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THE GREAT AIR SHOW AT POINT COOK The Bi-annual Air Show at Point Cook Air Base was again a fantastic success with more than 1000 spectators who thoroughly enjoyed the whole show of both static displays and magnificent entertainment in the sky.

in our history and represent what the ‘Museum’ is all about. On show all the time, a visit is a must on your agenda – a ‘Friend’ is waiting to show you around!

It was a lovely day to be near the sea although the wind and sun produced a few cases of red faces for some to take home (our roaming reporter was one). The organisaton of the whole affair was again top line ably assisted by the ‘Friends of the Museum’ who did a fantastic job. The now grounded F111 made a magnificent display as was the fantastic aerial parade that began at 12.55, complete with complex maneuvers. Of particular interest was the parade of ‘Old Timers). These now mature airplanes have all earned their place continued page 3


EDITORS COLUMN

Greetings from Warnambool! If you have not ventured down this way before, I highly recommend it. 3.5 Hours from Melbourne it makes a fantastic day trip. Everything you want on a country trip. Trees, paddocks, cows... You get the drift. Warnambool does have everything. Some lovely weather has made the end of Feb very enjoyable to! As always thank you for your contributions.

The morning tea in support of ovarian cancer went great. John, talking on behalf of his wife Deborah (battling ovarian cancer), gave a very heartfelt account of both his and his wife's experiences. The event attracted a very good turn out with all the local state MP's turning up, many locals and Council representatives. With some decent media coverage this event certainly helped raise awareness for the symptoms of ovarian cancer. Have a great month. Daniel.

PUDDLING WITH THE PUBLISHER Just a few weeks ago I was very lucky indeed to be invited to visit a new ‘Cookery Group’ of Ladies In Point Cook. so with Google map in hand I set off 15 minutes early to be sure not to be late. One hour later, after receiving some needed directions and having driven past my designation twice, I arrived at the door to be welcomed by our volunteer Louise, who introduced me to our host, the lovely Lesley. As I entered the home, I heard the sound of full on conversations of the members of the group whom I had come to meet and to find out about their activities. Suddenly I am surrounded by a group of lovely Asian ladies in a delightful setting for an afternoon tea party arranged by Lesley to demonstrate an ‘English’ and Australian afternoon tea to the guests, only one hour late! I was introduced to all the ladies, and with my memory being what it is, this became a little difficult, and very enjoyable. The level of conversation was full on and was keeping on as I tried to find out what the meeting was all about. A most interesting story unfolded. Our host, Lesley, from South Africa, together with her friends, had set out

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to form a Multi Cultural group to meet socially and particularly to help the young Asian ladies present to learn English conversation by engaging with Australian speaking people. What a wonderful and sensible idea which could only be encouraged – which I did. Back to the tea party – heaps of food, tiny sandwiches, lots of cakes, and, surprise, just pulled from the oven after I arrived, a huge annulus cake the ladies had made for the occasion. But that wasn’t all – during the tea party the ladies decided to be photographed with their only male guest – me! – So I was in demand and didn’t I love it. If you or your group would like to make contact with the group email me at billmcpherson@ optusnet.com.au put tea party in the subject line, and I’ll put you in touch with Lesley. I’m confident their presence would make a really great meeting!

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from front page

You can still book a ride as a passenger in a Tiger Moth vintage aircraft rated at one of the safest planes ever in the sky – a wonderful experience in an open cockpit – a really great birthday present for a friend or the kids - they photograph well with the helmet and googles!. We look forward with pleasure to the next display – see you there!

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TWO YEARS OF JAMIESON JOTTERS Have you ever thought of writing a poem, keeping a diary, having an article published in your favourite magazine, or selling your unpublished novel? For two years Jamieson Jotters, a writers’ group based at Jamieson Way Community Centre, at 59 Jamieson Way, Point Cook has been meeting on a monthly basis. As a means to advertise my business Shane’s Seminars, and because I have an interest in writing, I agreed to conduct Creative Writing Workshops on a volunteer basis at Jamieson Way Community Centre in March 2010. The staff at the Community Centre, have been very supportive of the group. Without their encouragement, provision of a room, and facilities, Jamieson Jotters would not be celebrating their second year. Two people attended the first workshop on 23 April 2010. I discussed my writing background and outlined

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the types of writing that would be examined such as diary writing, poetry, essays, articles, short stories, novellas and novels. The two participants discussed their writing experience and I finished with a writing exercise on clustering. Every month the group has met since then, and the numbers have varied from one to seven, but usually there are six regulars. Other topics that have been covered in 2011 are Romance Writing, Detective Fiction, Science Fiction and Fantasy, Structure, Publishing and Colonial Fiction.

Anyone, who has any interest in writing, is welcome to attend the free workshops, which are held every third Friday, from 11.30am to 1.30pm. If you wish to make enquiries, the contact number for the Jamieson Way Community Centre is 93953777. I can be contacted on 93948576 or 0427173868. Shane Tindal 16 February 2012

Our project for 2012 is to have a selection of poetry and short stories, both fiction and non-fiction, published. We are attempting to obtain funding for this. All members of the group have contributed work, to the project, which is called The Jamieson Jotters Anthology 2012. In 2012 I have arranged for a number of guest speakers, writers and journalists to speak to the group. Doug Mullett, teacher/writer/photographer and author of Intertwined, will be discussing writing and editing on 17 February and his involvement with musical productions on 17 August. Emma Sutcliffe freelance journalist and Communications Consultant will examine magazine and on-line writing and interviewing techniques, on 16 March. Murray Smith, a journalist, will offer advice based on working for 56 years with the Herald, Standard and Leader newspapers, on 20 April 2012.

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DIGITAL PULSE ANALYSIS (DPA) Digital Pulse Analysis (DPA): a new way to determine what causes high blood pressure Blood Pressure is a problem that troubles many people. However doctors are rarely able to determine what caused the blood pressure in the first place. Thus the standard treatment is symptomatic. A pill to ease the symptoms. This in no way addresses the cause of the blood pressure. A blood pressure test only tells you what the figure is rather than what causes it. Digital Pulse Analysis is a new way of analysing blood pressure. Blood pressure has a wave form (high in the middle and low either side) which corresponds to the beating of the heart. This wave form is analysed mathematically to measure: 1) Arterial thickness 2) Arterial flexibility 3) Arterial age Think of arteries like a garden hose. If the hose becomes blocked the pressure required to force water through it increases. If the hose becomes less flexible it it is more likely to crack (stroke). So for the first time it is possible to: -warn people before their blood pressure goes up. -tell people when their diet is helping -determine which foods are the most effective at improving arterial health The test is only 1 minute long, uses an optical sensor clipped to your finger and is easy to administer. The machine is quite small and portable (about the size of a phone book). DPA is a new technology which has won awards around for innovation. It is ideal for research but simple and cheap enough for the local doctor to use. If you would like to know more about DPA go to: http://dpa1.com.au

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LIGHTPOINT CHURCH From Sunday March 4th Lightpoint Church will be meeting at the new time of 10am in the newly completed $6.3 million Featherbrook Community Centre, 33-35 Windorah Drive, Point Cook. “The new time and location should suit more people, especially those with small children.” Phil Shand, pastor of the church, explains. “Our previous meeting time of 5pm meant that families with small children found it hard to attend due to bedtime schedules and dinnertime.” To celebrate the change of time and location, Lightpoint Church will be hosting a series of special meetings in March and April called 'Seven Super Sundays.' A number of guest speakers have been invited during this time including Rick Brouwer, CEO of Total Wellbeing, who will be addressing the topic 'Renewing Your Mind' on Sunday March 18th. For further details call 0425 722 868 or visit the website www.lightpointchurch.com.

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RELAY FOR LIFE ARRIVES IN POINT COOK Point Cook residents are invited to an Information Morning for what organisers hope will be an exciting fundraising event, Cancer Council Victoria’s Point Cook Relay For Life.

The Information Morning will take place at 10a.m. Wednesday 28 March at the Point Cook Community Learning Centre, 1-21 Cheetham St, Point Cook Town Centre and will be an opportunity for residents to discover how to be part of this special new community event to support those affected by cancer. For those who are unable to attend the morning session you will be able to attend an afternoon session on the same day (28 March) 7pm at the Electorate Office of Jill Hennessy MP, Suite 603 Level 1, 2 Main St Point Cook Town Centre. “For eleven years, Relay For Life has brought Victorian communities together to walk through the night to raise money for the Cancer Council and the fight against cancer,” said Relay For Life Coordinator, Erin Davidson. Jill Hennessy, State Member for Altona District said, “Cancer Council is excited to be involved with the first

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Point Cook Relay For Life and invite all residents to attend the Information Morning to be part of the planning of this new community event.”

To confirm your attendance,

Point Cook Relay For Life will take place in November 2012. During the event, ceremonies are held to honour locals touched by cancer whilst taking turns walking or running through the night to raise funds for the Cancer Council’s world-class cancer research, education and support programs.

email Erin at erin.davidson@cancervic.org.au

or to learn more about Point Cook Relay For Life, or 9635 519 or contact John at the office of Jill Hennessy MP on 9395 0221

“Cancer Council provides cancer education and support to cancer patients and their families through Victoria, including the City of Wyndham,” Mr Hennessy said. Ms Hennessy said the information morning would be an opportunity for everybody to find out how they can join in the fun of Relay and help the local community fight back against cancer. “There are many ways to join Relay For Life. For example, you can help organise the event, captain a team, be a volunteer on the day, or provide entertainment. Just come along to the information morning and we’ll help you find the best opportunity to get involved,” Jill said. Light refreshments will be served at the information morning.

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@SOCIALMEDIAMONS YOUR LOCAL SOCIAL MEDIA CONVERSATION

I’ve been reading the news with caution lately. Big and small companies alike are shedding local jobs. If you’ve found yourself looking for a job, for what ever reason, having a great LinkedIn profile is essential to your market yourself in a competitive market.

The reality is, job recruiters and prospective employers Google you when shortlisting candidates for interview. Google yourself. What comes up? A well crafted, complete LinkedIn profile or Facebook photo’s of you on a big night out?

4. Find your colleagues (past and present) and Link In. Create a network. Let people know you’re on the job hunt. Need a first connection? Look me up, and we’ll Link In! Join the conversation @socialmediamons on Twitter or find me on Facebook. Nicole Matejic @socialmediamons Social Media Monster

Tips for a great LinkedIn profile: 1. Complete all fields – make your profile work for you 24/7. 2. Upload a photo. If you are in need of a good photograph have someone take one of you in your office, the factory or the sales floor. 3. Provide a summary of your qualifications and employment history – leave the details for your application or interview.

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Point Cook Garden Page

BANKSIA SERRATA

SAW BANKSIA / SAW-TOOTH BANKSIA / OLD MAN BANKSIA Widespread in open forests along the coastal strip of eastern Australia, Banksia serrata extends as far inland as the Great Dividing Range. The species occurs from southern Queensland through New South Wales to Victoria, and there are outlying populations on Flinders Island and in northern Tasmania. Common names are Saw Banksia, Saw-tooth Banksia and Old Man Banksia, the latter no doubt referring to the bearded appearance of old cones that retain some of the old withered flower parts. In favourable areas, Banksia serrata can attain a height of 15 metres but, in less then ideal situations, trees can be much shorter, stunted and gnarled and, if they have survived bushfire(s), the thick, rough, grey, cork-like bark (up to 6cm thick) will be blackened. Many of our native Australian plants have remarkable powers of

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regeneration, and the Saw Banksia is no exception. The first signs of regeneration are visible a week or so after the fire has passed; when the tree sends out epicormic shoots from beneath the bark. Plants from exposed coastal positions may develop a prostrate growth habit and retain that habit in cultivation - one most attractive cultivar is Banksia serrata “Austraflora Pygmy Possum�. Saw Banksia flower spikes are large and cylindrical around 10cm wide by 12cm long. Flowers are silverygrey with yellow or cream styles. They are followed by large seed cones with prominent protruding follicles. Leaves are large and stiff, dark green on top, light green below, with serrated margins. These longlived trees provide food for a wide array of vertebrate and invertebrate animals in the autumn and winter months, and they are an important source of food for a range of honeyeaters. Immature follicles are eaten by Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoos.

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Banksia serrata is relatively easy to cultivate, but it does prefer a sunny aspect and sandy, well drained soil rather than a clay soil. This is why it does so well in Point Cook’s “sand belt” that runs in a narrow strip along the coast, and where I have seen several delightful specimens. Historically, Banksia serrata is important because it is one of the four original Banksia species collected at Botany Bay by Sir Joseph Banks and Dr. Daniel Solander in 1770. I am confident Around Point Cook readers will already know these two gentlemen were members of Lieutenant (later Captain) James Cook’s first expedition to the Pacific. Propagation is by seed, but only a small proportion of the prostrate form will retain the low habit. Prostrate forms are normally propagated by cuttings that may be slow to strike. I had been looking for a model for a fourth tonal drawing of dried plant material. When I saw this Banksia serrata cone on a friend’s tree, I knew my search had come to an end. Margot was delighted I wanted to draw her plant, and she generously cut this piece for me to bring back to my studio. Helene Wild Resident Artist Habitat Trust helene.wild@optusnet.com.au

COME SING WITH US!

The Laverton Community Choir had another great year in 2011 with our membership at one point reaching 31 members. We sang at many community events throughout the year including five different Community Carols concluding a very busy year. In July, along with many other choirs from the Western Suburbs, we sang in the Newport Festival. The culmination of all of our hard work at rehearsals was a performance that was universally enjoyed. ISSUE 26

A new experience for our choir this year was our participation in the Big Sing at Footscray. This was a wonderful event and the choir really enjoyed learning a different type of music. The massive Hip Hop choir were very generous with their time in coming to our rehearsal to help us develop the skills necessary to participate in the Big Sing. We are looking forward to a wonderful 2012 and are always looking for new members. No experience is necessary, we have a talented musical director and a friendly environment. The choir gets a buzz from singing music together, developing their skills and creativity, and celebrating diversity. They aim to perform to their greatest potential, and enjoy being together as ‘like-minded’ people committed to reaching into the community entertaining people through song. The choir is made up of members from all our surrounding communities from Altona through all areas to Wyndhamvale. Rehearsals are every Thursday 7pm-9pm at the P-12 Laverton College, Bladin Street, Laverton. Come and be our guest at a rehearsal and see if you would like to join. For more information please contact Di Coleman 0418544212.

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Community Board ATE 111 CERTIFIC REN’S IN CHILDCES SERVI

ALTONA MEA LAVERTON UNIT DOWS/ ING CHURCH 61 Central Aven ue, Altona Mea

dows. We invite you to join us any Sund ay at 10 am for worship. We cater for all ag es, se and you will be ve ated in a circle ry welcome. We offer Sunday groups for childre n an Bible study and discussion group d teenagers and have s during the week . There is also a low -cost playgroup on Wednesdays fro m 9.30-11.30. We now have a full-time Ministe r; Rev. Susan Malt house;9369 0384 The multi-purpo se building is avail It is carpeted, wi th kitchen faciliti able for regular hirers. es and a fenced playground. Enquiries to Laur is on 8386 9030

arch in mid M s Starting ’s Service Children in 1 1 1 te te 111 in Certifica Certifica e and ! n o ti Hom alifica ficate in Dual Qu re / Certi Aged Ca Community Care es n’s Servic f Childre o a m lo Dip ducation munity E ore m o C n o rt rm Call Lave on 9369 2726 fo e tr n n o Ce informati

LAVERTON COMMUNITY CHOIR

The Laverton Com you to attend munity Choir invites a re before you de hearsal as a guest cide if you w ould like to join. Experienced cond musical arrang uctor, different and fun emen necessary just ts. No experience is a love of sing ing. The choir rehe arses every Th ursday 7pm – 9pm at P-12 College, Blad in Street, Laverton.

SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Scottish Country Dancing at Jamieson way Community Centre 7.30pm until 9pm. Come along and have some fun and excerise. Good for brain and body. Phone Joan on 9394 7905

Italian Lessons for beginners!

Dinners group meet once a month. Phone Joan for information

with some I seek a person train as an to ty ili ab r compute ting Consultant Internet Marke ogle Places Go particularly in n SmartPhone and the moder a view w technology ith table ofi pr a g tin ea cr to Joint Venture. quired. No money is re t u o b a 7607 Phone 03 8677 re onate es, passi e our bik sclosu , di ll n fu a e r fo d m ri am of wo er to yndh and report group me togeth , in the W rides on a e r s r a o d a . c l e n h u e o t g W g, wh mon week ve re cyclin ly on the nd. We ha ays of the more and n d r i o r o a s tu ey m also hour ird Sa and b . We area rst and th sually two of fitness enance t the fi des are u ble level ike main nd away i a b e r n s k e o a e s s The ire a rea nts such ns, a we ng events requ extra eve on sessio ised cycli 9650156 host informati g in organ ntact 043 n s, Co night articipati the Bay. ug.net. and p s Around ww.wwb a or w such

G- G U B WW CYCLIN LE A M E F

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ITALIAN LESSONS

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Call Louise on 0403 191 084

ALTO PRIM NA NORT H Alto ARY S car b na North C H oot s P O rima OL a 9am to le on S ry Sch

oo at 1p a No m at the urday 17 l is holdi rth c t n s ost is chool C h march g a resse from $ 2 0 and p r trailo er car o Street r $30 r. car Book ing/e nqui ri Sam 0404 es phone 1433 65 Pili 0 or 4331 0914 9

Alton


SHED TALK This month we are pleased to feature our cycling group, the Hobsons Bay ‘Pelican Peddlers’ who recently took a tour of Southbank and as you can see from the smiling faces, had a good time. The group arranges regular tours to places of interest, stopping for any reasonable reason such as a look at something of interest, often travelling by train at off peak times to cover a reasonable distance. If you like cycling with a group email Graeme (Graeme Borlase [mailto:borlase39@gmail.com] ) and chat to him – you will be most welcome. Our Annual classic car show is on again at Apex Park on Saturday March 10 from 10 to 3, right next to the Circus on Queen St. as part of the Altona Beach Festival. You can enter your car on the day and we have prizes for most types of entries. Membership at the shed (280 Queens St Altona) grows almost daily – the best day to visit is Friday – we have a BBQ lunch around 12, tours of the building and projects are welcome – call in and see if it is of interest – visitors are welcome – ask for the Duty Officer and he will show you around.

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IS ESTATE PLANNING JUST FOR THE ELDERLY? This is a very easy question to answer – NO, Estate Planning is for everyone! A good Estate Plan requires the involvement of skilled legal, accounting and financial specialists, to ensure that the right assets end up in the right hands at the right time. Estate Planning does not just mean you have to have a valid Will, although that is a very important aspect. Estate Planning covers all of the following areas: • Wills and Powers of Attorney • Superannuation and Life Insurance Beneficiary Nominations and Types • Ownership structure of Assets • Taxation Planning • Consideration of Trusts including Testamentary Trusts • Life Insurance

It’s not hard to do Estate Planning  A solicitor can assist you to set up Wills (with the capacity for a Testamentary Trust if required) and Powers of Attorney as well as general Estate Planning advice.  An Accountant can assist you with tax planning, trusts and asset ownership to ensure your beneficiaries maximise any benefits they are entitled to.  A Financial Adviser can assist you to ensure your Superannuation, Beneficiary Nominations, Life Insurance and Ownership structures are appropriate. We can assist you to set your finances up correctly, and ensure that everything is structured in accordance with your Will. We can also work with your Accountant and Solicitor to assist you to get it right and to make changes if your circumstances change in the future.

Frequent Objections to undertaking Estate Planning

Did you know? • That assets held in joint names automatically pass to the other owner upon death without passing through the Estate? E.g. your house and joint bank accounts.

It won’t happen to me!

• That superannuation benefits with valid binding nominations to a dependent can bypass the Estate and not be covered by your Will?

My wife/husband will get everything anyway.

• That a non-binding superannuation nomination may be able to be challenged by people who think that they are entitled to your super benefits after you are gone and not able to give the real story? • That Life Insurance proceeds in Superannuation can have tax payable of up to 31.5% if received by a nondependent beneficiary (such as an adult child), but are paid tax free to dependents?

Maybe not, but is maybe good enough for your spouse and children? Probably. But it might take longer to sort out, and is probably good enough? If I make a Will I will die. Definitely at some stage, but no sooner than without a Will. If you don’t make a Will you will still die sometime, and your family will have to sort out your Estate without the benefit of your forward planning.

• That a Testamentary Trust can assist in preventing assets from going to that son or daughter-in-law that you don’t like? • That leaving two properties worth the same amount to two different children can have vastly different values when sold once Capital Gains Tax is applied? • That if you do not have a Will your Estate is much harder to manage by your loved ones you have left behind, particularly whilst they are grieving? • That if you are disabled and do not have a Power of Attorney the Courts may decide who is in charge of you and your Assets? • That many people do not have enough Life Insurance to support their families in the event of their premature death? 16

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I don’t want to think about it. Of course you don’t, but neither does your family when you are not around, and they will have to think much harder and longer about it if you don’t have a valid Will. I can’t afford it. You can’t afford not to. And it probably doesn’t cost as much as you think. It may cost much more to manage your Estate without Estate Planning, and proper planning can save tax and legal fees. I made a Will 20 years ago. Did you? Well done! Time to check with your Solicitor that it is still valid, current and that you don’t need to change anything. Did you establish Powers of Attorney, beneficiary nominations, and do tax planning then as well? I have seen many examples of Estate Planning strategies where people think they have it right, however without advice ensuring it is correct, their wishes may not actually be met. Once you are gone, it is too late to change it. Check your overall position now.

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Please contact Melinda Houghton at the office of Houghton Strategic Solutions in Point Cook on 9394 6344 to check your plans to protect your family. With constant changes to legislation, financial markets, world events, and your own personal situation it is essential to refer to a financial specialist who is experienced and up-to-date. Melinda Houghton Authorised Representative of Aon Hewitt Financial Advice Limited Authorised Representative No. 290343 Aon Hewitt Financial Advice Limited ABN 13 091 225 642 AFSL No. 239183 This information may be regarded as general advice. That is, your personal objectives, needs or financial situations were not taken into account when preparing this information. Accordingly, you should consider the appropriateness of any general advice we have given you, having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs before acting on it. Where the information relates to a particular financial product, you should obtain and consider the relevant product disclosure statement before making any decision to purchase that financial product.

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THE SECRET TO A GOOD NIGHT’S SLEEP

Along with healthy eating and regular exercise, a regular meditation practice has been proven to help reduce stress, improve our mood, increase concentration and lower blood pressure. Initially most people find it hard to sit still and concentrate on ‘not thinking’, and this is especially challenging because we are so mentally ‘wired’ that we find it hard to shut off. It’s important to remember

that meditation is a progressive practice, which means it takes more than one attempt (usually 10) to really start to feel the benefits. Once you start to re-train your body to find its natural state of relaxation meditation becomes easier and it will be a stress management tool you can incorporate into your everyday life or as your choice for relaxation. The best thing about meditation is you can meditate anywhere and anytime, you just need to turn everything off.

Danielle Harrison Director Western Wellness

When was the last time you took a deep breath, turned off the TV, iphone, ipod, blackberry and the kids and just sat in silence? If you can’t remember or perhaps you’ve never thought to give it a go, then you’re not alone. Sitting in silence and breathing is not what most of us would call ‘a good time’, but it will give you a good night’s sleep. Next time you kick back and watch TV after a busy a day or surf the internet before bed, take a step back and notice how well you sleep. Nowadays with modern technology becoming such an integrated part of our lives it’s not surprising most of us are constantly ‘switched on’. This state of being mentally ‘wired’ is leading to more and more of us suffering from high blood pressure, increased stress levels and a poor night’s sleep. The good news is it is possible to ‘switch off’ and reverse the effects of our busy lifestyles and our iphone.

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A WORD FROM JILL HENNESSY MP

LISTEN TO THE COMMUNITY

I would like to thank those concerned residents that have sent me a copy of your letter to the Growth Areas Authority (GAA) regarding the Point Cook West Precinct Structure Plan. I share your concerns.

Member for Altona, Jill Hennessy, recently used Parliament to attack the Baillieu State Government for dropping the ball on infrastructure and planning in relation to development in Point Cook.

I have also made a submission regarding the Point Cook West Precinct Structure Plan. In this submission I articulated the issues that local community members have recently expressed to me. I also raised my concerns about the broader issue of Point Cook wearing the burden for further growth while existing infrastructure, services and employment opportunities are under significant pressure. I am concerned about the proposed density, the lack of suitable private and public space and the long term time frame within which infrastructure may or may not be built. The GAA in a response to my earlier correspondence have indicated that they have extended the date required to have submissions in, to obtain Wyndham City Council’s official submission expected early in March. I have been assured by the GAA will accept and consider all submissions received during this time. I will continue to put pressure on the Baillieu State Government to ensure infrastructure and services in the West are able to cope with our current population, let alone support further growth. Regards Jill Hennessy Member for Altona

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Ms Hennessy said “There is great and deep anxiety in our local community about the potential development… of 3000 new houses in that area. “That comes on top of the authority’s current consideration, which may in fact deliver 5800 new houses. “It is high time the Minister for Planning took the concerns of the community seriously,” Ms Hennessy said. “I have expressed concerns about the Point Cook West PSP in my own submission to the Growth Areas Authority. “It is absolutely necessary to have a far shorter time frame on obtaining funding for infrastructure. “It is impossible to hold the government to account if their target for funding infrastructure is 15 years into the future,” Ms Hennessy said. “All you need to do is look at how much growth as occurred over the last few years locally, to understand that we need commitments from the Baillieu State Government, not for 15 years but right now,” Ms Hennessy said. Ms Hennessy said, while in Parliament, “there is deep growing concern in the local community around access to infrastructure, congested roads, insufficient public transport, the capping of local schools and the fact that we need to preserve local open space.” “I urge the Minister to listen to the community,” Ms Hennessy said.

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MPs TEAL UP FOR OVARIAN CANCER AWARENESS “Mr Robertson spoke about how his family had coped with the experience, and also emphasised the need to get any unusual changes that last too long checked by a doctor,” Ms Hennessy said. “Any niggle that seems to be lasting too long, get it checked – it doesn’t make you a sook. Deborah was lucky because she went to the doctor, and has now been clear for two years,” Mr Robertson said. Deborah will be shaving her head to promote ovarian cancer awareness on 29 February. Western suburbs State MPs Jill Hennessy, Tim Pallas and Wade Noonan today held a “Morning Teal” event at Point Cook Community Centre, to lend their support to Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month. The campaign to convert February into a teal-coloured awareness drive is led by Ovarian Cancer Australia, an organisation which provides support, education, advocacy and research funding to ensure that every Australian woman knows the symptoms of ovarian cancer and everyone affected by ovarian cancer feels personally supported and has access to and information about the best treatment and research. “Events like this are vital to raise awareness of how important it is that women take time out to pay attention to their own health,” Teal host, Ms Hennessy said.

The event was well attended raising over $350 for ovarian cancer research. “I am very proud to be able to lend my support to such an important issue which affects so many families in our community,” said Tarneit MP Tim Pallas. “I am pleased that so many people are here to help raise awareness about ovarian cancer,” said Williamstown MP, Wade Noonan. "Having lost one of my neighbours to ovarian cancer late last year, I think any activity to help raise awareness is worth supporting." Further information on ovarian cancer, its symptoms and treatment, can be found on the Ovarian Cancer Australia website at www.ovariancancer.net.au, or by calling 1300 660 334.

“One of the most difficult things with this type of cancer is that it is difficult to detect in its early stages, so we need to raise awareness about the symptoms and the need to see a doctor if ever you experience any changes that worry you.” “Our region is over-represented for cancer sufferers, and we have a high incidence of ovarian cancer as well,” Ms Hennessy said. “Attendees were fortunate to be able to hear the story of one family affected by ovarian cancer, with Point Cook local John Robertson telling the story of his wife Deborah’s diagnosis and treatment,” Ms Hennessy said.

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Pet Column

PET EAR CARE Ear infections are one of the more common problems we treat at Direct Vet Services. Signs of ear disease may include: • Unpleasant odour • Rubbing or pawing the ear and ear

• Shaking the head • Crying when the ear is touched • Black or yellow discharge • Redness or swelling of the ear canal or ear flap (pinna) • Loss of balance.

The ear is constructed of 3 main areas, being the outer ear, the middle ear and the inner ear. The outer ear is the funnel that directs sound into the deeper structures. The outer ear is the most common area affected by infections, and is usually caused by bacteria, yeast and/or ear mites. Other possibilities include a buildup of ear wax, matted hair, and foreign bodies such as grass seeds. Chronic or recurring ear infections may indicate other underlying problems such as allergies. The ear canal should be kept clean regularly and vets will have a variety of cleaners to help with this task. You may also need to keep the amount of hair in the canal reduced, particularly in breeds such as poodles. The middle ear is a cavity between the ear drum and inner ear that is made up of tiny bines that work to amplify the sounds that have funneled down the ears. Infection in this area is usually bacterial or viral, and will often cause the patient to tilt the head to one side. The inner ear contains the tiny hairs that transform the sound vibrations into nerve impulses that we then “hear” and interpret at the brain. Inflammation and infections can occur at this level and will cause loss of balance, disorientation and in some instances nausea.

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Pet Column

Diseases of the Outer Ear • Ear Mites: are a common parasite and highly contagious, transferring from pet to pet. Excessive itching and a dark, crumbly discharge that looks like coffee grounds. These can be easily treated with products available from the Vet. • Otitis externa: this is an infection of the outer ear canal and will usually have an odour and black or yellow discharge. Common causes are bacterial and yeast infections, both of which will need treatment from the Vet. • Aural hematomas: These are caused by excessive shaking of the head, leading to tearing of the blood vessels in the pinna or ear flap and bleeding. Prompt treatment of the cause of the shaking should be sought, but the blood should not be drained for several days until it has been allowed to clot. If done too early the ear may continue to bleed and fill. Various techniques can be used by the vet to resolve the situation; however the pinna will always remain thickened and may end up looking a bit like cauliflower. Deafness: is usually brought on by age, trauma, loud noise or infection. In some cases it may be hereditary and in certain breeds, congenital, meaning they are born with it. Unfortunately once diagnosed the condition is usually not treatable and is lifelong. ISSUE 26

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ROTARY CLUB BEING OUT AND BEING SEEN The Rotary Club of Laverton Point Cook has had a focus on “being out and being seen” in the community over the past 18 months and it has paid big dividends. Club membership is up by 47% over the past few months and many people in Point Cook are now learning about what a difference Rotary makes to our community. Club members were hard at work providing a free community BBQ at the recent opening of the new Prudence Parade Sports Pavilion in Point Cook. We have another team of members heading up to flood devastated Rochester, whilst another team is helping the neigbouring Wyndham Rotary Club with their annual Fun Run/Walk that raises money for the Royal Children’s Hospital. Meanwhile on the overseas front a consignment of computers provided by the club is heading to Mt Hagen in PNG, with club member Frank Spiteri heading to Mt Hagen on the 11th of March for the presentation to schools.

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Rotarians Philippa and Christine at the Prudence Parade Sports Pavilion Opening

To find out more about us please go to our website at www. rotarylpc.org.au or contact Frank Spiteri m 0412 361 144 Chris Egger President, Rotary Club of Laverton Point Cook

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ECO FAIR AT THE TOWN CENTRE

A GREAT SUCCESS The Eco Fair was designed to present information helping residents become even more aware of the need and importance of energy conservation and it certainly did that in a most impressive way. Taking place on Friday early evening and following on the procedure used at the Town Centre precinct The main street was closed to traffic and given over to some terrific stalls, all loaded with information and goodies, with lots aimed at the kids. There were allergy free delights which had a particular application at this time of the year, great fresh food stalls, a book swap…. City West were there with useful advice about how to save water, then there were special activities for the little ones including crafting and the much loved ‘animal farm’. The coffee tasting was an eye opener to the adults and ‘Club Houze’ made the evening special for the little ones with the special appearance of Blinkey Bill’. They also had special activities for the younger ones like musical statues. The whole Town Centre was a buzz and a good time was had by all. 26

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QUESTION OF THE MONTH (QOM) Question of the Month (Qom) is a new series which will enable APC to distribute some worthwhile prizes obtained from our advertisers and supporters. Each month we will ask 3 questions and each email answer received will go into a draw for the Major prize. Readers may answer all questions or simply the one of their choice. There are prizes for each question answered and you may answer as many times as you wish. We reserve the right to create a limit should we find it necessary. There is only one major prize each month for the first answer drawn digitally from all entries. There are prizes for each separate question, together with a prize for all who answer at least one of the questions. Question of the month of March 2012 You may answer one or more of the questions to be in the draw for prize s from one of our advertisers 1. What is a QR code 2. What is Around Point Cook’s sister publication 3. What is the name of the poet who regularly writes for APC /s tion our s e qu il y any d ema e s o n Cho like a : o you wer t om k.c o ans o c @ int th Qomundpo e 20 s o o r l a C ries t n E rch Ma

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Laugh Out Loud YOU KNOW YOU ARE LIVING IN 2012 when... 1. You accidentally enter your PIN on the microwave. 2. You haven't played solitaire with real cards in years. 3. You have a list of 15 phone numbers to reach your family of three. 4. You e-mail the person who works at the desk next to you. 5. Your reason for not staying in touch with friends and family is that they don't have e-mail addresses. 6. You pull up in your own driveway and use your Mobile phone to see if anyone is home to help you carry in the groceries... 7. Every commercial on television has a web site at the bottom of the screen 8. Leaving the house without your cell phone, which you didn't even have the first 20 or 30 (or 60) years of your life, is now a cause for panic and you turn around to go and get it 9. You get up in the morning and go on line before getting your coffee 10.You check your emails before going to bed.

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West Side Quotes

QUOTE ONE:

man’s chest, d a e d e th n no “Fifteen me ! bottle of rum a d n a , o -h o Yo-h est – one for the r d d a h il v e d e Drink and th m.” a bottle of ru d n a o -h o -h Yo

QUOTE TWO:

“The trouble with nu de dancing is that no t everything stops whe n the music stops.”

: E E R H T QUOTE

legs d, two o o g s leg “Four

Answer Quote Two: Robert Helpman – comment on Oh! Calcutta! Answer Quote Three: George Orwell (1903 – 1950) from Animal Farm. ISSUE 26

Answer Quote One: Robert Louis Stevenson, (1850 – 1894) from Treasure Island.

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bad.”


Famous Quotes I keep six honest serving men; They taught me all I knew; Their names are What and Why and When And How and Where and Who. Rudyard Kipling (1865 – 1936) English poet, journalist and author. “Just So Stories”, The Elephant’s Child

You go to Heaven for the climate and to Hell for the company. Mark Twain (1835 – 1910) American novelist and humorist. *** Don’t accustom yourself to use big words for little matters. Dr. Samuel Johnson (1709 – 1784) English man of letters.

Humour is reason gone mad. Groucho Marx (1890 – 1977) American comedian. *** We should all pray as if everything is up to God – but act like everything is up to us. Father Bob Maguire *** Be careful of reading health books; you may die of a misprint. Mark Twain

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PT COOK Sometime it feels like I’m stuck in Pt Cook When the roads are choked I have a big sook In fifteen years it’s grown and grown But I’m not one to moan and moan For the shops and restaurants keep me happy Also the lovely parks stop my dog being too yappy There are perfect paths for my kids to ride on And at Alamanda a slippery dip to slide on You can live your fantasies in a huge Pirate Ship There’s the Coastal beach in which your tootsies can dip And the Historic Homestead is sure to please There are over 200 species of birds and even more trees There’s a RAAF museum that’s worth taking a look at And lots of barbeques in pleasant places to cook at There are Zen gardens and designer playgrounds And an Ice-cream van always doing the rounds Skeleton Creek meanders throughout it But oh, the traffic, I could do without it! Still I love the variety of cultures I’m meeting on my walks With Chinese, Indian, Kiwi and African I’ve had great talks There are health clubs and sports’ clubs For young and old and also for mums and bubs Sanctuary Lakes has a pool and there’s more than one school The Library and Community Centre are really pretty cool So I really shouldn’t grizzle because on weekends I Adore It I can just relax and at my own pace Explore It

Jan Dunstone

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ANIMAL WORD SEARCH

Point Cook Kids

Calling on Point Cook Schools and Parents to share photos, art, stories, writing for this page. Email your contributions to editorpointcook@gmail.com or post to the PO Box 1145 Altona Meadows 3028

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Please redistribute rather than discard.

Around Point Cook 26  

Community Newspaper Issue 26, March 2012

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