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MEMBERPROFILE

SKIN CONSULTATION

Capturing the right data for a successful treatment design and outcome An interview with Gay Wardle TRADITIONALLY the role of a skin consultation is to identify valuable information that will allow you to determine treatment suitability, ingredient choices and any potential contra-indications that can lead to reactions. The more detailed the consultation in capturing valuable data the more effective it will be in guiding you in the best possible options for successful treatment solutions for your client or patient. Today’s consumers have choices as to whom they can approach for corrective skin treatments. They can visit a cosmetic clinic and be treated by a doctor, a dermal therapist or an aesthetic practitioner. While qualifications are important, consumers will also question your knowledge and investigate your reputation. At a diploma level Beauty Therapy qualification, the level of knowledge in skin analysis is quite fundamental, however with the consistent introduction of advanced and sophisticated technologies practitioners can achieve incredible treatment outcomes that target the deeper layers of the skin such as the dermis and beyond. Working at this level practitioners are required to investigate causative considerations that may contribute to the skin condition they are treating. Gay Wardle is considered the “Queen of skin analysis”. Her training is comprehensive and academically robust. Her three-day courses are transforming businesses and allowing practitioners to gain a more scientific understanding of the origin of skin disorders. Harnessing this information her training allows practitioners and businesses to address chronic skin conditions with successful treatment outcomes. In this article we interviewed Gay and asked her specific questions about what constitutes a thorough skin analysis and what information should be captured. APJ Q1: Gay, you have been studying and training in Advanced Skin Analysis for several years now. We know that every beauty therapist has studied skin analysis as part of their Diploma of Beauty Therapy, however, how does your training provide more in-depth knowledge and skills in identifying and understanding disorders and skin deficiencies? This is a great question. Students are learning so many units in the Diploma of Beauty Therapy that it’s really not possible

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to cover skin anatomy and physiology as comprehensively as is needed for today’s consumer expectations. Furthermore, we are required to constantly learn and grow our knowledge of the skin and we can achieve this with new research findings that we are continuingly able to access. Today, beauty therapists are challenged to not just improve skin texture, but also treat skin disorders. Many skin disorders are as a result of internally related issues more now than ever before and in fact, the percentage of skin disorders that have their origin in internal considerations is much higher than external causes. In my teaching I cover gut-related disorders, stress related disorders, hormonal related disorders, lung disorders and diseases that have a huge impact on the skin. All of these issues have a massive impact to skin health when these organs are not functioning in a healthy way. I teach cell biology so that therapists may understand why we see things on the skin, such as solar lentigo. Treatments being offered in clinics today can be very aggressive and at times could have an adverse reaction if the body is unhealthy. I am constantly studying and researching skin disorders and I am very excited to share my knowledge whenever I can. As beauty therapists we are taught the functions of the skin which is very important, but today we need to know and understand the skin disorders that are related to internal conditions. APJ Q2: What information should a good skin analysis aim to capture, in order to help the practitioner provide a safe and efficacious skin treatment? Another brilliant question. The impact of stress is a very common factor. We need to understand the type of stress our clients have and let’s face it, we all are impacted by stress. Stress causes pigmentation, acne, may cause or increase rosacea, ageing of the skin, rashes, hyper-proliferation disorders, eczema, psoriasis and many more conditions that we see. Stress changes hormone functions within the body that have a huge impact to the skin and of course, our immune system can also be compromised by stress. Our skin is inflicted by inflammation when the body is under

Profile for APAN - Aesthetics Practitioners Advisory Network

APJ Vol 38 2018  

Aesthetics Practitioners Journal Volume 38 Spring 2018 - The official publication of the Aesthetics Practitioners Advisory Network (APAN)

APJ Vol 38 2018  

Aesthetics Practitioners Journal Volume 38 Spring 2018 - The official publication of the Aesthetics Practitioners Advisory Network (APAN)

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