shrimp Bay leaves 6 small white onions 1 cup olive oil ¼ cup tarragon vinegar 2 teaspoons salt ½ teaspoon dry mustard 1 teaspoon sugar 1 teaspoon Worchestershire sauce Cayenne Handful of pickling spices

ns? QueCsonttiaoct

rg leston.o r a h c jl office@ .763.5284 or 843

In a crock, put a layer of boiled shrimp, a layer of bay leaves (about 5 to a layer) and a layer of very thin sliced onions. Alternate until all shrimp are used. Make a French dressing of the other ingredients and pour over shrimp, etc. Cover and put in refrigerator for 24 hours, stirring occasionally. Serve with toothpicks in a bowl over ice for a cocktail party or as a salad with lettuce.

Featured in Charleston Receipts

volume 3 number 3

CAUSE




cause for celebration

1

1. East Cooper Community Outreach Hurricane Party September 24, 2010 at the Omar Shrine Temple. From l-r Rose Stewart, Holly Wheeler, Peg Clarkson Photo courtesy of Dreams to Blessing Photography

3

2

5

4

2. East Cooper Community Outreach Hurricane Party September 24, 2010 at the Omar Shrine Temple From (l-r) Joan Welch, Anna Hage, ECCO board member Dick Query, ECCO board member Giff Daughtridge, Lisa Daughtridge. Photo courtesy of Dreams to Blessing Photography 3. Make-A-Wish Foundation, Waves & Wishes 5k Run/ Walk September 25, 2010 on Folly Beach. Runner Jean Carrasquillo and her birds Boomer and Jax. Photo courtesy of Douglas Carr Cunningham Photography 4. Team Roper St. Francis for the Start Lowcountry Heart Walk benefitting the American Heart Association September 25, 2010.

6

7

5. Caroline Redmond from Atlantic Bank and Trust, along with students from Memminger Elementary School enjoy field day May 28, 2010 at the school. 6. Volunteers from The Bank of South Carolina came to Clark Academy to help with renovations to front yard and green house for the Day of Caring September 14, 2010 (l-r) Stacy Arnett, Susan West, and Becky Crane 7. Volunteers from Atlantic Bank and Trust participated in field day at Memminger Elementary School. (l-r) Matt Templeton, Brianne Halpin, Caroline Redmond, Doug Deloache, Dean Lang, & Devon Ormson. 8. Volunteers from The Bank of South Carolina came to Clark Academy to help with renovations to front yard and green house for the Day of Caring September 14, 2010 (l-r) Chase Talbert and Stacy Arnett

8

9

11

12

9. Clark Academy had a Renovation Celebration on September 22, 2010. (l-r) Dana Mong, Communities In Schools (CIS) Program Director, Jane Riley, CIS Executive Director, Jack Mitchell, AT&T Regional Director and CIS Board of Directors, Rich Farrell, CIS Board of Directors President, Doug Gepford, CCSD Chief Academic Officer 10. Clark Academy had a Renovation Celebration on September 22, 2010. (l-r) Communities in Schools Support Specialists Derrick Toth and Miriam Bond 11. Brian Turner from The Bank of South Carolina came out September 14, 2010 for Day of Caring at Clark Academy 12. American Heart Association Lowcountry Heart Ball was held at Charleston Place February 20, 2010. (l-r) Brett McKee and Dr. Eric Powers- Heart Ball co-chairs



CAUSE

official publication of junior league of charleston, inc.

10


13. Starting line for Make-A-Wish Foundations Waves and Wishes 5K Run/Walk September 25 at Folly Beach. 14. Patrons in attendance at the Lowcountry Heart Association’s Heart Ball February 22 at Charleston Place. 15. East Cooper Community Outreach’s Hurricane Party September 24 at the Omar Shrine Temple. Dianne Schuler- Chair of the Hurricane Party, and Geoff Schuler

13

14

15

16. Courting Kids program participants and instructors pose with (l-r) Delores Jackson, Courting Kids Program Coordinator, Peggy Bohne, City of Charleston Tennis Manager, Joseph P. Riley, Jr., City of Charleston Mayor, Bob Moran, Family Circle Cup General Manager, Steve Hall, Dunlop Spots Marketing Director, Eleanor Adams, Family Circle Cup Tournament Manager, Rob Eppelsheimer, Family Circle Tennis Center Facility Manager to announce partnership with group September 18, 2010. Photo courtesy of Mike Saia 17. Lowcountry Heart Association’s Heart Walk Little Hearts Kings and Queens September 25, 2010. l-r Sarah Mei Horton, Nasir Montgomery, and Isabelle Horton 18. Adrian Wewers, Graham Parrish, Frank Lucas and Duane Parrish participated in Junior Achievement’s Golf Classic May 25, 2010 at Bulls Bay Golf Club 19. Jessica Bradley, race coordinator, and Dylan Gardner, a past wish kid, at the Make-A-Wish Foundation, Waves & Wishes 5K Run/Walk September 25 at Folly Beach Photo courtesy of Douglas Carr Cunningham Photography

17

16 19

20. Group shot of participants at Liberty Square in the American Heart Association’s Start Lowcountry Heart Walk September 25, 2010 21. Participants in the Daniel Island Race for the Cure October 16, 2010 22. New Channel 4 personality and emcee Tom Crawford during the live auction for the American Heart Association Heart Ball February 20, 2010 at Charleston Place 23. Attendees at the Heart Ball February 20 at Charleston Place Hotel. (l-r) Phil Padgett, Allison Dunn, Kenneth Nix, Kelly Nix, John Edens, Haynes Johnson, Gail Johnson, Ken Tibets

21

If you would like to submit a photograph to CAUSE, please email your high-resolution image with caption to causeeditor@jlcharleston.org with the subject “PHOTO.”

18

20 22

23 Please recycle this publication

volume 3 number 3

CAUSE




catalyst

Junior Achievement: teaching students how to mind their own business b y H e a t h e r Cr o s b y - B e d e n b a u g h

I

“The future of our country depends upon making every individual fully realize the obligations and responsibilities belonging to citizenship. Habits are formed in youth . . . what we need in this country now . . . is to teach the growing generations to realize that thrift and economy, coupled with industry, are as necessary now as they were in past generations.” Theodore Newton Vail (1845-1920), president of AT&T and Junior Achievement co-founder

For more information on volunteer opportunities please visit  www.jacoastalsc.org



CAUSE

magine your second grader announcing that in school today she learned how to operate a doughnut factory, your eighth grader balancing a budget better than you, or your eleventh grader understanding the concept of macro and micro economics without running scared from the room. On a simple level, this is what Junior Achievement ( JA) does. On a much broader scale, Junior Achievement is that and so much more. In a nutshell, Junior Achievement of Coastal South Carolina’s purpose is to educate and inspire youth to value free enterprise, business, and economics in order to improve their lives and to succeed in a global economy. The programs presented in a classroom setting foster financial responsibility, workforce preparation, and entrepreneurship, while focusing on the importance of education. Junior Achievement provides to kindergarten through twelfth grade students programs that are hands-on, age-appropriate, and that meet the South Carolina Standards of Education. Since 1966, more than 150,000 students in coastal South Carolina have been inspired by thousands of

official publication of junior league of charleston, inc.

Junior Achievement classroom volunteers committing tens of thousands of volunteer hours to educate students on what it takes to succeed in business. Junior Achievement of Coastal South Carolina works in nine counties (Beaufort, Berkeley, Charleston, Colleton, Dorchester, Georgetown, Hampton, Horry, and Jasper), has a home base in Charleston, and has distinguished itself as one of the premier non-profits in the tri-county area. Junior Achievement strives to empower participating students with the tools to become financially responsible and independent young adults in our community. Most parents assume that students are being taught these essentials in school, but due to budget cuts within the school system, they are not. This is where Junior Achievement steps in, providing both public and private schools the opportunity to run JA programs at no cost to them. Chad Vail, the president

of Junior Achievement and a relative of Theodore Vail, has hit the ground running since taking over the helm of the non-profit in April. Vail’s background is entrepreneurial, having developed, operated, and ultimately sold a retail concept called The Pretzel Twister. Through owning and running this business, he realized the need for economic education and financial literacy training; his business background has been essential to turning around the economic non-profit As he explained, “It was the experience in


staffing those establishments that fostered my passion for teaching students the value of early financial literacy and an entrepreneurial mindset to maximize their employability, and their life-long earning potential.” As with most non-profits, Junior Achievement isn’t immune to the challenges that today’s economy has bestowed upon business. Through a dedicated board of directors, corporate and

sells itself. He goes on to state that “no one disputes the JA message and what we do; the challenge is getting the volunteer into the classroom. If you interact with the child, you will make a difference”. He isn’t just the president; he is also a volunteer, having just taught his first class this Spring. Stepping into the kindergarten class and seeing the wonderment in their eyes, he immediately realized the impact a person can make and

few. Workforce preparation helps employer and employee alike while benefiting the local community. Research shows that as little as ten hours of personal financial education positively affects students’ spending and saving habits. Junior Achievement program materials, delivered by an outside volunteer, can make a significant impact. JA board member and class volunteer Dee Davidson has been influencing students’ lives

dealing with from day-to-day in regards to finances and careers.” What motivates him to continue volunteering is that “aha” moment when children start envisioning what they might want to be when they grow up, and the possibility of that student becoming an entrepreneur in the future gives him great satisfaction in what he does. Junior Achievement Worldwide, with headquarters in Colorado Springs, has

“No one disputes the JA message and what we do; the challenge is getting the volunteer into the classroom. If you interact with the child, you will make a difference.” – Chad Vail

individual supporters, grants, and fundraisers such as Bowling for Kids and the JA Nigel Cooper Golf Tournament, it is able to keep providing and sustaining programs in such schools as Daniel Island Academy, Hanahan Elementary, and the Garrett Academy of Technology. Chad sees Charleston as “a philanthropic community. Charleston is a giving community. Education and financial literacy are two very challenging issues that people think about.” Once the message of what JA is about comes across, the program

Please recycle this publication

the impression that can be left on a child. The material and format for the class is so well done that it is able to be modified for special needs children so that all participate. Chad knew the JA programs were good, but “was blown away” by the magic that occurred in the classroom and the amazement on the students’ faces when presented with the materials. Financial responsibility is paramount to the success of any local economy. It affects every segment--home ownership, business ownership, and the local tax base, to name a

for over 16 years. After being approached by a co-worker from Alcoa to teach a class, Dee stated that once he stepped into the classroom he was hooked. The lessons and teaching that JA brings to the classroom are skills and fundamentals that can be used their entire life. Dee remarked that he “loved going into a classroom and watching the kids get excited about learning financial literacy. You can tell when a child gets it, and they start to put together what you are teaching and what they and their families are

been in operation since 1919, and has routinely presented materials that are synonymous with quality. JA is the world’s largest organization dedicated to preparing young people for the real world by showing them how to generate wealth and effectively manage it, how to create jobs that make their communities more robust, and how to apply entrepreneurial thinking to the workplace. Throughout JA’s sequential and integrated kindergarten through twelfth grade programs, students continued on page 25 >>

volume 3 number 3

CAUSE




goodwill

Alcoa Mt. Holly: Global Production, Local Commitment b y H e a t h e r Cr o s b y - B e d e n b a u g h a n d Mar g ar e t M c Call

A

Alcoa President and Plant Manager Mark Dunlay, John Autrey, and Trident Technical College President Mary Thornley pose with two apprentices in the Trident Technical College skills lab. The apprentice program allows students to gain valuable on-the-job experience at Alcoa while attending technical classes at Trident.



CAUSE

lcoa has a world wide presence as one of the leading producers of recyclable aluminum. What many people do not know about is the organization’s equally farreaching charitable presence. Over the past four to five years, the Alcoa Foundation has given over a million dollars to organizations including the United Way, Nature Conservancy, South Carolina Waterfowl Association, Junior Achievement, and Trident Technical College. Alcoa Mt.

official publication of junior league of charleston, inc.

Holly’s grants are certainly diverse, and its contributions to education in particular are manifold. Alcoa Mt. Holly has helped shape many students into what it calls “industrial athletes.” When high school students are not drawn to the idea of a fouryear degree, dropping out may seem like the only option. With Alcoa Mt. Holly’s aid, they can see their needs in the broader world and understand their options with respect to the pursuit of a technical degree. As President and Plant Manager Mark Dunlay explained, “It’s a worldwide competitive playing field and to win, we need to have industrial athletes. We need the aptitude, the attitude, and the team skills to solve problems fast, stay educated, and stay fit for life.” High school students realize that even if a four-year degree is not right for them, there are other exciting options. Through Trident Technical College, Alcoa Mt. Holly set up an apprenticeship program that allows students to go to school for a technical degree and work a full-time job at Alcoa. The position uses skills similar to those learned in class and allows students to gain on-the-job experience for Alcoa

or elsewhere. The program goes even futher - - offering tutoring services for any students looking for extra help outside the classroom. Each student apprentice also has a mentor in his or her department who provides guidance throughout the program. This mentor is well-trained in the area and knows what to expect from the job. For many young people, this is their first experience with earning a living. The apprenticeship also offers money management guidance so that students can grasp how to regulate their expenses effectively. While a student in the apprenticeship program is not necessarily guaranteed a position with Alcoa upon graduation, he or she is prepared with skills valuable to prospective employers. Alcoa Mt. Holly has also partnered with Santee Cooper to educate teachers on the kinds of skills employers currently seek. For three weeks, teachers go to Alcoa to learn about the qualities companies are seeking when considering new hires. Educators then return to their classrooms to work with their students on problem-solving, teamwork, and other abilities.


Alcoa Mt. Holly volunteers give their time to the United Way Day of Caring for the Westview Primary, Elementary, and Middle Schools. The group improved the exteriors with weeding and planting, as well as installed new bumpers and benches on the playground.

Awards/Accomplishments over the last few years: NAME (North American Maintenance Excellence) Award in 2007 Silver Crescent Large Manufacturer of the Year Award in 2009.

Building these attributes can help the students become more marketable not just to Alcoa, but to all employers. The Alcoa Foundation helps educate teachers in other capacities as well. This year, the foundation has sent five teachers to the Keystone Institute in Colorado. There, educators attend a week-long program, learning how to make students more aware of environmental issues in their communities. “Rather than having a science curriculum that every teacher in every school teaches across the state, it helps the teachers take local problems in their backyard and present to the students so they’re more aware of them and can help solve those problems,” noted Erin Pabst, Alcoa Mt. Holly’s communications specialist. The teacher selected last year, Alex Davis of Hanahan Middle School, went on to lead students to victory in the national Lexus Eco Challenge. Their project featured oyster shell recycling and reef restoration, the same environmental issue that Alcoa Mt. Holly’s grant assisted the Nature Conservancy with. “It’s really cool how sometimes with the work going into these relationships, we have no idea

Please recycle this publication

they’re all going to weave back in together,” commented Pabst. Environmental education and the Alcoa Foundation have also converged with Lowcountry Earth Force. Teachers and students work on projects to put their classroom learning into action. “It works through schools to basically build environmental stewards of our young people,” said Pabst. “Not just lessons or training. They learn about the environment, and these learnings culminate into projects that are presented to their peers.” The program—available throughout three school districts—puts classroom education into action. At the event in the Spring when the projects are showcased, Alcoa Mt.

Holly employees are on hand as volunteers. Whether speaking at schools, appearing at career fairs, or helping events run smoothly, Alcoa Mt. Holly volunteers are eager to participate. “We don’t have any [incentive program],” explained Lewis Creel, director of human resources. “We don’t have any trouble getting people to volunteer, to talk to schools. The only problem we have is coordinating the effort.” Alcoa Mt. Holly employees have even suggested that their thank-you lunches be canceled, noting that they do not volunteer for the recognition. With all of these details in mind, one thing is clear: a will of aluminum is stronger than one of steel. At the Berkeley Elementary School Energy Jamboree, Alcoa Mt. Holly volunteers educate students on the process and environmental benefits of recycling aluminum.

Environment/Conservation: * Waterfowl Association Corporate Sponsor of the Year * SC DHEC Smart Business Recycling Award * Wildlife at Work Certification Wildlife Habitat Council * Best Industrial Recycling Program SC Chamber of Commerce Safety: * SC Manufacturers Alliance 2008 & 2009 Safety Performance Award Community Outreach: * Callen-Lacey Children’s Shelter Corporate Partner in Excellence * Berkeley County School Board Volunteer Award * Friend of Education Award - SC Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development * “Berkeley’s Best: Corporate Crusader Award” - Berkeley Chamber of Commerce * 1773 Award - Charleston Metro Chamber of Commerce * Junior Achievement Corporate Partner of the Month * 2010 Lamp of Learning Award from Williamsburg County School District

Awarded to Individuals: * Trident United Way Women’s Leadership Council “Behind the Scenes Hero Award” - Yvonne Infinger, Purchasing * Junior Achievement of Coastal SC’s Steve Waggenlander Most Valuable Player Award - Dee Davidson, Carbon Plant * Callen-Lacey Volutneer of the Year - Leonard Lanier, Potline

volume 3 number 3

CAUSE




10

CAUSE

official publication of junior league of charleston, inc.


from Metanoia is changing a once poverty stricken area of North Charleston into a community that is becoming more educated, building quality housing and generating economic development.

When you think of a taking a job, do you picture a cozy cubicle or window office? When Bill Stanfield and his wife, Evelyn Oliveira, took a job with Metanoia, their work space became the ChicoraCherokee neighborhood on the south side of North Charleston. A study had recently shown that the area held the highest

concentration of children living in poverty in the state of South Carolina. So that is where they headed, not just to work, but to live. Both are Doctors of Divinity from Princeton University and now they are part of the culture in Chicora-Cherokee - - they knew they needed to be in order to really make a change.

b y A n n W ard a n d C h r i s t y R e i d

Please recycle this publication

volume 3 number 3

CAUSE

11


F

unded by the Cooperative Baptist Church, Stanfield and Oliveira were hired to explore and start Metanoia together. The name Metanoia simply means “repent,” but on a deeper level, it means making a positive change. The community development corporation was originally funded so that the first year could be spent listening to the community and learning about the community. Stanfield and Oliveira did not jump in and immediately start forming programs, instead, they waited for the community to discover what they needed for themselves. Stanfield says one of the reasons this project has worked so well is because they were able to spend a whole year just hearing the community’s thoughts and concerns. They let the community drive the process and determine the best practices and ways to improve and build. They took an asset versus a needs-based approach based on the findings of John McNight and Jodie Kretzmann - both sociologists from Northwestern University who have studied assets versus needsbased approaches to helping a community. The research has shown that the more needs providers in a neighborhood, like counseling and soup kitchens, the worse off the neighborhood. “It’s putting resources towards the problem, but no resources towards fixing the problem,” says Stanfield. He also believes that a needs-based approach is like “sending you to college, but only for the subject that you are worst in.” Stanfield believes needs organizations are needed in a community, but they do not help build the capacity of a community. “At Metanoia we believe the most effective way to combat problems are through discovering and growing the assets of a community,” says Stanfield. They do not focus on the problem, and look at the glass as half full, not half empty. Today, Metanoia is owned by the community. Of their nine board members, five are from the community. While other groups have asked Metanoia to expand to reach more areas, Stanfield explains that it really has to happen from within the community. The Metanoia team is happy to share their process and model, but believes an internal revolution is key. Educating members of the community has been at the forefront of Metanoia’s process. When Metanoia began, it offered

12

CAUSE

official publication of junior league of charleston, inc.

Vision Statement: Metanoia envisions a diverse community of people that are inspired and empowered to make the community better for generations to come; where home ownership and work are accessible to all; where there are academically achieving schools; where businesses, and churches benefit the community; where the quality of life includes Green Space and recreational opportunities; and where Reynolds Avenue is a hub of community activities. We recognize the current residents of our community are essential to the accomplishment of this vision.

programs for first through fourth grades; the second year it added fifth grade; and now it has grown to include high school students. During the summer, 120 students attended Metanoia’s Freedom School. A literacy-rich program, the Freedom School teaches and shares with students the love for reading. This past year some of the after school students were Junior Counselors at the Freedom School, and received a small stipend - a valuable lesson and opportunity for the counselors and the neighborhood. During the school year, around 60 children attend the after school program. The staff at Metanoia

keeps track of students progress, grades and school reports. Metanoia also offers programs that focus on leadership development for elementary through high school students. “Metanoia has so many expectations for me as a leader,” says student Dashia Drayton. “I cannot help but be that leader that they see in me.” The focus of the leadership development programs is to help the students realize character, excellence, and presence. “Leaders possess all of these qualities, and it is important for these kids to realize their own potential and step up to the challenges of working on these qualities,” says Stanfield. Students are recommended for the program by their teachers. The kids have to show leadership potential, whether it is leadership in a good way or even in a bad way. The program helps all students use their natural leadership skills for good. One student, Alexi, was accustomed to being labeled a rebel by kindergarten. However, through the Young Leaders Program at Metanoia she has shed that title. Instead of fighting in the classroom, she now wants to be a lawyer so she can fight for others in a courtroom. Lexi wants to “inspire Latinos and Americans to get a good education, good job, and make their dreams come true.” Parent participation is required in order for a student to remain in the program. While this requirement is sometimes challenging, Metanoia parents are becoming much more active in the community. Since Metanoia’s inception, parents together boast over 2,000 service hours. And when Chicora Elementary almost closed a few years ago, the parents rallied together to keep it open. Yvette Davis signed up her first grader for an after school program at Metanoia, and it has changed both of their lives. She sees a difference in her son - he became more patient, opened up and showed leadership potential. She also sees a difference in herself. She’s on the Parent Dream Team, a group of highly involved parents at Metanoia. “Now that I am more active as a parent, I like helping the program and being more involved in my son’s life,” shares Davis. For older students, Metanoia offers a financial literacy class and a 3 week Biz Camp, where students learn how to


Studies show that students who do not read in the summer months lose about 1/3 of their previous grade level’s learning.  Here, students in Metanoia’s Freedom School observe a “DEAR (Drop Everything And Read)” time each day.  Metanoia’s Freedom School teaches a love of reading to 120 students daily for six weeks during the summer months.

develop business plans. They have entrepreneurial programs, and the students actually run a jewelry and screen printing business. Over the summer, students were offered the opportunity to learn about investing as Metanoia’s Civic Leaders. Along with financial literacy, Metanoia has an agreement with the students that for every dollar they save, Metanoia will match their savings up to $1,000 for college. “It’s all about building assets, even with the students,” says Stanfield. Metanoia is not just about giving kids good care for two hours after school. It is about giving them good and meaningful care. It also expands to caring about the home they live in, the neighborhood they live in and the jobs they will hold one day.

Through a partnership with Verdi Architecture, Metanoia teaches Green Building Techniques to HUB Academy students and Civic Justice Corps participants. As a result, residents are more skilled as they apply and enter local jobs. Metanoia also began a farmers market - the only one in the Charleston area that allows comprehensive use of food assistance programs in market purchases. Through a grant, Metanoia is able to provide culinary training for local residents through the Lowcountry Food Bank. Affordable, quality housing is available to more residents through Metanoia’s financial literacy classes, home ownership counseling, the building of new homes and ownership occupied repair.

Metanoia is looking forward to 2012 when it will celebrate its first graduating class and ten-year anniversary. “This really is an organic process,” adds Stanfield. “There is no finish line, and we will keep growing [Metanoia] and growing opportunities.” The long-term goal is to change the view that it is a failure to return to Chicora. Metanoia wants people to feel like it is a success to stay; its function is not to create amazing and efficacious leaders and send them elsewhere. They need them in Chicora. They are building up a community, raising up a new generation of leaders, making the southern portion of North Charleston stronger and growing its capacity.

For more information on Metanoia, visit their website www.pushingforward.org or call 843-529-3014.

Please recycle this publication

volume 3 number 3

CAUSE

13


motivated

Sit. Listen. Good Dog.

By Ca t h e r i n e Y aw

I

Students are encouraged and excited by the presence of the dogs at Roscoe Reading quarterly events. Their motivation has led to the involvement of over 1,300 students in 2005 to over 2,700 students in 2010.

14

CAUSE

t began with a kiss, like all good stories do; only this kiss wasn’t from a frog or a prince on horseback. This “prince,” per se, was of the four-legged, furry variety. He went by the name of Roscoe Shine and, with one slobbery kiss in 2002, the wrinkly bloodhound with the velvet ears entered the lives of twenty-five fourth graders as the ultimate teaching tool.

official publication of junior league of charleston, inc.

“Several years ago, I began bringing Roscoe, a trained search and rescue dog, into area schools to teach about safety,” said Marietta Hicks, founder of the Roscoe Reading Program, a 501(c)(3) organization. “In a roundabout way, he also taught about reading and writing. When the students asked their teacher to kiss Roscoe, I didn’t think much about it. Then came the challenge. Only when the students met their reader goals would she kiss Roscoe. That’s where the program and my passion began.” The Roscoe Reading Program is an incentive program for students in grades two through five across the Berkeley Country School District. Now in its ninth year, the program has expanded its initiative across twelve different schools within the district and involves over 2,700 students. In five years, the program has more than doubled in size and broadened its outreach to include two new schools, Cane Bay and Westview Elementary, with the start of the new school year this past August. The program improves children’s reading and communication skills by employing a powerful method:

reading encouraged by a dog. But not just any dog. Roscoe Reading Program dogs are registered therapy dogs that volunteer with their owners/ handlers as a team and go to schools as reading motivators for children. As of this school year, over twenty dogs of all breeds and sizes, including a Labrador retriever, chihuahuas, and greyhounds, travel from school to school as part of the program. Apart from encouragement of the furry persuasion, the program also utilizes stickers, pencils, and ice cream parties to encourage participation and development of a life-long love for reading. Rewards are offered by the program once every nine weeks at each school. Dependent upon grade level, students must read enough books to earn a set amount of Accelerated Reader (AR) points to reach the first level prize—an invitation to the Roscoe Reading Program ice cream party. “The first level goal is simple; we set the children up for success. Not only do the students have to read the books, but they have to prove through the Accelerated Reader tests that they comprehend the books they’ve


Taz is one of twenty-one dogs in the program that travel from school to school in Berkeley County and serve as encouragement for the students.

Commercial

Residential

Locally owned and operated by the Rama family Since 1978

Serving Coastal South Carolina & The Midlands Sonitrol Security Systems 4455 Tile Drive, Charleston, SC 29405 read. It’s a win-win all around. We know that once they attend their first party, they will want to make it to the next party, so they read as much as they can. It’s like an exclusive club that all of the students want to take part in,” said Hicks. Students who make it to the party are treated to sugar-free, low-fat Breyers ice cream with dog-bone-shaped sprinkles. Those who have gone above and beyond the minimum requirements are invited to “shop” for additional prizes with their points. Last year alone, the students purchased nearly 18,000 books with the points they earned. As a RRP student once remarked, “AR Points are kind of a big deal.” “It’s absolutely amazing the number of books these children will read for something as small as a pencil or as big as a bicycle. I can’t believe we were able to give away over one hundred bikes last year,” said Chastity Allen, a Roscoe volunteer and mother of a student in the program.

Please recycle this publication

Allen, a mother of three, credits the program for the remarkable improvement it has made in the life of her daughter. In 2006, Allen and her family adopted Belle, a retired racing greyhound and current Roscoe Reading Program dog. “Even though Belle was retired from racing, technically she never did race. She was considered too ‘slow’ and small for racing. Much like Belle, our daughter has never been what others consider ‘normal,’ Allen explained. “She was diagnosed with a severe case of ADHD and doctors, too, labeled her ‘slow’ like Belle. She has difficulty remembering things she’s read and the older she’s become, the more other children have noticed. Kids can be cruel, especially when a child is different.” Doctors recommended that Allen’s daughter read aloud to others, but her shyness interfered. Instead, she read to Belle, who loved the attention and loves children even more.

“When children in her class found out she lived with Belle, their school’s RRP ambassador, life was a little easier for her. For once, she was accepted by the ‘normal’ kids and has picked up a love of reading. While being ‘slow’ might not be a good thing in most families, it’s truly cherished and perfectly normal in ours!” said Allen. While the Roscoe program encourages volunteers--most of whom are over sixty years old--it is most in need of new and gently-used books, as well as donations of any kind, including prizes, bicycles, and monetary donations. “We strive to go above and beyond 501(c)(3) requirements. This program is for the children, and we want to make sure we’re spending our money the best way possible so that we remain financially solvent,” Hicks explained. “We always

wish we could do more, so we greatly appreciate any and all donations we can get.” While the program took a huge leap of faith this past year by adding two new schools to its broadened outreach, Hicks and the Roscoe Program Board of Directors are certain that the success will continue whenever they visit a school and see the enthusiasm in the children’s eyes. This is one program of “tail-wagging” success, all pun intended.

Contact information: Roscoe Reading Program Post Office Box 2095 Moncks Corner, SC 29461 marietta@homesc.com (843) 830-4703

volume 3 number 3

CAUSE

15


pay it forward

Enrichment Paying it Forward After the Bell Rings Meredith H. Siemens

W The WINGS Creed I soar with WINGS. Let me tell you why. I learn lots of skills that help me reach the sky. I love and accept who I am on the inside and know my emotions are nothing to hide Life’s full of surprises that make me feel different ways. If I can control myself, I will have much better days. I understand the choices I make should be what’s best for me to do, and what happens is on me and not any of you. I understand others are unique. I want to learn more about everyone I meet. I want to step into their shoes and see what they are going through. I am a friend. I support and trust. Working together is a must. Kind and caring I will be. I listen to you. You listen to me. I soar with WINGS. I just told you why. All of these things are why I fly high. · To hear the children recite this impactful creed visit www.wingsforkids.org/creed

16

CAUSE

hat is it like to have all of the riches? Prosperity isn’t found in monetary compensation or worldly things, but in the philosophy of the Golden Rule. “Treat others as you would like to be treated.” Self-worth and self control are two things that you can take with you wherever you go, and WINGS for Kids is taking children to new heights with its proven social and emotional education program. The organization’s creed says it all, but the proud strong voices of the smallest in the nest reciting the WINGS creed on its website show the determination of everyone involved in nurturing these children into loving, caring and well-adjusted young people. In 1996, Ginny Deerin, a Charleston marketing and fundraising guru, created WINGS for Kids. The resultsdriven, educational organization is designed to instill missing life lessons in children. Deerin understood that while the lessons learned within books and the hours of a school day are undeniably valuable, even with the best instruction, the development of social and emotional intelligence often takes a backseat.

official publication of junior league of charleston, inc.

Children who grow up in impoverished homes are less likely to receive a focus on the simple lessons of behaving well, making good decisions, and building healthy relationships–crucial lessons that help kids stay in school and out of trouble. As Deerin explains, “WINGS works by weaving comprehensive social and emotional education into an innovative and entertaining after school program.” In the “Stories” section of the website, one student recalls a changing point in the sixth grade when he continued his upward climb instead of being pulled down by peer pressure. Young Richard White found himself with a group of friends

who snuck to the bathroom between classes to smoke cigarettes. He made the brave decision to walk out of the bathroom and away from the bad influence. “I learned at WINGS to think a lot more about the consequences of doing bad things instead of just going along,” Richard said. Busy minds and bodies of school-age children often hear life lessons go in one ear and out the other throughout their jam-packed days. What makes these lessons stick with the WINGS participants is that unlike many other after school programs, WINGS is held Monday through Friday for three hours a day to ensure that tangible results and


For those seeking volunteer opportunities, there is an array of options for becoming involved with the WINGS program. They range from tutoring (a required minimum commitment of two hours each month throughout the school year) to purchasing novelty items that students can buy from the WINGMart store using the points they earn.

1VO`ZSab]\Wa=C@1O[^ca 1VO`ZSab]\Wa=C@1][[c\Wbg

1. High school students and older volunteers are encouraged to try the hands-on role of an individual academic tutor, meeting with students Monday through Thursday for three to six hours a month. 2. Friday afternoons at WINGS are “WildWINGS,� with volunteers needed once or twice a month to help with the many social and emotional learning games offered, including scavenger hunts, theatrical plays, and more. 3. Photo Fanatics are also needed to help two to three times a month with photographing children and creating a bulletin board to highlight their award-winning achievements.

objectives are met. Participants are selected by greatest need, based upon behavior, academics, and family support. They work through the five core learning objectives of the WINGS model: self-management, responsible decision making, social awareness, self-awareness, and relationship skills. Since WINGS’ beginning, nearly 15 years ago, it has grown into a four-school educational program. The programs are held at Memminger Elementary School, Chicora Elementary, North Charleston Elementary and James Simons Elementary Schools. The schools each serve between 100 and 120 students daily and work with kindergarten through sixth-grade students. Many of the participants and leaders find themselves coming back to the nest to continue making a difference. Memminger Elementary School’s new principal, Anthony Dixon, was first introduced to the children of Memminger when he signed on as a WINGS leader in 1999, while attending the College of Charleston. His experiences with the program and the impact it had on the children encouraged him to change his course of going to

Please recycle this publication

law school and choose education as his calling instead. He has truly come full circle. Dixon adds: “I felt compelled to be part of their lives. I could see I was making a difference. It wasn’t instant. But it was in areas of such critical need. To see how the kids responded -- and to have an impact and make them feel safe and motivated -- I found something that I loved doing!� During these tough economic times, one thing that we can continue to provide to children in our community is encouragement. After all, as the WINGS creed states, “Life’s full of surprises that make me feel different ways. If I can control myself, I will have much better days.� We can all take these life lessons with us. As founder Ginny Deerin simply puts it, “If only all kids could get a good social and emotional education, the world would be a much better place.�

For more information about how you can get involved with the WINGS movement visit; www.wingsforkids.org

4]c\RSR'!%1VO`ZSab]\2OgAQV]]Z ]TTS`aSfQSZZS\QSW\SRcQObW]\T]` U`ORSa  &B]ZSO`\[]`S^ZSOaS dWaWb]c`eSPaWbS 1VO`ZSab]\2OgAQV]]Z[OW\bOW\aO \]\RWaQ`W[W\Ob]`gOR[WaaW]\^]ZWQg O\ROR[WbaabcRS\ba]TO\g`OQS`SZWUW]\ Q]Z]`O\R\ObW]\OZ]`SbV\WQ]`WUW\

6&+2/$56+,3 ,17(*5,7< 5(63(&7 5(63216,%,/,7<

eeeQVO`ZSab]\ROgaQV]]Z]`U

Title Sponsor

www.philanthropyweek.org

volume 3 number 3

CAUSE

17


Feeding Young Minds School children receive a hand up from LCFB and the BackPack Buddies Program

By : M o ll i e W i ll i n g


n Saturday mornings, once a month, members of the Junior League of Charleston stand in an airless room at the Lowcountry Food Bank (LCFB). Shoulder to shoulder, like assemblyline workers awaiting the shift bell to sound, seasoned BackPack Buddies volunteers fall in and immediately begin opening boxes and removing shrink wrap from palettes. Novice workers step up to empty spots and for the next few hours, a nose-to-the-grindstone mentality sets in. Backpacks, although in truth donated handled bags, are filled with milk, cereal, fruit cups, canned proteins, and snacks. These food items are provided to roughly 1,200 Charleston-area school children. Nourishment to sustain them throughout the weekend, perhaps as their sole food source, until returning to subsidized school lunches the following Monday. State-wide, hunger acts as a major roadblock for many of our school children. According to the South Carolina Department of Education’s website, enrollment for the 2008-2009 school year stood at 690,434 kindergarten through twelfth-grade students. Of those 690,434 students, 327,718 students - - 47.5% - - were receiving subsidized (meaning free or reduced-cost) lunches. Although the exact effect hunger has on certain school milestones, such as graduation rates, is unknown, hunger’s direct relationship to development is widely established. Hunger impedes a child’s ability to problem solve and retain information, resulting in lower test scores, slower grade advancement, and poor self-esteem. Equally, as with psychological development, children suffering from hunger have a slower rate of psychosocial development, causing difficulties in forging and maintaining positive relationships, particularly with peers, which may result in greater absenteeism or truancy. In a recent study by the Gerda and Kurt Klein Foundation, researchers connected links in nutrition to brain development. The study found that undernutrition, as well as other

Please recycle this publication

volume 3 number 3

CAUSE

19


Hunger impedes a childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to problem solve and retain information, resulting in lower test scores, slower grade advancement, and poor self-esteem.

20

CAUSE

official publication of junior league of charleston, inc.


factors associated with children stricken by poverty, may permanently hinder brain development. “The longer a child’s nutritional, emotional, and educational needs go unmet, the greater the likelihood of impairment to the brain.” Often, although established with sincere intent to meet the needs of these children, school meal programs are only capable of battling the hunger and learning issue during school hours. During non-school hours, many children go without. LCFB Volunteer Coordinator, Mary Kate McLernon, underscores the state of affairs succinctly, “Households with problems feeding their families throughout the week don’t suddenly have food over the weekend.” Fortunately, LCFB is constantly evolving, introducing new programs, and strengthening its efforts. New and forward-thinking programs are underway and the need for volunteers is ever present. McLernon noted, “We always have a need for groups and individuals to help us go through the multitude of items that are donated to the Food Bank...That includes but is not limited to our food-sorting process to help us go through the more than 17 million pounds of food that is scheduled to pass though our doors this year.” Founded in 1983, the LCFB began servicing low-income populations from a 10,000 square-foot, rented building in Ladson, South Carolina. Today, the LCFB operates from the 65,000 square-foot Paul Hulsey Community Food and Nutrition Center in North Charleston, South Carolina, with regional food centers in Yemassee and Myrtle Beach. BackPack Buddies, a school-based program, is active in eight of the ten counties that comprise the LCFB service area. LCFB Programs Manager, Deb Loesel, explains,

“Currently the LCFB, with support provided in part by Community Partners such as the Junior League, administers 45 BackPack Buddies programs; 56% of the participating schools and 61% of our buddies are in Charleston’s Tri-county area.” Although a large number of children in need reside in Charleston and the surrounding areas, the issue of hunger and how it affects learning is not isolated to our region. Other LCFB volunteer opportunities include the Urban Garden, the Production Kitchen, and, of course, traditional food drives. The Urban Garden is located on the premises and is currently gearing up for the Fall planting season. Volunteer hours for the Urban Garden are weekly, Monday through Friday, as well as the first and third Saturdays of the month. The Production Kitchen is equally in need of volunteers primarily to service the LCFB’s Kid’s Café Programs. This program, launched in 2000, is an afterschool program that provides low-income students with hot, healthy meals and academic assistance. The LCFB currently operates 15 Kids Cafe sites, and plans to provide more than 160,000 hot, nutritious meals in 2010. As always, a traditional food drive is a welcome act of philanthropic contribution as well as a great activity for a larger group of volunteers. Volunteer Coordinator Mary Kate McLernon will happily provide any food drive enthusiasts with the LCFB’s children’s hunger programs wish list. All LCFB volunteers, whether individual or group, must attend an orientation. Orientations are conveniently held twice per month. For orientation dates and times, please visit www.lowcountryfoodbank.org or telephone (843) 747-8146 ext. 120.

Volunteer times for the Urban Garden; Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.; 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. First and third Saturday each month, 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Volunteer times for the Production Kitchen Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.; 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Please recycle this publication

volume 3 number 3

CAUSE

21


groundwork

Ask the Experts

By : M o ll i e W i ll i n g , C h r i s t y R e i d , a n d M e r e d i t h S i e m e n s

I

lliteracy is an ugly word. What would the world be like if you did not know how to read? As readers, it’s a difficult notion to entertain. Your ability to read enables you to perform day-to-day tasks without stopping to think about them, reading food labels, checking the paper for movie times, helping your child with his or her homework. It’s easy to allow illiteracy to fall off your radar. However, in our tri-county communities it has been reported that sixty thousand adults are high school dropouts and twenty thousand have less than a ninth grade education. These two statistics undoubtedly affect the well being of our society, but the personal impact is greater than perhaps realized. In the simplest terms, it is estimated that the average taxpayer pays hundreds of thousands of dollars over the life of each dropout. In this article, Cause Magazine asked Pam Cadden, children’s services coordinator for Charleston County Public Libraries, and Eileen Cepentik of Trident Literacy Association to address this issue. Both were asked a simple list of general questions. Their

22

CAUSE

official publication of junior league of charleston, inc.

responses were chosen as they offer two views on the importance of literacy, the child’s and the adult’s. Additionally, Richard Hendry of the Coastal Community Foundation supplied us with a list of multiple educational organizations.

Question I: What educational issues do you feel most affect the Lowcountry? Pam Cadden, CCPL: Learning to read and write is essential to success. Children who are proficient readers are usually the most successful learners. From my perspective, we as a community need to work even harder towards getting all young children on board with their early literacy (or preliteracy) skills. Here at the library we follow closely to the mandates of Every Child Ready to Read put forth by the American Library Association. There are six early literacy skills each child must obtain before they actually become literate. They are: Vocabulary (words), Print Awareness (using books), Print Motivation

(loving books), Narrative skills (storytelling), Phonological Awareness (sounds), and Letter Knowledge (ABCs). These skills are incorporated into every program that we offer. Eileen Cepentik, TLA: Trident Literacy focuses on adults, ages seventeen and up, who do not have a high school credential. People with low literacy skills are not qualified for jobs. They cannot complete a job application or take a driver’s license test. Illiteracy is directly linked to greater welfare dependency, increased health care costs, and higher incarceration rates. Illiteracy is the root cause of poverty. If we cure this tragic curse, most, if not all, of its accompanying social ills will be ameliorated.

Question II: Tell me about the program(s) your organization offers. Pam Cadden, CCPL: CCPL has always had three traditional age-appropriate storytimes: Wee Reads (ages zero to twenty-four months, with caregiver) is designed to introduce babies to books and


language. These storytimes can include finger plays, rhymes, music, and toy sharing in a gentle social setting. Time for Twos (ages twenty-four to thirty-six months, with caregiver) lets toddlers enjoy a variety of picture books, flannel board fun, sing-a-longs, poetry, and simple movement activities that encourage emerging language skills. Preschool Storytime (ages three to six years, with caregiver) allows children to be exposed to books, stories, poetry, music, crafts, and additional activities ideal for reinforcing early literacy skills. We also provide family storytimes, summer reading programs, school age programming, craft programs, after school programs, book clubs, puppet shows, storytelling, tours of the library, special school/group visits by appointment, books-to-go, outreach services to area schools, head starts and daycares, and outreach programs at area festivals and literary celebrations.

Please recycle this publication

Eileen Cepentik, TLA: Trident Literacy works with adults one-on-one or in small groups to reverse the generational cycle of illiteracy. The curriculum is self-paced and individualized so students progress at their own pace and are not pressured to keep up, as in the traditional classroom setting. We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have classes in the traditional sense. We are flexible so students set their own attendance times. We are open day and evening and even have free babysitting at some sites. Our five dollar monthly fee is affordable and waived when necessary.

Question III: Anything in particular you would like people to know about your organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission or services? Pam Cadden, CCPL: In order to strengthen our commitment to instilling pre-literacy skills, in December 2010, we are debuting a brand new set of programs aimed at helping parents and caregivers. Every

branch in the system that is open on a Saturday will now have programs for children on that day. One Saturday out of every month will have a program directed towards dads. Every branch that is open in the evenings will have at least one program for children on a weeknight. With these alternative times, we are hoping to attract audiences that may not have been able to come to the library before. Eileen Cepentik, TLA: It is important to focus on adults because parents, especially mothers, are childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first teachers. When the mothers

volume 3 number 3

CAUSE

23


have low literacy skills, so will their children. They will be the ninth graders who read at a fourth grade level - that the Post and Courier has written about - and will likely drop out of school just like their parents did, be unemployed, dependent on welfare, and likely to end up in jail, thus perpetuating the tragic cycle. Research confirms that when low-income women increase their literacy skills, and subsequently their incomes, they use their new earnings to improve the education, health, and nutrition of their families. As recently recommended by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, in order to address the poor literacy skills of our schoolchildren, we must “enable parents and families to play their indispensable roles as co-producers of good outcomes for their children.” This includes improving the literacy skills of those parents who need it, so that they can instill a love of learning in their children and help them succeed in school. Trident Literacy is the only agency in the tri-county that provides the kind of one-on-one training, education, and support these deserving individuals need to improve their literacy skills—so they can improve their lives, their futures, and the lives of their children.

Question IV: Are there volunteer opportunities available? Pam Cadden, CCPL: Absolutely! There would be some training involved depending on what is being asked for at the time, but we have opportunities for day care visitors, book shelvers, craft assistance, and all kinds of program assistance.

24

CAUSE

People interested in volunteering need to call our training coordinator, Susan Bednar at 805-6826 or email her at bednars@ccpl.org. Eileen Cepentik, TLA: Individuals can make a very significant difference by volunteering to tutor. One or two hours a week can help so much. Many of our tutors have been with us for years. They come for as little as one or two hours a week to as much as ten or more hours a week. Some come for a morning or afternoon. Any amount of time is welcome. Students and tutors often develop a strong bond that greatly contributes to their success. The mentoring relationship helps build the students’ self-esteem as well.

Educational Organizations offering services and/or looking for volunteers: Addlestone Hebrew Academy: For-profit, early childhood program that focuses on producing thinking, caring, and self-confident children. Focuses on balancing students’ academic, social, emotional, and spiritual needs. www.addleston.org Berekely County Kids Who Care: KWC was founded in the 1991-1992 school year to work with middle school students in Berkeley County, South Carolina. After a few years, the focus was shifted to work with elementary children to try to reach children when they are most receptive. www.bckwc.org Charleston Book Buddies: This volunteer tutoring effort, run by Charleston Volunteers for Literacy, serves James Simons, Mary Ford, Mitchell,

official publication of junior league of charleston, inc.

Burns, and Memminger elementary schools. Each tutor works with the same child each week in a one-on-one tutoring session. Each child is tutored for 45 minutes, twice a week, and tutors may sign up for once or twice per week. For more information, or to volunteer, please visit www.charlestonliteracy.org. Chucktown Squash: Chucktown Squash provides year-round services to its young student participants. These programs promote academic and personal development as well as an active and healthy lifestyle. www.chucktownsquash.org First Steps: Each of the state’s forty-six counties has formed a legislatively-designed partnership board, including parents of young children, and representatives of the business, faith, education, health, and non-profit communities. Each county offers different First Steps programs and services, depending on the needs of that county. First Steps funds are used to improve the quality of child care, expand early education programs, provide access to health services and offer family support. www.charlestonfirststeps.org Learning RX: For-profit, educational learning center that helps children with learning disorders re-focus. www.learningrx.com Meeting Street Academy: This non-profit, is a new school that has been created with the goal of providing a college preparatory educational program for approximately two hundred children whose families would not otherwise be able to afford a private school education. The school primarily serves the

neighborhood located in the upper peninsula of Charleston, South Carolina. www.meetingstreetacademy.org Pattison’s Academy: Yearround academics integrated with pediatric therapy and rehabilitation. www.pattisonsacademy.org SideWalk Chalk: Connects caring, creative members of the community with underresourced schools and students by implementing programs designed to unleash creativity, improve writing skills, raise test scores, increase graduation rates, and promote overall well-being among students in the Charleston County education system. WINGS for Kids: WINGS is an education program that teaches kids how to behave well, make good decisions, and build healthy relationships. The organization weaves a comprehensive social and emotional learning curriculum into a fresh and fun after school program. Kids get the life lessons they need to succeed and be happy and they get a safe place to call home after school. www.wingsforkids.org Young Ladies/Leaders Conquering Obstacles: The organization provides programs for youth, ages eleven to eighteen, that will enhance their SPACE (social/spiritual, physical, academic, character, and emotional) development. It offers an array of programs during monthly meetings to address the needs of participants. Through one-toone mentoring sessions and group activities, participants increase their knowledge and understanding of everyday issues. www.ylco.org


CATALYST: Junior Achievement: teaching students how to mind their own business continued from page 7

use information, apply basic skills, think critically, and solve complex problems. The use of role models from the community is an added bonus as they offer students inspiration, enthusiasm, knowledge, and life experience, along with further enhancing the teaching of economics to support reading, writing, and math concepts being taught in the classroom. The volunteer time is relatively small in comparison to what is given back to the student. Most JA programs are comprised of six thirty-minute lessons, and all of the materials are provided to the school. The Elementary School Program includes seven themes for kindergarten through fifth grade. The themes extend from â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ourselvesâ&#x20AC;? for kindergartners to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our Nationâ&#x20AC;? for the fifth grade curriculum. The programs illustrate how people assume roles as individuals, workers, and consumers in an expanding environment. The Middle Grades Program is for grades six through eight. It promotes three central themes: the economics of households, the economics of businesses, and the economics of the world marketplace. There is a particular emphasis on staying in school, including an examination of the personal and social impact of not completing a high school education. The High School Program focuses on workforce readiness. It prepares young people for their future roles, whether on the job or in continuing their education. Activities are geared toward real-world training through a series of programs that help students develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to become productive citizens and workers. As a volunteer,

Please recycle this publication

you could be helping a third grader plan a city or a ninth grader prepare for the workplace through mock interviews, as well as augmenting lessons presented by the teacher. One of the impressive aspects of JA is the unique methodology used to teach students about economics, entrepreneurship, and free enterprise. Volunteers from the business community teach the lessons to students, and infuse real-life experience into the message put forth by JA. What makes it memorable is that the lessons are very similar to what the students are taught in school because all programs are based on the South Carolina Standards of Education. What is paramount is the interaction with someone who isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t their teacher reinforcing and enhancing what the school is trying to present. Both Chad and Dee agree that the exhilarating part of Junior Achievement is seeing students learn. Chad states that â&#x20AC;&#x153;JA empowers students to reach beyond what is in front of their faces and to fulfill their potential,â&#x20AC;? as well as helping â&#x20AC;&#x153;unlock the future of every student.â&#x20AC;? Dee enjoys making a difference in the life of a child, and loves â&#x20AC;&#x153;how they cheer every time â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Mr. Deeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; walks into the classroom. How cool is it to have kids cheer about learning!â&#x20AC;? According to Mr. Vail, the proof is in the sustainability of JA empowering students to financially succeed in a global market, and the take-away from Junior Achievement is that the American dream is still alive and well. Since 1966, Junior Achievement of Coastal South Carolina has been teaching students how to mind their own business!

THIS YEAR, CELEBRATE A SOUTHERN CLASSIC.

&HOHEUDWLQJ  \HDUV LQ SULQW WKH-XQLRU/HDJXHRI&KDUOHVWRQ·V &KDUOHVWRQ 5HFHLSWV LV D VWDSOH RI 6RXWKHUQ FXLVLQH 7R RUGHU FDOO  RU YLVLW XV DW &22.,1*,17+(6287+&20

757 A Long Point Rd. Mt. Pleasant, SC 843-971-6221 www.smilesbydrrandy.com

Dr. Randy and his daughter, Callie

volume 3 number 3

CAUSE

25


engage

Calendar of Events january 2011

Jan 15, 2011

January 16-19, 2011

Resolution Run-Walk For Rides

College of Charleston Foundation and Trident Literacy Association-Wild Dunes Club Author’s Luncheon

Chamber Music Charleston Presents House Concerts: Music for Double Reeds and Harpsichord

10:00 AM

11am

Start the New Year with a Run or Walk to benefit the Independent Transportation Network-CharlestonTrident, providing dignified transportation to seniors and the visually impaired in the lowcountry. Food, medals, prizes and music by The Folly Dogs Band. Special prizes for the top individual and team fund raisers. See organization’s website for information on team registration. 100% of proceeds benefit ITNCharlestonTrident, a 501 (c) 3 funded partner with the Trident United Way.

Enjoy a plated gourmet lunch and panel discussion with notable authors Diane Chamberlain, Tamar Myers, Ann Ross, Jeffrey Stepakoff and guest moderator Mary Alice Monroe. The luncheon also features a silent auction and book signing.

Chamber Music Charleston is a non profit performing arts organization dedicated to developing the audience for classical music through chamber music concerts and educational performances of high artistic quality by musicians of the Lowcountry. Building upon the time honored tradition of presenting small scale concerts in front of a gathering of friends, Chamber Music Charleston utilizes the talents of this city’s finest professional musicians to perform masterworks of the chamber music repertoire in some of Charleston’s most beautiful and historic settings.

January 8, 2011

Benefits: Independent Transportation Network-CharlestonTrident

Location: Joe Riley Stadium 360 Fishburne Street : Certified 5 K course begins at Joe Riley Stadium, winds around Hampton Park, The Citadel parade grounds and back to Joe Riley Stadium.

Cost: please check website for information on registration

Contact: http://resolutionrunwalkforrides.org/

Benefits: The Wild Dunes Club Scholarship for a College of Charleston teacher education student and Trident Literacy Association.

Location: The Sweetgrass Pavilion at Wild Dunes Resort

Contact: Amy Sottile Stevens, clubline@ wilddunes.com or 843-886-2020

Benefits: Chamber Music Charleston Location: Downtown Charleston, Daniel Island and Kiawah Island

Cost: Tickets: $30. Advance purchase required. House Concerts traditionally sell out weeks before the performance date.

Contact: 843-763-4941 or www.chambermusiccharleston.org

LOOK WHO’S CELEBRATING From Garden Festivals to Galas – Where will CAUSE find YOU? To see more images of the Lowcountry community celebrating a cause, check out the CAUSE for Celebration section on pages 6-7. If you would like to submit a photograph to CAUSE, please e-mail your high-resolution image with caption to causeeditor@jlcharleston.org with the subject “PHOTO.”  

To find out about upcoming local fundraisers and events with a cause, check out the Engage section on pages 26-29. If you would like to submit a calendar entry to CAUSE, please e-mail your information to causeeditor@jlcharleston.org with the subject “EVENT.”

26

CAUSE

official publication of junior league of charleston, inc.


January 31, 2011

Lowcountry Oyster Festival

2nd Annual ITN Oyster Roast

11:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Gates Open at 10:30 A.M.

Please plan to join ITNCharlestonTrident’s member riders, volunteers, friends and staff for the 2nd Annual “Shucking for Seniors” Oyster Roast. Last year’s “Shucking for Seniors” was a sell-out so don’t miss out on the fun.

Imagine.....65,000 pounds of oysters. Two tractor-trailers full of oysters will roll onto the grounds at Boone Hall Plantation to kick off the Lowcountry Oyster Festival. This event has been named in the “top 20 events in the southeast” by the Southeastern Tourism Society. Held by the Greater Charleston Restaurant Association, the “Oyster Fest” gates open with free parking available. In addition to plenty of oysters, other food will be available. The “Food Court” features food from some of the area’s popular restaurants, enough to satisfy every taste. Activities on the main stage include: the “Oyster Shucking Contest”, the “Oyster Eating Contest” and local live entertainment. A favorite to watch or participate in! Also, the winner of the “Oyster Recipe Contest” will be announced and the kids will love the “Children’s Area” designed to keep them happy and having fun. Oysters are sold by the bucket (approximately 3-4 dozen) for market value and served with cocktail sauce and crackers. You can BYO knife and glove or you can purchase them at the event. Beer, soft drinks and other beverages will be sold.

Benefits: The Ronald McDonald House, Hollings Cancer Center, Travel Council and Charleston County Science Materials Resource Center.

Cost: contact for information on ticket prices Location: Boone Hall Plantation Mt. Pleasant

Contact: Kathy Britzius at (843) 577-4030

Benefits: ITN Charleston Trident Location: Folly Beach Crab Shack Cost: call for ticket price Contact: 843-225-2715

february 2011 February 19 MESSA 8k for H2O 9:00 AM The Ninth Annual Master of Environmental Studies Student Association (MESSA) 8K for H2O is an 8K Run to promote improved water quality in the Charleston area. Proceeds from this race will be donated to a local non-profit organization promoting water quality. The course is USA T & F certified. Top overall M/F winners will be awarded. Age group awards to top M/F in each division, 17 and under, 18-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, 40-44, 45-49, 50-54, 55-59, 60-69, 70+. Food and beverages provided for all registered participants. Race packets and T-shirts may be picked up on Race Day starting at 7:45 am at the registration tables located near the Folly Fishing Pier on Center Street. If no shirt size was marked, a large will be given. Race Day registration will be held at 8 a.m. Silent Auction will be held near registration table for duration of the event.

5,000 copies are printed each issue.

1,100 are mailed directly to League Members.

3,900 are mailed to the area’s largest charitable contributors, local elected officials, and targeted business and community leaders.

12

PAGE

NONPROFITS CONNECT IN TIMES TIMES WHEN WHEN MONEY MONEY IS IS TIGHT TIGHT IN AND CHATTER CHATTER IS IS PLENTIFUL, PLENTIFUL, AND FOCUSED EFFORTS EFFORTS ARE ARE BEING BEING FOCUSED LAUNCHED BY BY NONPROFIT NONPROFIT LAUNCHED ORGANIZATIONS VIA VIA ORGANIZATIONS SOCIAL MEDIA MEDIA OUTLETS OUTLETS SOCIAL EVERY SECOND SECOND OF OF EVERY EVERY DAY DAY EVERY

CATALYST Trident Trident United United Way’s Way’s communications communications team team utilizes utilizes new new social social media media outlets outlets to to implement implement an an integrated integrated marketing marketing strategy. strategy.

GOODWILL Palmetto Palmetto Medical Medical Initiative Initiative helps helps South South Carolinians Carolinians change change the the world. world.

PAY IT FORWARD Local Local nonprofit nonprofit organizations organizations have have wish wish lists, lists, too, too, and and you you can can help help fulfill fulfill them. them.

GROUNDWORK Coastal Coastal Community Community Foundation Foundation dives dives into into Web Web 2.0. 2.0. Please Pleaserecycle recyclethis thispublication publication

Primary reader • 30-65 years old • high household income • college educated

Location: Folly Beach Pier All race events

• affluent background

Contact: messa.cofc@gmail.com or call

M EE 22 VV OO LL UU M M BB EE RR 44 NN UU M

Copies are also be available at the Junior League office and select locations around the community.

Benefits: MESSA student organization start and finish in front of the Holiday Inn on Center St. Cost: $20.00 if received before 2/1/2011 $25.00 if received after 2/1/11 Discounts; All current C of C students get $5 off. C of C student organizations with 5 or more participants receive $10 off. Valid ID must be shown for all students when packet is picked up.

OFFICIAL OFFICIAL PUBLICATION PUBLICATION OF OF JUNIOR JUNIOR LEAGUE LEAGUE OF OF CHARLESTON, CHARLESTON, INC. INC.

January 30, 2011

Why YOU should be advertising in CAUSE magazine

To reserve your space contact:

217-412-2942

Sis Reda 843-746-2258 sis@atlanticpublicationgrp.com

Please recycle this publication

volume 3 number 3

CAUSE

27


Calendar of Events continued February 26, 2011

February 26, 2011

March 5

March 24-25, 2011

6th Annual Lifepoint Gift of Life 5k/2k Run/Walk

Chamber Music Charleston Presents “Classical Kids Concert”: History of the Sweetgrass Basket

Chamber Music Charleston Fifth Anniversary Celebration

Fine Arts and Flowers

9:00 AM Our race helps raise awareness about organ and tissue donation as well as about South Carolina’s DONOR REGISTRY. Runners and walkers may participate in either the 5K or the 2K. Those who plan to walk leisurely are asked to register for the 2K. There will also be a transplant recipient division for men and women.

Benefits: Lifepoint Location: James Island County Park 871 Riverland Drive Cost: $25.00 registration fee includes T-shirt, goody bag and park entry fee. LATE registrations will be taken at our LifePoint office (3950 Faber Place Dr. - Suite 300, Charleston, SC 29405) beginning Tuesday, February 23, 2010 @ 9 am through Friday, February 26, 2010 until 5:00 pm. Participants may also register on race day at the park 7:45-8:45 am. ALL LATE REGISTRATIONS WILL BE $30.

Contact: www.lifepoint-sc.org or 843-529-9760

1pm Chamber Music Charleston is a non profit performing arts organization dedicated to developing the audience for classical music through chamber music concerts and educational performances of high artistic quality by musicians of the Lowcountry. Building upon the time honored tradition of presenting small scale concerts in front of a gathering of friends, Chamber Music Charleston utilizes the talents of this city’s finest professional musicians to perform masterworks of the chamber music repertoire in some of Charleston’s most beautiful and historic settings. Join us for Chamber Music Charleston’s award-winning adaptation of Margot Raven’s story about the history of the sweetgrass basket.

Benefits: Chamber Music Charleston Location: Circular Congregational Church 150 Meeting Street

Cost: tickets are $5-10 each Contact: 843-763-4941 or

February 26, 2011

www.ChamberMusicCharleston.org

14th Annual Charleston Heart Ball Art and Wine Auction The American Heart Association Heart Ball showcases artwork from Lowcountry artists along with wines, jewelry, trips and more. This event, hosted in hundreds of cities across the country, is a celebration of the funds that are raised for life-saving medical research and community education programs. This year is set to see significant growth as we continue to promote stroke and heart awareness within the Heart Ball. To support this growth, it is crucial to secure sponsors and auction donors to continue to fund our mission to reduce disability and death from cardiovascular disease and stroke.

Benefits: Charleston chapter of the American Heart Association

Location: TBA Cost: contact below for ticket information Contact: Meredith Jarvis at 843-853-1597 or Meredith.jarvis@ heart.org for more information

march 2011 March 3-6 BB&T Charleston Wine + Food Festival Guests have the opportunity to indulge in the unique flavors of the Lowcountry while enjoying the epicurean delights of the country’s best chefs, authors and wine professionals. Learn about and get a taste of Southern cuisine and the Lowcountry’s unique food styles, heritage and recipes at various events and venues throughout the weekend. Tickets go fast - so get them while they’re hot!

Benefits: The mission of the Charleston Food + Wine Festival, a recognized 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, is to enhance Charleston’s culinary reputation and support important charitable endeavors by focusing national attention on the entertainment, education and gastronomical gratification opportunities presented by world class culinary professionals and wine experts.

Location: TBA Cost: TBA Contact: 843.727.9998 or www.charlestonwineandfood.com

28

CAUSE

official publication of junior league of charleston, inc.

Concert Time TBA Chamber Music Charleston is a non profit performing arts organization dedicated to developing the audience for classical music through chamber music concerts and educational performances of high artistic quality by musicians of the Lowcountry. Building upon the time honored tradition of presenting small scale concerts in front of a gathering of friends, Chamber Music Charleston utilizes the talents of this city’s finest professional musicians to perform masterworks of the chamber music repertoire in some of Charleston’s most beautiful and historic settings. Brahms Piano Quartet in G minor Martinu La Revue de Cuisine Williams Air and Simple Gifts.

Benefit: Chamber Music Charleston Location: Sotille Theatre 44 George Street Cost: various, call for ticket prices Contact: 843-763-4941 or www.ChamberMusicCharleston.org

March 19 Charleston Walk for Water Registration 9am Walk starts 10am The Lowcountry Water Missions is hosting a 3.5 mile walk to promote awareness of the global water crisis while raising funds to provide safe water around the globe.

Benefits: Water Missions Location: Cannon Park- Downtown Charleston

Cost: contact organization for information Contact: Jenny Waller at 843-769-7395 or www.watermissions.org/walk for more information

Times vary The Women’s Council of the Gibbes Museum of Art will present the first annual Fine Art and Flowers, a two-day celebration that pairs timeless art with fresh flowers on Thursday, March 24 and Friday, March 25, 2011. This special event showcases a variety of fresh-cut floral arrangements inspired by and placed alongside paintings and sculpture from the museum’s collection. Thursday night features a soiree where patrons can eat and sip and view the beautiful floral arrangements. The Friday symposium and luncheon features noted speaker, Chris Giftos, former floral director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. All events will take place at the Gibbes. Thursday Night, March 24, 2011, 7:30 p.m. at the Gibbes Museum of Art; Cocktails and hors d’oeuvres in the courtyard under the tent, art and flowers throughout the galleries Friday, March 25, 2011, Luncheon and Lecture: 11:30 a.m. at the Gibbes Museum of Art under the tent in the courtyard. Lovely luncheon followed by floral demonstration and lecture by Chris Giftos. Guests are also free to view the flowers and art in the galleries.

Benefits: the Gibbs Museum Location: Gibbs Museum Cost: Opening party $75, Lunch/Demo $65, Combo tickets $125. Special sponsorship packages are also available.

Contact: Dolly Lipman 843-834-0097 or dollylipman@yahoo.com


A must for every kitchen 19.95

19.95

$

$

When you purchase cookbooks from the Junior League of Charleston, Inc., you not only receive award-winning tried and true recipes, but you support your community. Proceeds from the sale directly benefit the following Junior League of Charleston community service programs: • Lowcountry Food Bank • Back Pack Buddies • Gibbes Museum of Art Community Days • Children’s Museum of the Lowcountry • East Cooper Habitat for Humanity Women and Youth Build and Developing a Community Garden • Kids in the Kitchen • Fields to Families’ Garden Harvesting • Lowcountry Orphan Relief’s Clothing Closet Program

To order, call or click today! 843-763-5284 or www.jlcharleston.org.  Also available in various retail locations throughout the area.

“With Charleston Receipts...I’ve turned out comfort dishes that have never failed.” $

19.95

- Michelle Green, Food & Wine magazine


Non-Profit U.S. Postage

PAID

Charleston, SC Permit No. 852

In Our Next Issue: The Arts

Please recycle this publication


CAUSE_vol.3_no.3  

CAUSE is the periodic magazine of the Junior League of Charleston, Inc., and is published three-four times each year. CAUSE highlights the...

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you