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It can be confronting to be faced with a client, yours or previously someone else’s, who says they are not happy with their treatment result and they want it changed. It can take a technician well outside their comfort zone and introduce a range of technical issues they are not used to dealing with. That said, becoming known as a ‘go to’ technician for fixing up problems can set you apart from other technicians. that the skin is not over-worked with the needling process required to introduce the liquid into the skin. Some technicians will over-work the area to the extent that they are mechanically removing, or pulverising the epidermis to get to the base of the pigment. This can cause substantial skin trauma and significant scarring (not to mention lots of pain at the time!) The liquid should be doing the work once placed at the correct depth and the skin is adequately perforated to allow pigment migration.

STEPS TOWARD BECOMING AN EXPERT It can be confronting to be faced with a client, yours or previously someone else’s, who says they are not happy with their treatment result and they want it changed. It can take a technician well outside their comfort zone and introduce a range of technical issues they are not used to dealing with. That said, becoming known as a ‘go to’ technician for fixing up problems can set you apart from other technicians. Good training is essential. You can’t practice correction and camouflage the same way you practice brows and lips on a practice mat. Trial and error on clients who are already

unhappy is not an option, and if you are not sure what to do, either seek advice from a suitably experienced trainer of technician or tell the client you can’t help them. Good equipment is also essential. The complexities of a correction, camouflage, or removal procedure usually require the use of a machine, and this should be a good quality digital machine with precise needle strokes and a range of needle cartridge configurations available. Rotary machines, and to some extent blades, tend to rip and tear the skin and may results in irregular results and scarring. Liquid-based removal techniques present a range of options. Whether you try saline, glycolic or possibly lactic-acid based methods, it may be appropriate to conduct a test before attempting work on a larger area. With training and experience you will develop the confidence to know what will work best for more and more situations. APJ For further information and guidance on the techniques mentioned in this article, or for formal training please contact THink Aesthetics and speak to one of our experienced trainers or technicians. http://www. thinkaesthetics.com.au/

GAIN NATIONAL REGISTRATION FOR YOUR COSMETIC TATTOO QUALIFICATION Paving the way for national standard recognition and raising the standards in Cosmetic Tattooing APAN has established CTARP - a national registration process that allows qualified Cosmetic Tattoo practitioners to become accredited and recognised, differentiating them from non-qualified technicians.

CTARP REGISTRATION The Cosmetic Tattoo APAN Registered Practitioner (CPARP) is Australia’s leading recognition symbol for best practice in Cosmetic Tattooing.

CTARP PREREQUISITE REQUIREMENTS •

Must provide evidence of a nationally-approved qualification

Must provide evidence of SHBBINF001 Maintain Infection Control

Once your qualifications are validated and approved you will receive the following benefits: •

Registration Certificate

Cosmetic Tattooing Code of Ethics

CTARP Code of Conduct

Transparent CTARP Logo for business window or door

Included on the National Register

To retain your CTARP Registration you will need to maintain your professional development and adhere to the standards as set out by APAN and the CTARP registration requirements.

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07 5593 0360| info@apanetwork.com| www.apanetwork.com

Profile for APAN - Aesthetics Practitioners Advisory Network

APJ Vol 38 2018  

Aesthetics Practitioners Journal Volume 38 Spring 2018 - The official publication of the Aesthetics Practitioners Advisory Network (APAN)

APJ Vol 38 2018  

Aesthetics Practitioners Journal Volume 38 Spring 2018 - The official publication of the Aesthetics Practitioners Advisory Network (APAN)

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