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SCIENTIFIC NEWS

Research and Scientific New Developments

CHEMICAL PEELS CAN BE SAFE TREATMENT OPTION FOR PEOPLE WITH DARKER SKIN Results from a new study from Boston Medical Center (BMC) indicate that when performed appropriately, chemical peels can be a safe treatment option for people with darker skin, although having darker skin is a risk factor for complications during a chemical peel. Chemical peels have shown efficacy in the treatment of acne, photo-ageing, and pigmentary dyschromia, however, studies evaluating side effects, particularly in patients with skin of colour, are limited. Researchers followed 132 patients with darker skin who received a total of 473 chemical peels to determine how prevalent side effects were. The same dermatologist that performed all the chemical peels stated that the peel was applied all at once, rather than in sections on the skin. Eighteen participants experienced side effects, the most common being crusting, dark spots, and reddening. The side effects lasted an average of 4.5 weeks. Less than four per cent of people with darker skin experienced unwanted side effects from a chemical peel. The study also found that side effects were least likely to occur in the winter, which could be attributed to the limited sun exposure participants experience during that time. People with the darkest skin tones were most likely to experience side effects and complications. This study does not provide real information for those who are used to preforming chemical peels on darker skin, although it does give some guidance to those who do not feel confident in this area. While I have delivered peels on individuals of Fitzpatrick IV and above, you do need to take care in progressing the peel procedures and of course, have training in such high-risk skins. The study does add to the growing literature of advancing the treatment options for skins of deeper colour. APJ Vemula, S. Maymone, M. Secmsky, E. Widjaiiahakim, R. Ratzelt, N. Saade, D. Assessing the Safety of Superficial Chemical Peels in Darker Skin: A Retrospective Study. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. Published online (March 05, 2018) ahead of print. Retrieved March 7, 2018 http://www.jaad.org/article/S01909622(18)30350-5/pdf

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ROLE OF MAGNESIUM IN VITAMIN D ACTIVATION AND FUNCTION Uwitonze & Razzaque (2018) have released their study, which states that taking Vitamin D without Magnesium is hindering the adsorption of the Vitamin D. Magnesium and vitamin D are two essential nutrients that are necessary for the physiologic functions of various organs. Magnesium assists in the activation of vitamin D, which helps regulate calcium and phosphate homeostasis to influence the growth and maintenance of bones. All the enzymes that metabolise vitamin D seem to require magnesium, which acts as a cofactor in the enzymatic reactions in the liver and kidneys. Deficiency in either of these nutrients is reported to be associated with various disorders, such as skeletal deformities, cardiovascular diseases, and metabolic syndrome. It is therefore essential to ensure that the recommended amount of magnesium is consumed to obtain the optimal benefits of vitamin D. Patients with optimum magnesium levels require less Vitamin D supplementation to achieve sufficient vitamin D levels. Magnesium also reduces osteoporosis, helping to mitigate the risk of bone fracture that can be attributed to low levels of vitamin D. While the recommended daily allowance for magnesium is 420 mg for males and 320 mg for females, the standard diet contains only about 50 per cent of that amount. Magnesium is an essential cofactor for vitamin D synthesis, and activated vitamin D, in turn, can increase intestinal absorption of magnesium and, therefore, can form a feed-forward loop to maintain its homeostasis. Vitamin D is mostly synthesised from 7-dehydrocholesterol upon skin exposure to sunlight (>80%) and may also be obtained from dietary sources or supplements as either vitamin D2 or D3. In Australia the sun protection message is so strong, there is a concern that we are not getting this D synthesis from ultra violet light, so supplements are required. I would rather take a supplemental vitamin D than risk the damage of sunlight. I must remember to have magnesium as well. APJ Uwitonze, A. Razzaque, M. (2018). Role of Magnesium in Vitamin D Activation and Function. The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. 118, 181-189. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2018.037

Profile for APAN - Aesthetics Practitioners Advisory Network

APJ Vol 38 2018  

Aesthetics Practitioners Journal Volume 38 Spring 2018 - The official publication of the Aesthetics Practitioners Advisory Network (APAN)

APJ Vol 38 2018  

Aesthetics Practitioners Journal Volume 38 Spring 2018 - The official publication of the Aesthetics Practitioners Advisory Network (APAN)

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