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Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month

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Community Corner 6 Angel Island Detainees and Descendants Sought

Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month (APAHM), now officially proclaimed “Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month”, is a celebration of the culture, traditions, and history of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in the United States.

History

Congress passed a joint Congressional Resolution in 1978 to commemorate Asian-Pacific American Heritage Week during the first week of May. This date was chosen because two important anniversaries occurred during this time: the arrival of the first Japanese immigrants in America on April 11, 1843 and the completion of the transcontinental railroad (by many Chinese laborers) on May 10, 1869. In 1990 Congress voted to expand it from a week to a month long celebration; In May 1992, the month of May was permanently designated as “Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month.”

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13 Travel to Stockton’s Sister City, Shizuoka

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From the Publisher and Editor

Dennis Lee

Mary Nicholson

Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage Month (AAPI) is an opportunity to recognize the diverse culture of Asian Americans and the accomplishments and contributions they have made. The theme this year is “Lighting the Past, Present, and Future.” The history that has been chronicled, as well as history in the making will be shared in this issue. APA News & Review spotlights women who leaned in to tough issues and were game changers within their area of influence.

KVIE will showcase a series of programs for your entertainment and education. May is Stroke Awareness Month. You will find locations for stroke support and stroke related services and events, compliments of Healings in Motion. Most interior designers integrate some form of Asian influence into their décor. Each month Jodi King spotlights an interior design sharing her genius ability to bring life to a room. This month Jodi blends Tuscan style with an Asian influence. We also spotlight women of influence in the Asian American and Pacific Islander culture and to the world. Many women have been generous with advice and lessons they have learned in life and advice shared to a new generation of Asian women. Civic engagement is important to Asian American and Pacific

Asian Pacific American News & Review

Islander’s future. More politicians are realizing that the growing Asian population is influencing elections. MJ Stoneking is launching his interview segment, “On Tap in the Cap”, a candid interview with political candidates. Look for upcoming mixers and events offered by the Asian Chamber. Look for many of the Ambassadors in Memory Lane at Senior Awareness Day, May 29th at Micke Grove Park in Lodi, CA. 8AM-1PM. This year’s theme is “Peace, Love, Seniors”. You’ll see tie-dyed 60’s outfits, a car show and enjoy great entertainment. Jene Wah will be serving Chinese Sponsored by Healings in Motion.

Next Issue July/August 2014 Health & Wellness East/West

Objectives

The opinions expressed by contributing writers are their own and do not reflect the opinions of the newspaper’s owner, Editor, or staff.

Educate — inform readers about the issues facing Asian Pacific Americans.

Participate

Advocate

— Ask readers to be an advocate for the community as an informed, involved member. While we most directly address the concerns of Asian Pacific Americans, our publication is not a racial or ethnic sorting. It is a gathering of all those who wish to gather.

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mstoneking@capitolcitycommunications.com

Editor Mary Nicholson editor.apanr@gmail.com Susan A. Hernandez Editorial Coordinator Frankie J. Soliven-Meglin (510) 785-6264 Art Director Remi Estrella Advertising/Outreach Dennis Lee (209) 327-2407 leesource@inreach.com Edgar Calderon (916) 627-8701 Multicultural History Editor Lucky Owyang come.to.chinatown@gmail.com

Contributing Writers Jodi King Michael Stoneking Mary Nicholson, PHC Jim Chong Susan A. Hernandez Collaborative Partnerships Jim Chong

And also to give a voice to the community for sharing and lauding accomplishments and concerns.

— promote and encourage readers to take an active role in raising awareness of the Asian Pacific American community and its contributions and concerns.

Publication Director Michael Stoneking (916) 838-5506

Advocacy/Outreach Cynthia Lau

Mission Statement

The Asian Pacific American News and Review is a bi-monthly newspaper dedicated to providing a single, comprehensive publication, both in print and online, that seeks to raise awareness of issues of interest to Asians and associated ethnic groups in Northern California.

Publisher Dennis Lee (209) 327-2407 leesource@inreach.com

5665 N. Pershing Ave. Suite C-2 Stockton, CA 95207 Phone: (209) 327-2407

Contributing Photographers Tim Ulmer Danny Lee Advisors May O. Lee, Sacramento Jodi King, Sacramento Alex Eng, Sacramento

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Honoring Asian-Pacific Islander History HEADLINE: KVIE Features APA Topics in May Tune in to KVIE (channel 6) for programs in May highlighting Asian and Pacific Islander history, culture, health, and more in celebration of Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month. Visit kvie.org/schedule for more information. See our full schedule at kvie.org/schedule. Pacific Heartbeat – 4 part series Fridays, May 2, 9, 16 & 23 at 11pm Get a glimpse of the real Pacific—its people, cultures, languages, music, and contemporary issues. This anthology series journeys into the heart, mind, and soul

of Pacific Island culture, running the gamut from enlightening documentaries to musical showcases. piccom.org/pages/pacificheartbeat-season-three ViewFinder: Delano Manongs Wednesday, May 7 at 11pm Examine the story of the Filipino farmworkers who instigated the Delano grape strike in 1965. Discover how their efforts were instrumental in creating the United Farm Workers Union and strengthening workers’ rights. Searchlight Serenade: Big Bands in the WWII Japanese American Incarceration Camps Sunday, May 11 at 11pm More than 120,000 Japanese Americans were forced to live in incarceration camps during WWII. As

people endeavored to create a sense of normalcy during their incarceration, many detainees still enjoyed the popular music of the day—swing. Discover the story of nine detainees— big band trumpet players, saxophonists, singers—who created a soulful escape for themselves and their fellow prisoners. (searchlight-serenade.org)

Anna May Wong: In Her Own Words Monday, May 12 at 11pm Explore the career of the first Chinese-American movie star, who was both an architect and victim of her times. Anna May Wong began her

career in silent films as a teenager and made dozens of films in Hollywood, London, and Berlin. Enjoy this detailed portrait of this glamorous, talented, and cosmopolitan woman who spent most of her career typecast as either a painted doll or a scheming dragon lady.

ViewFinder: Little Manila—Filipinos in California’s Heartland Wednesday, May 21 at 7pm Examine the story of Jimmy Ente Jr., a longtime Filipino Stockton resident recruited to work in the asparagus fields. Witness how he and many others like him faced backbreaking work, low wages, and at times extreme racism to fulfill his dreams.

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Presidential Proclamation—Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, 2014 BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION During Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) Heritage Month, we celebrate the accomplishments of Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders, and we reflect on the many ways they have enriched our Nation. Like America itself, the AAPI community draws strength from the diversity of its many distinct cultures -- each with vibrant histories and unique perspectives to bring to our

Peace

national life. Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders have helped build, defend, and strengthen our Nation -- as farm workers and railroad laborers; as entrepreneurs and scientists; as artists, activists, and leaders of government. They have gone beyond, embodying the soaring aspirations of the American spirit. This month marks 145 years since the final spike was hammered into the transcontinental railroad, an

Love Seniors

Thursday, May 29, 2014 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Micke Grove Park in Lodi

Joni Morris &

John Covert & Crystal Image

the After Midnight Band

Hippie Show (prize for best cos-

10:00 -11:30 a.m.

tume)

San Joaquin Regional Transit District (RTD) provides free shuttle service to Senior Awareness Day event at Micke Grove Park. From 8am to noon, shuttle buses will leave every half hour from eastbound Yokuts Ave, just east of Claremont Ave, in Stockton. Returning buses will leave the park every half hour until 3 pm.

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achievement made possible by Chinese laborers, who did the majority of this backbreaking and dangerous work. This May, they will receive long-overdue recognition as they are inducted into the Labor Hall of Honor. Generations of Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders have helped make this country what it is today. Yet they have also faced a long history of injustice -- from the overthrow of the Kingdom of Hawaii and its devastating impact on the history, language, and culture of Native Hawaiians; to opportunity-limiting laws like the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 and the Immigration Act of 1924; to the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. Even today, South Asian Americans, especially those who are Muslim, Hindu, and Sikh, are targets of suspicion and violence. With courage, grit, and an abiding belief in American ideals, Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders have challenged our Nation to be better, and my Administration remains committed to doing its part. Nearly 5 years ago, I reestablished the White House Initiative on AAPIs. The Initiative addresses disparities in health care, education, and economic opportunity by ensuring Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders receive equal access to government programs and services. We are also determined to pass comprehensive immigration reform that would modernize our legal immigration system, create a pathway to earned citizenship for undocumented immigrants, hold employers accountable, and strengthen our border security. These

commonsense measures would bring relief to Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders who have experienced this broken system firsthand, and they would allow our country to welcome more highly skilled workers eager to contribute to America’s success. This month, as we recall our hardfought progress, let us resolve to continue moving forward. Together, let us ensure the laws respect everyone, civil rights apply to everyone, and everyone who works hard and plays by the rules has a chance to get ahead. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim May 2014 as Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month. I call upon all Americans to visit www. WhiteHouse.gov/AAPI to learn more about the history of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, and to observe this month with appropriate programs and activities. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirtieth day of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand fourteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirtyeighth. BARACK OBAMA

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May is Stroke Awareness Month Know Your Resources! Brain Aneurysm/AVM Brain Aneurysm/AVM Support, Dameron Hospital-Annex 525 West Acacia Street, Stockton, Ca 95203 Contact : Mary Nicholson Healings in Motion, 877-672-4480 facebook.com/brainaneurysmsupport, 2nd Thursday, 5:30pm-7:00pm Greater Sacramento Brain Aneurysm &AVM Support UC Davis Ambulatory Care Center, 4860 Y. Street, Sac Room 3015, Third Floor 916-734-6511 www.avmandaneurysmsupport.com 4th Saturday, 3-PM-5PM

Caregiver Support 7th Annual Regional Caregiver Symposium, Robert Cabral Ag Center, Healings in Motion, 877-672-4480, www.healingsinmotion.org November 8, 2014 In-Home Respite/Home Modification Catholic Charities Contact: Maryanne Trann 209-444-5931 www.ccstockton.org Stroke Survivor & Caregiver Mercy Learning Center, 6007 Folsom Blvd. Suite 200 Sacramento, CA 95819 916-537-5177 3rd Tuesdays, 11AM-12PM Memory Impaired UniQue ImAging 700 McHenry Avenue Modesto, CA 95354 Contact: Cynthia Wilson 209-852-6916 3rd Monday, 11AM

Stroke Atria El Camino Gardens 2426 Garfield Avenue Carmichael, CA Contact: Tess Carter 916-486-0231 Wednesdays, 11:30AM-12:30PM Brain Teasers Hutchins Street Square Senior Center Lodi, CA 9:30am-12:30pm, $25.00 weekly Central Valley Recovery, Awareness, Preventing Strokes Program (“CV-RAPS”) Dameron Hospital-Annex 525 W. Acacia Street, Stockton, CA http://cv-raps2014.eventbrite.com 4th Tuesdays monthly. For more information go to www.healingsinmotion.org VOLUME 12.NO.3

Kaiser South Stroke Support 600 Bruceville Road, Sacramento, CA 95823 Contact: Edie Happs 916-688-2674 St. Joseph’s Medical Center 1800 North California Street Stockton, CA 95204 Basement, Room 3 Contacts: Katie Wright and Sandra Hormiga 209-467-6365 1st Wednesday, 10:30am-12pm www.stjosephscares.org

Sutter Tracy-Stroke Club Contact: Laura Cook 209-830-2137 3rd Thursdays, 3-5PM UC Davis 4860 Y Street, Room 3015-A Sacramento, CA Contact: Kevin Wheeler 916-734-3467 Tuesdays, 2-3PM

Traumatic Brain Injury TBI Support Group Easter Seals 3205 Hurley Way Sacramento, CA 95864 Thursdays, 7-8:30PM

Green Haven Stroke Support Luncheon, Aviator’s Restaurant, 6151 Freeport Blvd. Sacramento, CA 916-392-5614 3rd Mondays, 11:30AM Contact: Jerry or Peggy Miyata 916-392-5614 *Everyone pays for their own meal Richmond Stroke Support El Camino Gardens Senior Center 4538 Juno Way, Sacramento, Ca 95864 Contact: Virginia Zebowski 916-488-5722 Wednesdays, 11:30AM Stroke Resources (209) 521-1786 PO Box 77321 Modesto, CA 95357 www.strokeresources.org Caregiver Support Group Central Valley Specialty Hospital 730 17th Street, Modesto, CA Wednesdays, 10AM-11:30AM Sutter General, Sac Stroke Support Meet in Cancer Center 2800 L Street, Sacramento, CA Contact: Rachel 916-454-6976 1, 3,5th Thursdays, 11AM-12:30PM www.sacstrokesupport.com Sutter Medical – Elk Grove 2nd Chances 8170 Laguna Blvd. Elk Grove, CA 95758 MOB II, Classroom 1, Ste.114 2nd/4th Thursdays, 10:30AM-12PM www.sacstrokesupport.com Sutter Roseville Contact: Teresa Carter 916-781-4036

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Tuscan style home with Asian Influences Have you noticed that nearly all interior décor has some Asian influence? That is because many parts of Asia have had a significant impact Jodi King on the interior décor patterns and styles we see today. Notice in this picture that although this is a Tuscan style home, I selected accessories that have Asian influences. It’s important that the interior décor of our surroundings feels good to us, and that is only achieved when there is alignment between our intuitive self and what we see. I love animals, people and water. Instinctively, the artwork and accessories that I place tend to reflect that theme. Also, being Japanese and the love of my ancestry has

inspired me to instinctively select décor that may have these inspirations. Go with what your heart is telling you in your décor and it will all flow together. It’s when we fight our inherit self that we become confused, and our surroundings will likely reflect that feeling. Creating your interior decorating themes helps us to get to know ourselves. Don’t worry about making “mistakes” or changing your mind. It is all an evolving process. Enjoy the journey. Celebrate your heritage! Jodi King, Owner ARTISTIC INTERIORS BY JODI 916.837.4159 see before and after pictures! www.ArtisticInteriorsbyJodi.com Home is where the ART is!

Angel Island Detainees and Descendants Sought The Angel Island Immigration Station Foundation is looking for stories from immigrants who were detained on Angel Island and their descendants. From 1910 to 1940, hundreds of thousands of immigrants, the majority of who came from Asia, passed through the United States Immigration Station on the island in San Francisco Bay. AIISF also includes stories from immigrants who arrived after the immigration station was closed in 1940. The over 110 current stories include men and women from China, Japan, Korea, India, the Philippines, Mexico,

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Russia, Austria, and many other countries. Many were written by their descendants, some are first-person stories. AIISF encourages families to write their own stories or make videos and submit them to the website. In special cases, its staff and volunteers may be able to travel to interview immigrants, especially if they were detained on the island. One of those profiled is Stockton resident Robert Hong. View videos of Mr. Hong and other stories at www.aiisf. org/immigrant-voices. For more information, contact Grant Din at 415-348-9200 x11 or gdin@aiisf.org.

The Frank Fat Founder’s Award CACS Congratulates Maeley Tom as the 2014 Frank Fat Founder’s Award Recepient. This year’s celebration will be held at the Happy Garden on Friday October 3, 2014 at 5:30 pm to 8:30 pm.

Named for the late Frank Fat (1904 – 1997), (the driving force that created the Chinese American Council of Sacramento in 1988), CACS past president Dr Sonney Chong and the CACS Board established the Frank Fat Founder’s Award in 1997. The intent of the Award was t o acknowledge those leaders who had, for years, selflessly given of themselves and their time for the community.

• Being a strong, positive role model for youth, demonstrating good citizenship and patriotism.

• Being a strong representative of the Asian Pacific Islander (API) community.

• Display a pattern of unselfish behavior which place the well-being of the API community before personal feelings.

• Has performed outstanding services to the API community for an extended period of time.

Individuals nominated for the Frank Fat Founder’s Award must have demonstrated a high level of leadership, involvement, and commitment to the API community and its organizations and projects for an extended period of time; to have had extensive The Frank Fat Founder’s Award is the highest involvement with one or more of the following: award given by CACS. Only one worthy • Programs/projects preserving the culture individual receives this award each year, and the and history of the APIs. presentation is held at the annual CACS Gold Mountain Celebration. • Advocate for civil right issues beneficial to the rights and well-being of APIs, both Candidates for the Frank Fat Founder’s locally and abroad. Award must be a member/organization of the • Humanitarian accomplishments benefiting Sacramento community in good standing and the API community. have qualities exemplifying the founding spirit • Constructive activities that raise the of CACS, which include: awareness of the community toward APIs.

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We are a resource collaborative team that provides invaluable resources in different communities by disseminating information through various forms of media. Some media include printed publications, events, workshops, conference calls, and internet radio. Visit us at http://www.S4LResource.com or http://www.facebook.com/YourS4L. Contact: 209.534.8000

S4L HEALTH, WEALTH, & SELF CARE: along or step strong. I feel called to Key to living your life intentionally dragged offer guidance to offset “overwhelm” which Life gifts us with opportunities to remember how precious it is disguised as ‘close calls’ sometimes. As we grow older, we are already more aware that there are Jim T. Chong fewer years left to make the most of, and it is natural that the things that matter most seem to surface, and even gain the power to change priorities. These moments where we are able to evaluate and reflect on what we have accomplished in life seems to be the growing trend of people that are nearing 50. The work that I do gives me the privilege to witness the range of life from the new horizons of a freshly married couple just starting out, to the passing of those that are older. This perspective helps me to appreciate the power of “making the most of every opportunity.” Some are looking to the horizon, while others are reflecting on their life in retrospect. I watch that some feel satisfaction, while others make peace with their regrets. I am grateful to learn from this eternally so that as I grow older, I am learning the significance of the statement that “LIFE can be lived intentionally” because it is our choices that are the living building blocks of our personal leadership for our lifetime. Yet, sometimes it is the things that happen ‘accidentally’ that bring deep insight into the fact that how well we are able to handle the unexpected matters just as much. Being prepared is a choice we make that matters not just to our life, but to the lives of our family and those who we care for deeply. Everyone wants to ‘do well’ but it takes many steps in the form of choices VOLUME 12.NO.3

along the way to navigate to the ‘Dream’ we long to make happen for ourselves and our legacy. I am excited about those that are around me that choose to continue to make a difference not just for themselves, but in ways that inspire others to go beyond the benefits of their own families…making a difference for the community at large that is the ‘family’ of the connected community and world. They live intentionally, ‘on purpose’ with a commitment to life itself. It definitely inspires me and calls me higher on a personal level on many fronts. As inspiration, motivation, and empowerment prevail to help those that live intentionally, I also realize the limitations that are imposed on people that have not taken steps to plan their future in the arenas of HEALTH care, WEALTH care, and SELF care. What I’ve come to realize more and more is just how important this triangle of care is to what we are called in our life to accomplish. Through prior writings, I have been more convinced as time goes by about having a plan in this “triangle”…but also how they are all interrelated. One’s health can definitely impact one’s wealth, which can take a toll on their “self ” esteem. As I speak to those that are in their “Golden Years” and see different people’s situations evolve, I’ve seen families that have very great memories of their parents; in contrast, I have also seen how people have also felt the burden of not knowing what to do when a loved one passes suddenly, or in dealing with a major life threatening situation, including the impact of financial crisis. Life moves forward, whether we are ready or not. Therefore, we can choose to be

can happen when we get ahead of ourselves, or fall too far behind. I am committed to making sure that those who seek to have the proper foundation and plan set in motion for their “health, wealth, and self ” care can find it with ease and even better, tell others where to find the same insights. The proper plan creates stability, and the flexibility to recover after the unexpected happens. I invite you all to take time to evaluate what’s important to you right now. Ask yourself where do you want to be later in life? Then take the time to get a plan created that puts what matters in a place of care and consideration, so that you can live your life intentionally and to your fullest potential, not just for yourself, but for also the generations to come. About The Author: Jim T. Chong is an S4L Executive Speaker/Trainer/Writer and specializes as a Navigator for LTC/Senior Benefits, Financial, Retirement, & Life Strategies, and is on the Executive Team/Board of various Foundations and Organizations. Solutions4Life (S4L) Resource includes…

WEALTHCARE: Jim T. Chong– LTC Navigator/Financial Solutions Professional & Host of “Cha-Ching with Chong: The Quest 4 The Cash Cow” / co-host of “Connections: Relationship Dynamics” calls and internet radio shows, S4L Executive Speaker/Speaker Trainer, & Writer. Contact: 209.534.8000 WEALTHCARE: Jo Anna Wright – Real Estate Investment Mentor/Instructor, S4L Speaker. Contact: 209.346.1014

HEALTH CARE: Mary Nicholson – Health Coach, S4L Executive Speaker / Writer, Founder Of Healings In Motion (http://www.healingsinmotion.org) Contact: 916.213.9407 SELF CARE: Katherine Gerardi – Transformational Coach & host of the “Power Half Hour” calls and internet radio show, S4L Executive Speaker/Speaker Trainer. Contact: 207.319.8210 BUSINESS CARE: Jane Taff – Business Planning, Relationship Coach, co-host of the “Connections: Relationship Dynamics” calls and internet show, S4L Executive Speaker/Speaker Trainer. Contact: 916.517.0342 BRANDING CARE: Deidre Trudeau – Branding & Design Artist at Ezeeye IMAGING & host of “The She-Fluence Factor” calls & internet radio show. Contact: 916.803.2787 IMAGE CARE: Cindy Gobrecht – Senior Sales Director at Mary Kay Inc., Speaker/Author Contact: 916.392.5259 VETERAN CARE: Chris Lambert – Resource for recovering Veterans, Speaker Contact: 209.985.7075 PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY: Bruce Robinson – Professional Photographer at Robinson Photography Contact: 916.806.4487

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Central Valley Asian American Chamber Of Commerce Launches First Annual Blood Drive Responding to a need in launching the drive with for more Asian American a well attended mixer on Blood the Central Valley April 24, 2014 at the Delta Asian American Chamber Blood Bank on March Lane of Commerce and the Delta BLOOD BANK in Stockton, CA! There were Blood Bank joined forces pledges, light refreshments on April 24, 2014 to launch the First and of course those wonderful Annual Blood and Membership The mixer began the month long Drive. Blood Drive April 24, 2014 through Leslie Edman who chaired the May 31, 2014 and this provides you committee for the “Blood Drive” with an opportunity to donate at stated the chamber “got involved any of the nine Delta Blood Bank because we want to be a leader in the locations with coupons and credit community and pave the way with going toward this event. Of course education and opportunity”. The the chamber wants to get you started education piece relates to teaching with a membership, however they the community about the need for are very happy and excited to accept specific types of blood, as there are any donations even if you are not particular diseases and concerns which able to join the chamber, please join are specific to each ethnicity and with this effort to increase the blood therefore build particular immunities. supply. The CVAA and the Delta The opportunity developed when Blood Bank want to thank everyone the CVACC decided to offer a who participated and who has already $50.00 discount toward renewing pledged or donated! and new chamber memberships and

DELTA

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GET with the GURU: Hints for Balancing Living by Susan A Hernández, MSW, HHP, CCHt

Part of our “heritage” is our health, some of this is genetic in nature, some, is our choice. For this edition I reviewed information from the Center for Disease Control relating to how disease if affecting the “Asian American” and “Asian Pacific American” communities. The following are the top five leading causes of death in the Asian American Community 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3. Stroke 4. Unintentional Injuries 5. Diabetes According to the Center for Disease Control Asian Americans represent a great variation in health concerns. This is due to the disproportionately high prevalence of HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis B in Asian Pacific Americans and at the same M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 4

time Asian American women enjoy the longest life expectancy, 85.5 on average, of any ethnic group in the US. Now you are armed with the power of knowledge. Now you can choose to leave a “heritage” of health and wellness for your families. Be proactive: learn to meditate, pray, see your “Guru” – learn balance. Make health your focus; make your goal to be one of leaving health, wellness and balance as your legacy for the future!

Celebrate National Women’s Health Week, May 11-17 The Office on Women’s Health invites you to celebrate National Women’s Health Week May 11, 17th. It is to empower women to make their health a priority. You can start by registering your National Women’s Health Week event or activity using a new process —Meetup Everywhere. The Office on Women’s Health and Meetup are making it easy for anyone to organize and participate in National Women’s Health Week events and promote women’s health.

Get started today! Visit womenshealth@hhs.gov to learn more about National Women’s Health Week and National Women’s Health Week Meetups. VOLUME 12.NO.3


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5/1/12

8:22:51 AM

Calendar of Events: Your Health and Wellness

May 3- “Walk for the Health of It”, Lodi Health Foundation, 209-339-7883 Registration for the 5 or Run is $40.00

May 8-Brain Aneurysm /AVM Support, Dameron Hospital-Annex, 525 W. Acacia Street, Stockton, CA, 5:30pm-7:00pm FREE and open to Survivors, Caregivers May 14 –Bike to Work Day, Janet Leigh Plaza, 6:30a-9a May 15- Measure Up/Pressure Down, National Action Day! Remember to Get Your Blood Pressure Taken. Know Your Numbers!! May 17, 2014-Connecting the Community for a Healthier Tomorrow, Stockton Memorial Civic Auditorium, 525 N. Center, Stockton, CA 95202, 10AM-2PM, Lunch provided. Register yourself and your children. Register at http://bit.ly/chforum May 18-Asthma Education Health Fair, SJC Asthma Coalition, Stockton Children’s Museum, 12PM-4PM. FREE May 22- The Sacramento Stroke Luncheon,Sierra Health Foundation, 1321 Garden Highway, Sacramento, CA. Presented by The American Heart Association and American Stroke Association, 11AM-2PM. Potluck Event. Main dish, desert and rolls provided by

Sierra Health. Survivor +1 guest. RSVP by May 17th May 23-Stroke The Big Picture! Resources, An Educational Conference, Modesto Center Plaza, 1000 L Street, Modesto, CA Modesto, CA, Registration 8:15AM-4PM. Lunch Included. www.strokeresources.org May 27-“Faces of Stroke in San Joaquin”, a special lunch to salute survivors and remember victims! Guest Speaker, Nate Terry, Stroke Survivor. Presented by Healings in Motion at Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia Street, Stockton, CA 95203. Register today at http://cv-raps2014.eventbrite.com May 29-36th Annual Senior Awareness Day, San Joaquin County Department of Aging, Micke Grove Park, 11793 N. Micke Grove Road, Lodi, CA 95240 www.sjseniorday.org May 31-Caregiver’s Conference, Catholic Charities St. Luke Church-Social Hall, 3847 N. Sutter Street, Stockton, CA 95204, 209-444-5924

Star Holistic Health Center Become Balanced

Susan A. Hernandez Holistic Health Practitioner 209.740.8215

sue@starholistichealth.com thelilycenter@gmail.com

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www.starholistichealth.com

Health and Wellness HEADLINE: KVIE Health Highlights Healing Quest Sundays at 11am Healing Quest is a weekly half-hour series that focuses on the leading edge of complementary and alternative medicine. Healing Quest gives viewers science-based information about new ways of achieving holistic wellness, that is, health that is much more than the mere absence of physical illness, but is instead the optimal wellness of mind, body, and spirit. In the May 18 episode, life coach Kevin Kitrell Ross discusses nourishing our spirit and Michele Bernhardt offers meditation tips. healingquest.tv/

Pacific Heartbeat: The Illness & The Odyssey Friday, May 9 at 11pm A cure for Alzheimer’s. A Nobel Prize. An honored place in medical history. All of this hangs in the balance as scientists race to find the cure for a rare disease found on the remote Pacific island of Guam. Examine the story of a deadly, mindwasting disease that could potentially hold the key to solving the riddle of many other neurological nightmares. Based on the book The Island of the Colorblind by Dr. Oliver Sacks, the film traces the struggle to solve a medical mystery plaguing the native population living on Guam. Dr. Sacks and many other luminaries in the field of neuroscience are featured. piccom.org/programs/the-illness-theodyssey M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 4


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“On Tap in the Cap”, A candid Interview with Steve Anthony Colangelo “On Tap in The Cap” an unusually close view of what is a series of interviews kinds of challenges there are out spotlighting political activity there for API boys growing up. in and around the Capitol. MJ Stoneking: Will you Steve Anthony Colangelo, explain further about your Republican, is a candidate family’s ties with the Japanese Michael J. Stoneking in the political race for the family? House of Representatives in Steve Anthony Colangelo: Congress, District 9. Should his bid During the Second World War when be successful, he will face off against Japanese Americans were subjected Democratic Incumbent, Congressman to internment camps, my father had Jerry McNerney, in November. a Japanese friend named James Abe. MJ Stoneking: How do you feel My father was asked by James Abe about the Asian Pacific Islander (API) to watch the Abe’s family farm until Community in the Central Valley? Do their family was allowed to return and you understand some of the cultural assume a normal life once again. For challenges faced? many Japanese families, things were not Steve Anthony Colangelo: To answer so good nor was it easy to return home your first question MJ, my best friend as a because many lost their clients, business, child growing up in the Sacramento area houses, momentum and many lost was a Japanese American. That gave me their entire business and had to rebuild

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everything from scratch. Being a hard working farmer, my father understood the challenges of getting back on your feet again after adversity, so he offered to hire the Abe’s to work his vineyard until they could get their business established again. The Abe family then joined with my family as working partners for several years. James Abe had a son about my age named Raymond Shiro Abe. Raymond and I became best friends during those early years of my childhood.” “Later Raymond and I decided to pursue careers in law enforcement and we entered the police academy together in Sacramento CA. I eventually went on to pursue a career in event management. Given our family history and mutual support for one another I guess it should be no surprise that Raymond Shiro Abe has endorsed me for California’s 9th Congressional District.” MJ Stoneking: Are you involved in supporting the efforts of the API community? Steve Anthony Colangelo: I am currently a member of Asian Pacific Islander Public Affairs Association, The

ColangeloForCongress.com (209) 916-4800

Organization of Chinese Americans, Capitol and The Central Valley Asian Chamber of Commerce and I am looking for opportunities to increase my role and support for the API Community at every opportunity. I sincerely want to continue the “Colangelo Family Tradition” of putting ourselves on the line to help API families and API friends which has been such a rewarding experience for the entire Colangelo family and our way of life. MJ Stoneking: What would you like to impart to API voters as they think about who they should support for Congress in the California 9th District. Steve Anthony Colangelo: I am a practical business person not a career politician. My family and I grew up supporting API rights and security to a good life. This is our heritage as a family and this will be my heritage as your representative in Congress. MJ Stoneking is the President of Capitol City Communications specializing in communication strategy and development within community outreach, programs implementation, and multicultural issues. VOLUME 12.NO.3


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Register to Vote for the Statewide Direct Primary Election by May 19, 2014

爲了全州直接預選 請在 2014 年 5 月 19 日 之前登記投票

Do you know voter registration forms are now available in Chinese in Sacramento County?

您是否知道沙加緬度縣現已經有 中文的選民登記表呢?

Pick-up Chinese voter registration forms at the Voter Registration and Elections office, DMV or public libraries.

中文選民登記表可在以下地區獲取: 選民登記與選務處,機動車輛管理局 (DMV), 或公共 圖書館。

Register to vote today!

請今天就登記投票吧! 選民登記與選務處

Voter Registration and Elections 7000 65th Street, Suite A Sacramento, CA 95823 (916) 875-6451

7000 65th Street, Suite A Sacramento, CA 95823 (916) 875-6451

www.elections.saccounty.net

www.elections.saccounty.net

APAPA presents the annual

Membership Drive & BBQ

Mardi Gras Saturday

June 14, 2014 4pm-8pm

Yin Ranch 6319 Pleasants Valley Rd Vacaville, CA 95688

$5 Admission

Free with new paid Membership or Renewal

apapamembershipdrive.splashthat.com VOLUME 12.NO.3

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For the dissemination of things Chinese: Learning—Customs—Arts and Crafts Exhibits and Presentations www.stocktonccss.org PO Box 692035 Stockton CA 95269-2035

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Travel to Stockton’s Sister City, Shizuoka Celebrate the 55 year Sister City relationship between Stockton< CA and Shinzuoka, Japan. The Stockton Sister Cities Japan Exchange Program is coordinating a trip to Japan-Sept 27-Oct 9, 2014. This 12-day trip includes: • 3 days in Tokyo • 2 days in Shinzuoka • 2 days in Kyoto • 2 days in Matsuyama on the island of Shikoku • 3 days in Hiroshima The trip includes airfare, hotel, train, ferry, 4 sightseeing days, 11 breakfasts and 5 lunches.

The price to enjoy this great trip is $4, 100.00 (Tentative Cost). This price is set for a group of 16, double occupancy. If you want to come with us to Japan, please attend a brief meeting on Thurs, May 1 from 8pm - 9pm at 10499 Big Oak Circle, Stockton, CA 95209. For more information call Aeko Yoshikawa at 209-470-5578.

Stockton Sister Cities Japan Exchange Program Join us on a 12 day trip Sept. 27 - Oct. 9, 2014 to Japan that includes:

E D U C AT E • P A R T I C I PAT E • A D V O C AT E

Californians Sign On To Support New Common Core Standards

The prominent statewide children’s advocacy organization, Children Now, has amassed unified and diverse support from more than 160 business, education, children, youth, family and community-based organizations, including the Central Valley Asian-American Chamber of Commerce, for its statement on the positive benefits of California’s new

Common Core State Standards. To join these groups on this show of support and ensure that California does not back away from this exciting opportunity to prepare our students to graduate from high school ready for the demands of a 21st century global economy, email Debra Brown at dbrown@ childrennow.org.

“YOU ARE NOT FORGOTTEN” A plaque was dedicated by members of the Friends of the Marysville Bok Kai Temple. Simple phrase, “YOU ARE NOT FORGOTTEN” is the same as in Chinese on the marble plaque next to it. The plaque was dedicated on Ch’ing Ming. David Chan lights the candles and incense.

3 days in Tokyo 2 days in Shizuoka-to celebrate our 55 year Sister City relationship 2 days in Kyoto 2 days in Matsuyama on the island of Shikoku 3 days in Hiroshima

$4,100 tentative cost

includes airfare, hotel, train, ferry, 4 sightseeing days and the following meals: 11 breakfasts, 5 lunches Prices set for a group of 16, double occupancy and may change based on exchange rate. Hurry call now to reserve your spot. Contact Aeko Yoshikawa 209-470-5578

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Cambodian New Year Celebration and Rich Khmer Heritage

LEt US FiND tHE bESt SHiPPiNg SOLUtiON FOr yOU. One stop shopping for all your shipping needs. No more shopping around for the best shipping option, because we’ll do it for you!

Pak Mail is your authorized DHL , FedEx, UPS, and US Postal Service carrier. 4719 Quail Lakes Dr • Stockton, CA 95207 • 209-487-9827 • www.pakmailstockton.com

F REE

F REE

SPECIAL EDITION

SPECIAL EDITION

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M AY 2 0 1 3

VOLUME 12.NO.2

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Getting to the Heart of the Matter by Mary Nicholson, Editor

Photos provided by

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http://issuu.com/apanewsandreview209

Ron Jones, a Sacramento television news anchor posted on Facebook his dramatic experience as a police officer, his previous profession. Ron witnessed the heartbeat slowly fading as doctors worked vigorously to save the young man’s life. Ron was present when the patient’s heart stopped. In that moment of silence Ron could hear the ticking of the watch the deceased man was wearing. While the victim’s bodily clock had stopped it was humbling to Ron to see that time move forward. Ron wandered if this was a preventable death. Did this young man have dreams unfulfilled? A few weeks ago Dennis Lee, the Publisher of the Asian Pacific American News and Review, had an emergency angioplasty resulting in a triple bypass surgery. The sudden reality and urgency was surreal because we were having an editorial meeting when he was rushed to one hospital and later relocated to another one in San Francisco. The intensity and concern was felt by family and friends. Fortunately for all of us, Dennis had excellent medical care and he is

recovering now. Dennis Lee is a Community Leader. Not only is he the founder of this newspaper, he also founded the Central Valley Asian Chamber. He is a board member and Senior Fellow for the Great Valley Chapter of the American Leadership Forum. During Dennis’ scary crisis, many reflected on the substantial contributions he has made to his community. Knowing that he still has many dreams and aspirations yet to be realized, we prayed for his survival. Today we root for the success of Dennis’ recovery and know that he supports others on this path. He expresses his heartfelt appreciation for all of the cards, calls and support during this time. Recovery Begins with Education and Resources Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, and accounts for nearly 30%, nearly 800,000 deaths annually. Heart disease, also called cardiovascular disease and coronary heart disease, is caused by plaque buildup in the walls of the arteries, or atherosclerosis. As the plaque builds up, the arteries narrow,

making it more difficult for blood to flow. Types of heart disease include heart failure, an irregular heartbeat or arrhythmia and heart valve problems. Like strokes, many heart disease deaths can be avoided. Simple lifestyle modifications can reduce the risk associated with heart disease. Having a heart attack increases the possibility of another one. So knowing and responding to the signs and symptoms is important. The five major symptoms of a heart attack are: • Pain or discomfort in the jaw, neck, or back. • Feeling weak, light-headed, or faint. • Chest pain or discomfort. • Pain or discomfort in arms or shoulder. • Shortness of breath.

MARCH/APRIL 2014

Community Corner 8-9

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East West

10 Cambodian New Year Celebration and Rich Khmer Heritage

If you’ve had a heart attack, your heart may still be damaged. This could affect your heart’s rhythm, pumping action, and blood circulation. Recovery takes conviction. With or without a Caregiver, you should work for survival. It isn’t easier and it doesn’t happen overnight, neither did the heart attack. It is a process. You don’t have to work toward recovery alone. Join a Support Group. Mended Hearts, a non-profit working with heart attack survivors, offers peer-to-peer support to patients, family members and caregivers. Survivors are gifted with The Heartbeat Magazine, which focuses on topics that matter most to heart attack survivors.

In San Joaquin County the Mended Hearts Support Group meets monthly on the 1st Thursday at 7:00PM at St. Joseph’s Hospital, in Class 2 in the basement. Let the parking attendant know you are there for Mended Hearts and parking will be free. http://mendedhearts.org

5665 N. Pershing Ave. Suite C-2 Stockton, CA 95207 A P A

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Phone: (209) 327-2407

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JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2014

Community Corner 3 Lift Our Voice, Life Our Spirit By Teresa M. Chen

senior

http://issuu.com/ apanewsandreview209

5 Community Leaders Work Together to Increase Stroke Awareness and Prevention in San Joaquin County By Mary Nicholson

Living

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