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experience QSI


CONTEXT

VISION

CODE

CONCLUSION

INDEX

Section Introduction Nature of Qsi Siting the Sun Ojai City and the Ojai Valley Physical Challenges Market Challenges Place Character

- - - - - -

1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6

Section Introduction Vision One Vision Two Vision Three Vision Four

- - - -

2.1 2.5 2.9 2.13

Section Introduction Mixed-Use Main Street Residential Street Mixed-Use Building Type Townhouse Building Type Multi-Unit Attached Building Type Single Family Detached Building Type Project Area Analysis

- - - - - - -

3.1 3.3 3.5 3.7 3.9 3.11 3.13

Final Words Photo Citations Document Citations


CODE: The following is meant to serve as a guide for future development. Included are two street and four building types,

which will function as guides to inform how building facades relate to the public realm of Qsi. These types, in particular the building types, are meant to be understood not as prototypes or templates, but rather as styles with which individual variation is encouraged. This controlled variation will ensure that the built environment of Qsi is harmonious while maintaining diversity.


3.1 CODE

Street Types Commercial Streets - Description The retail street of Qsi will be a tree lined boulevard, bordered along its entirety by a public arcade. This will not only give Qsi a unique character but help to shelter pedestrians from the sun and rain. The the building type on the street will be three story mixed use buildings with ground floor retail.

Typical Plan public square

rain garden

parking lane

bicycle lane

travel lane

lighting

The travel lane widths of the street are kept narrow and the turning radii are kept tight in order to slow traffic. This will help to create a safer street environment for all users. The center median will contain a planter row that will also function as a pedestrian island at crosswalks. Rain gardens will be constructed in the “bumpouts” at major intersections. Parking will be next to the sidewalk, with bike lanes between the parking lane and travel lanes. Major intersections will be paved with brick or stone. All other intersections in the commercial corridors will use painting to demarcate pedestrian crossings. Intersecting residential streets will adopt the 15’ sidewalks of the main street on the intersecting blocks, though will remain consistent in tree planting and lighting.

arcade

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tree building footprint

pedestrian island

25’


3.2

Typical Section

arcade

parking

15’

8’

travel 5’

10’

travel planter travel 11’

6’ 114’ ROW

11’

travel 10’

5’

parking

arcade

8’

15’

Dimensions: Sidewalk: 15’ (includes 8’ transition zone for signage and on sidewalk retail and seating) Parking lane: 8’ Bike lane: 5’ Travel lanes: 10’ and 11’ Median: 6’ Effective turning radius: 20’ Materials: Sidewalks: brick, stone, or pervious cement Parking/cycling lanes: pervious cement Travel lanes: cement or asphalt Street furniture: Pedestrian lighting: Type: recessed under arcade Spacing: 35’ Height: 10’ Auto lighting: Type: double column Spacing: 35’ Height: 15’ Benches: Type: flat seat Material: wood and steel Placement: in curb zone Trash receptacles: Type: slatted round container Material: steel Placement: in curb zone Street trees: Type: bigleaf maple Spacing: 35’ Other landscaping: All aesthetic landscaping will consist of indigenous fauna. Exceptions will be granted for food producing gardens. Rear gardens are encouraged to feature water elements.

CODE

Commercial Streets Development Standards


3.3 CODE

Residential Streets - Description The residential streets in Qsi will be designed for the safety and comfort of pedestrians, cyclists, and drivers. This will be accomplished primarily by slow “design speeds” for vehicular traffic. Through the separation of usages, a dense tree canopy, modification of lane width at main intersections, and narrow turning radii, traffic is forced to go slower through the corridor and to be more aware of the surroundings. This will help to create a safe environment for all users and travel speeds appropriate to residential usages.

Typical Plan

public square

tree

rain garden

lighting

One of these modifications is the use of “bumpouts”, which physically project into the street, shortening the crossing width for pedestrians as well as. In the bumpouts will be planted rain gardens, which collect storm water as well as to provide visual stimulus to the neighborhood. The street will be framed by a row of street trees on both sides and by the consistent building setback of no more than ten feet. Bike lanes will be located between the parking and traffic lanes. Intersections will have marked crosswalks and major intersections will have special painting or pavement materials in the intersections. bicycle lane storm drainage

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parking lane

travel lane

building footprint

25’


3.4

Typical Section

sidewalk parking 10’

7’

4’

travel

travel

10’

10’

62’ ROW

parking sidewalk 4’

7’

10’

Dimensions: Sidewalk:10’ (includes 4’x4’ planter wells) Parking lane: 7’ Bike lane: 4’ Travel lane: 10’ Effective turning radius: 15’ Materials: Sidewalks: brick, stone, or pervious cement Parking/cycling lanes: pervious cement Travel lanes: cement or asphalt Street furniture: Lighting: Type: led powered globes on columns Spacing: 35’ Height: 10’ Street trees: Type: coastal live oak, flowering ash, or bigleaf maple Spacing: 35’ Other landscaping: All aesthetic landscaping will consist of indigenous fauna. Exceptions will be granted for food producing gardens.

CODE

Residential Streets Development Standards


3.5 CODE

Building Types Mixed-Use Retail Building Description

Axonometric Oblique

The main body of the mixed-use retail building will be rectilinear. Parcels will have a consistent 25’ frontage on the main street. This will allow for ground floor flexibility to meet the tenants’ needs. The length of the frontage will be covered with a public arcade continued to all adjacent parcels. Floor heights may vary, though buildings should be three stories. Third story units may feature balconies. Roofs may either be pitched or flat. If pitched, should rise no more than one half of height of one story and be gabled. Overhangs are encouraged. If flat, the roof should feature a parapet. Ground floor fenestration should be between 40% and 70% of the facade beneath the arcade. Buildings will have slightly relaxed parking standards due to the density of the community. The extra land in the rear may be used as programmed public open space or as gardens for apartment residents.

garden

public arcade built over sidewalk

parking

planter property line

sidewalk

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trash area


3.6

Lot Plan and Building Elevation

Use: retail on ground floor, commercial or residential on upper floors

25’

Recommended Parcel Size: 142’ deep 25’ wide Main Building Setbacks: Front: 0’ Side: 0’ Rear: varies depending on parking demands Lot Coverage: 29%

25’

25’

Far: .86 Height: 3 Story

15’

15’

40’

6’

34’

Parking: 1 space/apartment unit, 1 space/1000sft retail, 1 employee space/20’ frontage, available in rear of building accessible by alley way or on street.

60’

y

Materials: Locally found and harvested wood such as oak, maple, or ash, stucco, or locally harvested available sandstone. Glass should have no tint. Spanish clay tile roofs are encouraged.

2y

Color Palette: The main facade will be colored in earth tones. It may be detailed with the hues of any indigenous fauna such as the indigo of purple larkspur, the yellow of the bush poppy, the lavender of the hoary yerba santa, the goldenrod of the western wallflower, or the eggshell white of the lord’s candle.

2y

2y

x

x

x

CODE

Mixed-Use Retail Building Development Standards


3.7 CODE

Single Unit Attached Residential - Description

Axonometric Oblique

The main body of the single unit attached residential building should be rectilinear, situated perpendicular to the main adjacent street. The roof will be pitched, either gabled or hipped, though hipped is preferred in order to fit with adjacent buildings. The building may share or have it’s own roof line. The ridge may be broken to allow light to an optional third story loft within the roof. The front facade should feature a prominent deck or porch, though both are preferred, of a depth of no less than 10’. These may be built to the property line or setback to match the surrounding structures. These buildings should be clustered in groups of no fewer than two individual structures. Abundant fenestration will allow for the circulation of air and natural light. Outbuildings should mirror the style, material, and color of the main building. They may be shared between adjacent properties.

property line

porch built to property line

5’setback for corner unit sidewalk

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shared outbuilding


3.8

Lot Plan and Building Elevation

Use: single unit attached residential 5’

Recommended parcel size: 90’ deep and either 20’ or 30’ wide Main building setbacks: Front: 0-10’ Side: 0-5’ (on corner lot) Rear: 30’

15’

Outbuilding setbacks: Side: 0’-5’ (same as main building) Rear: 5’

10’

y

Lot coverage: 35% Far: .7

2y

Height: 2 story + 1 story within roof

2y

Outbuildings: should not exceed 15’x15’ unless shared between adjacent property, in which case 25’x25’

40’ x

Parking: 1 spot in rear outbuilding or on cement pad accessible by alleyway, and on street

x

Materials: Locally available and harvested wood such as oak, maple, or ash, stucco, or locally harvested available sandstone. Glass should have no tint.

10’

10’

20’

20’

5’

10’

Color palette: The main facade will be colored in earth tones. It may be detailed with the hues of any indigenous fauna such as the green of bird’s foot, the indigo of purple larkspur, the yellow of the bush poppy, the lavender of the hoary yerba santa, or goldenrod of the western wallflower.

CODE

Single Unit Attached Residential - Development Standards


3.9 CODE

Multi-Unit Attached Residential Description

Axonometric Oblique

The main body of the multi-unit detached residential building should be rectilinear, situated with its longest side parallel to the main adjacent street. The roof may be either pitched or flat. If pitched, the roof should be gabled. The pitch will rise no more twice the height of one story above the facade. If flat, should have parapet and be vegetated. Facade of building should be broken to include a courtyard of no less than 25’x25’. Building should also have porch or arcade facing main adjacent street of a depth of no more than 15’. This arcade may abut the property line. Trellis’ may be used to provide continuity in arcades and to provide an accentuate the entrance of the courtyard. Solar panels or machinery appropriate to the generation of electricity by wind energy are encourage on the multi-unit attached residential buildings.

arcade built to property line

sidewalk property line 10’ side setback sidewalk

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parking


Lot Plan and Building Elevation

Use: Multi-unit detached residential, ground floor retail allowed

y 2y

Recommended parcel size: 90’ deep and either 110’ wide

2y

Main building setbacks: Front: 0-10’ Side: 10’’ Rear: 30’

4x

3x

4x

Lot coverage: 45% Far: .91

20’

Height: 2 story + 1 story within roof Outbuildings: Should not exceed 15’x15’ unless shared between adjacent property, in which case 25’x25’

10’

Parking: 1 spot in rear outbuilding or on cement pad accessible by alleyway, and on street Materials: Locally available and harvested wood such as oak, maple, or ash, stucco, or locally harvested available sandstone. Glass should have no tint.

50’

10’ 10’

10’

32.5’

25’

32.5’

10’

10’

Color palette: The main facade will be colored in earth tones. It may be detailed with the hues of any indigenous fauna such as the green of bird’s foot, the indigo of purple larkspur, the yellow of the bush poppy, the lavender of the hoary yerba santa, or goldenrod of the western wallflower.

3.10 CODE

Multi Unit Attached Residential Development Standards


CODE 3.11

Single Unit Detached Residential - Description

Axonometric Oblique

The main body of single unit detached residential building should be rectilinear, situated parallel to the main adjacent street. Where possible, symmetry should be avoided by the addition of single story rooms onto the main story. The roof should be pitched, though rise no more than 6’ above the facade. It may be either hipped or gabled, though hipped is preferred. Overhangs are encouraged. Buildings should have covered porches facing the street with similar roofing as the main building. Fenestration should be oriented in order to minimize unintentional solar heating. Outbuildings should mirror the style, material, and color of the main building.

property line

sidewalk

10’ front setback

outbuilding 5’ side setback

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Lot Plan and Building Elevation

Use: single family detached residential 5’

Recommended parcel size: 90’ deep and 50’ wide Main building setbacks: Front: 10’ Side: 5’’ Rear: 40’

20’

Outbuilding setbacks: Side: 10’-15’ (same as main building) Rear: 5’

15’

y

Lot coverage: 30% 2y

Far: .6

30’

Height: 2 story

2y

7x

3x

Outbuildings: Should not be greater than 25’x25’ Parking: up to 2 spots in rear in outbuilding or on cement pad accessible by alleyway, and on street

10’

10’

Materials: Locally available and harvested wood such as oak, maple, or ash, stucco, or locally harvested available sandstone. Glass should have no tint.

10’

5’

28’

12’

5’

10’

Color palette: The main facade will be colored in earth tones. It may be detailed with the hues of any indigenous fauna listed previously.

3.12 CODE

Single Unit Detached Residential - Development Standards


CODE 3.13

PROJECT AREA ANALYSIS Land Use Explanation Housing is the single most abundant land use of the development site. This provides the economic basis as well as the motivation for Qsi. Public spaces such as streets and community gardens are the next most abundant use of land. Due to the social nature of the development, these public spaces are vital the desirability, success and marketability of the project. The next most prominent land use is areas set aside for conservation and careful land management. These areas are not only important in order to protect Qsi from the seasonal flooding, but will also provide help to create habitats for at risk wildlife. Furthermore, these areas add to the perception that Qsi is truly an ecologically sensitive city in a mountain valley, and not just another sprawling suburb. Finally, land has been set aside for institutional uses. This may include schools, government buildings, social halls or clubs, and religious buildings. All of these land uses together provide the opportunity for an ecologically friendly, picturesque, walkable, and complete development. Furthermore, these carefully coordinated land uses will help the City of the Sun in the Valley of the Moon to be a great place to visit, live, work, and play.

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200’

Forest Land

Conservation Area

Site Boundary


Land Use

Number of Units

Single Unit Detached Residential Single Unit Attached Residential Multi Unit Residential Mixed Use Retail/ Residential Total Residential Land Use Streets and Sidewalks Institutional Community Gardens Pocket Parks and Open Space Forest Land Conservation Area Total Other Land Use

Number of Lots

Average Lot Dimensions (feet)

Average Lot Size (square feet)

Total Area of Land use (acres)

560

560

50x90

4,500

58

280 280

280 35

25x90 110x90

2,250 9,900

15 8

280

140

25x140

3,500

11 92

N/A N/A N/A

N/A N/A N/A

N/A N/A N/A

N/A N/A N/A

60 17 5

N/A N/A

N/A N/A N/A

N/A N/A N/A

N/A N/A N/A

5.5 15 5.5

N/A

Total Estimated Project Land Use Total Housing Units Project Area Housing Density - Residential Land Use Total Project Area Housing Density

108 200 1400 15.22 7

3.14 CODE

Land Use Area Table


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