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Aperte Summer 2013

D.I.Y. PEDI

RETRO Fitted This Summer’s

Swimwear

beauty on a budget

Beauty & The Beach

Six Swimsuit Shopping Secrets

Swimsuit Edition

Spotlight: Photographer

Brian Powell AperteMag.com


APERTE Summer 2013 www.AperteMag.com 6.

Retro Fitted

This Summer’s Swimwear Photos by Alex Buntin

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Beauty & the Beach Swimsuit Shopping Tips by Leah Leitch

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Poolside

Hot Summer Styles Photos by Amy Texter

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D.I.Y. Pedi by Leah Leitch

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42.

Spotlight:

Interview with Commercial & Fashion Photographer Brian Powell Photos by Brian Powell

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Melt

A Fashion Editorial

Photos by Azzura Piccardi

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Music & Fashion: The Dane Myers Band

by Brooke Worley On The Cover:

Model: Casey Parmerlee Swimsuit: Collective Hearts Swimwear Sunglasses: Metropolitan Photographer: Alex Buntin AperteMag.com 2 5


Swimsuit: Collective Hearts Swimwear Model: Casey Parmerlee Photographer: Alex Buntin


Swimsuits: Collective Hearts Swimwear Models: Brittany Wadas & Casey Parmerlee Photo: Alex Buntin


Swimsuits: Collective Hearts Swimwear Models: Brittany Wadas & Whitney Janzen Photo: Alex Buntin


Swimsuit: Collective Hearts Swimwear Model: Brittany Wadas Photo: Alex Buntin


Swimsuit: Collective Hearts Swimwear Model: Alyssa Alcordo Photo: Alex Buntin


Swimsuit: Collective Hearts Swimwear Sunglasses: Metropolitan Model: Casey Parmerlee Photo: Alex Buntin


Swimsuit: Collective Hearts Swimwear Model: Nabila Alcordo Photo: Alex Buntin


Swimsuit: Collective Hearts Swimwear Model: Nabila Alcordo Photo: Alex Buntin


Swimsuits: Collective Hearts Swimwear Models: Nabila Alcordo & Alyssa Alcordo Photo: Alex Buntin


Swimsuit: Collective Hearts Swimwear Model: Casey Parmerlee Photo: Alex Buntin


Swimsuit: Collective Hearts Swimwear Model: Whitney Janzen Photo: Alex Buntin


Swimsuit: Collective Hearts Swimwear Model: Brittany Wadas Photo: Alex Buntin


Swimsuit: Tidal Cool Creations Model: Christina Cardoza Photo: Alex Buntin


Swimsuit: Red Dolly Simwear Model: Amy Gee Photo: Alex Buntin


Swimsuit: Tidal Cool Creations Model: Anissa Rachelle Flores Photo: Alex Buntin


Swimsuit: Red Dolly Swimwear Model: Mikayla Dorsey Photo: Alex Buntin


Swimsuit: Red Dolly Simwear Model: Amy Gee Photo: Alex Buntin


Swimsuit: Red Dolly Swimwear Model: Mikayla Dorsey Photo: Alex Buntin


Swimsuit: Tidal Cool Creations Model: Anissa Rachelle Flores Photo: Alex Buntin


Beauty and the Beach by Leah Leitch

For most of us shopping for a bathing suit is akin to paying taxes or getting a root canal. The truth is, it doesn’t have to be that way! Follow these easy tips and you’ll be stepping out onto the sand (or pool deck) in confidence no matter what your size or shape.

2. Know your body. No skipping this step either! Beauty comes in all shapes and sizes and even the seemingly “perfect” among us have things they want to cover up or camouflage. Yes, ladies - even Tyra Banks has complained about cellulite. Do a little research on flattering styles for your body type and don’t settle for less. 3. Focus! Temptations abound at the mall. Walk straight past the cute shorts, sale racks (I can’t believe I said that) and even the coffee shop. You’re on a mission to get yourself the best possible bathing suit for you. Stick to the plan and you can have your nonfat double mocha latte to celebrate when you’re done. 4. Dress to undress. It sounds funny, but you’ll likely try on quite a few suits, so why torture yourself by wearing impractical clothing? Wear clothes you can unbutton or zip off at the front.

© Alex Buntin

1. Shop early. Bathing suits hit the stores early in the season and get picked over very quickly. Waiting too long to shop means you’ll be faced with a less-than-prime selection; narrowing your options. You may have to pay full price, but this is one investment you won’t regret!

5. Feel pretty. Start the day off right by going in feeling good about yourself. Make sure you’ve moisturized your body, shaved, and have a bright pretty color on your toes. Do your hair and makeup. Walk with a spring in your step and tell yourself you WILL find the perfect suit today! 6. Ask for help. Take a trusted friend or relative with you for an objective opinion. This is not the time to go shopping with a gang of friends. In a dedicated swimsuit shop the sales people are usually well informed and can help you zero in on that special suit. There’s nothing like the feeling of finding the perfect one -- bathing suit that is. Armed with these tips you’ll have the confidence to get the job done. Yes, the sand is heating up and the lazy days of summer are upon us. Stock up on sunscreen and get ready to strut your stuff in your well curated swim suit. You look amazing! AperteMag.com 2 33


Bikini: LUX Swim Sunglasses: Vinyl Factory Earrings: H&M Necklace: Stylist’s Own Photographer: Amy Texter www.texterphotography.com Model: Makaha Sugita www.envymodelmanagement.com Wardrobe: Raven Roberts www.ravenroberts.com Makeup & Hair: Sher Vasquez www.shermymakeup.com


Top: Gypsy Junkies Shorts: Gypsy Junkies Swimsuit: Stylist’s Own Necklace: Impressive Swank Earrings: H&M Bracelets: ShopLilyWang.com Hat: Merona Photographer: Amy Texter www.texterphotography.com Model: Makaha Sugita www.envymodelmanagement.com Wardrobe: Raven Roberts www.ravenroberts.com Makeup & Hair: Sher Vasquez www.shermymakeup.com


Top: Gypsy Junkies Shorts: Legacee Denim Earrings: H&M Bikini: Stylist’s Own Necklace: Stylist’s Own Photographer: Amy Texter www.texterphotography.com Model: Makaha Sugita www.envymodelmanagement.com Wardrobe: Raven Roberts www.ravenroberts.com Makeup & Hair: Sher Vasquez www.shermymakeup.com


Dress: Gypsy Junkies Swimsuit: LUX swim Necklace: ShopLilyWang.com Belt: H&M Bow Bracelet: ShopLilyWang.com Purple Bracelet: Impressive Swank Earrings: Stylist’s Own Shoes: Jeffery Campbell Photographer: Amy Texter www.texterphotography.com Model: Makaha Sugita www.envymodelmanagement.com Wardrobe: Raven Roberts www.ravenroberts.com Makeup & Hair: Sher Vasquez www.shermymakeup.com


Tunic: Gypsy Junkies Shorts: Legacee Denim Necklace: ShopLilyWang.com Earrings: ShopLilyWang.com Visor: Xhiliration Shoes: ALDO Photographer: Amy Texter www.texterphotography.com Model: Makaha Sugita www.envymodelmanagement.com Wardrobe: Raven Roberts www.ravenroberts.com Makeup & Hair: Sher Vasquez www.shermymakeup.com


D.I.Y. Pedicure by Leiah Leitch

Our feet deserve a lot of credit. Aside from supporting us all day, we dance, we kick, we squish them into boots, we workout, we sweat……well, you get the idea. Come the lazy flip-flop wearing days of summer, they need and deserve a little TLC. Getting someone to give you a pedicure can be a wonderfully relaxing treat. On the other hand, if you’re pressed for time or don’t have the extra cash you can achieve impressive results at home. Set aside a good half hour of you time, put on your favourite music and follow these easy steps: 1) Remove any polish from your feet and soak in warm water for up to 10 minutes. You can be as indulgent as you’d like with this step. Looking for that true spa experience? Then fresh petals are a must! Epsom salts are relaxing and detoxifying. A few drops of tea tree oil will provide an antibacterial boost. Add your favourite essential oil for an aromatherapy experience you’ll enjoy. 2) Next, you’ll want to exfoliate the dead skin. This may not sound like a fun step but you’ll love how your feet feel afterwards. Use any foot scrub you like and make sure it contains quality moisturizers to keep things soft. Start at your toes and work your 40 AperteMag.com 2

way up to your calves, massaging as you go. Rinse off with warm water. 3) Deal with callouses and rough spots. These need a bit more attention than the basic foot scrub can give them. A pumice stone or foot file will work well. If using a pumice stone add a squirt of body wash to make it easier. Be gentle and pay special attention to your toes, heels and the bottoms of your feet. 4) Trim and file your toenails. Trim nails straight across with good quality nail clippers. Smooth the edges with a nail file. What’s important here is that you go for a slightly rounded edge which can help prevent painful ingrown toenails. 5) Moisturize, moisturize, moisturize! Once again you will begin at your toes and massage the moisturizer all the way up to your calves. 6) Polish. Make sure you’re nails are free of any moisturizer build up. Begin by using foam separators or rolled up paper towels to separate your toes. Apply a base coat and let dry. Choose a bright, fun colour and apply two coats (allow to dry well in between.). Finish off your masterpiece with a clear topcoat to seal the deal! The last step is the most important. Go out and buy yourself the cutest sandals of the season. You’ve gone through all this hard work doing your own pedicure and now it’s time to show it off!


Spotlight: Brian Powell Brian Powell is a successful wedding, portrait, stock, and fashion photographer based in Lafayette, Indiana. Shooting to the top of his industry in Indiana, Brian is a great example of what to do in the beginning of your commercial photography career. We had a few questions for this rising star from the Midwest, and boy did he have some answers:. Here’s the interview: Aperte: How did you get started doing photography? BP: Well it’s a long story, but I actually wasn’t gifted a camera by my grandpa at a young age… like I read in most bios! I went to Kansas for architecture school in 1998 and discovered photography a few years later while I hiked 14ers in Colorado. That spark led me to beg for a seat in Photo 1 (restricted to art majors), which I was able to get in the summer of 2000. The rest – the 13 years since – has been a long but rewarding journey! BP: One of my many mantras has always been ‘if you want your photos to look better, put better-looking things in front of them.’ I am not the only one who has said this. Every great photograph starts with great content. Since that initial attraction, I’ve grown to appreciate it for the lighting and shooting challenges it presents, along with the styling and hard work the designers Aperte: I noticed you recently shot a fashion show for Purdue University. Can you tell me more about that? BP: Most of the fashion I shoot is the Purdue annual show, but I shoot both the runway (two shows that day) and about 150 models on a full isolated set. The rest of the year, I do shoot with a few of the designers on their own shoots -- and I’m currently planning a fashion video for one of the seniors that I’m excited about. Although I use similar styles, I technically haven’t had advertising and editorial clients for fashion. The designers are students in the Apparel Design program, where the seniors are in charge for putting on the show (and designing a full collection of up to 9 pieces or so). This year was my 3rd show to cover, and I always have fun. It’s a super long day.. or week. Thursday and Friday are rehearsals and prep, and then Friday starts at about 5am and ends around 11pm when I get home and back up the photos (a third time). The runway is shot however the runway can be shot, but rules of thumb include: 1: Action-stopping speed of either the shutter speed or the flash duration (if you use lights). 2: Shooting about waist level with the models 3: Getting the moment they’re in midstride, pulling one knee forward. That last one is picky, but hey - I’m picky. They don’t all work out that way. On the set, I love getting some motion captured for pieces that allow it. Otherwise, it’s whatever poses and expressions that go well with the design being photographed. I rely on the designer’s input for that as well. Aperte: Of course a camera doesn’t make a photographer, but can you tell us about the gear you use on fashion shoots, and a little about your production and post-production workflow? BP: Gear can definitely improve how you shoot, but you’re right - it’s not the main thing. The runway is always shot with the 70-200 f2.8 IS, version 2. This allows me to follow the model coming down the runway for a while (zooming) and is the right length for being at the end of the runway. Of course it’s pretty dark, but I’m shooting the Canon 5D mkIII which helps. I can usually still get a shutter speed of 1/200th or so, even if I can’t light them myself. The bigger production, than the runway, is the isolated-on-white set we shoot all day. It’s a truck full of junk that we set up at 6am. There are tutorials online, but basically it’s a 9’ roll of seamless paper and 3 tileboards (reflective, white). Two lights on the background and one big key light (86” PLM by Paul Buff). I shoot the 100mm lens on this set for a few reasons, and transmit the photos wirelessly to a nearby iPad for designers and 42 AperteMag.com 2

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(cont from page 40) models to review. Post production is pretty minimal, but I still shoot RAW to tweak the white balance, level horizons, crop, etc. I’m using Lightroom4 for almost everything now - love it. Aperte: What other areas of photography do you practice in, aside from fashion photography? Do you find your fashion photography experience influences your style in other areas, or vice-versa? BP: Right now, I’m primarily a wedding+portrait photographer who dabbles in fashion, landscape, stock, and personal work. There is definitely some crossover and influence between my wedding/portrait work and fashion... I’m not sure I can even put my finger on it, but it’s one reason I tell people not to specialize too narrowly too soon. You can learn so much from different genres (at least where shooting people is concerned) that translates to other shoots and situations. Aperte: What is a piece of advice you might give to folks out there who are in the early stages of a freelance photography career? BP: Run! Run as fast as you can, and don’t forget to take your wallet with you. But seriously, I have a long list of mantras and nuggets that I could include here. Let me just focus on this one: “Be so good they can’t ignore you”. That was not a quote from a photographer, but from Steve Martin. It applies to anyone. You’ve heard it said, “Better to be lucky than good” but also “Luck favors the prepared”. There is NO substitute for hard work. Even the ones that seem to fall backwards into money and fame, there was a lot that went into getting to that position in the first place. It does take both talent and hard work, but there is no amount of talent that can replace the work. So I always post “You gotta want it. How bad do you want it?” Because when people come to me with their sob stories about being a starving artist (broke photographer), yet they have expensive tattoos/ glasses/clothes/cars and seem to spend a ton of time online or in front of a TV... they get zero sympathy from me. Photography is all about making a complex set of decisions - whether you’re making a photo or making a career. The faster you can make the right ones that benefit your long run, the better. Also, we all started from zero. Learn from someone who’s where you want to be. Aperte: You’re stranded on a desert island where you’ll only have 5 pieces of gear available to you.... What would those 5 things be? BP: I would say a camera, lightweight tripod, fast 50mm lens, bottomless memory card, and I guess a card reader or laptop that could satellite uplink my photos off that island! This assumes my laptop cover was a solar power panel - one I could hook my camera up to as well. Aperte: Do you have any current personal projects in the works you can tell us about? BP: I have an ‘artisan’ project that is long term, and is a collection of artists or craftsmen that are working in their space. Environmental portraits are my favorite these days, and I love the challenge of connecting the moment, the lighting, the composition, and the real (often unseen) working environment of real artists. Maybe it’s that I miss the craft of the film process, but it sure is fascinating. Hopefully I can have a full gallery or book someday of the images. Aperte: What are some personal philosophies that you live and shoot by? BP: “Don’t ask yourself what the world needs. Ask yourself what makes you come alive and then go do that. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive.” - Howard Thurman.

www.BrianPowell.info

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Š Azzura Piccardi


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by Brooke Worley

Aperte caught up with Dane Myers, lead man for the Dane Myers Band, this summer on his way to a gig in sunny downtown Dunnellon, Florida. Music isn’t all that Dane is up to these days. He has been re-evaluating his

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© Brooke Worley

Music & Fashion: The Dane Myers Band

image for the big stage and ramping up his music since the 2013 school year commenced. Dane began his singer/songwriter career just two years ago while studying at the University of Central Florida. “It’s really fun for me to see these people with immense talent get involved with my project. They really get behind the group and its music and it’s really encouraging.” When asked to describe his music Dane says, “It’s very age 19; the music is dynamic and always changing.” The album’s mix of blues, bubble-gum pop, acoustic, jazz and a little bit of reggae makes for a unique and eclectic sound, and word is traveling fast. Making their debut on college radios across Central Florida, the boys are excited to hear their first track played on local radio stations. The recording studio experience has been quite comfortable but life changing for all of them.


© Brooke Worley

“Yes! Everything is coming together now and we are all happy about that,” Dane blurts. The group has also been asked to record songs for a television series pilot. The group is recording covers and originals for this project, which could turn out to be a big break for the group. This summer, the Dane Myers Band plans on honing in on their sound, style and music. The band will be working with their producer closely for the release of their CD debut this fall. Dane also plans on teaching at a music camp in Ocala, Florida and working the Wing House’s stage in Sanford, Florida; while still touring the Central Florida festivals. With all that stage presence, fashion is becoming an ever greater concern for the Band. Fashion expression was kept to

a minimum at the group’s outset; the group stuck to jeans and designer tees. But, “There is something to be said for looking the part,” according to Dane. “I want it to reflect the element of familiarity; nothing too extreme or alienating, but casual, classy and warm. Reinforcing our sound with our image is what we’re going for with this new style.” In that spirit, Dane’s wardrobe today is comprised of Banana Republic Khaki Chinos, A Hollister Plaid Shirt and a an H&M Soft Jersey V-neck Tee; accented by a canvas clip belt and his signature Dark Grey Fedora Hat. To see and hear more of the Dane Myers Band, please visit:

www.DaneMyersMusic.com AperteMag.com 2 61


Aperte Magazine 2013 Swimsuit Edition  

Aperte Magazine Summer 2013 Swimsuit Edition. Retro is in this summer, and this issue is full of fantastic suits from amazing independent de...

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