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Publisher Dennis Lee (209) 327-2407 dennislee99@gmail.com APANR Team Dorcas Yee Cheryll Lim Dennis Lee Edgar Calderon Jim Chong Remi Estrella Art Director Remi Estrella

Dennis Lee Build Relationships Earn Trust The opinions expressed by contributing writers are their own and do not reflect the opinions of the newspaper’s owner, Editor, or staff.

Asian Pacific American News & Review Mission Statement

The Asian Pacific American News and Review is a bi-monthly newspaper dedicated to providing a single, comprehensive publication, both in print and online, that seeks to raise awareness of issues of interest to Asians and associated ethnic groups in Northern California.

Objectives

Educate — inform readers about the issues facing Asian Pacific Americans. And also to give a voice to the community for sharing and lauding accomplishments and concerns.

178 West Adams Street Stockton, CA 95204 Phone: (209) 327-2407

Multicultural History Editor Lucky Owyang come.to.chinatown@gmail.com Marketing/Advertising Consultant Susan Cruz (209) 477.5001 scruz@cruzintergrated.com Contributing Writers Jodi King Mary Nicholson, PHC Jim Chong Grant Din Collaborative Partnerships Jim Chong Contributing Photographers Tim Ulmer Dorcas Yee Jack Funamura

Next Issue

Advisors May O. Lee Jodi King Alex Eng Linda Ng

in raising awareness of the Asian Pacific American community and its contributions and concerns.

September/October 2016

Advocate — Ask readers to be an advocate for the community as an

Civic Involvement

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Edgar Calderon (916) 627-8701

http://issuu.com/ apanewsandreview209

Participate — promote and encourage readers to take an active role

informed, involved member. While we most directly address the concerns of Asian Pacific Americans, our publication is not a racial or ethnic sorting. It is a gathering of all those who wish to gather.

Advertising/Outreach Dennis Lee (209) 327-2407 dennislee99@gmail.com

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Relocation Center during World War II, Tommy’s lungs cleared and he learned about weightlifting from friends.

Tommy Kono Documentary to Air on KVIE

After the war, Tommy chased his passion for weightlifting, winning local competitions. He was drafted into the Army to serve during the Korean War, but when officials learned about his talent for weightlifting, he went to train for the 1952 Summer Olympics in Helsinki. Then the awards started pouring in. Tommy was a gold medalist at the 1952 and 1956 Summer Olympics. He was a silver medalist at the 1960 Summer Olympics, won the World Weightlifting Championships six consecutive times from 1953 to 1959, and set 26 world records and 7 Olympic records.

Tommy Kono was a Sacramento native with an amazing story, and a new episode of KVIE Public Television’s local documentary series ViewFinder explores his life. ViewFinder: Arnold Knows Me – The Tommy Kono Story premieres on Wednesday, August 3 at 7 p.m. on KVIE Channel 6. Born in the vibrant JapaneseAmerican community in Sacramento, Tommy suffered from asthma as a child. When his family was interned in Tule Lake VOLUME 14.NO.4

Tommy was also a bodybuilder and was named Mr. Universe three times and Ironman Mr. World once. Along the way, he met a young Austrian named Arnold Schwarzenegger and

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inspired him to compete. Tommy also coached three Olympic weightlifting teams after he retired. ViewFinder: Arnold Knows Me – The Tommy Kono Story was directed by Ryan Yamamoto, a journalist and news anchor, and produced by Suzanne Phan, a journalist, in collaboration with the Center for Sacramento History. KVIE Public Television is proud to present this amazing story of a local hero overcoming incredible odds. Stay Up to Date with Politics At the end of July, the Republican National Party and the Democratic National Party will each host their own conventions, and KVIE can help keep you up to date.

Know more about the presidential candidates and the two major parties by watching special coverage on KVIE Channel 6. PBS NewsHour is teaming up with National Public Radio (NPR) to provide balanced, quality coverage, live from the convention. From July 18 to July 21, PBS NewsHour will broadcast live from Cleveland from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. to cover the Republican National Convention and the presumed nominee Donald Trump. From July 25 to July 28, PBS NewsHour will broadcast live from Philadelphia from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. to cover the Democratic

National Convention and the presumed nominee Hillary Clinton. KVIE can help you stay in touch with politics and the world throughout the year. BBC World News America airs at 5 p.m. on weekdays for an international perspective, Nightly Business Report airs at 5:30 p.m. on weekdays for a look at economics, and PBS NewsHour airs at 6 p.m. on weekdays for a well-rounded view on what’s happening in the country and the world. Washington Week airs at 7 p.m. on Fridays with a recap of the latest political news, and PBS NewsHour Weekend airs at 5:30 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays. Stay in the loop with in-depth examination of issues important to the Central Valley and Northern California with KVIE’s own local public affairs show, Studio Sacramento. Host Scott Syphax moderates guest conversations about everything from emergency preparedness to regional history. It’s a half hour of serious discussion – no sound bites, no spin, just local conversation around important issues that impact our region. Studio Sacramento airs at 7:30 p.m. on Fridays.

178 West Adams Street Stockton, CA 95204 Phone: (209) 327-2407 http://issuu.com/ apanewsandreview209

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Dali Lama Visits the State Capitol By Jacqui Nguyen

that began in Orange County, California and will end in Indiana later this month.

SACRAMENTO – Today, the California State Legislature welcomed His Holiness, the 14th Dalai Lama of Tibet, to the State Capitol. This is His Holiness’ first visit to Sacramento as part of his public tour of the United States

The Tibetan spiritual leader arrived to the State Capitol and made a brief public appearance on the West Steps before making his remarks to members of the state Senate and Assembly. The spiritual leader addressed members of the joint Legislature in the Assembly chambers on the topics of compassion, the environment, and ethical leadership.

“I was honored to join my colleagues in welcoming His Holiness the Dalai Lama to the State Capitol and hear him speak about human kindness. The Dalai Lama is an inspiring and renowned leader, and this is a historic visit for our state Legislature. I commend my colleague Senator Janet Nguyen’s efforts to help make all this possible,” said Senate Republican Leader Jean Fuller (R-Bakersfield). “Today is a historic day for the California Legislature. His Holiness the Dalai Lama carries with him a message of compassion and kindness that I believe everyone can benefit

from irrespective of their religious affiliation,” said Senator Janet Nguyen (R-Garden Grove). “After meeting His Holiness last year, I am honored that he accepted my invitation to address a special convention of the California State Legislature and grateful for his contributions to the culture of the State of California.” For press inquiries or questions, please contact Jacqui Nguyen, press secretary for the Senate Republican Caucus at (916) 651-4016.

2016 Senior Awareness Day

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2016 Filipino Independence Day By Gloria Nomura

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(1) Leslie Edman and Dennis Lee of the Central Valley Asian-American Chamber of Commerce with Vice-Mayor Christina Fugazi. (2) Escrima display by the junior members of the Bahala Na Group. (3) Arnis Exhibition by the Bahala na Group. (4) The little folk dancers from Little Manila Foundation. (5) Ronald Lee and friend of Solar City. Photography provided by Dorcas Yee

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Senior Living: THE HEART Of The Home

By Jodi King This issue of the ANANR is especially meaningful to me at this point in my life’s journey. It seems that I am being blessed by being involved with living Beings at the golden years of life. I enjoy taking my parents and Auntie Agnes out to meet with their sister Miyo. Auntie Agnes just celebrated her 81’s birthday and Auntie Miyo her 91st. Our three dogs are all considered “seniors” and because of their age were not likely to be adopted, so we are blessed with having them

in our lives and all three bring so much joy into our home. Many of my clients are getting older and are transitioning into new surroundings that are more practical to their needs. While most of us think of the tangible factors such as easy access, good lighting, low maintenance, and other factors, we may overlook the intangible. Nature is such a big factor in having peace of mind, stability and a sense of joy and belonging and renewal. Whenever I want to find inspiration for a design, I look to nature. In this home shown in the photo, I selected furnishings that continued the color of the bark

plant or flower arrangement in front of it. Surround yourself with a few items that influence a connection to nature in you. Play music that has sounds of nature. What we carry in our hearts and our minds ns far more important than our physical surrounding. And if you believe as I do that what we think about, we attract, you will find that your thoughts are being manifested all around you. There is no age limit to God’s blessings on our life’s journey. Namaste. of the trees to the inside, and used neutral colors to keep the beautiful views as the focal point. Not everyone can afford to stay in a living space that has spectacular views, maybe even no views. Don’t lose hope. You can create your view by selecting a piece of art that you love to look at and place a

ASSOCIATES  BACHELORS  MASTERS

Jodi King, Owner ARTISTIC INTERIORS BY JODI 916.837.4159 see before and after pictures! www.ArtisticInteriorsbyJodi.com Home is where the ART is!

Apply now to start Law School in the Fall of 2016

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Get the facts about becoming an Attorney! Law School Information Meeting is held on the 2nd Tuesday of each month at 7:00 pm

Apply Now! Fall Quarter Starts October 3, 2016

www.humphreys.edu

Military Friendly

WASC Accredited

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Stockton Campus

Modesto Campus

6650 Inglewood Ave. Stockton

3600 Sisk Road, Suite 5-A. Modesto

(209) 478-0800

(209) 543-9411

Financial Aid

Day, Evening & Online Classes

Stockton Campus 6650 Inglewood Ave. Stockton www.humphreys.edu

(209) 478-0800

WASC Approved  Cal Bar Accredited  Financial Aid  Military Friendly  Evening Program

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Susan Sarinas Program Manager ACC Senior Services 7334 Park City Drive Sacramento CA 95831 Phone: (916) 393-9026 ext. 339 Email: ssarinas@accsv.org Web: www.accsv.org

ACC Care Center Senior Services 5 2

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ing play Art s i d , iving ctor stru ay of G n I D ing aint C’s Big P d d Alfre y an rk at AC h m p o r a igr wo on f Call ts’ art less e s g n e n e s: in ki stud tion , Ch Coo d e Cap nita Lo nd her ation. y njo r a A ts e 1. er own c Celeb n e d i i h res Mus nter s e and C ents mpu d a are u C t C la s CC s ACC r Hu at A e 2. ee g mpu h n a d o C n P Y a CC ng my at A g Pi l n ty A l i a n y u b a A le n pl 3. Pick g fu g n n i i v Ha play 4. fun g n i Hav 5.

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Benefits of Proper Breathing By Teresa M. Chen Improper breathing has long been held as a common cause of many health problems. Tense people often take short and shallow breaths, which hamper the body’s normal function, causing disease symptoms like hypertension, insomnia, asthma, poor digestion, and headaches. When we practice deep breathing, the vague nerve sends signals from the brain to relax all the internal organs – the lungs, the heart, the stomach, the kidneys, the intestines, etc. Activity of involuntary cardiac and smooth muscles and glands, usually restricted to the autonomic-parasympathetic nervous system, can be influenced by the practice of deep breathing. Techniques of Deep Breathing: Breathing is life. Our life starts with the first breath and ends with the last breath. Ever watch an infant breathe in sleep? The little body billows gently with every inhale and relaxes gracefully with every exhale, showing

a natural rhythm. Since when have we lost this natural rhythm? To breathe life back to our rigid bodies, grown-ups have to re-gain this natural rhythm through training. Breathing exercises train us to breathe like a baby, deeply down to the belly (diantian) and even down to the feet (yongchuan), inhaling slowly through the nose and exhaling slowly and continuously. Breathing can be practiced standing, sitting or lying down. Different breathing exercises adopt different movements and postures, but their purpose is mainly to enhance the breathing. Hand and feet, head and eye movements have to be intentionally emitted from the diantian and integrated with the breath. Ready examples of qigong (Breathing Exercise) forms include baduanjin (Eight Section Brocade), taiji (Taichi), liutong and yoga (pranayama). The body stretches,

Practical Tips for Seniors Having worked with senior placement and being an advocate on issues surrounding keeping seniors Therese Johnson and the elderly in their home as long as possible, I have seen many times, the pain felt by an aging parent and their loved ones when old age hits in some way, perhaps suddenly, without notice and without preparation. With that in mind, here is a short list of very helpful tips to prepare you for aging in place.

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1. If buying a new home and are over the age of 45, be sure it is one-story with no stairs and a step-in shower, and that it within a relatively short drive of a hospital and emergency care.

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bends, sinks, and/or rotates in sync with the breathing-in and breathingout. People tend to hold their breath when they concentrate on various tasks, such as threading a needle, stringing beads, or working on computers.

Self-massage is yet another addon. Coupled with conscious and coordinated breathing, the mind directs the hand to do the rubbing, pressing, kneading, and/or thumbing on certain points or areas of the body surface.

To reverse the bad habit of incorrect breathing, we need to start with conscious breathing. Before the natural rhythm can be established again, we must practice consciously and regularly.

The combination of breathing, movement, and self-massage allows for immediate feedback of the various senses of warmth, relief, relaxation, and even joy, once we get over the anxiety of learning something new.

Lasting power of attorney gives a chosen individual the right to manage your affairs for you on an ongoing or permanent basis.

dentist at least twice a year, and get a dermatological cancer screening once a year.

4. Minimize or at least delay health problems common to the elderly:

2. Broaden your interests and stay involved socially to avoid painful loneliness later... join a club, class, or church, learn a hobby that gives pleasure sitting in place working with your hands, adopt a pet, etc.

- Maintain posture: sit straight, stand straight, and walk straight.

3. Set up a power of attorney now while you have ‘sufficient mental capacity’ to legally plan for how your money should be handled in the event of illness or death. Ordinary power of attorney gives someone a temporary right to handle your financial affairs.

- Work out with weights or other resistance training three times each week to slow the process of muscle loss all people experience after age 60.

- Walk daily and take the stair wherever you can. - Eat unprocessed foods.

About The Author: Therese Johnson is a Gerontologist and Senior Care Advocate, In-Home Care expert, and Residential Care for the Elderly (RCFE) placement expert. She has been seen and heard on KAHI Radio, ACTV & Professionals Magazine, and is an educator for the Board of Registered Nurses (BRN) and the California State Legislature. She is also featured in Sacramento on the “Senior Moments” segment of MONEY 1055FM Rush Hour For Success. Find our more at http://www. SeniorCareofSacramento.com

- See your primary care doctor and your

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Great Appreciation to APANR for Supporting the Brain Health to Beat Strokes 5K Run/Walk by Mary Nicholson

Every year 795,000 people have a stroke. 80% of those strokes can be prevented. When a stroke occurs time is of the essence off-set long-term disability. That is why stroke awareness is important. Special thanks to APANR for supporting our efforts to beat stroke at this year’s Brain Health to Beat Stroke 5K Run/Walk, which was held June 25, 2016 in downtown Stockton, CA at the McLeod Lake Park. In addition to APANR, other great sponsors included: Columbus Life Insurance Company, Genentech, Sierra Health, Dignity Health/St. Joseph’s Medical Center, Golden 1 Credit Union, San Joaquin General Hospital, Republic Services, River Islands, Nu-You Weight Management, CA State Council on Developmental Disabilities, Fleet Feet, University of the Pacific, Pine Street Physical & Occupational Therapy, Walgreens, The Garibaldi Company, Positive PR Stockton and WOK STAR Entertainment.

Brain Health to Beat Stroke 5K Run/Walk was a great event thanks to all of our volunteers, participants, donors and sponsors.

About Healings in Motion Healings in Motion (“HiM”) is an established 501(c)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to providing resources related to brain health, stroke awareness, and stroke prevention. Founded in 2007 by Mary Nicholson, this Stockton based organization has taken center stage at many events throughout the region, educating the community about brain health and stroke awareness while also providing support programs and events for caregivers.

Walk Kick-Off with Jim Chong

Champion Walker Finisher Stroke Survivor with 2 sons VOLUME 14.NO.4

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Stockton Ports Host Japanese American Heritage/Cultural Night Stockton Ports, the Class A Affiliate of the four- time (1972, 1973, 1974, 1981) World Champions Oakland A’s will be hosting the 8th Annual Japanese American Heritage/Cultural Night on Thursday, July 28th, at the Banner Island Ballpark , 404 W Fremont St. Stockton, California, 9203. Game time is 7:10pm. Price of admission is $7.00 and the first 500 attendees will receive a Stockton Ports baseball cap. It is only fitting that we use the baseball game as the vehicle to introduce, educate and entertain the fans about the Japanese American Heritage and Culture. Baseball played an important part of the Japanese American lives prior to and during W.WII. After the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt declared war on the Empire of Japan and signed the Executive Order 9066, in February, 1942. This Executive Order removed more than 120,000 Americans of Japanese ancestry, living on the West Coast to concentration camps throughout the United States. The incarcerated individuals JULY/AUGUST 2016

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relinquished and sacrificed everything but what they could carry and began their lives in the concentration camps. The population of the camps had to reorganize and re-establish their lives. Churches were started, gardens were planted, schools established, dances

and other forms of entertainment were scheduled and baseball games became an important part of their lives. For that nine innings of the baseball games, the friendly bantering between the teams and their fans took them back to the days of the Stockton Yamato’s, Lodi Templars , San Pedro Skippers, San Jose Asahi, Sebastopol Sakura’s and other ball teams around the West Coast.

HERITAGE NIGHT Thursday July 28 7:10pm

For more information or to purchase tickets, please contact Tickets Operations Manager Scott Gillies at (209)644-1967 or sgillies@stocktonports.com

In spite of all the difficulties and miseries of “camp lives”, the individual’s intestinal fortitude, their “SHIKATAGA NAI” and “GUN BARE” attitude carried them through the dark days of W.WII. The life in “camps” went on without a slight respite and so the baseball games were a time for relief and a time to relax. Prior to the scheduled game between the Stockton Ports and the Visalia Rawhide, the Minyo Tanoshimi Kai, which is a traditional folk songs and dancers will perform followed by a Japanese classical dance by students of Bando Junjiro. Students of the New School Aikido led by instructor Kate Song will take the stage following the dancers. Rev. Katsuya Kusunoki of Buddhist Church Lodi, Pastor Hiromi Yoneda, of Calvary Presbyterian Church, Charles Bagwell, President of the Stockton Buddhist Church, Exchange Students from Shimizu, Japan, their Teachers, Chaperones and the Hosts VOLUME 14.NO.4


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(continued from page 14) Stockton Ports Host Japanese American Heritage/Cultural Night representing the Stockton Sister City Association will be throwing the Ceremonial First Pitches. The Stockton JACL President Steve Sue and the Heritage/Cultural Committee wish to thank the Stockton Ports Team, Management and Staff for making this event possible. Our special Mahalo to Scott Gillies, Tickets Operation Manager, for his patience and cooperation.

Committee Members: T. Ted Yoneda – Chair Taylor and Madison Davis – Ass’t to Chair Steve Sue- President, Stockton JACL – Co-Chair Gene Morita – Co-Chair Dr. Ron Ouye – Co-Chair June Okubo – Bando Junjiro Shizue Morita – Minyo Tanoshimi Kai Kate Song – New School Aikido 3rd Degree Black Belt Linda Bazett – Stockton Sister City Association Dennis Morita – Lodi Templers Baseball Haruko Ewert – Translation and Words to Remember Cathy Fujimori – Photography

For more information about the Japanese American Heritage/Cultural Night or to purchase tickets please contact Scott Gillies at: (209) 644-1967. VOLUME 14.NO.4

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Ellen Junn Named President at Stanislaus State Junn, 58, most recently the provost and vice president for academic affairs at CSU Dominguez Hills, began a new leg of her journey at Stanislaus State on July 1. She succeeded Joseph F. Sheley, who retired June 30.

Ellen Junn

Over the last 25 years, as she served in teaching and leadership positions at five California State University campuses, Ellen Junn constantly displayed a gift for helping nontraditional students succeed — one of the many qualities that will serve her well as the 11th president of California State University, Stanislaus.

“Under the leadership of President Sheley, Stanislaus State has become an academic powerhouse in the Central Valley, providing students with a transformative educational experience and the region’s employers with jobready graduates,” Junn said. “I’ve been looking forward to coming back to the Central Valley and am honored to have the opportunity to work alongside the many dedicated faculty and staff who guide students along that journey and prepare them for achievements beyond the classroom.” Prior to her position at Dominguez

Hills, Junn was the chief academic officer at San José State, served as associate provost at Fresno State and held various leadership positions at Cal State Fullerton. “As a higher education veteran who has held leadership positions at multiple CSU campuses, Dr. Junn is an accomplished and visionary leader who understands the importance of partnering with faculty, the campus community and external stakeholders to bolster educational opportunities for students,” said CSU Trustee Hugo N. Morales, who served as the chair of the Trustees’ Committee for the Selection of the President.

Junn said she relished her return to the Central Valley for several reasons, most notably that she sees the region on the cusp of becoming an economic powerhouse with Stan State in position to be a catalyst for development. “The Central Valley has been largely ignored, but it has the most vibrant potential,” she said. “Let’s prepare now for the future of the Central Valley and make it a brighter, sustainable future.” Junn holds a bachelor’s degree in experimental and cognitive psychology from the University of Michigan, where she graduated cum laude. She earned both a master’s and Ph.D. in cognitive and developmental psychology from Princeton University.

Mixing Cultural Lessons and Fun in her Books By Cheryll Lim

Pat Kim wrote two children’s books for her two youngest grandchildren, Shep and Addie, who were also the main characters. The first book was about Pat’s life in colonial Macau. It talks about her adventures with her family playing games, and other fun activities. She describes the fruits, flowers, animals and other cultural attractions in detail. If you have ever been to Macau, the book actually takes you back. The second book is an amusing tale of going on a safari to find a lost baseball that’s very dear to Shep. Meeting the various African animals featured in the book will be an exciting read for children, especially for those who love animals. You can avail of the signed hardcover books directly from Pat Kim at (email or phone number?) for $20. You also have the option to get the soft covers on Amazon.com or CreateSpace.com for only $10 although, according to her, the reproductions from the latter sites were not as sharp as the hardcovers.

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Democracy in action!!

APAPA Asian Pacific Islander American Public Affairs Association Community Education Foundation (APAPA-CEF)

Empowering and Engaging Asian and Pacific Islander Americans Non-profit 501(c)(3) Tax ID #55-0849384 www.apapa.org

In November, we have the privilege to vote for the various federal, State and local candidates that will be representing us in our great democracy. Since our founder, C.C. Yin founded APAPA, we have worked diligently to unite all the various community organizations in one venue. This venue is the annual voter’s forum. This gives our communities a strong and unified voice to discuss the needs of the local API and all Americans. There is better representation of all our communities since we have begun this endeavor.

15th Annual Voters Education & Candidates Forum

On Saturday, September 24, 2016, Asian Pacific Islander Public Affairs Community Education Foundation (APAPA-CEF) will host the 15th Annual Voters & Candidates Education Forum at Sacramento State University. We extend an invitation to you, your family and friends at this great event. This is event is free and open to the public.

Featuring Candidates:

Presidential, Federal, State and Local Offices

APAPA-CEF is a non-profit, non-political, and non-partisan educational organization. The forum affords an opportunity for candidates and elected officials to address issues that affect our community and general public, in one location. This is a tremendous venue to unify, and listen to the candidates and other elected officials. Together, we have made and will continue to make a difference!

Saturday, September 24, 2016 | 1:00pm – 5:00pm

1:00pm - 4:00pm Forum Program; 4:00pm - 5:00pm Appreciation Mixer

California State University, Sacramento - University Union 6000 J Street, Sacramento, CA 95819

For more information contact APAPA Headquarters at 916-928-9988 or info@apapa.org Statewide Sponsors

Johnson & Gina Chiang

Sandy Chau

KENSON VENTURES Ken Fong

Hsing Kung

We sincerely hope that you will accept our invitation to come to this event.

Andrew K.C. Wong

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Written by Major Ty Sorci, Government Affairs and Media Relations Director for APAPA

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Stockton’s 6th Annual Chinese Culture Camp Cultural Dances * Filipiniana Fashion Show

A Message from the Camp Director

Pinoy Bands * Hawaiian Dances * Martial Arts Demo Filipino Food * Philippine Arts and Crafts Exhibits

It was a fun-filled week for the 17 campers, 20 counselors and 19 instructors who participated in Confucius Church of Stockton’s 6th Annual Chinese Culture Camp! Back were favorite activities such Lion Dancing, Folk Dancing, Recorders, Songs, and Cooking. We also sculpted Terra Cotta Warriors. Introduced this year were: Chinese Drumming, using our brand-new drums from Hong Kong; the art of Ancient Book Binding and Calligraphy; the fun tileclattering Chinese game of Mah Jongg; and the sport of Badminton, very popular in China. We also had storytelling, with Pat Kim reading her book, Once Upon a Time with Po Po Avo.

T-shirts * Big Bikes Motorcycle Demo * Face Painting

Health Fair with Flu Shots Barrio’s Got Talent Karaoke presented by BINGO at the Social Hall

Little Manila Dance Collective 

It’s been a great six-year run for camp organizers Lorna Louie, Debbie Mar and Janwyn Funamura. The activities developed and the experiences gained have formed the foundation for venturing in a new direction. Yes, we’re changing it up! Next year, rather than a Culture Camp Week, we look forward to a series of Chinese Cultural Days––perhaps an entire day of active Chinese games such as Chinese Yo-Yo, Rouli Ball, Jump Rope, and Badminton; or a Chinese cooking day beginning with a trip to the Asian Farmers Market, followed by local market tours and a hands-on cooking class; Arts and Crafts Day; Performing Arts Day...the possibilities are endless!

PAROL (Christmas Lantern) MAKING Workshop MOTORCYCLE SHOW—— Vote for your favorite motorcycle

Te Ihi O Te Ara Nui

For Information:

Children will always be our focus, so we look forward to our campers joining us. We have a winning combination with our enthusiastic youth volunteers and our incomparable, loyal, talented instructors. We will continue to have a great need for them. Stay tuned and keep in touch!

Please call Big Ray and the Freeloaders Band

209-466-1416 209-479-1180 209-466-3940

Sincerely,

Email: frank_gatdula@sbcglobal.net THANKS TO OUR GENEROUS SPONSORS!

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Janwyn Loy Funamura, MD Camp Director and Immediate Past President Stockton Chinese Benevolent Association

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The ladies from our Chinese community, who volunteered as instructors for the culture camp, preparing for cooking class.

Learning to make dumplings at the 2016 Chinese culture camp

Campers doing their sidewalk calligraphy VOLUME 14.NO.4

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Fruity Refreshment.

$2

any small blended beverage

Price and participation may vary. Limited time offer. ©2016 McDonald’s.

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Profile for Dennis Lee

APANR July/August 2016  

Non Profit - Community Organization - Educate, Participate and Advocate

APANR July/August 2016  

Non Profit - Community Organization - Educate, Participate and Advocate

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