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Report on APCD-JICA Project Workshop Asia-Pacific Development Center on Disability (APCD) APCD Training Building and Amari Watergate Hotel, Bangkok, Thailand 12-13 July 2012


Report on APCD-JICA Project Workshop Organized by Asia-Pacific Development Center on Disability (APCD) Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) 12-13 July 2012 APCD Training Building and Amari Watergate Hotel, Bangkok, Thailand

Printed by Asia-Pacific Development Center on Disability 255 Rajvithi Rd., Rajthevi, Bangkok 10400 Thailand Tel: +66(0)2 354-7505 Fax: +66 (0)2 354-7507 Email: info@apcdfoundation.org Website: www.apcdfoundation.org This report is available in a text format for persons with visual impairments and blind persons. Please contact info@apcdfoundation.org for further details.


Contents

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

4

PROGRAM

5

PARTICIPANTS AND GUESTS

7

Roadmap to New Decade, 2013-2022

9

Inputs to Draft Incheon Strategy

10

SESSION PRESENTATIONS

32

PHOTOS

94

ANNEXES

97

- PRE-WORKSHOP


Summary Summary Report Executive Since August 2007, the Asia-Pacific Development Center on Disability (APCD) has been collaborating with the Japan International Collaboration Agency (JICA) through its technical cooperation project (APCD/ JICA Project Phase 2) with strong determinations of promoting the rights of persons with disabilities, empowerment and promoting a barrier-free society in developing countries in the Asia-Pacific region. Upon the completion of the Project, APCD- JICA Project Workshop was organized on 12-13 July, 2012 in Bangkok, Thailand. The aims were to review the achievements of the Project, future direction of APCD with further collaboration of key partners, stakeholders and networks, particularly through regional activities in line with the new Decade of Asian and Pacific Decade of Person with Disabilities, 2013-2022. Since the Project started, a lot of work has been conducted consistently and disability movements were processed further. Progresses were made in many sectors, yet, there are a lot of areas that still needed to be highlighted. One of the significant successes would be the intensified collaborations and cooperation between APCD and JICA, relevant stakeholders and associated networks working on disability movement. This fusion of forces has created a great strength and platform to turn future into a better direction. The Workshop was held over two days and brought together representatives from eight networks composed with Community-based Rehabilitation Asia-Pacific Network (CBR AP Network), South Asian Disability Forum (SADF), Central Asian Disability Forum (CADF), ASEAN Autism Network (AAN), Asia-Pacific Federation of the Hard of Hearing and Deafened (APFHD), Thailand Council for Independent Living (TCIL), United ID Network Mekong Sub-Region and E-CafĂŠ. In this connection, APCD Executive Members, JICA JCC Members, the Embassy of Japan, Executive Officers from the Government of Thailand through the National Office for Empowerment of Persons with Disabilities (NEP), the Ministry of Social Development and Human Security. A representative of the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) was also invited as a resource person to work on the draft Incheon Strategy which is expected to be the regional policy paper in the proposed new decade. In this occasion, representatives from all networks proactively shared their inputs collectively on the draft Incheon Strategy according to their own viewpoints. Such inputs have been successfully consolidated as one joint statement through the Workshop. Moreover, with consistent support from APCD and JICA, a new network for self-advocate groups of persons with intellectual disabilities in Mekong Sub-Region countries comprised of Cambodia, Myanmar and Thailand as of now shall be called the United ID Network Mekong Sub-Region was successfully established, introduced and welcome as one of the eminent outcomes. The two-day workshop was concentrated but productively, numbers of output were agreed upon further engagement and continue collaboration. The Project was successfully completed based on collective efforts by APCD and JICA in collaboration with Focal Points, Associate Organizations and relevant parties as a cornerstone to promote the rights of persons with disabilities and inclusive development.

4


Program 12 July 2012 APCD Training Building, Bangkok, Thailand Session 1: Opening 9.00-10.00

Opening Remark by Mr. Kawabata, Senior Representative, JICA Thailand Welcome Speech by Mr. Ninomiya, Executive Director, APCD Introduction of participants by Mr. Jasper, Networking Manager, APCD / Mr. Onoda, JICA Chief Advisor, APCD Group Photo 10.00-10.15 Coffee Break Session 2: Sustainable Collaboration with APCD 10.15-12.00 1. Power UP Empowerment Café 2. Sustainable Networking in Partnership with APCD (Computer Room) (Multi-Purpose Room) - Introduction of E-Café - What is Networking? 12.00-13.00 Lunch 13.00-14.30 - Exercise and Improvement - Networking Agenda Development 14.30-14.45 Coffee Break 14.45-16.30 - Design of Sustainability - Networking Agenda Application Exchange Dinner 17.00-19.00 Dinner by APCD

5


13 July 2012 Amari Watergate Hotel, Bangkok, Thailand Session 2: Sustainable Collaboration with APCD (Cont.) 9.00-10.30 3. Discussion on Incheon Strategy - Inputs to the 2nd Draft 10.30-10.45 Coffee Break 10.45-12.00 Feedback to 3 sessions 12.00-13.00 Lunch Session 3: APCD/JICA Project Presentation 13.00-13.20 Greetings to Partners by Mr. Ninomiya 13.20-14.30 Presentation of Achievements -Overview of Achievement of APCD/JICA Project Phase 2 by Mr. Onoda (10 min) -CBR Asia-Pacific Network (10 min), Thailand Council for Independent Living (10 min), E-cafĂŠ (10 min), ASEAN Autism Network (10 min), Q&A (20 min) 14.30-14.45 Coffee Break 14.45-16.00 Presentation of Achievements (cont.) - South Asian Disability Forum (10 min), Central Asian Disability Forum (10 min), AsiaPacific Federation of the Hard of Hearing and Deafened (10 min), Groups of Persons with Intellectual Disabilities in the Mekong region (15 min), Q&A (30 min) Session 4: Closing 16.00-17.00 - Closing remark by Mr. Kawabata / Closing speech by Mr. Ninomiya - Presenting Certificate Dinner Reception 18.00-20.00 Dinner by APCD/JICA Project

6


Participants and Guests Participants 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

Ms. Shirin Akhter Ms. Bethi Akter Mr.Malai Hj Abdullah Othman Ms. Sok Sambo Kay Ms. Nectar Prok Mr. Vichetra Kong Ms. Rachmita Maun Harahap Mr. Sunarman Sukamto Ms.Yoshimi Horiuchi Ms. Lyazzat Kaltayeva Ms. Dana Kaltayeva Mr. Mirbek Asangariev Ms. Gulaisha Zhoshybayeva Mr. Silatul Rahim Bin Dahman Ms. Nurulisma Ismail Mr. Min Shwe Htet Mr. Salai Vanni Bawi Mr. Kiran Shilpakar Mr. Ghulam Nabi Nizanami Mr. Muhammad Atif Mr. Muhammad Akram Mr. Ranilo Sorongon Mr. Rajesh Kumar Nanda Mr. Asadullo Zikrikhudoev Mr.Udomchok Churut

26

Mr. Paradon Koomsab

27 29 30 31

Mr. Doosadee Khiaopaeng Ms. Phacharin Sujatitwatanasak Ms. Araya Chanapolchai Ms. Hanh Duong Phuong

Chairperson, SADF PA of Ms.Shirin EC member, AAN Leader, Rose Group PA of Ms.Sambo Supporter of Ms. Sambo Vice President, APFHD EC member, CBR AP Barista, E-café Chairperson, CADF/ Barista, E-café PA of Ms. Lyazzat Vice Chairperson, CADF PA of Ms.Mirbek Barista, E-café PA of Mr.Rahim Leader, Unity Group Supporter of Mr. Min Shwe Htet EC member, SADF Chairperson, CBR AP/ Chief Barista, E-Café Honorable Chairperson, SADF/ Barista, E-café Secretary General, APFHD EC member, AAN EC member, CBR AP Vice Chairperson, CADF Chairperson, Thailand Council for Independent Living Committee Member, Thailand Council for Independent Living PA of Mr. Paradon Leader, Dao Ruang Group Supporter of Ms. Phacharin President, APFHD

Bangladesh Bangladesh Brunei Cambodia Cambodia Cambodia Indonesia Indonesia Japan Kazakhstan Kazakhstan Kyrgyzstan Kyrgyzstan Malaysia Malaysia Myanmar Myanmar Nepal Pakistan Pakistan Pakistan Philippines PNG Tajikistan Thailand Thailand Thailand Thailand Thailand Viet Nam

7


Guests 1

2

3

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

8

Ms. Napa Setthakorn

Secretary General, National Office for Empowerment of Persons with Disabilities (NEP), Ministry of Social Development and Human Security Ms. Vijita Rachatanantikul Director, National Office for Empowerment of Persons with Disabilities (NEP), Ministry of Social Development and Human Security Ms. Phatcharamont Pitipanyakul Chief of Partnership development Section, National Office for Empowerment of Persons with Disabilities (NEP), Ministry of Social Development and Human Security" Mr. Yoshihiro Ishikawa First Secretary, Embassy of Japan Ms. Aiko Akiyama Social Affairs Officer, Social Development Devision, UNESCAP Dr. Damrong Reinprayoon APCD Executive Board member Ms. Rubina Suwanpong APCD Executive Board member Dr. Benja Chonlatanon APCD Executive Board member Prof. Wiriya Namsiriphongphan APCD Executive Board member Senator Monthian Buntan APCD Executive Board member Ms. Saowalak Thongkuay APCD Executive Board member Mr. Suporntum Mongkolsawadi APCD Executive Board member Ms. Marie Ann Fernandez APCD Executive Board member Mr.Suppacheep Didhead APCD Executive Board member Mr. Suchart Owatwunasakul APCD/JICA JCC member Mr. Yongyut Borisut APCD/JICA JCC member Mr. Akihisa Tanaka Senior Representative, JICA Thailand Office Mr. Tomoyuki Kawabata Senior Representative, JICA Thailand Office Ms. Ayumi Yuasa Representative, JICA Thailand Office

Thailand

Thailand

Thailand

Japan Japan Thailand Thailand Thailand Thailand Thailand Thailand Thailand Thailand Thailand Thailand Thailand Japan Japan Japan


Roadmap to New Decade, 2013-2022

High level Meeting of the General Assembly on Disability and Development (Heads of State/Government) 23 September 2013, New York

69th Commission Session April/May 2013

New Decade on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, 2013-2022

• Report • The Incheon Strategy to Make the Right Real for Persons with Disabilities in Asia & the Pacific High-level Intergovernmental Meeting 29 October-2 November 2012, Incheon, Republic of Korea

makethe rightreal campaign

68th Commission session 17-23 May 2012, Bangkok Regional Preparatory Meeting 14-16 March 2012, Bangkok

End-ofDecade Survey

Second session of the Regional Stakeholder Meeting 14-16 December 2011, Bangkok

Research: Disability, Poverty, Livelihoods

67th Commission session 19-25 May 2011, Bangkok Second session of the Committee on Social Development 19-21 October 2010, Bangkok First session of the Regional Stakeholder Meeting 23-25 June 2010, Bangkok Source: Presented by UNESCAP

9


Inputs to Draft Incheon Strategy

Join nt Inputs for the drraft ministeerial declarration on th he Asian an nd Pacific Decade D of P Persons wiith Disabiliities, 2013-22022, and th he draft Inch heon strateegy to “mak ke the righ ht real” forr persons with w disabillities in Assia and the Pacific Asia-Paciific Developm ment Centerr on Disabiliity Asia--Pacific Fedeeration of th he Hard of H Hearing and Deafened D ASEAN Au utism Network CBR Asia-P Pacific Netw work C Central Asian n Disability Forum F S South Asian Disability Forum F Thailan nd Council ffor Independ dent Living United d ID Networrk Mekong Sub-Region S Em mpowermentt Café on Diisability 31 July 2012 Bangko ok, Thailand d

10


The “APC CD/JICA Projject Workshop p” was organ nized by the Asia-Pacific A D Development C Center on Disability y (APCD) in co ollaboration with w the Japan n Internation nal Cooperatio on Agency (JIICA), from 122 to 13 July 2012, in Bang gkok, Thailan nd. More than n 30 leaders with w disabilitiees and supporrters from 9 internatio onal networkssi, forums and d organization ns in 16 counttriesii particip pated in the Workshop. W The representaative from thee United Natiions Economiic and Social C Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) w was also invitted as a resou urce person. The Work kshop includeed a session to o provide inp puts on the draft ministeriaal declaration on the Asian n and Pacifiic Decade of Persons P with Disabilities, 2013-2022, 2 and the draft In ncheon strateg gy to “make the right rreal” for perso ons with disaabilities in Asiia and the Paccific. This papeer was developed and unan nimously agreed based on n voices from the participan nts, including g emerging groups such as persons with w intellectu ual, learning and a developm mental disabiliities, persons with autissm, persons who w are hard of hearing an nd deafened, ffamily advocaacy groups, as a well as otheer marginaliized persons with w disabilitties in rural arreas.

Represen ntatives from AAN, APFHD, CAD DF, CBR AP Networrk, E-Cafe, SADF F, TIL, United ID D Network

Presentation b by United ID Nettwork "Intellectual Disabilitty (ID) Voice Must Be Heard"

Parents group p representative provid ding inputs from the perspective of o autism

hard of hearing and a deafened Particcipants who are h checking th heir inputs carefu ully

Givin ng feedback and incorporating voices of persons with w disabilities on o the draft Incheeon Strategy

Participants sharing their inp puts on the drafft Incheon Strateg gy

                                                           

Asia-Pacificc Development Center C on Disability, Asia-Pacificc Federation of th he Hard of Hearing and Deafened d, ASEAN Autism m Network, CB BR Asia-Pacific Network, N Centraal Asian Disability Forum, South Asian Disability Forum, Thailand d Council for Independen nt Living, United ID Network Meekong Sub-Region n, Empowermen nt Café on Disabiility i

Bangladesh h, Brunei Darusssalam, Cambodiaa, Indonesia, Japaan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Mallaysia, Myanmarr, Nepal, Pakistan n, Papua New Guinea, the Phillippines, Tajikistan, Thailand and d Vietnam ii

11


(Summary) Joint Inputs for the draft ministerial declaration on the Asian and Pacific Decade of Persons with Disabilities, 2013-2022, and the draft Incheon strategy to “make the right real” for persons with disabilities in Asia and the Pacific B. Key principles and policy direction Old New (k) …… persons affected by leprosy, family (k) …… persons affected by leprosy, parents and advocacy groups, as well as particularly other family advocacy groups, as well as marginalized persons with disabilities living in particularly marginalized persons with disabilities living in slums, rural and remote areas and island slums, rural and remote areas and island atolls; atolls; Goal 1: Reduce poverty and enhance work and employment prospects. Old New Target 3: Increase the participation of persons with Target 3: Increase by at least 20 per cent the disabilities in vocational training… participation of persons with disabilities in vocational training… Goal 2: Promote participation in political processes and decision making Old Core indicators 2. Proportion of polling stations in the national capital that are accessible with measures for protecting the confidentiality of voting by persons with disabilities.

New Core indicators 2. Proportion of polling stations in the national and subnational capital that are accessible with measures for protecting the confidentiality of voting by persons with disabilities.

Supplementary indicators 1C. Proportion of persons with disabilities who hold cabinet positions at the national level.

Supplementary indicators 1C. Proportion of persons with disabilities who hold cabinet positions at the national and subnational level.

None

Supplementary indicators 1E. Proportion of persons with disabilities who hold positions in the local city council or equivalent local legislative body. Supplementary indicators 1F. Proportion of family representatives of children with disabilities who hold positions in the government decision-making bodies on disability.

None

12


Goal 3: Enhance access to the physical environment, public transportation, knowledge and information and communication Old Target 1: Increase the accessibility of the physical environment in the national capital that is open to the public.

New Increase the accessibility of the physical environment in the national and subnational capital that is open to the public.

Core indicators 1. Proportion of accessible government buildings in the national capital. None

Core indicators 1. Proportion of accessible government buildings in the national and subnational capital. Core indicators 2A. Proportion of accessible international seaports. Core indicators 3B. Proportion of audio description of public television news programmes. Core indicators 5. Availability of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the Incheon Strategy to “Make the Right Real” in Asia and the Pacific in the national language. Core indicators 5A. Availability of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the Incheon Strategy to “Make the Right Real” in Asia and the Pacific in easy-to-read versions in the national language.

None None

None

Goal 4: Strengthen social protection Old Target 1: Increase health care provision for persons with disabilities. Target 2: Increase disability benefits for persons with disabilities. Target 3: Enhance services and programmes, including for personal assistance, and peer counselling that support persons with multiple, extensive and diverse disabilities in living independently in the community.

New Target 1: Increase health care provision for children and adults with disabilities. Target 2: Increase disability benefits for children and adults with disabilities. Target 3: Enhance services and programmes, including for personal assistance, peer counselling and counselling for parents of children with disabilities that support persons with multiple, extensive and diverse disabilities in living independently in the community. Core indicators Core indicators 1. Proportion of persons with disabilities who use 1. Proportion of children and adults with disabilities who use government health care government health care programmes. programmes to live independently in the community. 3. Availability of government-funded services and programmes, including for personal assistance and, peer counselling that enable persons with disabilities to live independently in the community.

3. Availability of government-funded services and programmes, including for personal assistance, peer counselling and counselling for parents of children with disabilities, that enable persons with disabilities to live independently in the community.

13


Supplementary indicators 1A. Number of government-supported programmes for care services, including for respite care. None 3A. Availability of national community-based programmes rehabilitation programmes. None

Supplementary indicators Number of government-supported programmes for care services, including for respite care and therapy centers. Supplementary indicators 2A. Availability of health insurance for persons with disabilities. 3A. Availability of government-supported programmes according to the Community-based Rehabilitation Guidelines. 3B. Availability of services and programmes funded by the private sector, including for personal assistance and peer counseling, that enable persons with disabilities to live independently in the community.

Goal 5: Expand early intervention and education of children with disabilities Old New Target 2: Halve the gap between children with Target 2: Halve the gap between school aged disabilities and children without disabilities in children with disabilities and children without enrollment rates for primary and secondary disabilities in enrollment rates for primary and secondary education. education. Core indicators Core indicators 1. Number of children with disabilities receiving 1. Number of children with disabilities receiving early childhood intervention, in government early childhood intervention, including day care and therapy, in government facilities. facilities. 1A. Proportion of government pre- and ante- Supplementary indicators Proportion of government pre- and antenatal care facilities that provide information and 1A. services regarding early detection of disability in natal care facilities that provide information and children and protection of the rights of children services, including day care and therapy, regarding early detection of disability in children and with disabilities. protection of the rights of children with disabilities. None 2E. Proportion of schools for children who are hard of hearing and deafened that provide speech therapy. None 2F. Proportion of public universities which have disability support programs for students with disabilities. Goal 6: Ensure gender equality and women’s empowerment Old New Ensure that all girls and women Target 2: Ensure that all girls and women Target 2: with disabilities have access to sexual and with disabilities have access to sexual and reproductive health services on an equitable basis reproductive health services, and legal support on an equitable basis with girls and women without with girls and women without disabilities. disabilities.

14


Goal 7: Ensure disability-inclusive disaster risk reduction Old Core indicators 2A. Proportion of accessible emergency shelters and disaster relief sites. None

New Core indicators 2A. Proportion of accessible emergency alert system, exits, evacuation route, shelters and disaster relief sites. 2C. Availability of temporary assistive device in case of disasters.

Goal 10: Advance subregional, regional and interregional cooperation Old ‌ The Asia-Pacific region still faces long-term challenges. Core indicators 1. Number of United Nations entities that have regional cooperation programmes

New ‌ The Asia-Pacific region, particularly Central Asia and the Pacific, still faces long-term challenges. 1. Number of United Nations entities that have regional and subregional cooperation programmes

15


E/ESCAP/APDDP(3)/WP.1 Distr.: Participants only 3 July 2012 Original: English

Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific High-level Intergovernmental Meeting on the Final Review of the Implementation of the Asian and Pacific Decade of Disabled Persons, 2003-2012 29 October-2 November 2012 Incheon, Republic of Korea Item 3 of the provisional agenda Consideration of the draft ministerial declaration on the Asian and Pacific Decade of Persons with Disabilities, 2013-2022, and the draft Incheon strategy to “make the right real” for persons with disabilities in Asia and the Pacific

Draft ministerial declaration on the Asian and Pacific Decade of Persons with Disabilities, 2013-2022, and the draft Incheon strategy to “make the right real” for persons with disabilities in Asia and the Pacific Working Paper∗

16

The present document has been issued without formal editing.


E/ESCAP/APDDP(3)/WP.1

Contents

Page

I.

Draft Ministerial Declaration on the Asian and Pacific Decade of Persons with Disabilities, 2013-2022

4

II.

Draft Incheon Strategy to Make the Right Real for Persons with Disabilities in Asia and the Pacific

8

A. Background

9

B. Key principles and policy direction

11

C. Incheon goals and targets

10

Goals: 1. Reduce poverty and enhance work and employment prospects

10

2. Promote participation in political processes and in decision making

11

3. Enhance access to the physical environment, public transportation, knowledge and information and communication

12

4. Strengthen social protection

13

5. Expand early intervention and education of children with disabilities

14

6. Ensure gender equality and women’s empowerment

15

7. Ensure disability-inclusive disaster risk reduction

15

8. Improve disability data reliability and comparability

16

9. Accelerate the ratification and implementation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and harmonization of national legislation with the Convention 17 10. Advance international, regional and subregional cooperation

17

D. Modalities for effective implementation: national, subregional and regional levels

18

1. National level

18

2. Subregional level

20

3. Regional level

20

Annex: Terms of reference: working group on the Asian and Pacific Decade of Persons with Disabilities

21

2

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E/ESCAP/APDDP(3)WP.1

I.

Draft ministerial declaration on the Asian and Pacific Decade of Persons with Disabilities, 2013-2022

We, the ministers and representatives of members and associate members of the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) assembled at the High-level Intergovernmental Meeting on the Final Review of the Implementation of the Asian and Pacific Decade of Disabled Persons, 2003-2012, held at Incheon, Republic of Korea from 29 October to 2 November 2012, PP1. Recalling United Nations General Assembly resolution 37/52 of 3 December 1982 that adopted the World Programme of Action concerning Disabled Persons, and resolution 48/96 of 20 December 1993 that adopted the Standard Rules on the Equalization of Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities, in which persons with disabilities are recognized as both development agents and beneficiaries in all aspects of development, PP2. Recalling United Nations General Assembly resolution 61/106 of 13 December 2006 that adopted the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its Optional Protocol which entered into force on 3 May 2008, PP3. Recalling United Nations General Assembly resolution 65/1 of 22 September 2010 on keeping the promise: united to achieve the Millennium Development Goals which, inter alia, recognized that policies and actions must focus on the poor and those living in the most vulnerable situations, including persons with disabilities, so that they benefit from progress towards achieving the Millennium Development Goals, PP4. Recalling Commission resolution 48/3 of 23 April 1992 on the Asian and Pacific Decade of Disabled Persons, 1993-2002, that proclaimed the first such regional decade in the world, PP5. Recalling Commission resolution 58/4 of 22 May 2002 on promoting an inclusive, barrierfree and rights-based society for people with disabilities in the Asian and Pacific region in the twentyfirst century that proclaimed the extension of the Asian and Pacific Decade of Disabled Persons, 1993-2002, for another decade, 2003-2012, PP6. Recalling Commission resolution 59/3 of 4 September 2003 on regional implementation of the Biwako Millennium Framework for Action towards an Inclusive, Barrier-free and Rights-based Society for Persons with Disabilities in Asia and the Pacific during the Asian and Pacific Decade of Disabled Persons, 2003-2012, in which the Commission, inter alia, requested members and associate members to support the implementation of the Biwako Millennium Framework for Action, PP7. Recalling Commission resolution 64/8 of 30 April 2008 on regional implementation of the Biwako Millennium Framework for Action and Biwako Plus Five towards an Inclusive, Barrier-free and Rights-based Society for Persons with Disabilities in Asia and the Pacific, that mandated the convening of a high-level intergovernmental meeting to review the implementation of the Biwako Millennium Framework for Action and Biwako Plus Five in 2012, the concluding year of the Asian and Pacific Decade of Disabled Persons, 2003-2012, PP8. Recalling Commission resolution 66/11 of 19 May 2010 on regional preparations for the High-level Intergovernmental Meeting on the Final Review of the Implementation of the Asian and Pacific Decade of Disabled Persons, 2003-2012, that encouraged the participation of all key stakeholders, including organizations of and for persons with disabilities from Asia and the Pacific, in the preparatory process leading up to the High-level Intergovernmental Meeting,

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PP9. Recalling Commission resolution 68/7 of 23 May 2012 that proclaimed the Asian and Pacific Decade of Persons with Disabilities, 2013-2022, as well as urged all members and associate members to participate actively in the High-level Intergovernmental Meeting, and to consider and adopt a strategic framework to guide the implementation of the Decade that is based on the general principles and obligations stipulated in the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, PP10. Noting that an estimated 650 million persons, approximately 15 per cent of the population in Asia and the Pacific, live with disabilities, with 80 per cent of that group living in developing countries, PP11. Welcoming the progress that has been achieved, over the course of two Asian and Pacific Decades spanning the period 1993 to 2012, by ESCAP members and associate members in establishing the foundation for a rights-based approach to inclusive development, particularly through policy and institutional commitments, as well as new strides in legislation and empowerment, PP12. Noting with appreciation the contributions of civil society, particularly organizations of and for persons with disabilities, to the progress achieved, including through continuous awareness raising of the rights of persons with diverse disabilities, innovation of good practices, and engagement in policy dialogue, PP13. Bearing in mind that Pacific Leaders at the Forty-first Pacific Islands Forum in Port Vila reaffirmed through their Communiqué on 5 August 2010 their strong support for the Pacific Regional Strategy on Disability 2010–2015 to protect and promote the rights of persons with disabilities, provide a framework for coordination in building a disability-inclusive Pacific, and strengthen stakeholder commitment towards implementation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and other disability-related human rights instruments, PP14. Taking note of the Bali Declaration on the Enhancement of the Role and Participation of Person with Disabilities in ASEAN Community, adopted on 17 November 2011 by the 19th ASEAN Summit held in Bali, Indonesia, that also proclaimed the period 2011-2020 as the ASEAN Decade of Persons with Disabilities, towards ensuring the effective participation of persons with disabilities and mainstreaming disability perspectives in ASEAN policies and programmes across the economic, political security and socio-cultural pillars of the ASEAN Community, PP15. Welcoming the Busan Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation, adopted on 1 December 2011 by the Fourth High Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness, Busan, Republic of Korea, which recognized the importance of international commitments on disability for forming the foundation of cooperation for effective development, PP16. Noting the Community-based Rehabilitation Guidelines, a Health Organization, the International Labour Organization, the Scientific and Cultural Organization and the International Disability which provides a comprehensive, multi-sectoral poverty reduction Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities,

joint document of the World United Nations Educational, and Development Consortium, strategy for implementing the

PP17. Recalling the “Future We Want”, the outcome document of the Rio+20 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development which Member States of the United Nations adopted on 22 June 2012, which inter alia identifies persons with disabilities and recognizes their right to inclusion in measures that accelerate implementation of sustainable development commitments, PP18. Noting with concern that there are still many challenges to be addressed to ensure that persons with disabilities in Asia and the Pacific have the right to equitable access to economic and social opportunities and political participation, PP19. Underscoring the need to address the disability dimensions of the long-term consequences of rapid population ageing that is under way in Asia and the Pacific, 4

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E/ESCAP/APDDP(3)WP.1

PP20. Further noting with serious concern the disproportionate impact of disasters on persons with disabilities in Asia and the Pacific which in the past three decades has been the region that has suffered the largest number of disasters, PP21. Also noting that negative stereotyping and discriminatory behaviour towards persons with disabilities still prevail, PP.22. Mindful that there are increasing opportunities for promoting the rights of persons with disabilities, including through the use of new technologies for enhancing access, OP1. Adopt the Incheon Strategy to Make the Right Real for Persons with Disabilities in Asia and the Pacific (hereinafter referred to as the Incheon Strategy), as attached, to catalyze action that shall accelerate, during the new Asian and Pacific Decade of Persons with Disabilities, 2013-2022, the achievement of the regional vision of an inclusive society that ensures, promotes and upholds the rights of all persons with disabilities in Asia and the Pacific, OP.2. Recognize the central role of government in ensuring, promoting and upholding the rights of persons with disabilities, OP2. Commit to implement this Declaration and the Incheon Strategy by promoting action to reach the Incheon goals and targets by 2022, OP3. Invite all concerned stakeholders, including the following, to join in a region-wide partnership to contribute to the implementation of this Declaration and the Incheon Strategy: (a)

Subregional intergovernmental entities, including the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, the Economic Cooperation Organization, the Pacific Islands Forum, the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation and the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation, to promote and strengthen subregional cooperation for disabilityinclusive development, in coordination with ESCAP;

(b)

Development cooperation agencies, to strengthen the disability-inclusiveness of their policies, plans and programmes;

(c)

The World Bank and the Asian Development Bank, to harness their technical and financial resources for promoting disability-inclusive development in Asia and the Pacific;

(d)

Members of the United Nations system, to “deliver as one� on promoting disabilityinclusive development in Asia and the Pacific, including through effective use of existing mechanisms at the regional and country levels, such as the United Nations Development Group and United Nations Country Teams, and to facilitate the inclusion of disability dimensions in the post-2015 development agenda in diverse sectors;

(e)

Civil society entities, particularly organizations of and for persons with disabilities, to foster continuous Decade responsiveness to the aspirations and needs of persons with disabilities, including through outreach to diverse disability groups, and contributing to policy and programme development and implementation;

(d)

The private sector, to promote disability-inclusive business practice.

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E/ESCAP/APDDP(3)/WP.1

OP4.

Request the Executive Secretary of ESCAP to: (a)

Accord priority to supporting members and associate members in the full and effective implementation of this Declaration and the Incheon Strategy, in cooperation with other concerned entities;

(b)

Engage with stakeholders and encourage their participation in the implementation of this Declaration and the Incheon Strategy;

(c)

Submit the outcome of this High-level Intergovernmental Meeting to the Commission on its sixty-ninth session for endorsement;

(d)

Report to the Commission triennially thereafter until the end of the Decade on the progress in the implementation of this Declaration;

(e)

Convene a high-level intergovernmental meeting to review Decade progress at the mid-point of the Decade (2017), and to mark the conclusion of the Decade (2022).

6

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E/ESCAP/APDDP(3)WP.1

II.

Draft Incheon strategy to “make the right real” for persons with disabilities in Asia and the Pacific

1.

The proposed structure of the Incheon Strategy is as follows: A. B. C. D.

A.

Background Key principles and policy direction Incheon goals and targets Modalities for effective implementation: national, subregional and regional levels

Background

2. The development of the draft Incheon Strategy to “Make the Right Real” for Persons with Disabilities in Asia and the Pacific is derived from the experiences in the implementation of two consecutive Asian and Pacific Decades of Disabled Persons, 1993-2002 and 2003-2012, as well as the historic adoption by the United Nations in 2006 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. 3. The development of the Incheon Strategy benefited from the contributions of governments, organizations of and for persons with disabilities, and other key stakeholders. It drew from the observations, feedback and insights obtained through the following regional consultations: the Expert Group Meeting-cum-Stakeholder Consultation to Review the Implementation of the Asian and Pacific Decade of Disabled Persons, 2003-2012: The Biwako Millennium Framework for Action (Bangkok, 23-25 June 2010); the Committee on Social Development on its second session (Bangkok, 19-21 October 2010); the Regional Stakeholder Consultation for the High-level Intergovernmental Meeting on the Final Review of the Asian and Pacific Decade of Disabled Persons, 2003-2012 (Bangkok, 1416 December 2011); and the Regional Preparatory Meeting for the High-level Intergovernmental Meeting on the Final Review of the Implementation of the Asian and Pacific Decade of Disabled Persons, 2003-2012 (Bangkok, 14-16 March 2012). 4. The responses of governments and organizations of and for persons with disabilities to an ESCAP regional survey on the final review of the Asian and Pacific Decade of Disabled Persons, 2003-2012, provided a rich evidence base for developing the Incheon Strategy. 5. The Incheon Strategy is not intended to replicate the comprehensive coverage of the Biwako Millennium Framework for Action towards an Inclusive, Barrier Free and Rights-Based Society for Persons with Disabilities in Asia and the Pacific, the Biwako Plus Five and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, which will all continue to serve as overarching policy frameworks for regional work in the field of disability. 6. Similar to the Millennium Development Goals1, the Incheon goals and targets are time-bound for accelerating implementation by focusing particular attention on the achievement of a set of priority goals and targets during the course of the new decade, 2013-2022, as well as facilitating the measurement of progress to be attained by Asia and the Pacific.

1

The Millennium Development Goals comprise eight goals, 21 targets and 60 indicators . 7

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B.

Key principles and policy direction

7. The Incheon Strategy is based on the principles of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities: (a)

Respect for inherent dignity, individual autonomy including the freedom to make one’s own choices, and independence of persons;

(b)

Non-discrimination;

(c)

Full and effective participation and inclusion in society;

(d)

Respect for difference and acceptance of persons with disabilities as part of human diversity and humanity;

(e)

Equality of opportunity;

(f)

Accessibility;

(g)

Equality between men and women;

(h)

Respect for the evolving capacities of children with disabilities and respect for the right of children with disabilities to preserve their identities.

8.

To realize and protect the rights of persons with disabilities in the Asian and Pacific region, the Incheon Strategy underscores the policy direction stated below.

9.

Strive to ensure:

(a)

Legislative, administrative and other measures supportive of rights fulfillment are adopted, implemented, reviewed and strengthened so that disability-based discrimination is eliminated;

(b)

Development policies and programmes are disability-inclusive, gender sensitive and harness the potential of combining universal design with technological advancements for enabling persons with disabilities to fulfill their rights;

(c)

Development policies and programmes address the basic needs of persons with disabilities and their families who live in poverty;

(d)

Rigorous collection and analysis of gender-disaggregated disability data is pursued for evidence-informed policy making;

(e)

National, subnational and local policies and programmes based on disability-sensitive plans accord priority to disability-inclusive development towards enhancing the participation of persons with disabilities in development programmes and in service coverage concerning all aspects of life;

(f)

Ensure that the necessary budgetary support is provided at all levels for disability-inclusive development;

(g)

National, subnational and local coordination, with subregional and regional linkages, is further strengthened through intensification of multisectoral collaboration, to expedite and review Decade implementation and share related good practices;

(h)

Community-based inclusive development is promoted to ensure that all persons with disabilities, irrespective of socio-economic status, religious affiliation, ethnicity and location, are able on an equal basis with others to contribute to and benefit from development initiatives, particularly poverty reduction programmes;

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(i)

Persons with disabilities are included in mainstream community life with choices equal to those of others, including the option to live independently if they so wish;

(j)

Persons with disabilities have access to the physical environment, public transportation, knowledge, and information and communication systems, in a usable manner, with reasonable accommodation provided, and taking into consideration the need to accommodate economic, geographic, linguistic and other aspects of cultural diversity, which altogether constitute a critical bridge to fulfilling their rights;

(k)

Diverse disability groups are empowered that include but are not limited to the following under-represented groups: girls and boys with disabilities, young persons with disabilities, women with disabilities, persons with intellectual, learning and developmental disabilities, persons with autism, persons with psychosocial disabilities, persons who are deaf, hard of hearing and deafened, persons who are deafblind, persons with multiple disabilities, persons with extensive disabilities, older persons with disabilities, persons living with HIV, indigenous persons with disabilities, persons affected by leprosy, parents and other family advocacy groups, as well as particularly marginalized persons with disabilities living in slums, rural and remote areas and island atolls;

(l)

Organizations of and for persons with disabilities, self-help groups and self-advocacy groups, with the support of families of persons with disabilities, as needed by the groups concerned, participate in decision making, as appropriate, to ensure that the interests of marginalized groups are adequately addressed;

(m)

Action on awareness raising is strengthened and continued throughout the Decade, to improve attitudes and behaviour and mobilize effective multi-sectoral engagement in implementation modalities.

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C.

Incheon goals and targets

10.

The Incheon Strategy is composed of 10 interrelated goals, 26 targets and 50 indicators.

11.

The timeframe for achieving the goals and targets is the Decade, 2013 to 2022.

12. Goals describe the desired end-results to be achieved. Targets are aimed to be achieved within a given time frame. Indicators measure and verify that the targets have been achieved.2 There are two types of indicators: core indicators and supplementary indicators.3 Goal 1: Reduce poverty and enhance work and employment prospects. The Decade must see greater progress in reducing poverty among persons with disabilities and their families. The majority of persons with disabilities are disproportionately poorer, more disadvantaged and often excluded from society. Having a decent job and the necessary education, training and support to keep that job is one of the best means of overcoming poverty. Those who can and want to work must therefore be better supported, protected, and equipped to do so. This requires more accommodating labour markets. Lifting persons with disabilities and their families out of poverty would contribute to the achievement of inclusive growth and sustainable development. Target 1:

Halve the proportion of persons with disabilities living in poverty.

Target 2:

Increase by 50 per cent the employment of persons with disabilities.

Target 3:

Increase by at least 20 per cent the participation of persons with disabilities in vocational training and other government employment-support programmes. Goal 1: Indicators for tracking progress

Core indicators 1.

Proportion of persons with disabilities living below the US$ 1.25 (PPP) per day international poverty line.

2.

Employment rate of persons with disabilities.

3.

Proportion of persons with disabilities who participate in government-funded vocational training and other employment-support programmes.

Supplementary indicators 1A. Proportion of persons with disabilities living below the national poverty line.

2

All indicators should be disaggregated by sex wherever possible. Core indicators facilitate inter-country sharing of progress in the course of the new Decade; these are indicators for which data can be generated with some effort. Supplementary indicators may facilitate progress tracking among countries with similar social and economic development conditions and for which data may be less easy to collect. 3

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Goal 2: Promote participation in political processes and decision making The participation of persons with disabilities in the political process and in decision making is the cornerstone for the realization of the rights of persons with disabilities. Being able to exercise the right to vote and the right to be elected is intrinsic to this goal. The Decade, 2013-2022, must witness greater and more widespread progress in the participation of diverse groups of persons with disabilities, including women and youth with disabilities, in political processes and in decisionmaking at all levels. Moreover, technological improvements should be harnessed to enable persons with disabilities to participate in public decision-making processes and to exercise their rights and fulfil their responsibilities as full members of society. The improvements include the provision of an enabling environment for qualified persons with disabilities to have equitable access to appointments in the judicial, executive and legislative branches of government, including those of the supreme court, ministries and national legislative body. Target 1:

Ensure that persons with disabilities are represented in government decision-making bodies.

Target 2:

Provide reasonable accommodation to enhance the participation of persons with disabilities in the political process. Goal 2: Indicators for tracking progress

Core indicators 1.

Proportion of seats held by persons with disabilities in the parliament or equivalent national legislative body.

1A. Proportion of diverse disability groups represented in the membership of the national coordination mechanism on disability. 1B. Proportion of women with disabilities represented in the national women’s machinery for gender equality and women’s empowerment. 2.

Proportion of polling stations in the national and subnational capital that are accessible with measures for protecting the confidentiality of voting by persons with disabilities.

Supplementary indicators 1C. Proportion of persons with disabilities who hold cabinet positions at the national and subnational level. 1D. Proportion of persons with disabilities who are supreme court judges. 1E. Proportion of persons with disabilities who hold positions in the local city council or equivalent local legislative body. 1F. Proportion of family representatives of children with disabilities who hold positions in the government decision-making bodies on disability. 2A. Availability of legislation that requires the national election authority to conduct the election process in a manner that makes it accessible for persons with diverse disabilities.

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Goal 3: Enhance access to the physical environment, public transportation, knowledge and information and communication Access to the physical environment, public transportation and information for knowledge is a precondition for persons with disabilities to fulfill their rights in an inclusive society. The accessibility of urban, rural and remote areas based on universal design increases safety and ease of use not only for persons with disabilities, but also all other members of society. Access audits are an important means of ensuring accessibility and must cover all stages of the planning, design, construction, maintenance and monitoring and evaluation process. Access to assistive devices and related support services is also a precondition for persons with disabilities to optimize their level of independence in daily life and live in dignity. Ensuring the availability of assistive devices for those living in low resource settings involves encouraging research, development, production, distribution and maintenance. Target 1:

Increase the accessibility of the physical environment in the national and subnational capital that is open to the public.

Target 2:

Enhance the accessibility and usability of public transportation.

Target 3:

Enhance the accessibility and usability of information and communications services.

Target 4:

Halve the proportion of persons with disabilities who need appropriate assistive devices or products but do not have them. Goal 3: Indicators for tracking progress

Core indicators 1.

Proportion of accessible government buildings in the national and subnational capital.

2.

Proportion of accessible international airports.

2A. Proportion of accessible international seaports. 3.

Proportion of daily captioning and sign-language interpretation of public television news programmes.

3A. Proportion of government websites that meet internationally recognized standards for information and communications technologies. 3B. Proportion of audio description of public television news programmes. 4.

Proportion of persons with disabilities who need assistive devices or products and have them.

5. Availability of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the Incheon Strategy to “Make the Right Real” in Asia and the Pacific in the national language. 5A. Availability of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the Incheon Strategy to “Make the Right Real” in Asia and the Pacific in easy-to-read versions in the national language. Supplementary indicators 1A. Availability of government access audit programme that requires the participation of experts 12

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with disabilities. 1B. Availability of mandatory technical standards for barrier-free access that govern the approval of all designs for buildings that could be used by members of the public. 3B. Number of sign language interpreters. 3C. Availability of mandatory technical standards for barrier-free access that govern the approval of all ICT-related services, such as websites for the public. Goal 4: Strengthen social protection Social protection coverage in developing countries of Asia-Pacific is often only available to those with regular employment contracts in the formal sector, leaving the vast majority of the population, especially persons with disabilities, without sufficient coverage. It is therefore critical to mainstream a disability perspective in general social protection schemes, and to promote further the social protection floor with a focus on health care and basic income protection. The Decade has to see universal coverage of social protection schemes for persons with disabilities. Furthermore, there is a lack of affordable services, including personal assistance and peer counselling services, which enable persons with disabilities to live independently in the community. Such support is particularly critical in the case of persons with psychosocial disabilities, persons with extensive disabilities, persons with multiple disabilities and persons with intellectual disabilities. Target 1:

Increase health care provision for personschildren and adults with disabilities.

Target 2:

Increase disability benefits for personschildren and adults with disabilities.

Target 3:

Enhance services and programmes, including for personal assistance, and peer counselling, and counselling for parents of children with disabilities that support persons with multiple, extensive and diverse disabilities in living independently in the community. Goal 4: Indicators for tracking progress

Core indicators 1. Proportion of personschildren and adults with disabilities who use government health care programmes to live independently in the community. 2.

Average annual amount of disability benefits per person with disabilities qualified to receive social protection.

3.

Availability of government-funded services and programmes, including for personal assistance, and peer counselling and counselling for parents of children with disabilities, that enable persons with disabilities to live independently in the community.

Supplementary indicators 1A. Number of government-supported programmes for care services, including for respite care and therapy centers. 2A. Availability of health insurance for persons with disabilities. 3A. Availability of national community-based rehabilitation government-supported programmes 13

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according to the Community-based Rehabilitation Guidelines. 3B. Availability of services and programmes funded by the private sector, including for personal assistance and peer counseling, that enable persons with disabilities to live independently in the community.

Goal 5: Expand early intervention and education of children with disabilities Early detection, intervention, care, education and empowerment of children with disabilities are essential for maximizing the development potential of children with disabilities. Investing in such early childhood programmes yields higher returns than at subsequent levels of education and training. However, in much of Asia-Pacific, a disproportionate number of children with disabilities do not have access to such programmes. Government commitment to such early childhood programmes would significantly improve their development outcomes. Furthermore, it is essential for governments to ensure that children with disabilities have access, on an equitable basis with others in the communities in which they live, to quality primary and secondary education. This process includes engaging families as partners in providing more effective support for children with disabilities. Target 1:

Enhance measures for early detection of, and intervention for, children with disabilities from birth to pre-school age.

Target 2:

Halve the gap between school-aged children with disabilities and children without disabilities in enrollment rates for primary and secondary education. Goal 5: Indicators for tracking progress

Core indicators 1. Number of children with disabilities receiving early childhood intervention, including day care and therapy, in government facilities. 2.

Primary education enrollment rate of children with disabilities.

2B. Secondary education enrollment rate of children with disabilities. Supplementary indicators 1A. Proportion of government pre- and ante-natal care facilities that provide information and services, including day care and therapy, regarding early detection of disability in children and protection of the rights of children with disabilities. 2C. Proportion of schools for deaf children that use sign language as a medium of instruction. 2D. Proportion of students with visual impairment that have educational materials in formats that are accessible. 2E. Proportion of schools for children who are hard of hearing and deafened that provide speech therapy. 2F. Proportion of public universities which have disability support programs for students with disabilities. 14

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Goal 6: Ensure gender equality and women’s empowerment Girls and women with disabilities face multiple forms of disadvantage. Isolation, compounded by dependency on caregivers, renders them extremely vulnerable to many forms of exploitation, violence and abuse, with attendant risks, including of HIV infection, pregnancy and maternal and infant death. Girls and women with disabilities are largely invisible in mainstream gender equality programmes. Information concerning sexual and reproductive health, general health care, and related services is seldom in formats and language that are accessible. The true promise of the Decade, 2013-2022, will be fully realized only when girls and women with disabilities are active participants in mainstream development. Target 1:

Enable girls and women with disabilities to have equitable access to mainstream development opportunities.

Target 2:

Ensure that all girls and women with disabilities have access to sexual and reproductive health services, and legal support on an equitable basis with girls and women without disabilities.

Target 3:

Increase measures to protect girls and women with disabilities from violence.

Goal 6: Indicators for tracking progress Core indicators 1.

Availability of national plans on promoting the participation of girls and women with disabilities in mainstream development programmes.

2.

Proportion of girls and women with disabilities who access government sexual and reproductive health services.

3.

Number of government programmes aimed at reducing violence, including sexual abuse and exploitation, perpetrated against girls and women with disabilities.

Supplementary indicators 2A. Proportion of girls and women with disabilities who access HIV prevention, treatment, care and support through government programmes.

Goal 7: Ensure disability-inclusive disaster risk reduction Asia-Pacific is the region most adversely affected by disasters, including those caused by climate change. Persons with disabilities and other vulnerable groups are at higher risk of death, injury and additional impairments, as a result of exclusion from disaster risk reduction policies, plans and programmes. Public service announcements are often issued in formats and language that are not accessible by persons with disabilities. In addition, emergency exits, shelters and facilities tend not to be barrier-free. Regular participation of persons with disabilities in emergency preparedness drills and other disaster risk reduction measures at the local and district levels could prevent or minimize risk and damage when disasters occur. Physical and information infrastructure that incorporates universal design principles would improve the chances of safety and survival. 15

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Target 1:

Strengthen disability-inclusive disaster risk reduction planning.

Target 2:

Strengthen implementation of measures on providing timely and appropriate support to persons with disabilities in responding to disasters. Goal 7: Indicators for tracking progress

Core indicators 1.

Availability of disability-inclusive disaster risk reduction plans.

2.

Availability of disability-inclusive training for all uniformed service personnel.

2A. Proportion of accessible emergency alert system, exits, evacuation route, shelters and disaster relief sites. Supplementary indicators 1A. Disability prevalence data on disaster casualties. 2B. Availability of psychosocial support service personnel that can be mobilized for persons with disabilities affected by disaster. 2C. Availability of temporary assistive device in case of disasters. Goal 8: Improve disability data reliability and comparability Not being counted means that persons with disabilities tend to be invisible and excluded. Definitions of “disability” and “persons with disabilities” that are used for collecting disability data vary widely throughout the Asia-Pacific region. Taken together, data comparisons across countries are frequently unreliable. The Asia-Pacific region needs more accurate statistics on the population of persons with diverse disabilities and on their socio-economic status. The adequacy of disability statistics would enable policy making to be evidence-informed, to support realization of the rights of persons with disabilities. The Decade, 2013-2022, is an opportunity to enhance data collection aimed at generating comparable disability statistics over time and across borders. It is crucial that baseline data for Incheon Strategy indicators are made available to enable effective progress tracking towards goal and target achievement. Target 1:

Produce and disseminate reliable and internationally comparable disability statistics in formats that are accessible by persons with disabilities.

Target 2:

Establish reliable disability statistics by 2015, as the source for tracking progress towards the achievement of the goals and targets in the Incheon Strategy. Goal 8: Indicators for tracking progress

Core indicators 1.

Disability prevalence based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) approach or another approach (by age, sex, socio-economic status, education level, causes and types of impairment and geographic location).

2.

Number of Governments that have established, by 2015, baseline data for tracking

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progress towards achievement of the Incheon goals and targets.

Goal 9: Accelerate the ratification and implementation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and harmonization of national legislation with the Convention The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities is the first disability-specific, international legal instrument that provides a comprehensive approach to respecting, protecting and fulfilling the rights of persons with disabilities. The Convention explicitly empowers persons with disabilities as holders of rights, as distinct from being treated as objects of charity. The ESCAP region played an instrumental and historic role in the initiation and drafting of the Convention. At the global level, 106 States are parties to the Convention, while 153 are signatories. As of 28 June 2012, 35 Governments in the Asia-Pacific region had signed the Convention, while 23 Governments in the region had ratified the Convention or acceded to it. Target 1:

By the mid-point of the Decade (2017), 10 more Asia-Pacific Governments shall have ratified the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, and by the end of the Decade (2022) another 10 Asia-Pacific Governments shall have ratified the Convention.

Target 2:

Enact national laws which include anti-discrimination provisions, technical standards and other measures to uphold and protect the rights of persons with disabilities. Goal 9: Indicators for tracking progress

Core indicators 1.

Number of Governments that have ratified the Convention.

2.

Availability of national anti-discrimination legislation to uphold and protect the rights of persons with disability.

Supplementary indicators 1A. Number of Asia-Pacific Governments that have ratified the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Goal 10: Advance subregional, regional and interregional cooperation The experience of two Asian and Pacific Decades underscores the value of cooperation, at subregional, regional and interregional levels, for facilitating mutual support, including through sharing lessons learned, good practices and innovative solutions. The Busan Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation, adopted on 1 December 2011 by the Fourth High Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness, Busan, Republic of Korea, recognized the importance of international commitments on disability to form the foundation of cooperation for effective development. Civil society and the private sector could play important roles in catalyzing innovative approaches to reaching the Incheon goals and targets. The Asia-Pacific region, particularly Central Asia and the Pacific, still faces long-term challenges. In post-conflict areas, challenges such as landmines and remnants of war continue to exacerbate the occurrence of disability and undermine livelihoods. The Decade, 2013-2022, provides an opportunity for international cooperation, with multi-sectoral dimensions, to overcome such challenges, and support effective implementation.

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Target 1:

Contribute to initiatives and programmes to support the implementation of the Ministerial Declaration on the Asian and Pacific Decade of Persons with Disabilities, 2013-2022,4 and the Incheon Strategy.

Target 2:

Development cooperation agencies in Asia-Pacific strengthen the disabilityinclusiveness of their policies and programmes.

Target 3:

United Nations Regional Commissions strengthen interregional exchange of experiences and good practices concerning disability issues and the implementation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Goal 10: Indicators for tracking progress

Core indicators 1. Number of United Nations entities that have regional and subregional cooperation programmes, including for South-South cooperation, that explicitly support the implementation of the Ministerial Declaration on the Asian and Pacific Decade of Persons with Disabilities, 2013-2022, and the Incheon Strategy. 1A. Number of subregional inter-governmental bodies that have programmes, including for South-South cooperation, which support the implementation of the Ministerial Declaration on the Asian and Pacific Decade of Persons with Disabilities, 2013-2022, and the Incheon Strategy. 1B. Number of regional and subregional projects, including for South-South cooperation, in which organizations of and for persons with disabilities participate to support the implementation of the Ministerial Declaration on the Asian and Pacific Decade of Persons with Disabilities, 2013-2022, and the Incheon Strategy. 2. Number of development cooperation agencies operating in Asia and the Pacific that have mandates, policies, action plans and focal points on disability-inclusive development, supportive of ratification and implementation of the Convention and review of follow-up action. 3. Number of joint activities among the five Regional Commissions of the United Nations to support the implementation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

D.

Modalities for effective implementation: national, subregional and regional levels

13. This section identifies the modalities that together promote and support implementation. In particular, these modalities build data and information and strengthen multi-level cooperation for advancing progress on realizing the rights of persons with disabilities through implementing the Incheon Strategy in the course of the Decade, 2013-2022. 1. National level 14. The heart of Incheon Strategy implementation is the national coordination mechanism on disability with its all-important subnational linkages.

4

Hereafter referred to as the Ministerial Declaration.

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15. Many such mechanisms were established in the course of the past two Asian and the Pacific Decades of Disabled Persons. Thus, they would assume primary responsibility for coordinating and catalyzing the implementation of the Incheon Strategy at national and subnational levels. 16. Under the auspices of the national coordination mechanisms, national statistics offices would assume the focal point role for establishing baseline data for indicators and tracking progress in the implementation of the Incheon Strategy. 17. National coordination mechanisms on disability should undertake tasks that include but are not limited to the following: (a)

Mobilize diverse sectoral ministries, departments and government institutions at all levels, civil society, including organizations of and for persons with disabilities and their family support groups, research institutions, and the private sector for multi-sectoral and nation-wide engagement in implementing the Incheon Strategy;

(b)

Develop, monitor and report on the implementation of national action plans on achieving the goals and targets of the Incheon Strategy;

(c)

Translate the Incheon Strategy into national languages and ensure availability of the national language versions in accessible formats for wide dissemination to all sectors and at all administrative levels;

(d)

Undertake national and sub-national campaigns, such as the Make the Right Real! Campaign, to raise awareness throughout the Decade, 2013-2022, that fosters positive perceptions of persons with disabilities;

(e)

Promote and support research on the situation of persons with disabilities as a basis for policy making.

18. The United Nations Country Teams should support the revitalization and functioning of national coordination mechanisms, as may be required, with particular attention to advocacy, coordination and cooperation directed at implementation, including at sub-national levels. 2. Subregional level 19. Subregional intergovernmental entities, such as the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, Economic Cooperation Organization, Pacific Islands Forum, the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation, and the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation, have an important role in contributing to accelerated implementation of the Ministerial Declaration and the Incheon Strategy by actively promoting disability-inclusive policies and programmes within their respective mandates. 20. The ESCAP secretariat, in its promotion of the Asian and Pacific Decade of Persons with Disabilities, 2013-2022, shall support subregional and inter-subregional cooperation, in partnership with subregional intergovernmental bodies. In doing so, it shall harness the active participation of its subregional offices in North and Central Asia, East and North-East Asia, the Pacific, and South and South-West Asia, supported by its regional institutions 5 , in promoting disability-inclusive development.

5

Asian and Pacific Training Centre for Information and Communication Technology for Development (APCICT), Incheon, Republic of Korea; Asian and Pacific Centre for Transfer of Technology (APCTT), New Delhi; Statistical Institute for Asia and the Pacific (SIAP), Tokyo; Centre for the Alleviation of Poverty through Sustainable Agriculture (CAPSA), Bogor, Indonesia; United Nations Asian and Pacific Centre for Agricultural Engineering and Machinery (UNAPCAEM), Beijing. 19

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3. Regional level 21. A regional working group on the Asian and Pacific Decade of Persons with Disabilities, 2013-2022, shall be established. The working group shall support full and effective implementation throughout the Decade. Its functions shall focus on the provision of advice and support to the ESCAP secretariat, as appropriate, on the regional implementation of the Ministerial Declaration and the Incheon Strategy. The draft terms of reference of the working group are annexed. 22. The ESCAP secretariat shall contribute to implementation through its regional convening and norm setting role, analytical work, technical support to governments, and follow-up action concerning the implementation of the Ministerial Declaration and the Incheon Strategy. In particular, it shall undertake the following in cooperation with concerned United Nations entities: (a)

Support governments, as appropriate, in harmonizing legislation with the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, and in promoting the “Make the Right Real!� Campaign;

(b)

Promote sharing of national experiences and good practices in disability-inclusive development and in protecting and upholding the rights of persons with disabilities;

(c)

Track Decade progress and support the improvement of disability statistics;

(d)

Support members and associate members in capacity building to promote disabilityinclusive development;

(e)

Provide a regional platform for stakeholder consultations.

23. The Asia-Pacific Development Centre on Disability, which was established as a legacy of the first Asian and Pacific Decade of Disabled Persons to promote the empowerment of persons with disabilities, and a barrier-free and inclusive society, is called upon to continue building the capabilities of persons with disabilities and multi-sectoral collaboration, with special attention to encouraging private sector engagement in disability-inclusive business that promotes disabilityfriendly products, services, employment opportunities and entrepreneurship development. 24. Civil society entities are encouraged to participate in the implementation of the Ministerial Declaration and the Incheon Strategy and promote continuous Decade responsiveness to the aspirations and needs of persons with disabilities.

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Annex:

DRAFT Terms of reference: Regional working group on the Asian and Pacific Decade of Persons with Disabilities

Objective 1. The objective of the proposed regional working group on the Asian and Pacific Decade of Persons with Disabilities is to provide technical advice and support to the ESCAP secretariat, to promote the full and effective implementation of the Decade, 2013-2022. Functions 2. In pursuance of the objective stated in paragraph 1 above, the working group shall advise the ESCAP secretariat on the following: (a)

Reviews of Decade progress, especially concerning the implementation of the Ministerial Declaration on the Asian and Pacific Decade of Persons with Disabilities, 2013-2022, and the Incheon Strategy to “Make the Right Real� for Persons with Disabilities in Asia and the Pacific;

(b)

Regional and sub-regional cooperation to advance implementation of the Ministerial Declaration and the Incheon Strategy;

(c)

Research on the evolving situation of persons with disabilities in the Asia-Pacific region;

(d)

Outreach to diverse disability groups at national and local levels, and networking.

Membership 3. The working group shall be composed of representatives of ESCAP members and associate members, as well as civil society entities operating at the regional and sub-regional levels in Asia and the Pacific. 4. The tenure of working group members shall be five years, with the possibility of extension for another five years. 5.

All ESCAP members and associate members shall be eligible to serve in the working group.

6. A civil society entity that meets the following criteria shall also be eligible to serve as a working group member: (a) operate at regional and/or subregional levels in Asia and the Pacific; (b) be an organization or network that represents, supports and/or promotes the interests of persons with diverse disabilities; (c) has technical expertise relevant to advancing the implementation of the Ministerial Declaration and the Incheon Strategy. 7. The announcement of interest by individual ESCAP members and associate members, and civil society entities, in serving as working group members shall take place at the High-level Intergovernmental Meeting on the Final Review of the Implementation of the Asian and Pacific Decade of Disabled Persons, 2003-2012, to be held in Incheon, Republic of Korea, from 29 October to 2 November 2012. 8. The proposed composition of the working group shall be submitted to the Commission on the session that immediately follows the High-level Intergovernmental Meeting, for a final decision. Thus, the Commission at its sixty-ninth session in 2013 will make the final decision on the composition of 21

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the working group for the first term spanning the period 2013-2017. The second announcement of interest in serving in the working group shall take place at the mid-point of the Decade (2017) at the next High-level Intergovernmental Meeting. The Commission at its seventy-fourth session in 2018 will make the final decision on the composition of the working group for the second term spanning the period 2018-2022. Rules of procedure 9.

The working group shall adopt its own rules of procedure.

Secretariat 10. The ESCAP secretariat shall serve as the secretariat of the working group. It shall, inter alia, disseminate working group documentation in accessible formats.

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Session Presentations Overview of Achievement of APCD/JICA Project Phase 2 (1/5)

Mr. Katsuji Onoda Chief Advisor   JICA/APCD Project  13th July 2012   Session 3, APCD/JICA Project Workshop, Bangkok  Thailand   

What is JICA  Implementation body of Japan’s Official  Development Assistance (ODA)    Three Major Function  1) Technical Cooperation   2) Grant Aid Assistance   3) Official Loan  

38


Overview of Achievement of APCD/JICA Project Phase 2 (2/5)

JICA/APCD Project  y Royal Thai Government proposed Japanese  Government to extend grant aid for construction of  Asia‐Pacific Development Center on Disability  (APCD) and technical cooperation for establishment  of APCD  y In 2002, Technical Cooperation Project Started. This   is APCD Project Phase 1 for 5 years   y In 2004, APCD buildings (administration and  training) was completed   y In 2007, Technical Cooperation project Phase 2  started

JICA/APCD Project (Phase2) 1. Period: August 2007‐July 2012  2. Purpose:  

2‐1 To develop more effective and sustainable  networking & collaboration among APCD,  Focal Points, Associate Organizations and  others.   2‐2 To strengthen the managerial and  administrative capacity of APCD to sustain  the Internationalized organization 

39


Overview of Achievement of APCD/JICA Project Phase 2

Regional Networking ‐ Support on establishment and development of 6  Regional Networks : AAN, SADF, CADF, APFHD  ‐ Networking Support for Groups of persons with  intellectual disabilities in Thailand, Myanmar and    Cambodia    

 

Scene of developing constitution,   APHOH workshop Feb, 2012

International Training

‐ More than 1352 trainees in the Asia Pacific  developed their capacities  ‐ Increasing number of sponsored participants and  Customized training    Training/Workshop Participants by Country (%)  

 

2%

2%

2%

13%

Cambodia

20%

Laos

4%

Viet Nam Myanmar

11% 17% 14%

Thailand Philippines

15%

Uzbekistan Indonesia Kyrgyz Other

40


Overview of Achievement of APCD/JICA Project Phase 2

Information and Knowledge management  y 57 documents published  

JICA Short term experts ‐The JICA short expert with intellectual  disabilities, deaf, hard of hearing etc were  dispatched   ‐Family representative of Autism have been  dispatched, Knowledge management, Training  management etc      Ms. Narasaki, self advocate with   intellectual disability   

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Overview of Achievement of APCD/JICA Project Phase 2

Other achievements y Collaboration with more than 200 Associate 

Organizations   y 31 Action Plan with associate organizations signed  y The World Bank and OECD recognised APCD as a top  model project for South‐to‐South Collaboration    

Thank you very much 

42


CBR Asia-Pacific Network (1/8)

CBR Asia-Pacific Network Sunarman Sukhmoto Rajesh Nanda Ghulam Nabi Nizamani CBR Asia Pacific Network

13th July 2012, APCD/JICA Project Workshop Session 3

CBR Asia Pacific Network

With support of APCD and WHO 43


CBR Asia-Pacific Network (2/8)

Asia-Pacific Region ƒ Home to 62 percent of the world’s population and about 65 percent of the world’s poor ƒ Most dynamic and fastest growing region in the world ƒ An estimated 450 million persons with disabilities in the region ƒ 53 member countries in the Asia-Pacific Region (according to ESCAP) ƒ Sub-regions include: East and Northeast Asia, Southeast Asia, South and Southwest Asia, Central Asia, Pacific ƒ 24 Member countries/areas of CBR Asia-Pacific Network ƒ 23 countries in the Asia-Pacific Region ratified CRPD ƒ Two successful CBR AP congresses and one CBR Convention organized in the region ƒ Global CBR Congress will be held in India Asia Pacific Region

Vision, Mission, Objectives Vision : Inclusive Development and Inclusive Society Mission: To promote, develop, and support CBR in the region and globally. Objectives: To support, promote and facilitate: 1) Documentation and sharing of good practices and lessons learned; 2) Regional base for capacity development at individual and organizational levels 3) National, sub‐regional and global CBR networks; 4) Linkage among stakeholders and a strong alliance with organizations of persons w/disabilities and families, national and international non‐governmental institutions/o rganizations, academia, national and local governments, donors and UN agencies; 5) Evidence‐based research initiatives; 6) Implementation of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and inclusive Millennium Development Goals; 7) National and international development initiatives/commitments to be inclusive 8) Disability advocacy and awareness‐raising in the region.

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CBR Asia-Pacific Network (3/8)

Organizational Structure 2012 Executive Committee Name

Position

Country

Ghulam Nabi Nizamani

Chairperson

Pakistan

Tulika Das

Vice-Chairperson

India

Etsuko Ueno

Vice-Chairperson

Japan

Sunarman Sukamto

Treasurer

Indonesia

Akiie Ninomiya

Secretary General

Thailand

EC Members: Farida Yesmin

You Hong

Rajesh Kumar Nanda

Amy Bolinas

Shidhatha Shareef

Muhammad Sadiq Mohibi

Secretariat

Asia-Pacific Development Center on Disability

The Secretariat will be responsible for coordination and communication of the Network.

CBR-AP Network Coverage East and Northeast Asia: China, Japan, Mongolia Southeast Asia : Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Thailand, Timor Leste Vietnam South and Southwest Asia: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, India, Iran, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, Palestine, Sri Lanka Central Asia: None Pacific: Australia, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea

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CBR Asia-Pacific Network (4/8)

1st Asia-Pacific CBR Congress 18-20 February 2009, Bangkok, Thailand

More than 650 participants from 52 countries mainly in the Asia-Pacific region participated in the first Asia-Pacific CBR Congress.

Asia-Pacific CBR Convention 13-15 November 2010, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Launching the New CBR Guidelines in Asia and the Pacific More than 550 participants from 32 countries mainly in the Asia-Pacific region participated in the Asia-Pacific CBR Convention.

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CBR Asia-Pacific Network (5/8)

2nd Asia-Pacific CBR Congress

More then 650 delegates participated from 60 countries and other regions like Africa, America and Europe

Brochure

47


CBR Asia-Pacific Network (6/8)

Newsletter

Website

48

http://www.cbrasiapacific.net


CBR Asia-Pacific Network (7/8)

1st CBR World Congress

FUTURE DIRECTIONS 1st CBR World Congress 3rd Asia-Pacific CBR Congress Online Training Program Offline Training Program Development of CBR training manual Publications - Newsletter - Good practice model / lessons learned ƒ Promotion of CRPD ƒ Collaboration with CBR Global Network, IDDC, CBR Africa Network, CBR Network of the Americas and the Caribbean towards CBR Global Network

ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

49


CBR Asia-Pacific Network (8/8)

Thank you !!! http://www.cbrasiapacific.net

50


Thailand Council for Independent Living (1/12)

Udomchok Churut

Thailand Council for Independent Living (TIL)

2005

start IL Pilot Project In Thailand

2002

Thai learn from Japan 1972

Start in USA

1974

Sweden Canada

1988 - 2002 1986

Japan

51


Thailand Council for Independent Living (2/12)

Establish Thailand Council for Independent Living

TIL

Network Among 3 Working Group Working and Exchange Experiences Working and Exchange Experiences

2002

2005

Training to the 3 Working Groups Peer Counseling 2003

Training to the 3 Working Groups IL Concept and How to

Services : Information, IL Skill Training, PA

Setup Co-operation

2002

Human Care – JICA – Thai Government – Thai PWD Associations

Setup the Strategy of Thai IL movement Promote the IL concept to the public.

TIL

Serve as the mechanism in pushing public policy.

Promote, expand the network and build up more IL centers. Networking among 3 Centers Nakhonprathom IL Center Santi group

Chonburi IL Center Sriracha group

Bangkok group

Chanthaburi Group

Patumthani group

Planning to enlarge 10 Group more next year

52

Nonthaburi IL Center


Thailand Council for Independent Living (3/12)

Services ` Information Service ` Peer Counseling ` IL Skill Training ` Personal Assistance Activity ` Advocacy

Strategy of Thai IL movement Develops and Maintain Network among Stakeholder Local and International

Social Communication for Driving IL Movement

Goals

Build up IL Center in community

1. People with disabilities are confident to live their lives independently. 2. People in society accept human dignity of People with disabilities. 3. To make the change of environment to suitable for people with disabilities. 4. People with disabilities have equal chance to reach to the national resources.

Develops IL Leaders, staff and IL Center management knowledge

Full Rights and participation and non-handicapping environment

53


Thailand Council for Independent Living (4/12)

54


Thailand Council for Independent Living (5/12)

55


Thailand Council for Independent Living (6/12)

PA Services

2002 started Independent Living (IL) to learn and collect the experiences in providing services. 2005 Established Thailand Council for Independent Living 2006 Thailand Council for Independent Living present the Public Policy to Ministry of Social Development and Human Security ƒ Create the plans to expand concepts and the number of Independent Living (IL) center at less 5 centers per year. ƒ Encourage Independent Living to be the service unit in the National Health Security Office (NHSO), ƒ Inform the government and local government to support Independent Living (IL) for consistency in the future ƒ Set up the welfare of Personal Assistant (PA) for the severe disabilities to help the clients do routines activities at less 2 hours per day. 2007 Thailand has the Disable Act issue 2 that it has the concept and has the word including “Independent Living (IL)” 2010 Set up the subcommittee Recondition the Environment and Personal Assistant service (PA). The president of Thailand Council for Independent Living is in this subcommittee. 2011 Start up the Personal Assistant service at the first time in Thailand at less 5 persons per province. In the end of year have seminars to evaluate the Personal Assistant system for develop in next year.

56


Thailand Council for Independent Living (7/12)

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Thailand Council for Independent Living (8/12)

Project Prepare Independent Living to be the service unit of National Health Security Office 2009 Discussing of Develop the service plan between Thailand Council for Independent Living and National Health Security Office on 8 April 2010 at National Health Security Office. The result is Join together to run the Project to Prepare Independent Living Center to be Co-operation Service with and National Health Security Office. The Project with in 3 years. 2009 Start the first year of the project with 9 pairs of IL center and Health Services Organization (Hospital). 2011 Start the second year of the project with 15 pairs of IL centers and Health Services Organization. 2012 Preparation for the third year of the project.

58


Thailand Council for Independent Living (9/12)

` ` ` `

Note IL = Independent Living TIL = Thailand Council for Independent Living Act = พระราชบัญญัติ

59


Thailand Council for Independent Living (10/12)

FIRST STEP ƒ ESTABLISHMENT

EFFECTIVE T E A M

60


Thailand Council for Independent Living (11/12)

Overall Objectives

1 Promote and create barrier-free society. 2 Empower PWDs to be change agents by creating the role model of IL implementation.

Immediate Objectives

1 Organize the Independent Living Center in Bangkok. 2 Provide peer counseling / peer support group and IL skill training program to empower PWDs in Bangkok. 3 Creating the role model of PA service in Bangkok. 61


Thailand Council for Independent Living (12/12)

What we have done

?

Challenges for PTILC

To mobilize and expand IL concept to be nationally and internationally accepted as a role model for ILC to effectively study visit in the Asia and Pacific Region

62


Empowerment Café (1/7)

Achievements of Empowerment Café

Mr. Silatul Rahim Bin Dahman Ms. Yoshimi Horiuchi Empowerment Café Barista

What is Empowerment Café?

www.apcdfoundation.org/ecafe 63


Empowerment Café (2/7)

Empowerment Barista

E‐Café Statistics (1)

Pageviews: 101,926 1 May 2011 – 30 Jun 2012

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Empowerment Café (3/7)

E‐Café Statistics (2) Country / Visits Territory 1 United States 2 Pakistan 3 Thailand 4 Malaysia 5 India 6 United Kingdom 7 Japan 8 Kazakhstan 9 Philippines 10 Canada

Visits

%

5,015 3,778 2,265 1,808 1,762 1,473 1,287 1,055 896 890

17.20% 12.96% 7.77% 6.20% 6.04% 5.05% 4.41% 3.62% 3.07% 3.05%

29,153 persons 1 May 2011 – 30 Jun 2012

E‐Café Statistics (3)

No. of Posts June 2012

1,157

May 2012

792

April 2012

720

March 2012

634

February  2012

884

65


Empowerment Café (4/7)

E‐Café Statistics (4)

131 Followers

1,354 Friends

18 Clips

Lessons Learned (1) PR activities to promote E‐Café (2) Voice of Emerging Groups  (3) Incentives for Barista

66


Empowerment Café (5/7)

Response to Lessons Learned (1)

New Decade, 2013‐2022

Response to Lessons Learned (2)

Participating Organizations/Networks 67


Empowerment Café (6/7)

E‐Café Barista

New Barista

E‐Café Secretariat

Secretariat 68


Empowerment Café (7/7)

Response to Lessons Learned (3)

Empowerment on Disability  in Asia and the Pacific

Journal, 2 times / year

Thank you!

www.disability‐ecafe.net 69


ASEAN Autism Network (1/10)

Achievements ASIAN AUTISM NETWORK (AAN)

13th July 2012, APCD/JICA Project Workshop Session 3

Establishment w

w

w w

70

Established in 2010 through the coordination and assistance of APCD in cooperation with JICA on Dec 13th -15th 2010 Initiated by Mr. Chusak (AU Thai) Mr. Ranil (ASP) Mr. Malai (SMARTER Brunei) Mr. Kyaw Htut (MDPO) Mr. Ranilo (Autism Society) Ms. NGUYEN Mr. Akiie Ninomiya (APCD) First Chairman: Mr. Chusak, Thailand Second Chairman: Mr. Malai, Brunei


ASEAN Autism Network (2/10)

10 Members Countries w w w w w

Brunei Indonesia Malaysia Philippines Thailand

w w w w w

Cambodia Lao PDR Myanmar Vietnam Japan*

*Associate Member

Establishment Family comes first for ASEAN Autism Network

71


ASEAN Autism Network (3/10)

Establishment

Support From APCD 1. Provide Secretariat 2. Provide guidance 3. Provide technical support 4. Host online meetings 5. Provide information to AAN members 6. Sharing best practices.

72


ASEAN Autism Network (4/10)

Accomplishments w w

w

w w

1st Autism Congress in Thailand, 2010 Campaign on World Autism Awareness Day (WAAD) by AAN Members 2011 – 2012

Autism Awareness Campaign through the Understanding Autism poster Online Meeting of EC Members AAN website and domain

Accomplishments w

1st Autism Congress in Thailand, 2010

73


ASEAN Autism Network (5/10)

Accomplishments w

Campaign on World Autism Awareness Day (WAAD) by AAN Members 2011 – 2012

3,000 Participants of the Campaign Walk on “Walk and Expo 4 Autism” Jakarta.

The National Autism Society of Malaysia (NASOM) organized the Walk for Autism with more than 1,000 Participants.

Accomplishments w

74

Autism Awareness Campaign through the Understanding Autism poster


ASEAN Autism Network (6/10)

Accomplishments w

Online Meeting of EC Members

Accomplishments w

AAN website and domain

http://www.aan-asean.net/

75


ASEAN Autism Network (7/10)

Accomplishment Resource Sharing with other members

w

1. AU Thai welcomed Lao group for exposure 2. Autism Society Philippines assisted Smarter Brunei for visit to SPED Centers in the Phils.

Accomplishment w

Provided Support to other members

ANN supported 12th National Conference on Autism hosted by Autism Society Philippines

76


ASEAN Autism Network (8/10)

Accomplishment w

Represent the Southeast Asia autism community in International Conferences to advocate for the rights and welfare of persons with autism and their family members

Accomplishments w

w w w w

Networked with other foundations, government and international organizations 1. Khun Poom Foundation 2. NEP 3. UNESCAP 4. Etc

77


ASEAN Autism Network (9/10)

Challenges/Lessons Learned w w w

1. Funding 2. No full time personnel to implement plans 3. Identifying the cost effective intervention program available utilizing local resources

Way Forward/Future Plans w

Organizing of 2nd AAN Congress in Brunei Date: 26 - 28 April 2012

78


ASEAN Autism Network (10/10)

ACT 4 AUTISM NOW MAKE THE RIGHT REAL

79


South Asian Disability Forum (1/6)

Achievement      

South Asian Disability Forum (2010)   

13th July 2012,  

APCD/JICA Project Workshop Session 3 

Establishment As an outcome of the Regional  Leadership Conference held in  Islamabad on 31 July – 2 August   2010, the South Asian Disability   Forum (SADF) was initiated   through the Islamabad  Recommendations  endorsed by   the Ministry of  Social Welfare   and Special Education of Pakistan    (MSWSE), Asia‐Pacific   Development Center on Disability   (APCD), and other Partners and   DPOs.

80


South Asian Disability Forum (2/6)

Establishment (Cont..) Regional Network comprising of   8 countries, namely Afghanistan,   Bangladesh, Bhutan, India,   Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri   Lanka    This is the network of South   Asian Disability Organizations   (DPOs)     

Establishment (Cont..) Vision:   To mainstream disability towards an inclusive society for all in South Asia      Mission:   To promote and facilitate South Asian regional cooperation on disability‐ related concerns for the rights of persons with disabilities through  strengthening and facilitating Disabled People’s Organizations (DPOs)  network, grassroots leadership role with gender perspective to achieve  alternative goal of inclusive society for all in South Asia. 

81


South Asian Disability Forum (3/6)

Establishment (Cont..) • All south Asian countries are globally introduced as developing countries  and 24% population of the world are living in the south Asia sub‐region.    • SADF is of, for and by the Persons With Disabilities working too actualize  the aspirations and hopes of persons with disabilities, for all intents and  purposes to enable them to serve as self‐reliant and dynamic  participants in all aspects of the sub region.     

Support by APCD project Supported participants from South Asian countries to attend South Asian Leadership Conference of Persons with Disabilities Islamabad July 31-August 2, 2010

82


South Asian Disability Forum (4/6)

Support by APCD project (Cont..) Supported Preparation mission for SADF Workshop and South Asian Leadership Conference of Persons with Disabilities Dhaka March 15-19, 2011

Support by APCD project (Cont..) Supported publications and information creation and dissemination

83


South Asian Disability Forum (5/6)

Activities and Achievement Dhaka Recommendation after the South Asian Leadership Conference in Dhaka Promotion of Women with Disability Leadership. Publishing Report of SADF Conference in Collaboration with APCD. Elected with other 14 CSOs and Participated in ESCAP meetings for Drafting Incheon Strategy (2013-2022) Document Distribution of Wheelchairs in flood affected areas of Pakistan

Challenges and Lessons Learnt

What challenges your network have faced, and  how network has tried to overcame it   (Lessons Learnt) 

84


South Asian Disability Forum (6/6)

Future Plan 1) Strengthening Role of Disabled Peoples Organizations (DPOs) in South Asia; 2) The sub-regional base for capacity development of DPOs; 3) Sub-Regional knowledge and information sharing ; 4) Linkages with stakeholders national and international non-governmental mainstream and disability related organizations, Development Agencies, Donors, UN agencies and especially SAARC secretariat/mechanism. 5) South to South cooperation in sub-region and among other sub-regions. 6) Implementation of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and inclusive Millennium Development Goals through DPO’s leadership role in South Asia; 7) Exchange programs within South Asia sub-region and with other sub-regions. 8) Networking on very grass root level. 9) Women with Disabilities participation.

85


Central Asian Disability Forum (1/3)

Achievement      

Central‐Asian Disability Forum  (CADF) 

13th July 2012,  

APCD/JICA Project Workshop Session 3 

Establishment Initiated by 20 DPOs from 5 Central Asian countries:  • Kazakhstan  • Kyrgyzstan  • Tajikistan  • Turkmenistan  • Uzbekistan  27‐28 March, 2012 established on the Seminar in  Almaty (Kazakhstan)  Seminar was supported by APCD/JICA project 86


Central Asian Disability Forum (2/3)

Support by APCD project CADF was initiated by DPOs and leaders which  was supported before in the follow activities:  • CDSHOD (2005, Islamabad, Pakistan)  • CBSHOD (2008, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan)  • 1st and 3rd CBR Congresses (2010, Bangkok;  2011, Manila)  • Ecafe workshop (2011, Bangkok)  • and many other… 

Activities and Achievement • MRR Conference in Central Asia (2012, Almaty,  Kazakhstan)  • Networking in 5 CA countries  • First Advisor on disability in Ministry of Labor  in Kazakhstan 

87


Central Asian Disability Forum (3/3)

Challenges and Lessons Learnt • Difference in economic and political situation  in 5 countries  • Isolation from AP region because of language  difference  • Long distances within the sub‐region and  region   

Future Plan • International conference in Kyrgyzstan on  ratification the CRPD, 2012   • MRR Action in Kazakhstan in fall, 2012  • MRR Rally through three CA countries,  goal – CRPD singning/ratification and  Action plans in each of countries, 2013

88


Asia-Pacific Federation of the Hard of Hearing and Deafened (1/6)

13th July 2012,  

APCD/JICA Project Workshop Session 3  Asia Pacific Federation of the Hard of Hearing and Deafened (APFHD) 

Establishment People who are hard of hearing and deafened in Asia Pacific and the Asia-Pacific Development Center on Disability (APCD) initiated this network. APFHD founded in “first Asia Pacific Workshop on Hard of Hearing and Deafened” on Feb 29 – March 2, 2012 at APCD Bangkok Thailand. APFHD has 10 members countries in its network.

Asia Pacific Federation of the Hard of Hearing and Deafened (APFHD) 

89


Asia-Pacific Federation of the Hard of Hearing and Deafened (2/6)

Establishment

Asia Pacific Federation of the Hard of Hearing and Deafened (APFHD) 

Establishment

Communication Access in the Workshop

90

Asia Pacific Federation of the Hard of Hearing and Deafened (APFHD) 


Asia-Pacific Federation of the Hard of Hearing and Deafened (3/6)

Support by APCD project 1. 2. 3.

Support in Networking: got benefit from APCD network. Support for Establishment: APCD provided us the opportunity by organizing “first Asia-Pacific Regional Workshop on Hard of hearing and Deafened”. Continuous support: Support for secretariat, account and Support for Website. Support as Adviser - Mr. Akiie Ninomiya is APFHD adviser.

Asia Pacific Federation of the Hard of Hearing and Deafened (APFHD) 

Establishment

Got benefit from APCD network – majority of member are from APCD network Asia Pacific Federation of the Hard of Hearing and Deafened (APFHD) 

91


Asia-Pacific Federation of the Hard of Hearing and Deafened (4/6)

Activities and Achievement 1. 2. 3. 4.

Online meetings of EC members A survey of member countries needs for strengthening the movement is under process. APFHD-Open-Forum, Facebook to share information and discussing related issues. Website and some other material developed Website will be launched at the end of this presentation

Asia Pacific Federation of the Hard of Hearing and Deafened (APFHD) 

Challenges and Lessons Learnt 1. 2. 3.

92

Funding and resource development is a big challenge. Lack of accessible communication is another big challenge. Lack of expertise on SHOs development and management.

Asia Pacific Federation of the Hard of Hearing and Deafened (APFHD) 


Asia-Pacific Federation of the Hard of Hearing and Deafened (5/6)

Challenges and Lessons Learnt 1. 2.

Information and communication technology (ICT) can make impossible possible. It provides the base of the APFHD network initiative. Without professional CART service communication is somewhat difficult.

Asia Pacific Federation of the Hard of Hearing and Deafened (APFHD) 

Future Plan  2012‐2013

1. A project to strengthening the member organizations. 2. A project for awareness raising (developing material and dissemination) 3. A project to train human resources i.e. professional CART/Voice writers. And setting up a service center. 4. Searching potential partners for funding / technical support etc.

Asia Pacific Federation of the Hard of Hearing and Deafened (APFHD) 

93


Asia-Pacific Federation of the Hard of Hearing and Deafened (6/6)

BGM 2014

APFHD’s Biannual General Meeting (BGM) will be organized in Indonesia in 2014 by Sehijra

Asia Pacific Federation of the Hard of Hearing and Deafened (APFHD) 

Thank you

APFHD Representatives: Ms. Hanh Duong Phuong, Ms. Rachmita Maun Harahap, Mr. Muhammad Akram

94

Asia Pacific Federation of the Hard of Hearing and Deafened (APFHD) 


United ID Network (1/5)

Achievement    

•DAO RUANG  •UNITY   •ROSE   

13th July 2012, APCD/JICA Project Workshop  Session 3 

Establishment Group name: DAO RUANG (Thailand) Logo : Name of Leader : Ms. Phacharin Sujaritwatanasak

Group name: ROSE (Cambodia)

Year of Establishment : March 2009

Logo : Name of Leader : Ms. Kay Sok Sambo

Group name: UNITY (Myanmar) Logo :

Year of Establishment : November 2011

Name of Leader : Mr. Min Swe Htet Year of Establishment : February 2010

95


United ID Network (2/5)

DAO RUANG (Thailand)

UNITY (Myanmar)

96


United ID Network (3/5)

ROSE (Cambodia) 

Common challenges Limited financial support Limited technical support Limited capacity of supporters Limited participation from family members Lack of coordinating knowledge and experience with persons with intellectual disabilities Technique of marketing of projects Limited ownership

97


United ID Network (4/5)

ID Network  Agreement read by UNITY

Statement

Statement read by Rose

98


United ID Network (5/5)

Thank you very much! 

99


Photos

Representatives from AAN, APFHD, CADF, CBR AP Network, E-Cafe, SADF, TCIL, United ID Network

New Empowerment Cafe Barista Members

100


Participants Exchanging for Sustainable Networking in Partnership with APCD

Representatives from AAN, APFHD, CADF, CBR AP Network, E-Cafe, SADF, TCIL, United ID Network

101


Participants Sharing their Inputs on the Draft Incheon Strategy

Representative of UNESCAP as resource person working on the Draft Incheon Strategy

102


Annex: Pre-Workshop Roadmap for Self-Advocate Groups (Dao Ruang, Unity and Rose)

Preamble: The three self-advocate groups; Dao Ruang from Thailand, Unity from Myanmar and Rose from Cambodia, met in Bangkok, Thailand to join the APCD-JICA Project Workshop on July11-13, 2012. The groups decided to form their network called the “United ID Network Mekong Sub-Region” with the below logo.

Logo Definition: Since the three countries are from Mekong Sub-Region in Southeast Asia, Mekong River is presented in the logo as it is the most important river runs though many countries including Thailand, Myanmar and Cambodia. The ship with three different colors represents member countries (Yellow for Dao Ruang, Green for Unity and Red for Rose) and that they will be sailing together to promote the rights of persons with intellectual disabilities and work collaboratively. Commitments: - “We all believe in the rights and dignity of persons with intellectual disabilities, their potential to be agent of change in society”. - “We all understand that the importance of triangle collaboration among persons with ID, supporters and family members”. - “We agreed to collaborate among network’s member and complete our future plan as follows”.

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United ID Network Mekong Sub-Region “ID’s Voice Must be heard”

ID Network  Agreement read by UNITY

Future Plans and Activities of the network - Annual meeting in each country - November 2013, Thailand will be first annual meeting of the group - Online meeting on every three months - Sharing information via email by monthly - Chair person will be rotated per year Future Actions: We (Persons with ID) should: - Encourage persons with ID to live independently Statement - Lead local groups, clubs in community with supporters and families - Connect with donors/INGOs/NGOS and services providers and community - Communicate with other networks on intellectual disabilities for information exchanged - Regional exchanged programs and collaborations of self-advocates and supporters

Statement read by Supporters should: - Support/ facilitate groups’ members to meet regularly - Raising awareness of family and community - Promote capacity development of self-advocate group member - Voice out in case persons with ID can’t

Rose

Family should: - Encourage and provide opportunity for children to participate in the groups’ activities - Strengthen existed parents’ networks/ clubs - Provide development support for their children - Collaborate with supporters and relevant stakeholders

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Accessible for Persons with disAbilities . .. .. .. . . . . . . .. .. .. ... .. ... ... ... ... . . . . . . . . . . .

. Asia-Pacific Development Center on Disability 255 Rajvithi Rd., Rajthevi, Bangkok 10400 Thailand Tel: +66(0)2 354-7505 Fax: +66 (0)2 354-7507 Email: info@apcdfoundation.org Website: www.apcdfoundation.org

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Report on APCD-JICA Project Workshop  

Report on APCD-JICA Project Workshop

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