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t e e h s f o o r p th

Magazine of The Quarterly rk Chapter rtists | New Yo A ic h p ra g to ho e American P

Summer 2016


Supporting Photographers and the Business of Photography

Summer 2016

www.apany.com


proof shee t Summer 2016 • Vol. 1, No. 4

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Photographer Jason Evans: Modest and Motivated

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Karen Fuchs: Keeping Up with the Fastest Man Alive

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Into the Mud with Photographer Josh Campbell

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Blame It on Rio

Written by Diana Gerstacker

By Brad Smith

Consultant’s Corner: Q&A Interview with Veteran Photo Consultant Selina Maitreya – Steps to Success

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Written by Hope Lourie Killcoyne

The APA|NY Proof Sheet is a quarterly magazine, published by the New York Chapter of the American Photographic Artists. Copyright 2016 APA|NY; all rights reserved, collectively and individually. Content, either images or text, may not be copied or reproduced in any form, in whole or in part, without prior written consent from the photographer, writer and APA|NY.


Supporting Photographers and the Business of Photography

About APA|New York APA|NY is the Northeast regional chapter of American Photographic Artists (APA), covering the entire area from Pennsylvania and Ohio up through Maine. As part of the country’s leading non-profit organization for professional photographers, we organize events, negotiate benefits for our members, hold seminars, promote our members’ work, organize photo contests, and much more. Our mission is successful photographers; our goal is to establish, endorse and promote professional practices, standards and ethics in the photographic community as well as provide valuable information on business and operational resources needed by all photographers. We seek to motivate, mentor, educate and inspire in the pursuit of excellence and to speak as one common voice for the rights of creators. APA|NY is a 501(c)6 not-for-profit organization run by and for professional photographers. Our all-volunteer Board works hard to promote, within our creative community, the spirit of mutual cooperation, encouragement, sharing and support. APA, and APA|NY, continue to expand benefits for its members and works to champion the rights of photographers and image-makers worldwide. APA Members include professional photographers, photo assistants, educators, and students. We also welcome professionals engaged in fields associated with photography, advertising, or visual arts but who themselves are not professional photographers. Membership types can be found at http://apanational.org/join. We welcome you to join and get involved.

Reach us at: office@apany.com 217 E. 70th Street, #1514, New York, NY 10021 www.apany.com Twitter: @apanewyork • www.twitter.com/apanewyork Facebook: @apanewyork1 • www.facebook.com/apanewyork1

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212.807.0399

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www.issuu.com/apany

co-publisher

Ron Jautz

co-publisher

Dhrumil Desai

photo assitant list

rental studios list

Alley Maher alley@alleymaher.com Tony Falcone tony@tonyfalcone.com

contributing photographers Jason Evans, Josh Campbell, Karen Fuchs, Paul Aresu, Richard Schultz, Mike McLaughlin, Scott Dorrance, Anthony Rodale, Alessandra Petlin, Michel Leroy, Paul Bartholomew, Emily Hagopian, Jake Armour contributing writers Hope Lourie Killcoyne, Diana Gerstacker, Brad Smith, Karen Fuchs, Ron Jautz, Selina Maitreya advertising | email or call for a media kit Dhrumil Desai

dhrumil@dhrumildesai.com

Ron Jautz

ron@jautzphoto.com

letters to the editor: please email comments and suggestions to proofsheet@apany.com proof sheet design: daniel carmin-romack www.rtwerk.net

APA|NY Board of Directors Michael Seto Co-Chairman Ron Jautz Co-Chairman Bruce Byers Treasurer Scott Nidermaier Social Media Director Alley Maher Assistant Liaison

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www.michaelseto.com www.jautzphoto.com www.brucebyers.com www.nidermaierpictures.com www.alleymaher.com

Thank You to our volunteers advocacy Sharlene Morris events Bill Bert, Tony Falcone, Tina Zarbaliev, Jennifer Taylor, Nicole Pereira proof sheet Dhrumil Desai

APA | National APA National Office 5042 Wilshire Blvd, Suite 321, Los Angeles, CA 90036 President Tony Gale Executive Director Juliette Wolf-Robin Membership Representative Jeff Kausch • members@apanational.org


Letter from the Chairmen With our fourth edition of proof sheet Magazine, we mark our first year as Co-Chairs of the New York Chapter. Our membership continues to be strong, up 25% from a year ago, and we want to continue our inroads to building a solid, supportive photography community. We want to remind members of the behind-the-scenes benefits of APA Membership, especially the work that APA National is doing in vital areas like Copyright and photographer’s rights. APA has been deeply engaged in efforts to influence legislation in our nation’s capitol – ensuring you have remedies to the proliferation of rights infringements. You do not see this day to day work but it is critical to protecting our creative vision and one of the reasons we believe all photographers should join a professional organization. Members should take full advantage of tangible member’s benefits like: business insurance, Zipcar discounts, Apple Store discounts, as well as our numerous studio and equipment rental discounts – see our Member Benefits page for more. A couple of these discounts can more than offset the cost of membership. We continue to reach out to other members of the creative community. In addition to our growing Assistant List, we are assembling a list of studio resources, hair & makeup, stylists, and digital techs – everything you need to realize your photographic vision. Our Fall calendar of events will be anchored by PhotoVille, PhotoPlus Expo, two amazing success seminars and several important networking events where you get to mingle and network with future clients. Membership in a trade association like APA is vital to maintaining our community, it gives us the strength of numbers and a stronger voice to advocate for you, our members. And as always, we seek motivated individuals to pitch in, as volunteers, speakers, and on the New York Chapter Board of Directors. We urge you to stay involved in the organization and community as a whole and look forward to seeing you in the coming months.

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Photo by Paul Aresu, Honorary member, New York, NY | www.paularesu.com


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UPCOMING EVENTS August 10th – APA|NY and ASPP are teaming up for a Summer Party. FREE for Leader Pro and Associate Members, small fee for others. A great opportunity to meet members of the American Society of Picture Professionals (ASPP). Complimentary food and beverages will be provided. Get all the information and register to attend here: www.eventbrite.com/e/summer-party-apany-and-aspp-tickets-26582762759

August 30th -- “After Dark” Networking event with the Art Director’s Club. Join APA|NY as we co-host this popular event, well known as a low-key and relaxing way to meet art directors from the NYC club.

August 30th – Another installment of the APA|NY/Adorama Emerging Photographer series.

Join fashion photographer Bill Bert to hear how he made the transition from a corporate career into shooting fashion.

September – Adorama and APA|NY will host another Business and Legal Seminar... as part of our ongoing series of bringing industry leaders to the Adorama store to speak on topics you need to know in order to thrive and survive in the business of photography.

September 21st-25th – Photoville. Visit the APA|NY table at Photoville, we will be there all week! Photoville will be held in Brooklyn Bridge Park; get all the info here: www.photoville.com

September 28th – STEPS TO SUCCESS. Consultant Selina Maitreya will share the steps she uses to help her clients reach their creative, financial and professional goals. The discussion will center on the exact steps used by two highly successful photographers to manifest the success they envisioned. Registration is open. Check www.apany.com for registration information.

October 8th - STEPS TO SUCCESS / DO THE WORK. This all-day program is the follow up workshop to Selina Maitreya’s evening event and will allow participants the opportunity to work more closely with her in smaller groups; attendees will leave having determined where they are in the process of achieving success and the knowledge of what actions to take in order to move their business forward.

Find out all the info at www.photoplusexpo.com and look for APA at the show!

Summer 2016

For more news about upcoming events, go to http://ny.apanational.org/events/upcoming/

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October 20th-22nd – Photo Plus Expo at the Javitz Center.

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Photographer Jason Evans: Modest and Motivated


By Hope Lourie Killcoyne

Imagine yourself on a surfboard, waiting for a wave. Don’t worry if you’ve never actually been on one. That’s the point of imagination. Balance is key. So is awareness. Your senses are at their most agile and fluid. Sound, movement, and vision are all centered on one thing: finding the best wave and riding it out. Succeeding at surfing requires selective perception, good judgment, and the ability to react accordingly. It’s a synthesis of capturing the world around you while focusing on something very specific. When you think about it, the necessary skill set is not unlike that required for photography.

Maybe that’s why photographer Jason Evans is so good at both. Jason Evans of Newport, Rhode Island, is probably best known for his stunning award-winning sports shots – be they of the Summer and Winter Olympics; Newport’s college summer baseball team, The Gulls; or surfers cruising along the coastline. Born in the Midwest in the mid ‘70s, as Jason’s dad was in the Air Force, the family relocated several times, finally landing in, Concord, Massachusetts, which Evans considers to be his hometown. The second of four children, he has two brothers and a sister. Lisa Wagenbach, who for all intents and purposes is his wife, is also in the business—they met on a shoot. Lisa works as a producer in still-photo and video production.

What’s in a Name? If you Google “photographer” and “Jason Evans” – you’ll see that there is another photographer with the same name. Dig a little deeper, and you’ll discover that there are actually several photographers named Jason Evans. Seriously? Yeah. So what’s a guy to do? Specialize, stand out from the crowd, and stand his ground. Or, you know, water.

How it All Began

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But the spark that lit Evans’s photographic flash wasn’t really that lighting shot. Rather, it came years later, when he took a break from his engineering studies at the University of Vermont (UVM) to travel abroad with a couple

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As the story goes, twelve-year-old Jason was given a rudimentary camera by his grandfather, with which he caught a fairly spectacular shot: a bolt of lightning flashing across the desert sky.

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of friends. As he puts it, “That’s where my love of travel and capturing new and unexpected things in a camera, while trying to make them match the memory of what I saw and experienced all began” Essentially, a synthesis of documentation and art. Having taken two six-week-long trips in Europe and another one in Southeast Asia, when Evans came back to the states, he realized that he really didn’t want to be an engineer after all, and he dropped out of UVM. To make money, he started bartending, but he knew that mixing cocktails wouldn’t be something he would do forever. Over the course of his first week tending bar, he found himself aching for the thrill of travel and photography, and every day, would say just that to his girlfriend at the time. She finally shot back: “Would you stop talking about taking pictures and just go do it!” Easier said than done – for most folks, that is. Luckily for Evans, the father of one of his best childhood friends was a very successful professional photographer in the auto industry. Clint Clemens quite generously, offered to take Jason under his wing. In short order, Clemens recognized Evans’s talents and skills. “Literally a week after I got off the plane he said, ‘Do you want a job?’ The right circumstances all came together at the right moment. I fell into it.”

Patience and Personality From baseball players sliding home to surfers sliding ashore, you can tell that the athletes feel totally at home with Jason photographing (and sometimes videotaping) their every move. That comfort, decidedly earned, is due to Jason’s demeanor. Evans didn’t learn how to surf until he was around 30 years old. “When you’re that old and learning how to surf, there’s sort of an etiquette and judgment that goes on in the water. I like being out of my comfort zone as much as possible, but when you’re in the wrong place, you get yelled at. I paid my dues.”

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Then Evans copped a clue: use the camera as a vector of connectivity, and ultimately, community. “Taking pictures became a way to get to know the other surfers. I was no longer an obstacle. I was someone who could take a photo of them. You want to be alone in the water, but you do want a photo of yourself. I spent a lot more time taking pictures, which opened up a community to me. I went on to have a show at the Newport Art Museum. Then I went back to surfing, and became considerably better, because this time people were helping… telling me which waves to track… letting me cut in line. So yes; surfing is my favorite sport. I surf as much as I can.

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© IOC/Jason Evans

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The Early Bird Catches the Wave… and the Light

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As for how he fits in surfing with his full-time work as a photographer, Evans says, “It’s amazing how much you can get done when you start your day at 4:30 in the morning.” That’s commitment, and Evans affirms that surfing is his favorite sport in which to participate. But it isn’t necessarily his favorite sport to shoot. “I don’t have a favorite sport to photograph. They all have beautiful and unexpected moments. Even badminton: it’s actually a pretty incredible sport. There are those angles and moments in every sport; it’s up to you to find them. It’s preparation, and sometimes it’s accidental. Every sport has a great shot out there. It’s finding it.”

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Evans also enjoys shooting rugby and golf, which are new sports in Brazil, where he’ll be heading at the end of July for the 2016 Summer Olympics, the day after he turns 41. “Then of course there’s beach volleyball and soccer down there. They bring out the chaos and the fun—everything that Brazil’s all about.” Evans appreciates both the chaos and the calm: “Think about all of the training and the preparation that goes into one moment. You’re lifting a weight, and that happens in an instant. But you’ve trained for years. And there’s so much beauty that happens all around that. Whether you’re preparing or reflecting.” There’s also a bit of danger, especially taking close-up shots. “You want to get as close as you can. I’ve laid ten yards in front of a golfer. He assured me I’d be safe. Happily, the ball went over my head. I’ve also laid on the third baseline, shooting fifty balls in a row as they flew overhead. In that same job I shot the pitcher, sitting behind the catcher.” For protection, a large sheet of Plexiglas was in front of Jason. But in what was no doubt a conspiratorial joke, the catcher let one of the pitches hit the glass. The sound alone – let alone the visual – was more than a bit startling, to say the least.

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And what about when he’s off the clock? What’s his favorite sport simply to observe? “It depends. Soccer is a great sport to watch; the way it moves very fluidly, and the excitement is definitely there. The more you know about a sport affects your take on it. At the beginning, I didn’t know a thing about polo. Watching polo where I live has really made me appreciate it more. Personally, I grew up playing sports, especially wrestling.” 


Clearly, not all of Evans shots are waterborne, but they do seem born of the water. The runners’ feet often aren’t touching the ground. Nor are those of skateboarders, snowboarders, skiers or polo-, and badminton-players. There’s something literally and metaphorically uplifting about the images that Jason Evans puts out as the cream of his crop. And just as cream rises to the surface, so too do his in medias res images. The moment an athlete leaves terra firma and has to trust form and physics, training and tenacity. Whether intended or not, Evans’s oeuvre conveys life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Doing with your life what you choose to do shows. And not all of Evans’s photography is sports-related. One glorious example is an annual tradition he began in 2007. Ever since January 1 of that year, he has taken a photo “…with the first light of the new year.”

The importance of Variety, the World Around Us, and the World Within Aside from the International Olympic Committee, Evans also shoots for a variety of clients, which include Bose, Providence College, the International Yacht Restoration School, Nike, New Balance, Toyota, and Yankee Magazine. What’s his preference? “All have their advantages. Some are a little bit more challenging, some more exciting. You never know. You never know what a client is going to want, or what their story is. Who they are on paper is often very different than the way they are in person. I like all the shoots. I like shooting… anything, really. I enjoy photography, and I especially enjoy location work.” He continues, “It’s a fun job and I get to be outside and meeting new people every day. I’ve had the pleasure of working for the IOC and some other great clients, but most of all I had the very good fortune of working for some great mentors and creative folks so far in my life…. for which I am eternally grateful.” His gratitude – and goals – extend to travel. “I try to get to a new country for every year I’ve been alive. I’m getting a little behind so there could be a great trip in my future.” What’s at the top of his list? Peru. And Riyue Bay, China would be amazing.” Naturally, there are some unexpected interactions along the way. “It once took me 36 hours to travel from Boston to Stockholm; thank you, modern day-airlines. I once captured an image of Putin staring directly at me; God knows what I did. And once, Tom Brady asked if he could touch my hair. I let him and it was cool.”

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It probably won’t come as a surprise that for someone who spends so much time in the water, Evans considers himself to be a steward of the environment. “I love nature and protecting it. I guess you could call me an environmentalist. I’m involved with a few local groups and organizations and try to play my part in making our planet a better place. I don’t have kids, but I love the ones I know, and believe they deserve a beautiful and healthy planet to live on. I think there’s a lot to be said for leaving a place better than you found it. I try to practice that approach to life a lot.”

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The Man Behind the Lens “I’ve been told I can be quiet, but I’m usually just thinking and analyzing things: my surroundings… you. At home in Rhode Island, some of my favorite things are family, friends, bonfires, a good cigar, my latest beer of choice, and my two cats…. yes, my cats.” Evans’s social-media moniker is afrotographter, “… a nickname that I got when I was out in the water shooting surfing. If you look several pictures back in my Instagram feed, you’ll see how big my hair can be. I enjoyed having long hair and picking out my afro, but it is way too hot in the summer.” Not unlike other photographers, appearing in front of the camera is, “…not my favorite place to be. I definitely prefer to be behind the camera.” And he envisions being there for a long time, as in, forever: “We always joke that I’m not qualified to do anything else at this point.” “I don’t see myself without a camera.”

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A few epic travel adventures and 6 years of personal and advertising projects, have led Jason to his current photographic passions. Sports, portraits and the story behind anything rooted in athletics and action are what drive him. Jason will be shooting his fourth Olympics for the International Olympic Committee this August. To see his insider experience at the games, follow Jason on: Instagram and Twitter @afrotographer Facebook - Jason Evans Imagery  Blog:  http://blog.jasonevansimagery.com

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© IOC/Jason Evans

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To see more of Jason’s work visit his website: http://jasonevansimagery.com

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S TUDIO RENTAL S

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Studio Name

Neighborhood

website

Member Discount

Riker Studio

Clinton Hill

www.rikerstudio.com

15%

20/20 Kre8tivHauS StuDiOs

Chelsea

www.2020studio.nyc

10%-15%

Hudson River Studios

Union City, NJ

www.hudsonriverstudios.com

varies

2Stopsbrighter

Chelsea

www.2stopsbrighter.com

10%

42ndphotostudio

Midtown West

www.42ndphotostudio.com

10%

1887 Townhouse

UWS

www.1887townhouse.com

10%

Capsule Studio

Union Square

www.capsulestudio.com

10%

Shade Studio NYC

Midtown

www.shadestudionyc.com

10%

Michelson studio I

W. Village

www.michelsonstudio.com

10%

Michelson studio II

Middletown, NY

www.michelsonstudio2.com

10%

30th Street Studios

Chelsea

www.30thstreetstudios.com

10%

Urdaneta Photography

Lancaster City, PA

www.urdaneta.net

15%

Bathhouse Studios

E. Village

www.bathhousestudios.com

10%

Splashlight

SoHo/Tribeca

www.splashlight.com

varies

NEO STUDIOS

NOHO

www.neostudionyc.com

no

LightSpace Studio rental

Williamsburg

www.lightspace.tv

no

CAMART Studio Rental

Chelsea

www.camart.com

no

Alchemical Studios

Greenwich Village

www.atlnyc.com

no

Roger SallS Photography

Stratford, CT

www.rogersallsphotos.com

no

Ramscale Studio

W. Village

www.ramscale.com

no

Parlay Studios

Journal Square

www.parlaystudios.com

no


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Photo by Paul S. Bartholomew, Professional Member | www.paulsbartholomew.com

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I fell into sports photography by chance about 22 years ago, through doing a cover and portrait story of Linford Christie, then the 100m sprint champion, and ended up shooting him and Colin Jackson, then world record holder of 110 hurdles, almost exclusively for several years. With that assignment, I had no choice but to get my head around capturing the superfast world of Track and Field imagery -- a steep learning curve coming from a portrait photography background. My love of sports and being athletic myself helped considerably, especially since having an understanding of movement, and what you can ask from an athlete (and yourself!) is critical.

Karen Fuchs: Keeping Up with the Fastest Man Alive


In 2004 a friend tipped me off to a youngster in Jamaica, who was supposedly going to become a superstar, Usain Bolt. I first met Usain at the Olympics in Athens, a gangly teenager, full of life and laughter – but already a standout talent at 17. I took a chance and traveled to Jamaica a couple of times without a paid commission, but it laid the foundation of getting to know him. Puma noticed how comfortable he was around me and that I managed to capture many unguarded images of him in his own environment, both on the track and off. This led to many trips to Jamaica shooting him every year from 2004-2012, and it now turns out that I am the only photographer who has images from his early years before he shot to fame. To this day he responds to my camera when he sees me in a crowd, and earlier this year he allowed me exclusive access to his training sessions.

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When shooting sports, I consider several criteria: Is there a specific movement or moment I’d like to capture? What message do I want to convey, for example, the effort of an athlete, the emotion, the driving force behind it all, or portraying the athlete in a certain way. I evaluate all of the above for virtually every shot I take, and try not to be just a mere observer. Sometimes the more memorable images happen before or after an event, the preparation or quiet concentration before the gun goes off, or the exhaustion and effort after training, yet without depicting actual live action. The harder you drive yourself for that interesting angle, both mentally and physically, the more likely will you capture something special. Quite often I find myself flat on the floor (regardless of weather or conditions, covered in dirt or mud) looking up at the athlete to create a heroic effect, or isolating the subject from crowds or buildings so they stand clear against the background, or sometimes the opposite, situating myself on a very high vantage point to get a viewpoint most will never see. In my 21 years of shooting sports (and only meeting another female photographer on the infield on two occasions), I have found that what has gotten me the most respect, from both my peers and the athletes I have worked with, is that I am just as driven in my pursuit to get a great shot, as they are in their aim to be the best. n

Karen Fuchs is an award winning photographer who has been shooting internationally for over 23 years. Her work has appeared on numerous covers, features, as well as advertising campaigns. Her passion, sense of style, and ability to deeply connect with her subject are reflected in the vibrant and bold imagery she creates. In recent years Karen has focused more on personal projects in addition to commissioned work, keeping her love for her art strong. Her personal work has been exhibited in several shows in both Europe and America. See more of Karen’s work at www.karenfuchs.com and www.karenfuchs.nyc proof sheet Summer 2016 31


APA MEMBER BENEFITS INCLUDE: APA Chapters’ Membership Benefits, Legal Consultations and Referrals, Premium Video Vault (Members Only) and Public Video Vault, Portfolio in APA Creative Network, Discounts on Events and Competitions, APA Member Pro Media Card, Access to Members-Only Content, Professional Insurance Plans, Join a Chapter Success Team, Chapter Portfolio Reviews Head over to http://ny.apanational.org/chapter-benefits/ for details.

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Photo of Michael Phelps by Alessandra Petlin, Professional Member www.alessandrapetlin.com


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Congratulations to the winners of APA|NY’s 2016 “Give Us Your Best Shot” Photo Contest. Grand Prize Winner Michael Mayo Give Us Your Best Shot – Single Image

Winner: Michael Mayo Give Us Your Best Shot – Single Image

2nd Place: Jens Lucking Give Us Your Best Shot – Single Image

Honorable Mention: Lyndon Wade Give Us Your Best Series

Winner: Lyndon Wade Give Us Your Best Series

2nd Place: Kevin Mellis Give Us Your Best Series

Honorable Mention: Dhrumil Desai Give Us Your Best Series of Your Town

Winner: Hope Lourie Killcoyne Give Us Your Best Series of Your Town

2nd Place: Matthew Cherry

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Give Us Your Best Series of Your Town

Honorable Mention: Anthony Verde

Look for our upcoming special “2016 Give Us Your Best Shot” issue.


Photo by Scott Dorrance, Professional Member | www.dorrancestudio.com

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Perpetual Movement #5, Fann Beach, Dakar, Senegal, West Africa

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Photo by Anthony Rodale, Professional Member | www.anthonyrodale.com

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Into the Mud

with Photographer Josh Campbell By Diana Gerstacker


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Before the athletes toe the starting line, before most of them have even arrived on site, Josh Campbell has already double checked his gear, surveyed the grueling course and made a game plan for the long day ahead. Based on his pre-event routine, you’d think he’s competing in an endurance event – and he is. While Spartan racers prepare for a course that will take them anywhere from three to 12 miles, over, under and through at least 20 brutal obstacles, Josh is getting ready for his own endurance challenge – one or two days of continuous scoping, shooting and quickly moving through that same course. He’s hustling non-stop and embracing the mud, not unlike the competitors he’s capturing.


“When you have a full day or two days of an event, where you’re shooting non-stop, you learn to be in the moment,” he says. “I’ve learned to be more present and concentrate on what I’m doing and what I see.” A steadier pace and greater focus is something Josh was able to learn while shooting Spartan Races, but he discovered an aptitude for capturing action long before that – when he was just 13 years old, snowboarding with his friends. A teenaged Campbell started taking pictures of friends, something he would continue to do throughout his time as a top-tier, sponsored boarder. He ultimately decided to pursue photography as a career, but he’s found a way to keep snowboarding in the mix, both personally and professionally.

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“I really enjoyed the sport, so I wanted that to be part of my life, for life,” he says. “And I always enjoyed taking photos, so I melded the two. [That way] I would have an avenue into that world as I grew older and I still get to shoot that stuff.” His time shooting from a snowboard taught him a lesson all action sports photographers learn early—you only get one chance to get the shot. Beyond providing initial inspiration and valuable experience, Josh credits his early days on his board, camera in-hand, with teaching him a guiding principle that has shaped his career. “Authenticity is really important to me in the way I create things and I think that comes from being in the snowboard world,” he says. Capturing photos of his friends snowboarding wasn’t the only thing that drew him to photography. Back when he learned to process black and white film in high school, the tangible part of creating photos from film was a big draw. The hands-on element of working with materials was something that appealed to him early on, but he’s also found a different kind of love for digital photography. “I love the control of it,” he says. “I get much more control than I did with film, so I can capture one and then tweak stuff and then adjust it more and use Photoshop if needed. You know, get it to look the way I saw it from the beginning.”


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Today, whether it’s on the mountain, in the studio or crouching in a pool of mud at a Spartan Race, Josh said it’s important to him that his photos look as real, as cool – and as authentic – as possible.

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“It’s a dirty, gritty sport. There’s a lot of mud involved, so I want to portray the people who participate in it, whether it be the everyday guy running the race or the elite, sponsored athletes. I want to portray them and what they do in the best way possible, and in a very authentic way,” Josh says. He finds those genuine shots in a couple of different ways. He’ll often try to get in tight and capture the facial expression, which is a great way to relay “the grit, determination and toughness of the whole thing.” And just as the close-up shots of the face offer an intimate peek into the experience of competing in a Spartan Race, Campbell’s landscape images highlight places most of us don’t often see. With these shots, the combination of the environment, the mud and the “little tiny people in the frame doing their thing” is what makes for a stunning photo.

Another element that helps Josh land those incredible Spartan shots has less to do with technique and more to do with mother nature. “I have a little saying: shitty weather makes for better photographs,” he says. “So if it’s muddy or rainy, that makes it way more interesting to me than a bluebird day where it’s sunny and there’s white puffy clouds. If you have crappy weather and you manage to shoot through that, you get a cooler photograph.” It’s no wonder that a waterproof camera housing is at the top of Josh’s must-have gear list. But when it comes to keeping all of his gear protected and having it easily accessible, another important factor is having the right assistant. Help on-site allows him to focus solely on what’s in front of him and frees him up to get those fleeting shots. As it turns out, some of his assistants even prompt theoretical questions. Recently, after working with one of his assistants who had just turned 21, Josh thought back to what sparked his passion in photography – working with physical film in a dark room.


“It makes me wonder how the whole process is now, it’s just a different world than it was back when I was starting—I don’t think that’s good or bad or whatever—it’s the nature of things to change,” he says. “I’m curious if I could dive into the mind of somebody who’s 21 years old to see how they get interested in the whole thing and what draws them to it, because I really liked the tactileness of film and being able to feel something when you create a print. I think a lot of times people have stuff now that just gets seen – myself included – on a backlit screen. It never gets seen as a print or in a frame and you don’t get to hold it.” Although Josh’s recent work documenting the Nike Run Club in Boston, following snowboarders down the mountain or shooting Spartan Races across the U.S. doesn’t center around prints, he’s still happy to have the creative control that comes with digital. As far as what he plans on shooting in the future, well, he’s not as sure about that. “I think about that a lot. I’m almost 40 and I’m getting older. Noticing aches and pains I didn’t have 20 years ago, I try to think about where it’s all headed and your guess is as good as mine,” Josh says.

In more than 16 years of professional photography, his experience ranges from working in a studio environment shooting portraits to editorial work for the Boston Globe Magazine—and of course, there’s the action sports photography he’s best known for. “I really don’t have a goal of where to take it as I get older, I think it will naturally drive itself one way or the other. Whether I end up shooting studio stuff or I’m still out and about moving around, and doing that for the rest of my career… I will say I hope it goes that way. I hope I’m able to just stay outside and be in cool environments like the Spartan Races or photographing runners. I really like being outdoors and not glued to one spot, so hopefully it goes that way.” And as for competing in the race that he captures so well? “No. [laughs] I’ve considered it, but it’s not something I’ve done yet.” But who knows what’s ahead. n

Josh Campbell is a sports and fitness photographer based in the Boston area. Josh brings both an appreciation for the moments he captures and an eye for how to authentically convey those moments in a photograph. Energetic and with a deep love for what he does, he enjoys every aspect of the collaborative process and is always looking to take on new and interesting projects. He is comfortable working with clients of all sizes, from international brands to the smallest of start-ups, providing photos that incite and inspire action.  In his free time, Josh can be found snowboarding, hanging out with his wife, Maritza, or enjoying an epic craft beer (or two).  josh@joshcampbell.com www.joshcampbell.com proof sheet

617.921.6573

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ASSISTANTS Alessandro Casagli 4 years, 1st-3rd Assistant 646 881 4793 • ale@casagli.com www.casagli.com Specialities: Lifestyle, Editorial, Fashion, Still Life, Product, Portraits, Location

Michael Cardiello 3 years, 1st-3rd Assistant 929 242 9072 • mikecardiello@gmail.com www.michaelcardiello.com Specialities: Lifestyle, Editorial, Fashion, Portraits, Location, Video, Celebrity & Music Portraits

Adam Coppola 203 415 9851 • adam@coppolaphotography.com www.coppolaphotography.com Specialities: Lifestyle, Editorial, Fashion, Still Life, Product, Portraits, Location, Video

Dhrumil Desai 213 255 5145 • dhrumil@dhrumildesai.me www.dhrumildesai.me Specialities: Lifestyle, Editorial, Fashion, Portraits, Location

Sinziana Dobos 2 years, 2nd Assistant 347 337 0795 • dobos.sinziana@gmail.com www.dobossinziana.com Specialities: Lifestyle, Editorial, Fashion, Portraits, Location, Video

Tony Falcone 1st Assistant 718 702 5563 • tonyfalconenyc@gmail.com www.tony-falcone-9pqb.squarespace.com Specialities: Lifestyle, Product, Portraits, Location

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Summer 2016

Rebecca Grant 1 year, 1st-3rd Assistant 917 710 2570 • rebeccagrantphoto@gmail.com www.rebeccagrantphoto.com Specialites: Editorial, Fashion, Portraits, Beauty

James Gentile 4 years, 1st-3rd Assistant 781 561 5670 • info@jgentilephoto.com jgentilephoto.com Specialities: Lifestyle, Editorial, Fashion, Portraits,

Location, Retouching, Digital Tech


Dan Lidon 5 years, 1st Assistant 610 905 0208 • dan@danlidon.com www.danlidon.com Specialities: Lifestyle, Portraits, Location, Video

Alley Maher 4 years, 1st-3rd Assistant 203 733 7981 • alley@alleymaher.com www.alleymaher.com Specialities: Lifestyle, Fashion, Portraits, Location Danielle Maczynski 1st Assistant 908 268 6142 • dani-mac@live.com www.daniellemaczynski.com Specialities: Lifestyle, Editorial, Portraits, Location

Alyssa Meadows 1st Assistant 484 788 5534 • ameadowsphoto@gmail.com www.ameadowsphoto.com Specialities: Lifestyle, Editorial, Fashion, Portraits, Location

Jeffrey Morgan 1 year, 1st-3rd Assistant 404 333 2941 • jeff@jeffwmorgan.com www.jeffwmorgan.com Specialities: Lifestyle, Editorial, Still Life, Product, Portraits, Food

Sharlene Morris 1 year assisting 949 929 9509 • sharlene.m.photo@gmail.com www.facebook.com/smorrisphoto Specialities: Lifestyle, Editorial, Portraits, Location

Dan Orlow 18 years, 1st-3rd Assistant 617 460 5773 • dan@danoassists www.danoassists.com Specialities: Lifestyle, Editorial, Fashion, Still Life, Product, Portraits, Location, Video, PA

Specialities: Lifestyle, Editorial, Fashion, Still Life, Product, Portraits, Location

If you are an assistant and would like to be listed, join APA and request our assistant form by emailing office@apany.com

Summer 2016

All assistants are APA Members in good standing and have the work experiences listed.

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Andrea Patton 9 years, 1st Assistant 508 254 3131 • andrea@andreapattonphotography.com www.andreapattonphotography.com

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ASSISTANTS Rocio Segura 1st Assistant 917 993 1021 • hello@rociosegura.es www.rociosegura.es Specialities: Lifestyle, Editorial, Fashion, Portraits, Location, Video, Celebrity & Music Portraits

Darren Sabino 7 years, 1st-2nd Assistant 206 914 7406 www.DarrenJSabino.com Specialities: Lifestyle, Editorial, Fashion, Portraits, Location, Video

Jordan Tiberio 2 years, 2nd-3rd Assistant 585 645 3292 • jtiberioart@gmail.com www.jordantiberio.com Specialities: Lifestyle, Editorial, Fashion, Product, Portraits, Location Tina Zarbaliev 1 year, 1-3rd Assistant 646 684 8101 • tinazarbaliev@gmail.com www.tinazarbaliev.com/ Specialities: Lifestyle, Editorial, Fashion, Portraits

All assistants are APA Members in good standing and have the work experiences listed. If you are an assistant and would like to be listed, join APA and request our assistant form by emailing office@apany.com

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Summer 2016

It’s Your APA

APA is a member-driven organization and we need your help. Take this survey and let us know what you want from APA. CLICK HERE for the SURVEY or email your thoughts, comments and suggestions to proofsheet@apany.com


proof sheet Summer 2016

Photo by Michel Leroy, Professional Member | www.michelleroyphoto.com

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By Brad Smith

With this being an Olympic year, every photographer wishes they could participate in some capacity. And while there is always room for feature and portrait types, the real deal are the action shooters. How do you become one of those? How do you find yourself in a position to secure one of those hard to come by photo credentials for the worlds leading sports events? Photographing sports is like nothing else. The rush from games being played, with fans cheering all around you, the excitement of who will win…and who will lose. It’s all on the line, and your job is simple. Capture that moment when it all becomes clear. When the outcome is decided. And also make sure you show the despair of losing, along with the winners. And all of the major moments in between. That’s all. Easy, right? Except for conflict photography, sports is the most physically demanding photography there is. And the best photographers are like the athletes they cover. They are prepared, they have an exceptional ability to anticipate and react, and they’re extremely competitive. They take those skills and they attack the event. Methodically, they can not only see and react to whatever happens in front of them, they can see the next move or play before it unfolds. The best advice for someone that wants to shoot sports would be, go and shoot sports. Start at the local level, wherever you live. High school sports, local colleges, even Little League and Pop Warner football. Baseball is baseball, basketball is basketball, and so on. The only difference is the speed and intensity at which the game itself is played. And while that is a significant difference, you get a feel for the game. You start to understand which positions bring the best opportunity for photos. You see how a game flows, and you flow with it. For example, let’s say you’ve never photographed ice hockey before. It’s a very fast sport, and keeping up with a small puck traveling at 80mph isn’t as easy as it sounds. So start with one of the goalies. Remember, whatever happens at a hockey game, both teams are relentless in trying to attack the goalie. Stay on them, watch them make saves (Happy!), watch them let one get by (Sad!). After you’re comfortable with that, then you can start following them as they push the puck up the ice. And as they check into the boards. And as the players cheer and argue from the box when they aren’t in the game. And shaking hands in the post-game line. Now you have an entire game. But take it slow and learn to walk before you run.

Summer 2016

Photo by Mike McLaughlin

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Another sure-fire way to learn how to shoot sports like a pro is to assist a pro. Those opportunities don’t present themselves too often, so you’ll have to be aggressive and persistent. Find someone in your area that photographs action, and ask them if you can assist at some event. It’s more carrying stuff around type assisting than 1st assistant in a portrait studio, at least at first, but you’ll gain valuable insight and experience watching a full time shooter go about their business. Just shadowing their day will bring you something you can’t learn on your own.

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After you’ve started gathering some stock, find a good editor to help you break them down. Not only good from bad, but also to give you instruction what works and what doesn’t, and why. For technical issues, find a photographer to give you feedback. You need this; you can’t shoot and live in a vacuum. You need to have real and honest information channeled back to you, and not from your roommate. What editors and people who hire you are looking for are these 4 things. 1

Talent. Shooting and understanding the game, pulling off images that are visually interesting and informative. Original content is your goal, not to duplicate everyone else. Find your voice.

2

Professionalism. They are hiring you, and you are now representing them. Take it seriously. Dress appropriately. Behave like an adult. Show up not on time, but up early. Don’t ever be late. Say thank you, a lot. Smile. Say thank you again. Be polite to everyone, not just the star of the team.

3

Location. The majority of assignments do not include a plane ticket. Being in an area, a drivable distance is a huge marketing tool in your favor. Let people know these are the teams/events that I can easily attend.

4

Low maintenance. Don’t be the person who calls every time you hear the weather is changing by 3 degrees. Take care of business, get the job done, keep people in the loop for significant reasons. Transmit the images with all relevant info and call it a day.

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Summer 2016

There are plenty of sports to cover, plenty of entities to sell your images to. Just keep looking for them every day, don’t stop. Find your local paper or wire service, get one photo printed or posted online… and that’s the beginning of every success story. n

Brad Smith is an award winning photo editor, with 35 years experience in visual storytelling. He’s the former DOP at Sports Illustrated, as well as the sports photo editor for the NY Times and the photo editor and assistant director for the White House during the Clinton administration. He currently is the director of Brad Smith Creative, a visual consulting group. 917-743-0741 bradleymsmith@gmail.com


Photos by Mike McLaughlin, Professional Member | revolution@optonline.net | www.mikemclaughlin.com

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CONSULTANT’S CORNER


Steps to Success Q&A Interview with Veteran Photo Consultant Selina Maitreya

No one said this would be easy. Statistics show that nearly 90% of all small businesses fail in the first 5 years, yet here we are, choosing to run photography businesses. Whether you’ve been in business for one year or thirty years, the truth is, you need to pay attention to your business every day and be prepared to work hard and work smart. One smart action is to get help from experts when you hit roadblocks or reach plateaus. Fortunately, photographers have a number of great resources to help with various aspects of this crazy but wonderful way of making a living. What if there is a way, a proven path, for photography to be more joyful, creative and rewarding while simultaneously being less stressful, less tenuous? On September 28th, you’ll have an opportunity to learn how to get on that path to your dream business as one of our industry’s leading consultants, Selina Maitreya, leads a special evening seminar titled, “Steps to Success” for members of APA and others in our creative community. In this seminar you’ll learn the number one request buyers have of photographers, the importance of building a vision based body of work, how to identify your audience and the three key areas that you need to develop in order to build a successful sales and marketing program. As an added bonus, Selina will be conducting a day-long workshop, for APA members only. She will be working with a small group helping them to individually work the steps that will lead them to success. The workshop will be offered for a small fee, substantially less than Selina’s hourly rate as a consultant. The evening seminar and all-day workshop will be invaluable to those fairly new in their photography business, mid-career image makers wishing to increase their client base and receive more creative assignments and for veterans looking to reinvigorate or reposition their business. In advance of her seminar, proof sheet sat down with Selina to get a snapshot of the photography world from a broader perspective and to learn about her proven, step-by-step formula for success and fulfillment. A step-by-step formula for success? How can anyone make such a claim?

Summer 2016

Photo by Emily Hagopian

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My formula for success comes from observation, application and live testing with clients for over thirty years. When you’ve been in the creative consulting business for as long as I have, you learn a few things; one of the many things I’ve learned is that there are consistent steps that successful photographers take and when individual Creatives work these steps and give them time to mature their business will always be successful

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If you have been a consultant for over thirty years, are you still relevant? That’s a legitimate question. Frankly, my years of experience work to my benefit--and my client’s benefit-- in many ways; with years of experience comes a clarity of what works, what is most effective and what produces the best results. I watch the industry closely and have always been gifted the opportunity to sense buying trends and I bring that information back to my clients. There is nothing more relevant then knowing what buyers want and understanding how that effects a photographer’s sales approach. The business of photography has changed greatly over the years, and while many components of marketing have remained the same, certain aspects, options and tools have markedly changed. How did you get started in this business? After a year as a photography student, I became an agent for a successful photographer based out of Boston; he had me showing his portfolio to ad agencies, design firms and corporations. I had no experience and even less knowledge about what I was “supposed” to do, so I simply learned on the job; I seemed to have a natural talent, I worked extremely hard and within a year landed a number of National campaigns and found myself flying all over the country to meet with clients and pitch ideas. Being a rep was fine, but I wanted to help more people. The business of photography was quite new in 1984 and I found that photographers needed guidance, big time. They were very interested in learning the things I knew about developing well edited portfolios, approaching clients and landing assignments.  I was excited to be able to help. Through your longevity as a consultant you’ve written two books, participated in countless portfolio reviews and given hundreds of seminars; how has the world of photography changed? There have been huge changes in photography. Beyond the obvious move to digital and the need for many to add motion to their offerings, there have been changes in how images are used, how they are priced and how we approach buyers. The person buying photographs today isn’t necessarily the creative and sometimes their knowledge about photography and or rights is lacking. Photographers often need to be educators and they need to do so kindly and willingly.

Summer 2016

Photo by Emily Hagopian

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The process of creating images is constantly evolving, and the methods we use to sell photography are shifting as well. Part of my function as a consultant is to bring photographers back to the core structure of what works in marketing and to help them personalize their program so they build visual and brand identity and have a program that delivers their own specific creative, personal and professional success.

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Tell me a little bit about how you help your photographers? Photographers are curious people and I like that; they have a curiosity about the world around them. Every photographer has a vision, a visual approach as to how they create. Most have yet to explore their visual talent let alone use it as a foundation for building a body of work. Buyers need photographers and in today’s overly crowded market they hire the photographers who bring the most value to the table: visual value today is king. Photographers need to educate themselves and they need to build vision based portfolios online and off. Part of what I do for my clients is to help them speed-dial the process of building a business based around their visual approach to their chosen topic.  I’m well known for giving homework assignments that reveal the photographers visual approach. That’s the beginning of building value in client’s eyes. Value creation is a process and most photographers don’t know how to build a business this way. I hold the space for a bigger vision, even when they are confused, lost or expect too much in too short of time; I’m there moving us along. What are the Steps to Success? In the seminar we’ll go over the steps in detail and show real life success stories as examples.  The evening is a visual show backed up by some very real specifics. In the workshop we’ll spend hands-on time working the steps and each photographer attending will make substantial progress and know exactly which step they need to take next as the day ends. The workshop will be limited to 20 participants, which gives me the opportunity to work one-on-one with people as well as in small group interactions. The steps themselves may sound simple, but I’ve designed them as part of an overall transformational process that opens up new possibilities. It all starts with visual development, which is the base of any photographer’s value. Next we focus on identifying your audience—who in the buying world is your vision most aligned with? The third step is where we put all the pieces together with three specific layers of selling and marketing your work in today’s marketplace and finally, we explore the importance of attitude, which is indicative of both the current and future state of your business. Finally, why share such valuable information now, why share it with APA|NY and why share it at such a deep discount?

Summer 2016

Photo by Jake Armour

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I have been a long time member of APA|NY, longer than I can remember; I’m a big believer in the organization and in any organization that supports photographers and strives to improve the landscape for photography professionals. I

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think all photographers should join a professional organization like APA for the educational opportunities, like what we’re doing in September, for the networking possibilities and for supporting legislative reform to benefit photographer’s rights. Sharing this information is just part of who I am; I love to teach, I love to make a difference and I want to give back to a community that has been very good to me for a long time. Offering this seminar and workshop at a rate way below what I normally charge makes it affordable for all photographers to come and learn a proven system that builds value. Scarcity seems to be a prevalent attitude amongst photographers these days, yet human nature is one of abundance; changing limiting beliefs starts with knowledge. My hope is that we can create a community of knowledge that serves all photographers and improves the profession as a whole, a rising tide, if you will, of providing value to clients and helping everyone involved. My Steps to Success is the plan that puts all the pieces together. Thank you Selina, we look forward to your events this Fall. Great! And thank you; I’ll see you all on September 28th for the evening seminar and on October 8th for the all-day workshop.

The photographs in this article represent the work of two talented photographers, both members of APA and both of whom are clients of Selina’s. Each one has gone through all of the steps that will be shared at the APA event and these photographers are now reaping the results of their time, financial and creative investment. Jake Armour, an established pro photographer working out of Minneapolis had a thriving business and felt he was at a point in his career that he needed to make different choices. That decision led to him completely reposition his business around the work that he was visually passionate about. His efforts are paying off grandly and those attending the event in September will be able to see how he utilized each step of the program. See more of Jake’s work at www.armourphoto.com Emily Hagopian had been in business for a few years and was doing well but sought to develop more creative assignments and increase her client base.  In order to do that she needed to build more visual value that she could offer clients.  That’s when she began working with Selina and 2 years later she is now busier than ever shooting the type of work she loves. During the evening seminar we will look closely Emily’s body of work, and the sales and marketing tools she has utilized. See more of Emily’s work at www.emilyhagopian.com proof sheet Summer 2016

Photo by Jake Armour

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PARTING SHOT


Photograph by Professional Member Richard Schultz • www.rschultz.com • Barrington, RI • 401.289.2229


Summer 2016 "proof sheet" by APA|NY  

With a nod to the Summer Olympics in Rio, our fourth issue of "proof sheet" is dedicated to sports and highlights some of the many great spo...

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