Page 1

Coming Together‌ For effective learning, better training, and the highest quality care

Annual Report 2015


Our Vision The highest quality musculoskeletal care in North America.

This murmuration of birds metaphorically represents AO North America. Like a flock of starlings, we are an organization of many parts and individuals. Yet when we come together, these parts become a greater whole — fluid, flexible, and dynamically moving forward.


A time of change and opportunity From the time it was founded in 1958, the AO organization has been committed to collaboration in promoting effective treatments and successful transfer of knowledge and technology for improved patient outcomes. The original name — the Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen — translated from German means “working group for internal fixation.” Friendship, fellowship, and collegiality bound the AO founders together and remain core values for the organization to this day. We are proud to continue that commitment to fellowship and collaboration through our support of the AO Foundation and with our efforts in AO North America (AONA). Like the surgeons who founded the organization, we are committed to working together to advance the highest quality care and research, to maintaining the highest standards of training and techniques, and to educating new generations of surgeons in the fields of orthopedic trauma, craniomaxillofacial, spine, neurosurgery, and veterinary orthopedic surgery. AO North America is now a vibrant and regional part of the AO network, with more than 2,100 members, over 60 educational activities in our program, and a faculty featuring more than 1,400 expert surgeons. Our clinical division educational programs attract thousands of involved surgeons, fellows, and residents from all over the world and provide an opportunity to share information and stay current on the latest trends and techniques. In addition, the third annual “One AO” Congress brought together hundreds of active surgeons for discussions of “Common Problems and Common Solutions Across Disciplines,” and the heightened activity of the AONA Executive Council has ensured greater communication between regional clinical divisions. As successful as we have been, however, we continuously strive to be better than we are and to capitalize on the strength and opportunity for AO North America. While we have been successful attracting residents and fellows to For more information about the our courses, we continue to work to address the educational needs unique history of this multi-faceted, of practicing surgeons in North America. worldwide organization, visit While we have had high enrollment for our current courses, we www.aofoundation.org. need to develop new ways to educate modern learners who have many demands on their time and a preference for digital learning. AO North America’s excellence in surgical education is quite evident as a provider of continuing medical education with long-standing accreditation from the Accreditation Council of Continuing Medical Education (ACCME). To maintain such standards, we need to plan consciously so that we grow thoughtfully and effectively in the future. In order for all stakeholders to align on the organization’s strengths, opportunities, and vision for the future, we have created a Strategic Plan that includes initiatives to set future measurable and attainable goals for AONA. In the pages that follow, we will examine some of these goals and how they fit with the achievements of our clinical divisions. It is an exciting time for AONA and our members. There is much to do and much to learn as we move ahead. And as always, there are major achievements to be realized by continuing with our tradition of collaboration and fellowship. Sincerely,

Michael Baumgaertner, MD Chairperson, AONA Board of Directors

Robert McGuire, MD President AO North America


Our Mission

Dedicated to the best outcomes for patients by supporting our member specialties through education, mentorship, and research as a non-profit organization.

Our Focus Areas Education, Mentorship, Knowledge Translation, Sustainability, and Our Network. Our Core Values Passion, Camaraderie, Excellence, Transparency, and Professionalism.


Table of contents AONA participation and growth. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7 From the AONA Chairperson and President . . . . . . . . . . 8-9 “One AO” Congress. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-11 AONA’s Strategic Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-13

AOCMF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-15 AOSpine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-17 AOTrauma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-19 AOVET. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-21 AONeuro. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

The strength in our committees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23-25 AONA governance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26-27 The state of AONA finance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28-29

AO North America: Annual Report 2015  5  


AONA participation and growth

CO

UR

S SE

R PA

TI

N PA CI

TS W

EB

I

R NA

S R PA

CMF

13

TI

N PA CI

TS

Membership

1039

Spine

9

228

Trauma

(general)

18

1470

Trauma

(hand)

7

228

182

8

402

4

272 Trauma. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1112

Vet

7

5

Spine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 545

363

6  AO North America: Annual Report 2015

CMF. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 367 Vet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150


Fellowship Sites Trauma

27 SITES, SUPPORTING 41 FELLOWS

Spine

Growth fueled by commitment The growth in AONA participation reflects our commitment to working together to advance the highest quality care and research, to maintaining the highest standards of training and techniques, and to educating new generations of surgeons in the fields of orthopedic trauma, craniomaxillofacial, spine, neurosurgery, and veterinary orthopedic surgery.

25 SITES, SUPPORTING 52 FELLOWS

AO North America: Annual Report 2015  7  


The Executive Council is a vital link in the collaboration and communication efforts of AONA. 8  AO North America: Annual Report 2015


‘A uniter … and a powerhouse’ AONA Board Chairperson and President reflect on the gains, goals, and impact of AONA During 2015, AONA made advances in education, communication, and collaboration among its divisions. In 2016, we are poised for greater success advancing services, partnerships, and opportunities for fellowship and learning. In all that we aspire to and achieve, success is made richer by “Coming Together” in a spirit of collaboration. No one knows that more than spine surgeon Robert McGuire, President of AO North America, and orthopedic trauma surgeon Michael Baumgaertner, Chairperson of the AONA Board of Directors. These two respected surgeons have helped to drive the growth achieved by AONA and have insights to share about the top accomplishments of 2015 and important challenges of 2016. In their eyes, three things stand out in the achievements of AONA in 2015 — the development of a Strategic Plan for the future, the refinement of the “One AO” Congress concept as a model for sharing ideas and knowledge, and the heightened activity and interaction of the Executive Council. The Executive Council is a vital link in the collaboration and communication efforts of AONA. Its members include the AONA President, the Past President, the Chairpersons of the clinical division boards, the Chairperson of the Educational Advisory Board, and the AONA Executive Director. The Council ensures active, timely communication among the leadership of the clinical divisions and increases AONA’s ability to share solutions that improve our educational efforts. There are three primary goals for 2016: • Refine and improve the educational process. • Expand and strengthen our productive relationship with the international AOF. • Ensure stable funding for AONA’s extensive educational programs, planning for which requires a 3-year lead time.

At the top of the list is refining and improving the educational process and portfolio to improve educational effectiveness and relevance. The second is to continue fostering coordination, communication, and a positive relationship with the AO Foundation. The third is to align with the newly signed collaboration agreement between AO and DePuy Synthes. With the three-year funding commitment, AONA will be able to achieve financial stability for the region, lead the way in building new programs that focus on hospital and team-based education, and plan implementation of other key initiatives consistent with the mission and vision of our organization. “Historically, AONA was the first to create a formal regional entity, and it has maintained its identity,” Dr. Baumgaertner says. “Many of the other regions operate within their clinical divisions with little cross-linking between them. In North America new pressures on effective postgraduate education and how to deliver it exist for each clinical division. AONA’s coordinated structure is well positioned to not only respond to these pressures but to drive educational innovation across specialties. We should strive to serve as the vanguard for new educational approaches for the AO Foundation.” “AONA is a uniter — and a powerhouse,” Dr. McGuire states. “The organization is not something trivial. It represents major thought leaders from all four specialties and is a magnetic force that people are drawn to. Coming together is the feature that makes the organization unique. It should not be an exclusive group. Rather, we need to engage and capitalize on the opportunities for these eager leaders, skilled surgeons, and teachers to be a part of the AONA tradition.” AO North America: Annual Report 2015  9  


10  AO North America: Annual Report 2015


“One AO” Congress reinforces the ‘unity of purpose’ A benchmark for sharing ideas across disciplines Collaboration, friendship and fellowship have been the hallmarks of AO since the organization was founded in the 1950s. Continuing in the style of the AO Founders, AO North America in 2015 continued to recognize and develop those qualities at the third “One AO” scientific congress in Las Vegas. Organized to explore “Common Problems and Common Solutions Across Disciplines,” the February congress brought together surgeons, fellows, and residents in orthopedic trauma, craniomaxillofacial, spine, neuro­ surgery, and veterinary medicine to share knowledge, recent advances in research, and best practices for improving the care of patients with musculoskeletal injuries, diseases and disorders. More than 200 surgeons, fellows, and residents participated in the meeting. They were able to learn by sharing research and exchanging experiences with colleagues, as well as networking and exploring the latest ideas, innovations, and solutions for improving the care of their patients. Speakers and participants explored treatment and management concepts for both human and animal care in the areas of infection, bone healing,

soft tissue reconstruction, critical bone, and cartilage defects. At the scientific sessions, peerreviewed, original research studies were presented both orally and as posters. Other sessions explored topics such as practice management, continuing professional development, clinical research, and more. Guest speakers presented sessions covering topics relevant to AONA’s activities in research, as well as significant clinical challenges and the future of healthcare in the United States. “This meeting reinforces the unity of purpose for AONA,” noted traumatologist Michael Miranda, chair­ person of the congress. “This was a valuable forum for learning, networking, and promoting interaction among the four separate specialties of AONA.” “It’s an excellent format and one that greatly builds cross-fertilization and AO spirit,” added AO Foundation President and highly renowned surgeon Joseph Schatzker, who gave the Cliff Turen Memorial Lecture on Mentoring. “The participants not only enjoyed themselves but also went home much wiser,” he said. “I enjoyed the collaboration among the specialties,” said maxillofacial surgeon George Kushner. “We have a lot in common. This meeting should be continued in future years.”

The Cliff Turen, MD, Memorial Lecture was created to honor Cliff Turen, MD, an AONA Faculty member and a member of the AOTrauma Education Committee and the AO Foundation Board of Trustees, who played a significant role in the conception, creation, and development of the “One AO” Congress. AO North America: Annual Report 2015  11  


AONA’s Strategic Plan Gathering feedback, moving forward Throughout 2015, leaders of AO North America worked together to develop Vision and Mission statements, assess internal capabilities and external opportunities, and develop the goals and initiatives to be included in the AONA Strategic Plan. At the “One AO” Leadership Meeting in February 2016, President McGuire and AONA Executive Director Stephen Schwartz presented the plan to division and board leaders for input and feedback prior to taking the first steps toward implementation in March 2016. The plan includes mid-term (3-5 year) goals, as well as initiatives for Education, Marketing, Knowledge Creation, Financial Sustainability, Partnerships, Mentoring, Building the Network, and Process Improvement.

Our 3-5 year goals • Continue to be recognized as a pre-eminent provider of teaching and lifelong learning in musculoskeletal and neurological care. • Be a leader in knowledge creation and expand opportunities for knowledge creation and knowledge translation. • Create strategic relationships with sister organizations and societies. • Foster and nurture mentorship opportunities for faculty, members, and staff. • Expand and improve networking opportunities. • Increase efficiencies through process improvement • Develop a marketing strategy and awareness campaign to promote and increase brand awareness of AONA and the AO Foundation. • Develop a strategy for long-term financial stability and sustainability.

“Continuous” Strategy Monitoring and Adjustment

Phase 1: Direction Setting

12  AO North America: Annual Report 2015

Phase 2: Environmental Scanning

Phase 3: Strategy Formulation

Phase 4: Alignment & Implementation


A key role for Clinical Divisions The development of our Strategic Plan will help AO North America effectively move forward with focus, discipline, accountability, and the ability to prioritize. It also provides our Clinical Divisions a great opportunity to assist with implementation, develop success measures, and align resources both within and across divisions. Here are some key initiatives our Clinical Divisions will be helping shape and implement. Initiatives for education • Maintain ACCME accreditation at the highest level • Hire a Chief Learning Officer • Identify content for new delivery models and new technologies for delivery • Gather relevant information from course participants for future contact and follow-up • Develop lifelong learning pathways for Residents, Post-residency Fellows, and Practicing Surgeons Initiatives for marketing • Improve AONA website for ease of use • Improve website’s presentation of AONA’s goals, activities, and opportunities • Develop impact factors for marketing to target audiences

Initiatives for financial sustainability • Continue to develop our relationship with our current industrial partner • Recruit and solicit complementary industrial partners • Establish a fundraising strategy offering opportunities for members to donate • Grow our financial reserve • Improve transparency of budgets and adherence to budgets Initiatives for process improvement • Establish a robust internal communications plan • Require staff and faculty to be involved in process improvement • Establish a process for sharing best practices across divisions Initiatives for building the network • Foster relationships with AO Foundation and other AO Regions • Continue with “One AO” Leadership and Scientific Meetings • Increase social media presence with professional user interface • Develop an AONA App

Initiatives for knowledge creation • Identify significant knowledge gaps and determine how to translate division-specific gaps • Identify areas of focus/interest • Focus on translating knowledge, linking research to practice

AO North America: Annual Report 2015  13  


AOCMF North America

Improving training through small-group learning The courses offered by AOCMF North America (AOCMFNA) reflect its ecumenical focus with representation from each of the surgical specialties involved in craniomaxillofacial trauma care. In 2015, a wide range of principles and advanced courses were offered, and they were well received. The AOCMFNA Education Council also has been committed to improving the way information is delivered to participants, and has used various practice gaps to help identify areas for improvement. To optimize participants’ interactions during courses and to improve delivery of the material, courses transitioned in 2015 to a predominantly small group format with less reliance on traditional lectures. Short, standardized talks cover important basic principles, and small group discussions allow for better participation and direct feedback between the faculty and participants. Another area that has been a major focus of the AOCMFNA Education Council is the need to better prepare AOCMFNA faculty for participating in small-group courses. Faculty have been strongly encouraged to complete a Faculty Education Program (FEP), especially course chairs, through which skills for facilitating small groups can be developed. This program has been extremely well received and has improved the quality of teaching in AOCMFNA courses.

14  AO North America: Annual Report 2015

Education achievements In 2015, AOCMFNA provided 12 courses, nine of which were Principles courses. Two cadaver-based courses (Ballistics, Orbital Fundamentals) also were offered, along with an Orthognathic Symposium. AOCMFNA has 332 faculty members of which 38% are from Plastics Surgery, 31% from Oral Maxillofacial Surgery, 28% from Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, and 3% from Oculoplastics. To evaluate the success of the CMF courses, data was collected and analyzed in 2015 from both participants and faculty. Faculty were also surveyed to collect information comparing traditional and small-group courses, with the overwhelming majority supporting the interactive format. AOCMFNA also held three Faculty Education Program (FEP) courses in Chicago, Illinois, to prepare faculty for small-group instruction. Approximately 40 faculty members were trained in those sessions, with 69 CMF faculty members completing FEP training overall. AONA held the 2015 State of the Art: Facial Reconstruction and Transplantation Course on May 15-17, 2015 in New York City. Eduardo D. Rodriguez, MD, DDS (chairman); Michael P. Grant, MD, FACS, PhD; Paul N. Manson, MD; and Frederick J. Menick, MD, Co-Chairmen for the course, offered a dynamic program of lectures, case discussions, and panel discussions with distinguished faculty. In addition, 19 exhibiting companies and 50+ exhibitors attended this event. There were over 200 participants at the course, including attending surgeons, residents in Oral and Maxillofacial, Otolaryngology–Head and Neck, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Oculoplastic Surgery, and allied health professionals involved in the care of patients with craniomaxillofacial traumatic or oncologic defects. Many international participants attended the course, including participants from Argentina, Chile, Colombia, the People’s Republic of China, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Republic of Korea, South Africa, Spain, Taiwan, the United Kingdom, and Russia.


Coming in 2016 In 2016, the CMF division has scheduled eight Principles courses, three advanced courses including computer-aided maxillofacial surgery, pediatrics, and a cadaver-based course on orthognathic and sleep apnea. In January, an Advanced Symposium on Complex Facial Injuries: Controversies and Multidisciplinary Perspectives was very well received. AOCMFNA faculty have been integrally involved with work being done on a new template for the Principles courses that can be used worldwide. The new format was tested during 2 international courses and the feedback from those courses was also used to design the new course. The new program is in its final stages of development with its launch scheduled for September 2016 with

a trial course. The plan is for the new course format to be used for the 2016 Davos Principles courses, and then expanded worldwide for 2017. A Faculty Educator Program (FEP) training course was held in March 2016 and 2 more are scheduled for June and September 2016. A total of 44 faculty members are scheduled to attend the 3 sessions, and there is expectation there will be more participants at our courses in 2016 than in previous years. AOCMF will continue to analyze the number of participants and the types of courses chosen to improve delivery of courses. This analysis will improve the experience of course participants and result in improved overall care for patients suffering CMF trauma, degenerative disorders, deformities and reconstruction.

COMING TOGETHER

To optimize participants’ interactions during courses and to improve delivery of the material, courses evolved in 2015 to emphasize a small group format with less reliance on traditional lectures.

AO North America: Annual Report 2015  15  


AOSpine North America

A trusted partner for spine surgeons The year 2015 was an important one for AOSpine North America (AOSNA) in demonstrating its continued commitment to education and research. Five clinical research studies are currently under way, including work related to Spinal Cord Injury. This research is being conducted in partnership with the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation as well as the Rick Hansen Institute. Additionally, AOSNA awarded four Young Investigators Research Awards to support clinically relevant research that will have impact on spine care around the world. In education, AOSNA conducted several continuing medical education courses and webinars not only for Residents and Fellows but also for more experienced surgeons. The highlight of the year was the 13th Annual Fellows Forum that convened 53 Fellows from 25 Fellowship sites. These talented spine surgeons presented their research for the year and networked with more than 40 AOSNA surgeon faculty in attendance. AOSNA is poised to continue to be a trusted partner for spine surgeons in North America.

16  AO North America: Annual Report 2015

Education achievements In 2015, nine CME accredited courses were offered by the AOSNA Education Committee, and they were met with positive reviews. The inclusion of the Oral Board Review Course, webinars, a “flipped classroom” education pilot program, and hands-on labs utilizing anatomic specimens provided vigorous and interactive experiences for participants. AOSNA Residents and Fellows courses continued to offer high-value educational opportunities via consistent learning methodologies emphasizing spine knowledge, decision-making, and skills. Additionally, AOSNA partnered with major societies, such as the American Academy of Neurological Surgeons (AANS), the Cervical Spine Research Society (CSRS), North American Spine Society (NASS), and the Lumbar Spine Research Society (LSRS) to expand its visibility and presence in the spine community. In total, AOSNA educated 336 surgeons in 2015, launched a successful “flipped classroom” pilot with high participation, and conducted a new Virtual Training series. Delivery of “on demand” educational resources and virtual learning have allowed AOSNA to reach more surgeons around the world than ever before. Twenty-five fellowship sites with 52 Fellows were supported by AO funding, and the Premier Fellows Forum had 91 participants from AO supported Fellowship sites worldwide.


Research advances In addition to the five clinical research studies underway, AOSNA partnered with AOSpine International, the Rick Hansen Institute, and the Cervical Spine Research Society to bring together a spectrum of international experts in the fields of spinal cord injury and cervical myelopathy for a 2-day meeting in Toronto, Canada. The experts addressed key clinical questions and developed clinical protocols for the management of acute spinal cord injury and degenerative cervical myelopathy. These guidelines promise to have a significant translational impact by helping spine providers apply evidence-based treatment programs in clinical practice, with the ultimate goal of improved patient outcomes. In total, AOSNA members published 17 research manuscripts, submitted 29 manuscripts (some were/have been accepted, some are under revision, others under review), and gave 44 conference presentations. Coming in 2016 Based on market research and feedback conducted in 2015, AOSNA will further expand its leadership in preparing spine surgeons for the ever-changing healthcare environment. Due to increased need and positive feedback, the Fellowship Program and the Residents/ Fellows courses will continue to be major educational areas of focus. Successful patient outcomes will continue to be an area of focus for healthcare, and AOSNA will expand its effort to educate in this area. AOSNA, through its Fellowship, Education, and Research initiatives will help prepare the surgeon community to meet healthcare demands of the future.

COMING TOGETHER

The highlight of the year was the 13th Annual Fellows Forum that convened 53 Fellows from 25 Fellowship sites. These talented spine surgeons presented their research for the year and networked with more than 40 AOSNA surgeon faculty in attendance.

AO North America: Annual Report 2015  17  


AOTrauma North America

Spreading our vision of excellence in trauma surgery In 2015, AOTrauma North America (AOTNA) spread its vision and advanced its mission to provide training and educational opportunities for surgeons working in the fields of adult, pediatric, geriatric, foot and ankle, hand and wrist, and pelvic trauma. AOTNA exhibited at the 31st annual Orthopaedic Trauma Association meeting, and hosted its fourth Annual AOTNA Fellows Reception, followed by the AOTrauma North America Members Reception, where more than 300 AOTNA members and faculty enjoyed the AO spirit. To spread the vision of the AOTrauma world, AOTNA funded six fellows to attend the AO Foundation flagship event: the Davos courses in December. These six fellows participated in the Davos courses, met course attendees and faculty, and shared cultures and ideas. This was a truly special and memorable experience for the fellows.

18  AO North America: Annual Report 2015

Education achievements In 2015, AOTNA conducted more than 25 educational courses and seminars for nearly 1,700 residents, fellows, and practicing surgeons. AOTNA also provided 12 educational webinars to more than 670 participants. More than 550 AOTNA faculty members devoted their time to teaching during 2015. To help those faculty members update their skills, four Faculty Education Programs were offered with more than 60 faculty members participating. AOTNA also continued to offer the Advanced Clinical Education Program, providing grants and educational activities to 27 North American trauma fellowship programs. AOTNA also developed and implemented a Fellows Webinar Series, a four-year curriculum designed to offer fellow-level discussions in an interactive format. The four-year curriculum targeted to residents, fellows, and junior attendings who are pursuing a career in trauma follows the academic year, beginning with complex fracture decision-making and progressing to complications and deformity correction. AOTNA continued to work to improve outreach to fellows and trainees. It increased the number of North American programs that host AO short-term (4-12 week) fellows from 15 to over 30 sites, developed a process to capture trainees interested in trauma and maintain contact to engage them with teaching and fellow activities, increased awareness of short-term fellowships, improved promotion of prestigious named fellowships and special designation awards that provide additional funding to fellows approved for short-term fellowship placements, and improved value-added fellow offerings (such as courses meeting the specific needs). The Hand Education Committee increased educational offerings in 2015 while at the same time decreasing costs for hand education. It held six one-day courses, educating more than 176 participants. AOTNA conducted four webinars specifically for the hand specialty, and they had


nearly 300 viewers. In 2016, the committee will develop a handbook for the one-day course and make it available to participants in advance of the course. The one-day course content was formulated into an outline for course chairs to increase cohesiveness and to meet learner needs. This was the first year of completed pre- and post-course tests. In addition, the AOTNA webinar series for the hand specialty now has a comprehensive program. Research advances AOTNA advanced research in a number of areas in 2015. It successfully initiated the AOTNA Orthopedic Surgery Fellow in-training research grant program, making $15,000 grants available through AOTNA-qualified institutions. A total of 21 grants were funded in 2015 with work from seven of them presented and six already submitted for publication. AOTNA also successfully collaborated with the Orthopaedic Trauma Association (OTA) to develop an AO/OTA Jointly Branded Research Award. This two-year $100,000 grant ($50,000 per year)

COMING TOGETHER

AOTNA developed and implemented a Fellows Webinar Series, a four-year curriculum designed to offer fellow-level discussions in an interactive format. The four-year curriculum targeted to residents, fellows, and junior attendings who are pursuing a career in trauma follows the academic year. is designed to stimulate research on Patient Outcome Measurement in Orthopaedic Trauma. To date, 18 pre-proposals have been submitted, and the grant winner will be announced at the 2016 OTA meeting. AOTNA continued its successful resident in-training grant program. Of the 6 completed projects in 2015, 4 were submitted for publication. Coming in 2016 Building on the success and positive feedback from course participants, AOTNA will continue to focus on educating residents and fellows. Faculty education programs will also be an important focus of AOTNA in 2016. Fellowship and research activities will continue as the Advanced Clinical Education Program continues to grow along with its associated educational and networking opportunities. In 2015, the AOTNA Community Development Committee focused on the development of residency outreach programs, and in 2016 it will be planning and developing a series of Community Orthopedic Fracture Symposia. AOTNA will continue to grow and develop programs that engage its members and faculty in education, fellowship, research and collaboration. In 2016 the AOTNA hand specialty is making plans to strengthen its commitment to meet learners’ needs. It will introduce improved clinical cases for small group discussion and introduce in-course assessments to meet learners’ needs and provide support for program directors in the future. AO North America: Annual Report 2015  19  


AOVET North America

Broad spectrum of activities reinforces continuing stature as ‘go to’ source The year 2015 was an eventful one for AOVET North America (AOVETNA). Most significantly, fall courses were resumed in La Jolla, California, a critical component for continued success as a clinical discipline within North America. Due to the reputation of AOVETNA faculty and unique offerings, AOVETNA courses draw significant numbers of international participants. Because of the wide spectrum of orthopedic conditions treated by members, AOVETNA not only offers courses in small animal and equine trauma but also specialty courses in cranial maxillofacial, spine, MIO techniques, corrective osteotomy techniques for dogs, and master’s topics in equine orthopedics. This versatility positions AOVETNA as the “go to” source for veterinary orthopedic Continuing Medical Education in North America.

20  AO North America: Annual Report 2015

Education achievements A major accomplishment for AOVETNA over the last year was being one of two programs approved as an Educational Partner with the American College of Veterinary Surgeons (ACVS), the certifying organization for the veterinary specialty. This designation recognizes the vital role AOVETNA plays in Continuing Medical Education to surgeons in training and those earning diplomas from the ACVS. As a consequence of this partnership, AOVETNA will be able to market educational opportunities more effectively and expose the surgeons-in-training and diplomates to the wealth of information available through AONA and AO Foundation (AOF), including videos, teaching modules, and the surgery reference for horses and small animals. The AOVETNA Education Committee has continued to develop assessment tools for participant laboratory skills and course evaluators for its courses. It is working on developing a system and culture of integrating young faculty within courses while preserving the participation


of experienced faculty. It is also developing guidelines to assist new faculty in their preparation for teaching by assuring that they are assisted during this process by the chairs or other experienced faculty. Community Development efforts are continuing to provide assistance and opportunities for veterinary students, participants, and established surgeons. AOVETNA has something to offer to all these groups, and in the past few years, efforts to increase membership numbers have been successful. The goal going forward is not just to increase numbers but to add involved, quality members who recognize the excellence of what AOVETNA, AONA, and AOF have to offer them in their professional careers. Coming in 2016 In 2016, AOVETNA will be adding a new equine master’s course “Solutions for Complex Equine Orthopedic Problems” in September taking place in Orlando, Florida. Overall AOVETNA will have three courses in Orlando. The core Columbus Triple Courses, which always have high enrollments, will continue to take place in April. A new fellowship program for surgeons in training will be rolled out to provide residents opportunities to visit training programs to increase their exposure to AOVETNA faculty and AO techniques of fracture repair. Work will also continue on course assessment tools to help enhance the participant experience in courses. In addition, AOVETNA will begin a webinar series in 2016 with marketing assistance through ACVS. Given the recognized expertise of the AOVETNA faculty, the goal is to make the AOVETNA webinars a significant educational event in North America.

COMING TOGETHER

The AOVETNA Education Committee is working on developing a system and culture of integrating young faculty within courses while preserving the participation of experienced faculty. AO North America: Annual Report 2015  21  


AONeuro North America A new AO initiative to address the area of cranial neurosurgery and traumatic brain injury AONeuro is an initiative of the AO Foundation to expand its activities into the area of cranial neurosurgery. AONeuro is a unique worldwide multi-specialty community that includes cranial Neurosurgeons, Neurologists, Neurointensivists, Neuro anesthesiologists, Neuro Traumatologists, and Neurological professionals who are involved in cranial neurological trauma, cranial oncologic and cerebrovascular surgery, cranial reconstruction, and cranial congenital anomalies surgery. Its goal is to encourage and inspire residents, fellows, and experienced practitioners by means of education, academic stimulation, instruction, and international communication to improve patient care and achieve more productive careers in these fields. Using the experiences and expertise of the AO model, AONeuro seeks to help practitioners in these fields pursue solutions to problems they face in their line of expertise while enjoying the collegiality of educational partners such as AOSpine and AOCMF. “AONeuro is an organization of cranial neurosurgeons who wish, through AO education, to improve the outcomes of cranial neurosurgery patients throughout the world,” notes Paul N. Manson, MD, Chairperson, AONeuro Initiative, Past President, AO Foundation. “It is our privilege to welcome our cranial neurosurgical colleagues to this newly created educational and development front.”

Education achievements In 2015, AONeuro held 2 courses in North America on the topic “Controversies in Neurotrauma: Brain and Spinal Cord,” educating 49 surgeons and residents. To support the program, AO North America launched the AONeuro North America visiting professor program to provide support for AONeuro Visiting Professors at universities and improve the educational programs for their residents and faculties. Coming in 2016 AONeuro will hold three courses in North America in the fall of 2016, including: “Neurotrauma and Critical Care” (Philadelphia, PA, October 1-2); “Advanced Skull Base and Cerebrovascular Surgical Approaches (with Human Anatomic Specimens)” (Miami, FL, October 21-23); and “Pediatric Neurotrauma,” designed for residents and fellows in the field of neurosurgery and attending neurosurgeons (Phoenix, AZ, November 18-19). AONeuro is committed to communicating the latest advances, literature, treatment information, and protocols to provide education at the forefront of the specialty.

COMING TOGETHER

The goal of AONeuro is to encourage and inspire residents, fellows, and experienced practitioners by means of education, academic stimulation, instruction, and international communication.

22  AO North America: Annual Report 2015


The Strength in Our Committees AONA BOARD OF DIRECTORS Chairperson Michael Baumgaertner, MD Professor, Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation Yale University School of Medicine Clinical Division: Trauma President AONA Robert McGuire, MD Professor and Chair Emeritus Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery & Rehabilitation University of Mississippi Medical Center Clinical Division: Spine Jens Chapman, MD Complex Spine Swedish Neuroscience Institute Clinical Division: Spine John Frodel, MD, FACS Atlanta Medispa and Surgicenter andGeisinger Medical Center Director, Facial Plastic Surgery Department of Otolaryngology — Head & Neck Surgery and Geisinger Center for Aesthetics and Cosmetic Surgery Clinical Division: CMF James Gerry Member-at-Large Dean Richardson, DVM, DACVS Charles W. Raker Professor of Surgery Chief, Large Animal Surgery New Bolton Center University of Pennsylvania Clinical Division: Vet Peter Trafton, MD Professor Emeritus, Orthopaedic Surgery Alpert Medical School Brown University Clinical Division: Trauma AONA EXECUTIVE COUNCIL Chairperson, AONA Board of Directors Past President Michael Baumgaertner, MD Professor, Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation Yale University School of Medicine Clinical Division: Trauma

David Hak, MD, MBA, FACS Professor University of Colorado School of Medicine Denver Health Medical Center Clinical Division: Trauma Alan S. Herford, DDS, MD, FACS Professor and Chair Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Philip J. Boyne and Peter Geistlich Professorship in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Loma Linda University School of Dentistry Clinical Division: CMF Mark Reilly, MD Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery Chief, Orthopaedic Trauma Service Department of Orthopaedics Rutgers — New Jersey Medical School Clinical Division: Trauma Alan Ruggles, DVM, DACVS Equine Orthopedic Surgeon Rood & Riddle Equine Hospital Clinical Division: Veterinary AOCMF NA COUNCIL Chairperson D. Gregory Farwell, MD, FACS Professor and Vice Chair for Academic Affairs Director of Head and Neck Oncology and Microvascular Surgery Department of Otolaryngology UC Davis School of Medicine Chairperson-Elect Alan S. Herford, DDS, MD, FACS Professor and Chair Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Philip J. Boyne and Peter Geistlich Professorship in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Loma Linda University School of Dentistry Salvatore Lettieri, MD Chief of Plastic Surgery Maricopa Medical Center Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Mayo Clinic

Gorman Louie, MD, FRCSC Clinical Professor Division of Plastic Surgery University of Alberta

Joseph Cheng, MD, MS Professor and Vice Chair Department of Neurosurgery Yale University

Stephen MacLeod, MBChB, FDSRCS, FRCS, FACS, BDS

Theodore Choma, MD Professor & Vice Chairman Orthopaedic Surgery Department University of Missouri Director Missouri Spine Center

Joseph R. and Louise Ada Jarabak Professor, Chief, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Dental Medicine Program Director, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residency Loyola University Damir Matic, MD, MSc, FRCSC Associate Professor Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Department of Pediatrics London Health Sciences Center Andrew Murr, MD, FACS Professor and Chairman Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery University of California San Francisco School of Medicine Travis Tollefson, MD, MPH, FACS Professor Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Otolaryngology — Head & Neck Surgery University of California, Davis AOSPINE NA BOARD Chairperson Michael Fehlings, MD, PhD, FRCSC, FACS Professor of Neurosurgery University of Toronto Halbert Chair in Neural Repair and Regeneration Vice Chair Research, Department of Surgery University of Toronto Chairperson-Elect Darrel Brodke, MD Professor & Vice Chair Director of Spine Service Department of Orthopaedics University of Utah

Norman Chutkan, MD Chairman Banner/CORE Musculoskeletal Institute Director of Research and Education CORE Thomas Mroz, MD Director, Center for Spine Health Director, Spine Surgery Fellowship Department of Orthopaedic & Neurological Surgery Cleveland Clinic AOSPINE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE Chairperson Norman Chutkan, MD Chairman Banner/CORE Musculoskeletal Institute Director of Research and Education CORE Chairperson-Elect Lali Sekhon, MD, PhD, FRACS, FACS Sierra Neurosurgery Group Michael Daubs, MD Professor and Chief Division of Orthopaedic Surgery University of Nevada School of Medicine Ripul R. Panchal, DO Assistant Professor Department of Neurosurgery University of California, Davis Patrick R. Pritchard, MD Associate Professor Department of Neurosurgery University of Alabama at Birmingham John Smith, MD Professor, University of Utah Chief, Scoliosis Service Primary Children’s Hospital Mary Scrowcroft Perry Presidential Endowed Chair of Orthopaedics Justin Smith, MD, PhD Associate Professor Department of Neurosurgery University of Virginia Health System

President AONA Robert McGuire, MD Professor and Chair Emeritus Department of Orthopaedic Surgery & Rehabilitation University of Mississippi Medical Center Clinical Division: Spine

AOSPINE EDUCATION COMMITTEE

D. Gregory Farwell, MD, FACS Professor and Vice Chair for Academic Affairs Director of Head and Neck Oncology and Microvascular Surgery Department of Otolaryngology UC Davis School of Medicine Clinical Division: CMF

Chairperson-Elect John DeVine, MD Professor Chief of Spine Surgery Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Medical College of Georgia Augusta University

Michael Fehlings, MD, PhD, FRCSC, FACS Professor of Neurosurgery University of Toronto Halbert Chair in Neural Repair and Regeneration Vice Chair Research Department of Surgery University of Toronto Clinical Division: Spine

Chairperson Joseph Cheng, MD, MS Professor and Vice Chair Department of Neurosurgery Yale University

AONA Board Members Back row: Steve Schwartz, James E. Gerry, Mike Lewis. Front row: Richard S. Caputo, Esq., Robert McGuire, Jr., MD, Michael Baumgaertner, MD, Dean W. Richardson, DVM, DACVS , Peter Trafton, MD, John Frodel, MD, FACS Not pictured: Jens Chapman, MD

Richard Bransford, MD Associate Professor Department of Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Department of Neurosurgery Harborview Medical Center University of Washington • continued on next page

AO North America: Annual Report 2015  23  


The Strength in Our Committees AOSPINE EDUCATION COMMITTEE continued from previous page Dean Chou, MD Professor of Neurosurgery The UCSF Spine Center University of California San Francisco Roger Härtl, MD Professor of Neurosurgery Director of Spinal Surgery Weill Cornell Medical College Bradley Jacobs, MD, FRCSC Assistant Professor Division of Neurosurgery Calgary Spine Program University of Calgary Eric Klineberg, MS, MD Associate Professor Adult & Pediatric Spinal Surgery Department of Orthopaedics University of California — Davis Alpesh Patel, MD FACS Associate Professor, Chief Orthopaedic Spinal Surgery Director, Fellowship in Spine Surgery Co-Director, Northwestern Spine Center Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Steven Theiss, MD John D. Sherrill Chair of Orthopaedic Surgery Professor of Surgery Director Division Orthopaedic Surgery University of Alabama — Birmingham AOSPINE FELLOWSHIP COMMITTEE Chairperson Theodore Choma, MD Professor & Vice Chairman Orthopaedic Surgery Department University of Missouri Director, Missouri Spine Center Christina Goldstein, BSc, MD, FRCSC Assistant Professor Department of Orthopaedics University of Missouri Brandon Lawrence, MD Assistant Professor, Co-Director Spine Fellowship Department of Orthopedics University of Utah Robert Molinari, MD Professor, Chief Division of Spinal Surgery Department of Orthopaedic Surgery University of Rochester Daniel Sciubba, MD Associate Professor of Neurosurgery Oncology and Orthopaedic Surgery Director, Spine Research Johns Hopkins Hospital

AOSPINE RESEARCH COMMITTEE Chairperson Thomas Mroz, MD Director, Center for Spine Health Director, Spine Surgery Fellowship Department of Orthopaedic & Neurological Surgery Cleveland Clinic Chairperson-Elect James Harrop, MD Professor, Division Director Spine and Peripheral Nerve Surgery Departments of Neurological and Orthopedic Surgery Jefferson Medical College Paul Arnold, MD Professor and Vice-Chairman Department of Neurosurgery University of Kansas Medical Center Samuel Cho, MD Associate Professor Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Chairperson Samir Mehta, MD Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery Chief Orthopaedic Trauma and Fracture Service University of Pennsylvania Health System Eben Carroll, MD Associate Professor Director of Orthopaedic Trauma Wake Forest University School of Medicine Langdon Hartsock, MD, FACS Professor and Director of Orthopaedic Trauma Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Medical University of South Carolina Brad Yoo, MD Associate Professor Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation Oregon Health and Science University AOTRAUMA EDUCATION COMMITTEE

Wellington Hsu, MD Director of Research, Clifford C. Raisbeck Distinguished Professor Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Chairperson Roger Wilber, MD Assistant Professor Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine University Hospitals Case Medical Center MetroHealth Medical Center

Mohammed Shamji, BSc, MSc, MD, PhD, FRCSC Assistant Professor of Surgery Assistant Professor of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering University of Toronto

Brett Crist, MD Associate Professor Co-Director Orthopaedic Trauma Service Director Orthopaedic Trauma Fellowship Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

Michael Steinmetz, MD Director Center for Spine Health Cleveland Clinic Professor of Surgery Case Western Reserve University AOTRAUMA NA BOARD Chairperson Mark Reilly, MD Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery Chief, Orthopaedic Trauma Service Department of Orthopaedics Rutgers — New Jersey Medical School Samir Mehta, MD Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery Chief Orthopaedic Trauma and Fracture Service University of Pennsylvania Health System Berton R. Moed, MD Professor and Chairman Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Saint Louis University Jason W. Nascone, MD Associate Professor Department of Orthopaedics R. Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center University of Maryland Roger Wilber, MD Assistant Professor Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine University Hospitals Case Medical Center MetroHealth Medical Center

24  AO North America: Annual Report 2015

AOTRAUMA COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE

Pierre Guy, MD, MBA Associate Professor University of British Columbia David Hubbard, MD Professor, Chief Section of Orthopaedic Trauma Program Director Department of Orthopaedic Surgery West Virginia University Mark Lee, MD Professor Vice Chairman and Fellowship Director Department of Orthopaedic Surgery University of California — Davis Medical Center Michael Sirkin, MD Vice Chairman, Department of Orthopaedics Co-Chief, Orthopaedic Trauma Service Professor of Orthopaedics Rutgers — New Jersey Medical School Hobie Summers, MD Associate Professor Chief of Orthopaedic Trauma Loyola University Medical Center AOTRAUMA FELLOWSHIP COMMITTEE Chairperson Jason W. Nascone, MD Associate Professor Department of Orthopaedics R. Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center University of Maryland

Timothy S. Achor, MD Assistant Professor Department of Orthopaedic Surgery University of Texas at Houston Memorial Hermann Texas Medical Center Director, Orthopaedic Trauma Fellowship David Barei, MD, FRCSC Professor Department of Orthopaedics Harborview Medical Center Brian J. Cross, DO Chief of Surgery Director Orthopedic Trauma Service Broward Health Medical Center Associate Professor Department of Orthopedics NOVA Southeastern University James Krieg, MD Professor and Director of Orthopaedic Trauma Rothman Institute at Jefferson University AOTRAUMA FELLOWSHIP SUPERVISORY BOARD Chairperson Mitchel Harris, MD, FACS Professor Harvard Medical School Chief of Orthopaedic Trauma Brigham and Women’s Hospital Christina Boulton, MD Assistant Professor R. Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center University of Maryland School of Medicine Philip J. Kregor, MD Director of Orthopedic Trauma The Hughston Clinic TriStar Skyline Medical Center Andrew J. Marcantonio, DO, MBA Director of Orthopaedic Trauma Lahey Hospital & Medical Center Christopher McAndrew, MD, MSc Assistant Professor Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Washington University in Saint Louis AOTRAUMA HAND EDUCATION COMMITTEE Chairperson Paul Binhammer, MSc, MD, FRCSC Assistant Professor Division of Plastic Surgery University of Toronto Head, Division of Plastic Surgery Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre Chairperson-Elect Amit Gupta, MD, FRCS Associate Clinical Professor Department of Orthopaedic Surgery University of Louisville Terry Axelrod, MD, MSc, FRCSC Professor, Division of Orthopaedic Surgery University of Toronto Kyle Bickel, MD The Hand Center of San Francisco Clinical Assistant Professor of Surgery University of California San Francisco School of Medicine


John Capo, MD Professor Department of Orthopaedics New York University-HJD New York Chief of Hand Surgery Jersey City Medical Center

Amy S. Kapatkin, DVM, MS, DACVS Professor of Orthopedic Surgery Section Chief Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences School of Veterinary Medicine University of California — Davis

Susan Schaefer, MS, DVM, DACVS Clinical Associate Professor – Orthopaedics Section Head — Small Animal Surgery Department of Surgical Sciences School of Veterinary Medicine University of Wisconsin - Madison

Thomas Fischer, MD Partner – Indiana Hand to Shoulder Center Associate Clinical Professor Department of Orthopedics Indiana University School of Medicine Section Chairman, Hand Surgery St. Vincent Hospital & Health Services

Noël Moens, DVM, MSc, DACVS, DECVS Associate Professor, Chief of Surgery Orthopaedic Surgery Department of Clinical Studies Ontario Veterinary College University of Guelph

Jeffrey Watkins, DVM, MS, DACVS Professor Department of Large Animal Medicine & Surgery Veterinary Teaching Hospital Texas A & M University

Chaitanya Mudgal, MD, MS, MCh Assistant Professor in Orthopaedics Harvard Medical School Marco Rizzo, MD Professor Department of Orthopedic Surgery Chair, Division of Hand Surgery Mayo Clinic AOTRAUMA RESEARCH COMMITTEE Chairperson Berton R. Moed, MD Professor and Chairman Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Saint Louis University Gregory J. Della Rocca, MD, PhD, FACS Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery Co-Director Orthopaedic Trauma Service University of Missouri Joshua Gary, MD Assistant Professor University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Clifford Jones, MD, FACS The CORE Institute Banner University Medical Center Stephen Kates, MD Professor and Chair of Orthopaedic Surgery Department of Orthopaedics Virginia Commonwealth University AOVET NA BOARD Chairperson Alan Ruggles, DVM, DACVS Equine Orthopedic Surgeon Rood & Riddle Equine Hospital Steven Budsberg, DVM, MS, DACVS Professor Department of Small Animal Medicine & Surgery Department of Physiology and Pharmacology University of Georgia Loïc Déjardin, DVM, MS, DACVS, DECVS Professor – Head of Orthopaedic Surgery College of Veterinary Medicine Michigan State University José M. García-López, VMD, DACVS, DACVSMR Associate Professor of Large Animal Surgery Director of Equine Sports Medicine Department of Clinical Sciences Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine Tufts University

AOVET COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE Chairperson Steven Budsberg, DVM, MS, DACVS Professor Department of Small Animal Medicine & Surgery Department of Physiology and Pharmacology University of Georgia José M. García-López, VMD, DACVS, DACVSMR Associate Professor of Large Animal Surgery Director of Equine Sports Medicine Department of Clinical Sciences Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine Tufts University AOVET EDUCATION COMMITTEE Chairperson Amy S. Kapatkin, DVM, MS, DACVS Professor of Orthopedic Surgery Section Chief Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences School of Veterinary Medicine University of California — Davis Past Chairperson Charles DeCamp, DVM, MS, DACVS Professor, College of Veterinary Medicine Michigan State University Larry Galuppo, DVM, DACVS Professor and Chief, Equine Surgery Department of Surgical & Radiological Sciences School of Veterinary Medicine University of California — Davis José M. García-López, VMD, DACVS, DACVSMR Associate Professor of Large Animal Surgery Director of Equine Sports Medicine Department of Clinical Sciences Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine Tufts University Spencer Johnston, VMD, DACVS James and Marjorie Waggoner Professor Department Head Small Animal Medicine and Surgery College of Veterinary Medicine University of Georgia Sharon Kerwin, DVM, MS, DACVS Professor, Small Animal Clinical Sciences College of Veterinary Medicine Texas A & M University Simon Roe, BVSc, PhD, DACVS Professor of Small Animal Orthopaedic Surgery Department of Clinical Sciences College of Veterinary Medicine North Carolina State University

AOVET FELLOWSHIP COMMITTEE Chairperson Noël Moens, DVM, MSc, DACVS, DECVS Associate Professor, Chief of Surgery Orthopaedic Surgery Department of Clinical Studies Ontario Veterinary College University of Guelph AOVET RESEARCH COMMITTEE Chairperson Loïc Déjardin, DVM, MS, DACVS, DECVS Professor – Head of Orthopaedic Surgery College of Veterinary Medicine Michigan State University AONA EDUCATION ADVISORY BOARD Chairperson David Hak, MD, MBA, FACS Professor University of Colorado School of Medicine Denver Health Medical Center Clinical Division: Trauma Michael Baumgaertner, MD Professor, Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation Yale University School of Medicine Clinical Division: Trauma Paul Binhammer, MSc, MD, FRCSC Assistant Professor, Division of Plastic Surgery University of Toronto Head Division of Plastic Surgery Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre Clinical Division: Trauma/Hand Joseph Cheng, MD, MS Professor and Vice Chair Department of Neurosurgery Yale University Clinical Division: Spine Amy S. Kapatkin, DVM, MS, DACVS Professor of Orthopedic Surgery Section Chief Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences School of Veterinary Medicine University of California — Davis Clinical Division: Veterinary Stephen MacLeod, MBChB, FDSRCS, FRCS, FACS, BDS Joseph R. and Louise Ada Jarabak Professor Chief, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Dental Medicine Program Director, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residency Loyola University Clinical Division: CMF

Robert McGuire, MD Professor and Chair Emeritus Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery & Rehabilitation University of Mississippi Medical Center Clinical Division: Spine Roger Wilber, MD Assistant Professor Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine University Hospitals Case Medical Center MetroHealth Medical Center Clinical Division: Trauma ETHICS AND CONTENT VALIDATION SUBCOMMITTEE Chairperson James Hughes, MD, FACS M. Beckett Howorth Professor Professor Emeritus Department of Orthopaedic Surgery UMMC Medical Director BMHT Clinical Division: Trauma Terry Axelrod, MD, MSc, FRCSC Professor Division of Orthopaedic Surgery University of Toronto Clinical Division: Trauma Fred Fedok, MD, FACS Adjunct Professor Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Department of Surgery University of South Alabama Clinical Division: CMF Glenn Rechtine, II, MD Associate Chief of Staff – Education Bay Pines VA Healthcare System Professor University of South Florida University of Rochester Clinical Division: Spine Alan Ruggles, DVM, DACVS Equine Orthopedic Surgeon Rood & Riddle Equine Hospital Clinical Division: Veterinary KATHRYN CRAMER CAREER DEVELOPMENT AWARD COMMITTEE Chairperson David Karges, DO Professor Director, Foot and Ankle Department of Orthopaedic Surgery St. Louis University Hospital Clinical Division: Trauma Kelly Lefaivre, MD, FRCSC, MSc Associate Professor University of British Columbia Clinical Division: Trauma Anna N. Miller, MD, FACS Assistant Professor Assistant Director Orthopaedic Trauma Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Wake Forest University School of Medicine Clinical Division: Trauma

AO North America: Annual Report 2015  25  


AONA Governance AONA President

AONA Trauma Chair

1

1

AONA Past President

AOCMF Chair

1

1

AONA President-Elect

1

AOVET Chair

1

Education Committee

Education Committee

Education Committee

Research Committee

Research Committee

Research Committee

Community Development

Community Development

Community Development

Post-Graduate Support Chair

Post-Graduate Support Chair

Post-Graduate Support Chair

Immediate Past-Chair

Immediate Past-Chair

Immediate Past-Chair

(2 years)

(1 year)

(2 years)

Incoming Chair

Incoming Chair

Incoming Chair

(1 year)

(1 year)

(1 year)

ED/Designate

ED/Designate

ED/Designate

Trauma Clinical Division

CMF Clinical Division

Vet Clinical Division

26  AO North America: Annual Report 2015


AONA Executive Director

Executive Council Education Advisory Board Chair AOSpine Chair

1

Education Committee

Research Committee

Education Advisory Board Chair

Education Advisory Board

1

 oting Member of Executive Council V For CMF, chair or delegate serves on Executive Council

Community Development

Post-Graduate Support Chair 2 Immediate Past-Chair (3 years)

Chair Elect

AOSpine Regional Director

Spine Clinical Division

AO North America: Annual Report 2015  27  


The State of AONA Finance 2015 Financial Results The 2015 financial results reflected continued careful fiscal management. As a result, AONA maximized investment in ongoing operations and major projects. AO Foundation and course registration fees continued to comprise our major sources of revenue. Both sources of revenue have been consistent for many years. Expenses were primarily devoted to Education in all Clinical Divisions, Trauma and Spine Fellowships, and Spine Research. Expenses include 33 employees.

2015 Statement of Activities (Income Statement)

Expenses by Category

Revenue AO Foundation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23,685,163 Course Registration Fees. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,166,891 Reeve Foundation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150,000 Hansen Foundation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47,360 Other. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179,180   Total Revenue. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $26,228,594 Expenses Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,158,500 Fellowships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,466,895 Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,818,372 Community Development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180,987 Boards and Committees. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 525,906 AO Patient Outcomes Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 565,630 General & Administrative. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,128,101   Total Expenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25,844,391   Change in Net Assets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $384,203   Net Assets Beginning of Year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $21,253,643   Net Assets End of Year . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $21,637,846

Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59% Fellowships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17% Research. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11% General & Administrative. . . . . . . . 8% Boards and Committees. . . . . . . . 2% AO Patient Outcomes Center . . . . 2% Community Development. . . . . . . 1%

28  AO North America: Annual Report 2015


2015 Financial Position The December 31, 2015 net assets are $21,637,846. We are finalizing a multiyear financial commitment at a level that will allow AONA to continue to achieve ambitious program and project results.

AONA Statement of Position Expenses by Clinical Division

(Balance Sheet) as of December 31 Assets 2014 2015 Cash and Cash Equivalents. . . . . . . . . $22,258,550 . . . . $24,329,850 Accounts Receivable and Prepaid Expenses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,947,682 . . . . . . . 748,145 Fixed Assets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 497,875 . . . . . . . 276,959   Total Assets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24,704,107. . . . . $25,354,953 Liabilities and Net Assets Accounts Payable and Accrued Liabilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,607,184. . . . . . $3,069,817 Deferred Revenue. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 843,280. . . . . . . . . 647,290 Net Assets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21,253,643. . . . . . 21,637,846   Total Liabilities and Net Assets. . $24,704,107. . . . . $25,354,953

Trauma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50% Spine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29% CMF. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13% Vet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7% Neuro. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1%

Regarding investable assets, AONA’s investment policy as directed by the Board of Directors focuses on preservation of principal. As a result, all AONA funds are held in cash or cash equivalent accounts. In 2015, AONA maintained a culture of fiscal accountability and discipline. All Clinical Division boards and committees actively managed their respective financial resources. Budget discussions occurred at every meeting. AONA has engaged an independent CPA firm to complete our first external audit on 2015 results. Audited financial statements will be available.

AO North America is exempt from federal income tax under Section 501(a) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”), and is described in Code Section 501(c)(6). AO North America Charitable Foundation is exempt from income tax under Code Section 501(a) and is described in Code Sections 501(c)(3) and 509(a). AO North America: Annual Report 2015  29  


In the Community

In Memoriam

A food drive to help those among us who are less fortunate

Barbara A. Brinkman

All over North America, AONA works to advance high quality care, promote research, and maintain the highest standards of training to educate new generations of surgeons. It also is active in its local community to improve the lives of others. In late 2015, AONA initiated a companywide food drive to address hunger and food security in collaboration with the Chester County Food Bank (www.chestercountyfoodbank.org) near our Paoli offices. Food security is an ongoing crisis in the United States, and one does not have to look far to find people who face hunger on a regular basis. We are making a difference in our community by helping people who are hungry and urge all members to help make a difference in their own communities. AONA has already donated nearly 200 pounds of food and is continuing this initiative in 2016.

May 17, 1950 - June 17, 2015 AONA lost a dear friend and colleague, Barbara Brinkman, after a brief illness. Barbara was hired more than 25 years ago and was the first staff employee under Joan Rousseau in the original “continuing education department.” She quickly established herself as reliable and knowledgeable, earning the respect and friendship of everyone who worked with her. Over the years, AO surgeons always counted on seeing Barbara at courses, and she spent countless hours behind the scenes making sure that those courses went perfectly. We will especially miss Barb’s dry humor and her incredible loyalty and commitment. She loved her job and being with her colleagues, and we all loved her. Her passing feels like the loss of a family member. We’re sure that many of you have special memories of Barb and of the times you shared with her, and we hope you find some comfort in recalling those memories and sharing them with others.

Educational Development Manager

In Appreciation Nancy Holmes Retires Nancy Holmes retired from her dual role as AONA Executive Director and AOSpine North America Regional Director at the end of 2015. Nancy’s relationship with the AO began over 20 years ago as an AO Nurse Fellow in Tubingen, Germany which led to a 15-year career. She served as Regional Director of AOSpine North America for nine years while simultaneously taking on the role of Executive Director of AONA in January 2012. Nancy has had a distinguished career with AOSpine and AONA, and we are all incredibly grateful for her legacy. 30  AO North America: Annual Report 2015


AO North America established as first regional entity of AO Foundation Rinerhorn, Davos, Switzerland, 1992

AO North America 1992

Left to right: Geoffrey Sumner-Smith, DVM, Hansjörg Wyss, Douglas W. Klotch, MD, FACS, Marvin Tile, CM, MD, FRCSC, Keith A. Mayo, MD, Jesse B. Jupiter, MD, Jeffrey W. Mast, MD, Bruce A. Mallin, MD, FACS, Peter Trafton, MD, Roby D. Mize, MD, Sigvard T. Hansen Jr, MD, Howard Rosen, MD, Andrew R. Burgess, MD, Joseph Schatzker, CM, MD, FRCSC, Stanley D. Gertzbein, MD, Hill Hastings II, MD, James Hughes, MD, FACS, Kenneth Lambert, MD, Donald Piermattei, DVM, Lawrence Bone, MD, David L. Helfet, MD, James E. Gerry AO North America: Annual Report 2015  31  


AO North America 1700 Russell Road Paoli, PA 19301 610-993-5100 customerservice@aona.org aona.org

Coming Together  

AONA Annual Report 2015

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you