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i n c o r p o r a t i n gA publication of the Archdiocese of Hobart Complimentary

C AT H O L I C E D U C AT I O N

Issue 5: Easter 2006

connec ions TA S M A N I A N C A

H O L I C E D U C AT I O N O F F I C E

Mt. St. Canice a new beginning 15

For the past few years, Catholic Education Tasmania has produced its own high quality magazine about schools and school life, entitled Connections. The magazine has featured many articles showcasing the achievements and hopes of our school communities and has been sent home to all families once a term so that parents, grandparents, students and friends can enjoy the vibrant educational involvements of the schools their loved ones attend. Increasingly, the award-winning Tasmanian Catholic magazine has also featured events and achievements of our Catholic schools statewide. Our Mission as Church to teach the Good News of Jesus, heal the sick, comfort the lost and bring sight to the blind has many faces and expressions in Tasmania. As Catholic schools, we are working within the ambit of the Archdiocesan Vision and Mission Statement and share our goals with other agencies that minister in so many ways to families and those in need. It is important that we are seen to share this Mission together, rather than to be working in isolation from the other Catholic Church agencies; a combined magazine is one way to demonstrate this unity.

catholic.tas.edu.au TA S M A N I A N C A

Students and families will now have the opportunity to read about the many human interest stories, events and inspiring achievements that are happening in so many aspects of Catholic life across this state. There will be a clearly identifiable section at the centre of The Tasmanian Catholic specifically dedicated to reporting about our colleges and schools. Reporting about Catholic education will now be situated within many good news stories from around the Archdiocese from parishes and agencies working for the community, sitting within the overall context of the Church’s Mission in Tasmania. That can only be a positive step as we share with families the scope and influence of our Church. Its liturgical celebrations, parish life, social justice and ecological commitment, care for asylum seekers, family counselling, outreach and ministry to prisoners, are just some examples of the good works of the Archdiocese that are reported in issues of The Tasmanian Catholic.

Dr Trish Hindmarsh

This is the first combined edition of Connections and The Tasmanian Catholic.

Director Catholic Education Tasmania

From the Director

The magazine is bright, contemporary, comprehensive and attractive. I do hope that you enjoy this first combined edition of Archdiocesan and schools news, and watch out for it as a regular gift to your family four times a year.

H O L I C E D U C AT I O N O F F I C E

Issue 18 2011

Beatitudes for living!

FEATURE FEATURE STORY

Ordination Deus Caritasof Deacon Est (God is love) Paul Crowe

4-55 Complimentary

YOUTH MINISTRY FEATURE STORY

WYD ‘11 Madrid Cloning and Our pilgrims the Lockhart are back! Report

6-77

By Pat Gartlan

SOCIAL CONCERNS GENERAL NEWS

Building My Road to the Bridges, DiaconateNot Walls By Nick MacFarlane

18 13

Vol 7:5 October 2011


INSIDE THIS ISSUE

Catholic Church Directory www.hobart.catholic.org.au

Archbishop Doyle writes 1 News in Brief

Catholic Diocesan Centre

2–3

35 Tower Road New Town 7008, GPO Box 62 Hobart 7001 Phone: (03) 6208 6222 Fax: (03) 6208 6292

Features Ordination of Deacon Paul Crowe

4-5

Youth Ministry World Youth Day 2011 Report

6-7

General News Willson Training for success

8

Senator’s delight for Stitch

12

Faith in Action From forensic science to straw huts

9

Catholic Aid Hear My Voice on World Mission Day

The Office of the Archbishop Phone: (03) 6208 6222 Fax: (03) 6208 6293

Tasmanian Catholic Justice and Peace Commission Phone: (03) 6208 6271 Fax: (03) 6208 6299

Business Manager – Peter Cusick CPA Phone: (03) 6208 6227 Fax: (03) 6208 6292

Catholic Youth Ministry Phone: (03) 6208 6274

Catholic Development Fund Phone: (03) 6208 6260 Fax: (03) 6208 6290

Towards Healing Help Line Phone: 1800 356 613

Liturgy Office Phone: (03) 6208 6233 Fax: (03) 6208 6292

Museum and Archives Phone: (03) 6231 4740

Marriage Tribunal Phone: (03) 6208 6250 Fax: (03) 6208 6297

Heritage Office Phone/Fax: (03) 6224 5920

The Office of Church Life and Mission Phone: (03) 6208 6232 Fax: (03) 6208 6292

11

Social Concern Building Bridges Not Walls

13

Connections Cover image by Isabella Hickling

15

From the Director

15

Polo without horses!

16

PhD in Psychology takes Kelly to Europe

17

Catholic Schools respond to the call 18 –19

– Catholic Education Week

Hearts of Hope – Stella Maris Catholic Primary School

20

Feast Day Fun at St Thomas More’s

21

Betta Bee and the 4Bs – St Aloysius Catholic College

22

Vicar General Fr Mark Freeman VG 44 Margaret Street, Launceston 7250 Phone: (03) 6331 4377 Fax: (03) 6334 1906

Hobart 35 Tower Road New Town 7008 Phone: (03) 6278 1660

Chancellor Fr Terry Rush VF PP PO Box 42 Richmond 7025 Phone/Fax: (03) 6260 2189

Burnie 108 Mount Street Burnie 7320 Phone: (03) 6431 8555

Catholic Education Office 5 Emmett Place New Town 7008 Phone: (03) 6210 8888 Vocations Ministry 99 Barrack Street, Hobart Phone: (03) 6234 4463

Centacare Welfare Services

Launceston 201 York Street, Launceston 7250 Phone: (03) 6332 0600

Devonport 85 Best Street Devonport 7310 Phone: (03) 6423 6100 Willson Training 35 Tower Road New Town 7008 Phone: (03) 6208 6000 Diocesan Ecumenical Commission Phone: (03) 6335 4708 A/H: (03) 6335 4826

Fly on the wall Buzzing around a happy bunch

23

Edgeways A shrunken God?

25

Pastoral Life Valuing lives and stories

26

Acolyte Les Ennis – faithful servant

27

Fifty years of service – Society of Christian Doctrine

28

Five minutes with Maureen Clarke

29

Celebrations Wedding – Margaret Watts and Dean Chatwin

30

The Baby Corner – Sophia Grace McNulty

30

Kids’ Page 31 Lifestyle Book and film reviews

32 – 33

Obituary Mieko Carr

34

Darlene Haigh

35

Jack O’Rourke and Terry O’Rourke

36

connec ions

and is published by the Archdiocese of Hobart and Catholic Education Tasmania, and is distributed to Catholic schools, hospitals, retirement villages and parishes statewide. We welcome contributions, but no guarantee of publication can be given because of demands on available space. Hard copy versions of items for publication cannot be returned so please keep a copy. Photographs submitted will only be returned if accompanied by an addressed stamped envelope. Contributions, advertising or other enquiries may be sent to The Tasmanian Catholic and Connections GPO Box 62, Hobart, Tasmania, 7001. The Tasmanian Catholic Editor Pip Atkinson (03) 6208 6278 0409 337 143 tascath@aohtas.org.au Production and Design Chris Cumming doubleCdesign (03) 6376 1224 0400 224 435

Connections Editor Mary-Anne Johnson (03) 6208 6230 0419 529 963 connections@cet.tas.edu.au Printing Foot and Playsted, Launceston (03) 6332 1400 Fax: (03) 6332 1444

L-R: St Aloysius students Matthew Gifford, Zach Wills and Nicholas Paine with Betta Bee, the primary school campus’s mascot, whose motto is ‘Better be safe, better be a learner, better be fair and better be respectful’. Read about Betta Bee and the 4Bs on page 22. This is the last Connections supplement for 2011. The next supplement will appear in the March 2012 magazine. All material in this publication is copyright and must not be reproduced without the written permission of the Archbishop of Hobart or his authorised delegate. DEADLINE NEXT EDITION November 22, 2011


1

Archbishop DoyleWrites Write Archbishop Doyle Friends in Christ,

Dear Friends in Christ,

F

he days before settledduring downthe to month write of or two Iweeks, August, I was away from Tasmania, s Easter message, I attended a Funeral enjoying the company of the Tasmanian s for a young man, 30 years of age, who Pilgrims to World Youth Day 2011, which been murdered in Melbourne one week took place in Madrid, Spain. The pilgrims er. Myhad particular association with the left for overseas a few days prior to my andtime, they spent the first four days y goesdeparture, back to the 34 years earlier, Italy,celebrant mostly in Assisi and Rome. We all n I wasinthe of the marriage met up at the airport at Toulouse in France s parents. and together we travelled to Lourdes for a any people packed into St. Mary’s two-night stay. hedral and end of the Onetowards of the manythe highlights of our short stay in Lourdes was to attend a twilight , before the prayers of final committal, of some of the Gospel scenes, youngre-enactment man’s mother addressed the which took place on the steps and the gregation. In the course herfeatures very in forecourt of the basilicaof which ng address, indicated she and many ofshe the pictures thatthat we see of Lourdes. The presentation was designed around amily forgive the person who caused a request on the part of Bernadette to Mary death of her son. It was a gesture that to explain to her the Gospel stories and their ed me place and in allthe present. It was a gesture life of Jesus. rgivenessOninleaving the very deepest Christian Lourdes, we travelled into Spain a stop at Loyola, the birthplace ning ofand themade word. of St to Ignatius, the for founder of this the Society s we come prepare Easter year, of Jesus. There is something very solid about the emember the words of Jesus on the cross: character of the buildings where St Ignatius her, forgive for they what he spentthem the early yearsknow of his not life before answered the call to follow Jesus, and to bring do.” The death of Jesus was the great a new group of followers along with n of forgiveness. It was the examplehim. of The next stop was in the city of Bourgos, venesswhich that can and does inspire others is the last main city through which o the same in situations would de all pilgrims pass en where route toitSantiago the final destination of all those m to be Compostella, almost impossible from a human who travel along the Way of St James. The t of view. familiar yellow arrow which guides the pilgrims has been noted that all those people is painted on the wall of the refugio where the hom Christ first appeared after the pilgrims are able to be accommodated before rrection areout portrayed as leg being a starting on the last big of thein journey, over 500 kilometres. ative mood of some kind or other when we reached Madrid which was to be first heardFinally the news. Christian experience our home for the next week. It soon became irms that we that can thousands only come to know obvious of young people isen Christ when we upon havethe experienced were descending city from all over world, and that in itself is an experience e kind the of death, some disillusionment which is very profound for all the young ourselves and others, some loss, pilgrims, including those from Tasmania. For avement, sense of hopelessness the pilgrims, thefear, accommodation is quite eaninglessness. basic, and that is all part of the experience. It was not made easier by the fact that each day the temperature would rise to 40 degrees in the afternoon. The leadership of our group was in the competent hands of Rachelle Smith and Michael Hangan from Catholic Youth Ministry, well supported by Fr Michael Delaney, as

This is also a common feature of o experience. first come to und Popefaith Benedict arrived fromWe Rome in Madrid on the Thursday, and there was a welcome outsi the Resurrection as something ceremony later that day. It must be a verytwo th something that happened uplifting experience for the Pope to see many years ago. thousands of colourfully attired young people Slowly wehis come to isappreciate t gathered before him, but message about Christ. Ithappening was in accordance the theme of Risen herewith and now. The World Youth Day 2011, “Planted and built up in close continually coming through the Jesus Christ, firm in the faith.” (Colossians 2, 7.) of our minds. When he enters, he g In his homily at the final Mass on the words challenged “Peace be with Sunday,with Popethe Benedict the you.” A final common feature the Resu young pilgrims: “You have been givenof the extraordinary task of being disciples and accounts is that those to whom Christ missionaries of Christ in other lands and are commissioned to go out and to te countries fill with young people who are early activities looking The for something greater.” of the disciples a followers aresaid: described in great d As one young pilgrim “Catholic is what we are, the not something we belong to.” Theearly b Acts of the Apostles. The young pilgrims from Tasmania have been manifested a spirit of forgiveness, of “Catholic is what we are, not challenged by the words of Pope Benedict of peace, amidst conflict andare persecu and I have every confidence that they something we belong to.” they were united in heart, sharing w equal to that challenge. As their was aco-believers. privilege and an hadbishop, with ittheir chaplain, and the Team Leaders. Over a inspiration The to bevictory with them muchover of a sin, su of for Christ number of years now, a good system has period of ten days. Thankfully all arrived back and death is there for us to accept, bu been developed in which the participating home safely in Tasmania, and with memories of invitation for us forget to take upwillseriously pilgrims are assigned to a small group, with an experience they will never –nor I. an older person acting as Team Leader. It is a for forgiveness and to draw on that c Yours sincerely in Christ very effective way to ensure everyone is safe, that Christ gives us through our Bap taken care of, and in contact with the other ADRIAN L DOYLE AM I pray that the celebration of Ea pilgrims at all times. Archbishop of Hobart take us to the level of what is really im in life. May the message of Easter go d All revised Mass texts to be prayed our hearts. The first disciples of Jes on the First Sunday of Advent transformed by the first-hand exam ommunities throughout Australia will be asked to use was too powerful to ignore. May i all the prayers in the newly translated Roman Missal same for all of us as well. from the first Sunday of Advent this year at all Masses. Up until now parishes have been using the new I wish all those who read this m people’s responses and singing the new music settings only. A second feature of the accounts we have is every Blessing of the Risen Christ on y From 20th November this year, all the revised texts in the the slowness ofprayed, those to whomthe Christ appears, and the parish community wit Mass will be including Eucharistic Prayers. family The newly printed ritual books are being distributed throughout to recognise that it is the Risen Christ. The you have recalled and celebrated a Fr Paul Turner the diocese this month, ready for the final stage of disciples on the road to Emmaus walked for great events the life of Christ, hi frominUSA will implementation. speak on the several kilometres before they recognised and Resurrection. To assist with the introduction of these texts, international revised Missal: the revised translation, Fr Paul Turner on L. Doyle him.expert MaryonMagdalen initially mistakes thewill speak Adrian 2 Nov – Launceston the Missal at public gatherings in Launceston (2 November) risenand Christ for the gardener. Archbishop of Hobart 5 Nov – Hobart Hobart (5 November). Fr Turner will also spend some time

“The death of Jesus was the great action of forgiveness.”

C

working with the priests of the Archdiocese.

Fr Turner was secretary to the bishops and scholars who worked on the revised translation and is featured on the DVD resource Become One Body One Spirit in Christ. The gatherings in Launceston and Hobart will be vital sessions for those who seek a better understanding of these prayers prior to their full introduction in Advent.

We have the largest circulation in Tasmanian to private hospitals, www.hobart.catholic.org.au

Please phone OCLAM office on (03) 6208 6232 for more information.


NEWS IN BRIEF NEWS IN BRIEF NEWS IN BRIEF NEWS IN BRIEF NEWS IN BRIEF NEWS IN BRIEF NEWS IN BRIEF NEWS IN BRIEF

2 Volume 7 Issue 5 2011

NEWS IN BRIEF

The Flickering Flame launch A

new Tasmanian book, The Flickering Flame – Catholicism in North – East Tasmania 1877-2011, will be launched on October 19, 2011 at Scottsdale.

This self-published book, lovingly and painstakingly researched, details the rich history of how the Catholic people of Scottsdale and North – West of Tasmania – clergy, religious and lay-people, past and present, have sacrificed much to keep the flame of faith burning. Much of this history also gives thanks to the ministry of the Missionary Sisters of Service Sisters of St Joseph who served the people over such a vast area. Tasmania The pages also relive the despair of the loss of two church buildings to fire at Ringarooma

(in 1890) and at Scottsdale (in 1992). There are also a good many photos from past and present, including clergy, religious, some artefacts and a few wedding celebrations from St Augustine’s and St Mary’s. Order forms will be available from various parishes, or the book can be ordered by contacting either Fr John McKay or Margaret Fairburn, parish secretary on (03) 6343 1875 or via mail order to Catholic Parish of Scottsdale PO Box 222, Scottsdale 7260. The book costs $15.00 plus $4 postage.

DATE CLAIMER Sisters of St Joseph Tasmania

And the winners are... T

2DATE 4 t h CLAIMER May 2012 24th May 2012

hank you to all those school students, along with their teachers, who entered our Colouring in Competition to win copies of the new Australian Children’s Mass Book. We received a mountain of colourful and creative pages of colouring in. Well done to all of you!

125th Anniversary of Foundation at Westbury

Pre-School and Kindergarten: 1st Prize – Aurora Giuliani, St John’s Catholic School 2nd Prize – Anastasia Hoskinson, St Paul’s Catholic School

Prep and Grade 1: 1st Prize – Aryana Samarakkody, Our Lady of Lourdes 2nd Prize – Olivia Barnett St Finn Barr’s Catholic School.

Grades 2 and 3: 1st Prize – Kelsey Anderson, Stella Maris Catholic School, Burnie. 2nd Prize – Frankie Roberts, Stella Maris Catholic Primary School, Burnie.

2 5 t hThe Anniversary A n n iMass v e will rsary of be celebrated at Holy Trinity Church, 2.00pm ounda t i oWestbury n a tat We stbury on Thursday 24th May. This will be followed by afternoon tea in the Town Hall and the launch of the History of the Sisters of St Joseph in Tasmania.

Margaret Silf returns H

ear one of the most popular and accessible spiritual writers of our time as Margaret Silf returns to Tasmania for the first time in three years. Margaret will present two talks at the Josephite Mission and History Centre in New Town on Tuesday, October 25. From 9.30am to 12.30pm she Anniversary MassSisters will ofbeStcelebrated at Holy Trinity Church, Joseph Tasmania will present The Challenge of Change: Finding God in Times of Transition and then from 6.30pm 67 Clare tbury at 2.00 p.m. onStreet Thursday 24th May. This will be folto 9.30pm Margaret will speak on the theme Faith in the Future. PO Box 38 d by afternoon teaNew in the Town Hall and the launch of theThere History of Town Tasmania 7008 will be time for group discussion following her presentations. Please make your isters of Ph: St Joseph in 1503 Tasmania. (03) 6278 Fax: (03) 6278 2338 booking by October 18. The cost is $10.00 (or affordable donation). Phone (03) 6278 1503 or E-mail: ssjadmin@tastelfibre.com.au email: ssjadmin@tastelfibre.com.au Sisters of St Joseph Tasmania 67 Clare Street PO Box 38 New Town Tasmania 7008 Phone: 03 6278 1503 Fax: 03 62782338 E-mail: ssjadmin@tastelfibre.com.au

Office@jadunnfunerals.com.au www.jadunnfunerals.com.au

www.hobart.catholic.org.au


3

Silver lining for L’Arche I

n August, 90 people gathered to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Beni-Abbes Community (L’Arche Hobart). During the celebration it was recalled how from 1982 Fr Terry Yard and the Sacred Heart Parish laid down a wonderful foundation for the Community involving many people, particularly Phil Vincent, Lilian Sutton and Ken Lowrie, and established connections with many other churches and groups. 1986 marke d the beginning of the Community with the Celebrations at their 25th Anniversary. welcoming of its Core

The Beni-Abbes community.

Members (members with a disability) and live-in Assistants. Over the years it has grown to have three houses and a

Support at Pontville T

he Southern Tasmanian Faith Communities Support Group – under the umbrella of the Tasmanian Council of Churches – recently met to examine how they can best minister to the asylum seekers at Pontville. This group consists of representatives chosen by the respective heads of Churches in Tasmania. The meeting was attended by Noah Folau, program manager for SERCO, who talked about programs for detainees and what we as members of the church may be able to do to assist them. Support Group member Margaret Donaghy said it is not the intention of the support group to duplicate services being offered by other volunteer groups. “As a church we able to offer community engagement and everyday life experience to detainees which may include community garden work, volunteering or attending a parish barbecue,” said Margaret. For information contact Margaret at the Tasmanian Catholic Justice and Peace Commission on (03) 6208 6271 or tcjpc@aohtas.org.au. Alternatively contact Graham Roberts, President of the Tasmanian Council of Churches on graham.roberts@aus.salvationarmy.org

Tenancy Support Service. It is one of the now 140 communities of L’Arche spread across the world, inspired by the initial vision of Jean Vanier.

Your Tasmanian Catholic wins Gold! T

he Australasian Religious Press Association (ARPA) has awarded its Best Regional Publication Gold Award to The Tasmanian Catholic. The judges said: “These awards recognize the publications that spoke best to the worshipper in the pew, rather than to church officialdom. “The Tasmanian Catholic is profoundly local, but with a good seasoning of stories from beyond Tasmania ... Gives a good view of what Catholics are thinking and doing in Tasmania.” We would like to offer our sincere thanks to all our valued contributors, our printers Foot and Playsted in Launceston, as well as our faithful advertisers – all of you make our magazine possible.

www.hobart.catholic.org.au

NEWS IN BRIEF NEWS IN BRIEF NEWS IN BRIEF NEWS IN BRIEF NEWS IN BRIEF NEWS IN BRIEF NEWS IN BRIEF NEWS IN BRIEF NEWS IN BRIEF

NEWS IN BRIEF


4 Volume 7 Issue 5 2011

FEATURE

Serving the people of God Ordination of Deacon Paul Crowe

T

he ordination of Paul Crowe to the permanent diaconate was a joyous occasion witnessed by a vibrant Catholic community from whose ranks Paul has come. It was the second such ordination in Tasmania, the first being Nick McFarlane’s five years ago. As senior deacon, Nick wants to encourage many more men to take on this role and hopes that the next will be much closer than five years away. “Believe what you read, teach what you believe and practise what you teach.” Thus are deacons exhorted as they are presented with the Book of the Gospels during their ordination liturgy. In the ceremony at Launceston’s Church of the Apostles on September 4, the Archbishop told Paul that now he ‘must not only listen to God’s Word’ but he is also to preach it. The contemporary event was linked with the original Apostles when the Archbishop laid hands on Paul and this continuity with the ancient and continuing tradition of the Church was echoed by the choir singing the litany of the saints and Adoramus Te Domine. The lovely singing from both the choir and the assembly, the sounds of the organ and other instruments, the smells of incense, the presence of many priests of the Archdiocese, three seminarians, three deacons (including Deacon Paul Simmons from the Broken Bay Diocese and Deacon Greg Kerr from Newcastle-Maitland Diocese) and two servers on the altar all combined to mark the solemnity of the occasion. The words of the hymns, including Christ be our Light and Come to the Feast, point to Paul’s spirituality and concern for social justice. Paul’s family smiled proudly and lovingly as Paul received the Sacrament of Orders. They helped robe him in the deacon’s stole and dalmatic. He paid tribute to the love and encouragement of his wife Gordana, their children and other members of his family. (Gordana had been asked to give written permission before the ordination could take place). Paul also thanked everyone involved in his formation and in the celebration which filled the Church of the Apostles. We wish Paul God’s blessings in his new role as he continues to minister among us.

Gordana and Paul Crowe.

Pope John Paul II once said “a deacon’s service is the Church’s service sacramentalised”.

If becoming a deacon is something which interests you, please speak with Deacon Nick MacFarlane on 0418 242 010 or nick.macfarlane@aohtas.org.au www.hobart.catholic.org.au


FEATURE

5

Why I became a deacon M

any people think of a deacon as a ‘lay’ minister, but this is not entirely accurate. A deacon is an ordained minister, but he is ordained to service in the Church, not to the priesthood. In the Catholic Church the ordained ministry comprises three orders: bishops, priests and deacons. Deacons make visible Christ who serves. They symbolise a communion between the wider world and Church ministry – their ministry comprises pastoral, liturgical and charitable roles. But deacons are first and foremost living reminders of what it means to be a member of the Church and to be a Disciple of Christ. Deacon Paul says his initial sense of being actively called to serve came from a conversation he had with theologian Draško Dizdar around five years ago. “I felt I had more to offer the Church. I wanted to know how I could make this offering,” said Paul. “I was already quite involved with the parish helping those through the RCIA process and catechesis on their way to becoming newly baptised Catholics,” said Paul. “One person whom I was instructing in catechesis came to me and thanked me for helping them understand the Church’s teachings in a way they hadn’t before.”

“Then they said: ‘If only you were legit’.” “I knew what they meant immediately,” said Paul. While all Catholics are called to fulfil a role of evangelisation of the faith, not just priests and religious, Paul understood this off-the-cuff comment to mean: you have a particular place in our Church. Paul says, in his view, to be a deacon is more akin to the notion of the Apostles, particularly Steven and Philip, meaning ‘one who is sent forth’ and to spread the word of the Gospel. Pope Gregory the Great was originally a deacon. The process of becoming an ordained deacon took around three years for Paul. He is also a Benedictine Oblate. To say that Paul Crowe’s life is now busier than ever is an understatement. He is a prominent orthodontic surgeon in Launceston with many years’ experience in treating patients with cleft palates and craniofacial complications. He is, with his wife Gordana, the father of five adult children, Commissioner of the Tasmanian Catholic Justice and Peace Commission, past president of the Launceston Rotary Club plus he is an avid reader! “My wife and my children have been extremely supportive of me,” says Paul.

www.hobart.catholic.org.au

He recalls one of the earliest ‘moments’ of realisation of a calling was witnessing the life-changing experience that his son, Ben, underwent as a pilgrim at World Youth Day 2002 in Cologne, Germany. One of the most difficult things, says Paul, has been how he and his wife have had to re-work their relationship with each other to include his new commitments. In the end, he says they have found a way to strengthen their Sacrament of Marriage alongside his Holy Orders. Paul says he has been overwhelmed by the loving support he has received from his parish and the wider community. “The applause at the end of the ordination service just went on and on.” In his first ‘official’ weekend, Paul delivered three homilies within the Launceston Parish. “The homilies were brought to life by my own experiences,” says Paul. “My role as deacon for my Church will be my ‘adventure with the Lord’,” says Paul.

Deacon Nick MacFarlane (left) with Vince Bannon.


6 Volume 7 Issue 5 2011

YOUTH MINISTRY

Palpable, Electric, Joyful, Prayerful, By Rachelle Smith, Pilgrimage Coordinator.

T

he heat was a consistent 40+ degrees well into the balmy evenings, the music pumped almost every night from the park across from our university dorm accommodation, the streets were alive with thousands of friendly pilgrims from almost every nation on earth, the movement of the Spirit was evident in every pilgrim, place, activity and corner turned ... this was WORLD YOUTH DAY 2011 in Madrid, Spain!!!

Thirty eight Tasmanian pilgrims, well with sights, sounds and wonders all amongst the hectic – very authentic and represented from right across the state from Smithton to Cygnet, made this significant alive Roman culture and atmosphere! We pilgrimage to Spain, coordinated by Catholic were overwhelmed by the visit to many Youth Ministry. churches on our first morning including St After months of physical and spiritual Paul’s Basilica, St John in Lateran, St Mary preparation our Tassie pilgrims boarded Major and the Holy Stairs. We were also lucky 23 hours worth of flights to land in Italy for enough to visit historic and popular Roman the first part of their pilgrimage experience. sites such as the Colosseum, Panthenon, Trevi Assisi, hometown of St Francis and St Clare, Fountain and Piazza Navona. was our first destination. After such a long One of the main highlights for a number of journey to arrive our pilgrims came in this place really the following day put pilgrims in the in Rome. We visited peaceful, reflective the Vatican. We began our day and prayerful place with Mass, which they needed and wanted to be for Fr Mike celebrated their pilgrimage. in St J os e p h’s Tom Burdick, Huon Valley. From here we Chapel in the main moved onto Rome, via a day trip that saw part of St Peter’s Basilica, very, very close to the us visit Siena, hometown of St Catherine main altar in the Basilica. It was a very special and Orvieto, home to the Eucharistic Mass for us, and as Fr Mike said, “It’s the closest miracle. Again, both beautiful towns, with he’ll ever get to celebrating Mass at the main magnificent Cathedrals, relics and stories of altar in St Peter’s”. We then visited the Vatican our saints and faith. museum, including the Sistine Chapel. Rome was experienced at a much more We were blessed with the great fortune intense pace, with two full days overflowing of being accepted to take part in a tour of

When 2 million people went completely silent during the Consecration, I felt the presence of God as I had never before.

www.hobart.catholic.org.au

the Scavi Excavations. These excavations are directly below St Peter’s Basilica. During World War I, while searching for the tomb of St Peter, a whole town was uncovered below the Basilica. Today you can walk along first, second and third century Roman streets, seeing buildings and tombs that have remained untouched since Ancient Roman times. As we walked through these excavations, the story of St Peter in Rome, as one of the early founding fathers of our faith, unravelled before our eyes. From Rome, we continued onto Toulouse where we met up with the Archbishop and bused onto Lourdes, a place filled with such hope and faith as millions of pilgrims a year come searching for peace, reconciliation and healing. Again, pilgrims named the serenity, the sense of dedication to Mary, and prayerfulness of the candlelight procession as highlights of their journey.

Arrival in Madrid The atmosphere in Madrid was unlike any other I had experienced at a WYD before (although being accommodated in the centre of Madrid went a long way in helping this!). One of our pilgrims, Di O’Rourke, used these words in describing the atmosphere: “Palpable, Electric, Joyful, Prayerful, Spiritfilled”. Being located so centrally, we were blessed to be able to attend so much of the WYD week. We heard from some charismatic Bishops in Archbishop Tim of New York and our own Australian Archbishop Mark Coleridge, Canberra-Goulburn, in Catechesis. We made it to a range of youth festival events from informative speakers and panels to an interpretation of the passion through flamenco dancing and musical concerts.


YOUTH MINISTRY

7

Spirit-filled: World Youth Day 2011

support of World Youth Day and youth Each bringing passion, energy, life, faith and A huge THANK YOU to all who contributed ministry and for his on-the-ground support formation in their own way. to, supported, and made this pilgrimage what and guidance in Europe. Of course the magnitude, sound and is was. To our small group leaders for their Many thanks to all of you for your practical colour of the main WYD events brought a dedication to the pilgrimage in watching and prayerful support on our journey. Your sense of unity for our pilgrims and a greater over their pilgrims and ensuring their safety thoughts and prayers were truly felt and understanding of the worldwide Church, from and well being, and walking with pilgrims recognised by our pilgrims, they helped the Opening Mass to the arrival of the Pope. on their journey. To our pilgrimage chaplain, us through and we are very grateful for When we arrived at the Opening Mass you Fr Mike Delaney, thank you for your time, them. Please continue to keep our pilgrims could not get close to the action due to the effort and support, and, for your willingness in your prayers as they continue to process size and location of the event in the middle of to jump in and to commit to this role when this experience and build on the graces of an intersection in central Madrid. At this point we needed you. Thanks also to Fr Richard their pilgrimage. Pilgrims will be gathering in the week there was no sound available Ross who began this journey, for his guidance, for a reunion retreat on the weekend of 8-9 either, and limited visibility of any screen. passion and inspiration in the planning and October. So, the Tassie group moved to a completely early preparation of pilgrims. Thank you to separate square where the Mass was being Archbishop Adrian for his full and ongoing shown on a screen. During the Eucharist, Our blog is still available to read: www.wydtas.blogspot.com we took out our journals and began to sing hymns together in the middle of this square. We were the only pilgrims there – the locals made their way around us. Eventually, people stopped to look at what we were doing, and began to take photos and videos of us. It was quite an experience to feel a witness to these people in this way. The Final Mass was of course spectacular. Attended by almost two million people, it is incomprehensible and unexplainable. Through making our way in the heat to Cuatro Vientos, being locked out of the main venue due the large numbers flooding in, the dancing, the praying, the meeting new After you provide for any loved ones your Will, please consider you provide for any loved ones inany your Will, please consider After you provide for any loved ones inyour your Will, please consider After you provide for any loved ones in your Will, please consider After you provide for loved ones inin Will, please consider After you provide for any loved ones in your Will, please consider people, the Vigil, the unexpectedAfter electrical After you provide for any loved ones in your Will, please consider After you provide for any loved ones in your Will, please consider After you provide for any loved ones in your Will, please consider also including a bequest to the St Vincent de Paul Society. a also bequest to theaSt Vincent de Paul Society. alsoincluding including abequest bequest tothe the StVincent Vincent dePaul PaulSociety. Society. including a bequest to the St Vincent de Paul Society. to St de also also including a bequest to the St Vincent de Paul Society. also including a bequest to the St Vincent de Paul Society. storm we endured, the sleeping onalso rockincluding solid also including a bequest to the St Vincent de Paul Society. also including a bequest to the St Vincent de Paul Society. lumpy dirt overnight, waking up to blazing Because of the generosity and compassion people like you, Vinnies of the generosity and compassion people like you, Vinnies Because of the generosity and compassion of people like you, Vinnies heat with millions of others, the Because final Mass Because of the generosity andofcompassion of people like you, Vinnies of the generosity and compassion ofof people like you, Vinnies Because ofBecause the generosity and compassion of people like you, Vinnies Because of the generosity and compassion of people like Vinnies Because of the generosity and compassion ofyou, people like you, Vinnies Because of the generosity and compassion of people like you, Vinnies volunteers and members can help those who are struggling to take volunteers and members can help those who are struggling to take volunteers and members can help those who are struggling to take volunteers and members can help those who are struggling to take volunteers and members can help those who are struggling to take volunteers and members can help those who are struggling to take volunteers andand members can help those whothose are struggling to take and making your way back home through volunteers members can help who are struggling to take volunteers and members can help those who are struggling to take control of their lives. control of their lives. control of their lives. control of lives. their lives. control ofof their lives. control of their control their lives. control their the heat and crowds, something truly special control of of their lives.lives. Home and hospital -Migrant and refugee support -Indigenous Indigenous support - Home - visitation Migrant refugee - Indigenous support - Home Home and hospital visitation -Migrant Migrant and refugee support Indigenous support - Home hospital visitation - Migrant and refugee support - Indigenous support and visitation visitation -and Migrant and support - Indigenous -hospital Home and hospital visitation - support and refugee support - support support and incredibly unique happens to you.and It- Home ishospital --and and hospital visitation -refugee Migrant and refugee support -- Indigenous support Home and hospital visitation -and Migrant and refugee support Home and hospital visitation Migrant and refugee support Indigenous support - Indigenou -Support Support for children and families -Mentoring Mentoring tutoring -Disability Disability services - Support- for children and families Mentoring and tutoring Disability services Support for children and families Mentoring and tutoring Disability services Support for children and families Mentoring and tutoring Disability services Support for children and families Mentoring and tutoring Disability services for children and families and tutoring services -- Support for for children and families - Mentoring-and tutoring and tutoring - Disability services - Disability difficult to put into words. It’s a feeling of Support children and families Mentoring Support for children and families Mentoring and tutoring Disability services Vinnies Centres Mental illness support and young adult support - Vinnies -Centres - Mental illness - Youth and young adult support Vinnies Centres Mental illness support -Youth Youth and young adult support - Vinnies Centres -support Mental support - Youth and young adult support Vinnies Centres - Mental illness support - Youth and young adult support - -Vinnies Centres - -Mental illness support - -Youth and young adult support --- Vinnies Centres --illness Mental illness support Youth and young adult support Vinnies Centres - Mental illness support-- Overseas - development Youth unity, of love, and of true life that comes from Vinnies Centres Mental illness support Youth and young adult supportand Budget counselling -Disaster Disaster recovery assistance partnership - Budget Disaster recovery assistance Overseas partnership development Budget counselling Disaster recovery assistance Overseas partnership developmen After you provide for any loved ones in your Will, please consider - Budget counselling Disaster recovery assistance Overseas partnership development -counselling Budget counselling Disaster recovery assistance Overseas partnership development - -Budget counselling recovery assistance Overseas partnership development -- Budget counselling - Disaster recovery assistance - Overseas partnership- developmen Budget counselling Disaster recovery assistance Overseas Budget counselling Disaster recovery assistance Overseas partnership -Affordable accommodation -Drug Drug and alcohol -Support Support for the homeless and thos the atmosphere, the spirit, the inexplicable - Affordable accommodation - Drug alcohol rehabilitation - rehabilitation Support for the homeless and those -Affordable Affordable accommodation Drug and alcohol rehabilitation Support for the homeless and thos - Affordable accommodation - and Drug alcohol rehabilitation -Paul Support for thefor homeless anddevelopmen those - Affordable - Drug alcohol rehabilitation -de Support for- the homeless and those -accommodation accommodation -and and alcohol rehabilitation the homeless and those including a and bequest to the St Vincent --also Affordable accommodation -- Drug and alcohol rehabilitation --Society. Support for the homeless and thos Affordable accommodation Drugat and - Support fo risk homelessness risk alcohol of at homelessness - Affordable accommodation - Drug and -alcohol rehabilitation -ofat Support for the homeless and thos at risk of homelessness risk homelessness riskat ofrehabilitation homelessness at risk ofof homelessness at risk of homelessness and undeniable presence of God in that place at risk of h at risk of homelessness and in every single one of the people present For bequest information or wording, please call: 03 6333 0822 Because of the generosity and compassion ofcall: people like you, Vinnies For bequest information orinformation wording, call: 03 6333 0822 Forbequest bequest information orwording, wording, please call: 03 6333 0822 bequest information or please wording, please 03 6333 0822 For For bequest information or wording, please call: 03 6333 0822 For or please call: 03 6333 0822 For bequest information or wording, please call: 03 0822 For bequest information or wording, please 03 6333 08 there that unifies the Church and affirms you For bequest or help wording, please 03 6333 6333 0822 volunteers andinformation members can those who arecall: struggling tocall: take as a member of that Church and disciple of control of their lives. www.vinnies.or www.vinnies.org.au www.vinnies.orw www.vinnies.org.au www.vinnies.org www.vinnies.org.au www.vinnies.or Christ. This is the true grace of participating - Home and hospital visitation - Migrant and refugee support www.vinnies.or - Indigenou in a World Youth Day pilgrimage. - Support for children and families - Mentoring and tutoring - Disability

How you can help change lives ... in future generations

- Vinnies Centres www.hobart.catholic.org.au - Budget counselling

- Mental illness support - Disaster recovery assistance

- Youth and - Overseas


8 Volume 7 Issue 5 2011

GENERAL NEWS

Willson Training for success J

odi Griggs wondered if a career in education might be in her future when she realised she spent most of her free mornings helping at her own child’s family day care. As a parent, and not being quite ready to make a commitment for full-time university, Jodi sought the assistance of Fiona Excell from Willson Training, the Catholic Church’s Registered Training Provider (RTO). Jodi had seen a Willson Training ad for a teacher’s aide training course at her local LINC (library) centre. Jodi says Fiona encouraged every one of the trainees from the start. “She was very honest and up-front about the training process and she stepped in whenever it was needed. “We also had the option of staying on after the course was finished to develop our interview techniques,” she says. Following the successful completion of a Certificate III in Education Support in June of this year, Jodi undertook her practical experience at St Aloysius School, Kingston. Now, Jodi has work on a fairly regular basis at St Aloysius as a relief teacher’s aide and she is more than pleased about this outcome. Willson Training has a track record of taking on a wide range of clients for training and vocational support. Working in partnership with other agencies including the WISE employment and the

Willson Training graduate Jodi Griggs with St Aloysius students (L-R) Zoe Donnelly, Joshua Agnew and Imogen Lister.

Commonwealth Rehabilitation Service (CRS), Willson Training employ trainers to teach Administrative Support, Asset Maintenance, Child Care, and Teacher’s Aide courses to their clients. They can also cater training courses for equity groups. Willson are also known in the training industry for taking on the challenging cases, the long-term unemployed and people with mental illness.

“Now, Jodi has work ... as a relief teacher’s aide.”

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FAITH IN ACTION

9

From forensic science to straw huts

L-R: Madeleine Leggett, Liz De Venuto, Danusia Kaska and Ashleigh Eyre.

S

t Vincent de Paul Development Officer, Danusia Kaska, left fourteen years of DNA forensics behind to be where she feels most at home: with the people of TimorLeste, north-east Thailand and other parts of the Asia-Pacific region which experience poverty and hardship. “It’s the simplicity of living, which I really enjoy,” says Danusia. Danusia was in Tasmania recently to share her volunteer experiences with school students around the state. On this day she kept a group of year eight students from Mount Carmel College enthralled from start to finish as they listened in silence to her stories. Danusia lived in communities with families too poor to send their children to school. Many of these children are sent to work from the age of five or even younger to help feed their family. Although Danusia has no formal medical training, one of her most unforgettable roles has been caring for orphaned babies who are dying from AIDS-related complications. A heartbreaking role for many, but Danusia says she is grateful for the opportunity to be with these children, allowing them dignity during their last precious moments. Some families are forced to sell their female children for dowries to survive. “Just imagine if one day you, as a fourteen year old girl, were told you had to marry a man twice your age, just to help your family,” she said to the students. Shrieks of horror filled the classroom. In Pakistan, children as young as five work in brick kilns to help the family pay off their

A child in Pakistan works off his parent’s debt.

“We can help these people by sharing some of ourselves – what we have – with those in need in our neighbouring countries...” peshgi (the illegal, yet common, advance system of bonded labour). Many children scavenge for commodities like plastic bottles to resell. But, says Danusia, these same families welcome her into their homes when she visits as if she were one of them.

“You may look at these photos and be shocked by their poverty, but this is not the whole story,” says Danusia. “These people may not have much material wealth but they have hope for the future, a spirit of hope,” she said. These are the people who are trying to break the crushing cycle of poverty – in

partnership with volunteers like Danusia and the St Vincent de Paul’s Assist a Student program. Education is now widely understood as a key to enabling an individual to support themselves, their families and their communities independently in the future. The Assist a Student program reflects Vinnies’ mission at its core – to encourage people to take control of their own destiny, to respect people’s dignity and to provide hope for the future. It provides funding for an education scholarship to train and educate a student for one year. St Vincent de Paul members in partner countries choose the neediest students to receive the subsidies for their education. By doing this they are empowered with the autonomy to support their own people. The St Vincent de Paul Tasmanian branch directly sponsors Assist a Student programs in Papua New Guinea. Nationally, St Vincent de Paul sponsors around 7000 students per year across the Asia Pacific region. But the demand far exceeds the capacity. “We can help these people by sharing some of ourselves – what we have – with those in need in our neighbouring countries,” says Danusia.

For more information about St Vincent de Paul’s Assist a Student programs please contact Merlene Cronin on (03) 6333 0822 or visit: www.vinnies.org.au. Danusia Kaska and Tony Muir (Vice President of the National St Vincent de Paul Council) are available to make school visits from time to time. Contact (03) 6333 0822 for more details. www.hobart.catholic.org.au


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CATHOLIC AID

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Hear My Voice on World Mission Sunday

All o

Hear My Voice is our theme for this year’s World Mission Month, where we hear the voices of the world’s Indigenous peoples. We celebrate their contribution around the world with their unique cultures, languages and spiritual traditions, all enriching our Universal Catholic Faith. Catholic Mission’s National Director Mr Martin Teulan says: “The World Mission Day appeal helps sustain parishes and their priests, and supports thousands of catechists who share their faith and lead their local village communities. “We ask you to give generously for the cause of bringing about God’s kingdom on Earth through the work of missionaries and local people working together in places where resources are few but great acts of faith and humanity happen every day.” Be inspired on World Mission Sunday, October 23, to Hear My Voice and share your faith with the world!

World Mission Day Appeal

All over the world Indigenous communities share their faith – our faith. World MissionDay DayAppeal Appeal WorldMission Mission World Day Appeal Please give generously All over the world Indigenous communities overthe world Indigenous Indigenous communities AllAllover communities their faith – our faith. in your parish or share their faith – our faith. share their faith – our faith.visit Please give Pleasegive givegenerously generously catholicmission.org.au Please generously in your parish or visit

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Thamarrurr School Wadeye

W

hen you think of bilingual schools you might think of countries overseas, in Europe, perhaps, where English is taught as a second language. You might even think of some exclusive and expensive school in Australia. You don’t necessarily think of the Australian Outback. Wadeye (Wad-Air) is a remote town a few hundred kilometres away from Darwin at the western edge of the Daly River. A population just over 2,000 people, with seven different languages from 20 different tribes make up the townsfolk. In fact, Wadeye is the largest Aboriginal community in the Northern Territory. The town itself is totally cut off during the wet season, and only accessible by sea or air. Thamarrurr (Tam–ah–Rrah) School has a dedicated unit to develop educational resources in the dominant Aboriginal language of the town, Murrinh Patha. Murrinh Patha (Moor–in–Putt–ha) is taught to each and every student. It is the predominant language used in Early Learning Literacy for all students right through to year three. English is a language they speak orally until then.

From year four, students can only learn Murrinh Patha in Religion class. Sr Teresa (Tess) Ward OLSH has been teaching at Thamarrurr School for many years and says “It is very important for the students. They have a right to learn in a language that is their own mother tongue.” English, for them, is not a second language, but a foreign one. They begin at school only speaking English, so they have a comprehension of what they are saying. “It is impossible to learn in a language you can’t speak.” Sr Tess says. “You need to understand the meaning of what you’re saying. Educationally and ethically, it is important for the children too. Research tells us that it is important for a child’s development if they are learning in a language that they speak at home.” Even though they continue to learn Murrinh Patha in Religion classes Sr Tess would like to see the return of both languages taught right through until Year 12, as once was the case, rather than ending at year three. Sr Tess is not afraid to say that she is “Pushing the point, but not having much success. This is doing a great disservice to the children.” www.hobart.catholic.org.au

Once all students were taught Murrinh Patha right through to year 12, and Sr Tess says “those former students have significant jobs because they learned right through.” This includes one of the school’s teachers who qualified with a Bachelor of Arts in Teaching. For now, they at least learn their Religious classes in their native language. “From their point of view, the child’s development is better when they are learning in the language they speak at home” says National Director of Catholic Mission, Mr Martin Teulan, “They learn spoken English before they begin literacy in English which gives the students a context to understanding. From then they are learning their Religious studies in Murrinh Patha which speaks to their heart, their spirituality in a way that English cannot.” Catholic Mission supports Mission in Australia, through the Home Mission Fund, and around the world. This World Mission Month we focus on Indigenous people of Australia and Guatemala. “We are many people speaking many languages that express one faith,” says Mr Teulan.

c


12 Volume 7 Issue 5 2011

GENERAL NEWS

Senator’s delight for Stitch By Aileen Hough, Coordinator Settlement Projects, Centacare.

S

enator Kate Lundy, Parliamentary Secretar y for Immigration and Citizenship, visited Centacare in Hobart recently to announce the results of the Department of Immigration and Citizenship Funding Round for Settlement Grants Program (SGP) for 2011 to 2012. Senator Lundy appeared to enjoy the informal atmosphere of being in the Stitch room for the announcement and very much enjoyed the homemade ‘Somalian Delight’ presented to her by Zahra Mahamed from Stitch – a take away bag of “Somalian Delight” was packed for the Senator’s flight back to Canberra! The Stitch Program for new entrant women was the only project in Tasmania to receive funding for two years until 2013. Stitch will continue providing a program based around life skills, arts, crafts, sewing, mentoring and leadership skills which has become such a successful formula for supporting new entrant ladies. We acknowledge the legacy lef t by Sister Philippa who originally commenced the Stitch project at Centacare many years ago. She had a vision to provide a safe place for new entrant women to come and be nurtured while working through many difficult past issues and to learn new skills while sewing

L-R: Senator Kate Lundy, new entrant Zahra Mahamed and Senator Lisa Singh.

– we are grateful for her heart for new arrivals. In Southern Tasmania, Centacare has been funded to provide a continuation of Case Management services. A new SGP Housing Worker has also commenced to assist clients on a more one to one basis in locating and securing accommodation and providing assistance with tenancy issues. The inclusion of a Housing Worker has recognised one of the main areas of need that we have been advising the Department of Immigration and Citizenship about during our reporting on the programs.

“Stitch ... was the only project in Tasmania to receive funding for two years until 2013.”

In Northern Tasmania, Centacare has been funded to continue to provide the HOME Housing Worker project to assist new entrants to locate and maintain accommodation in the Launceston area – a highly sought after service by those settling in the north of the state. We thank the clients from the Stitch group and the Hobart Baptist Burmese community who were keen to come and meet Senator Lundy and provide her with valuable client feedback. We are most appreciative of receiving this funding as it affords us the opportunity to continue the good work that is already being done in Settlement Projects – assisting and supporting new entrant clients as they begin their new life in Tasmania.

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ve to see you living as a normal man outside’. He al man would look like’. A prison chaplain

13

Building Bridges Not Walls

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We are grateful for the faithful service of the priests and the men and women, religious and lay, who bring Christ to those behind bars. They have provided us with real inspiration and hope in preparing this Statement and in addressing these very difficult social questions relating to prisons and justice.

Knocking on Prison Walls – It’s time.

social justice statement 2011–2012 •

3

“I was in prison, and you came to see me”.

rchbishop Adrian Doyle launched the 2011 Catholic Social Justice Statement in Hobart on the 21 September. The address to the Statement was given by Greg Barns, barrister and president of National Lawyers Alliance. The statement title, chosen by the Australian Catholic Bishops, is Building Bridges, Not Walls: Prisons and the Justice System. The Statement points out serious shortcomings in Australia’s prisons and justice systems, and challenges citizens and politicians to search for a more constructive way forward. The Catholic Bishops invite the Australian community to extend Christian love to those who are often despised and forgotten. In his talk Archbishop Adrian Doyle pointed out that in the 25th chapter of the Gospel of Matthew, Jesus gives a list of the people who deserve our special attention. If we offer that attention, it is as if we are doing it for Jesus Himself. One of the gestures mentioned is that of “I was in prison, and you came to see me”. As part of the Church there are chaplains, visitors and mentors reaching out to those in prison. Archbishop Adrian Doyle celebrates Mass at the prison each year on a day close to Christmas and again soon after Easter Sunday. The Archbishop stated that our actions can assure inmates that they are not forgotten; that there is hope and the opportunity to begin again. Who becomes imprisonEd? Greg Barns observed in his address that the main message in the Statement is that prisoners are our brothers and sisters. Greg’s experience working in the criminal justice system concurs with the comments from the Australian Bishops that those imprisoned are “from the most disadvantaged sections of the community: Indigenous people, the underprivileged, and those suffering from mental illness”. Most prisoners are released back into society. Greg stated that prison is a brutal system where often there is little to do, and very limited contact with family or friends. Therefore it is difficult for a person to leave prison a ‘better’ person. When they are released they are often homeless and have lost their jobs. Those who have been in prison on remand, who may not be convicted or receive a prison sentence, can also face the same difficulties. Generally the rate of crime is not increasing, but the rate of imprisonment is. More people are going to prison and prison sentences are longer. Society does need a prison system, but research suggests it is not effective in rehabilitating and deterring offenders. It is easier for the political system to be ‘tough on crime’ rather than ‘tough on the causes of crime’. HOW DO I LIVE NOW? The statement tells the story of Jason, who entered prison as an angry aggressive 17 year old. He has grown from a boy into manhood in a violent environment. Jason is the exception who has taken advantage of every opportunity and turned his life around without any support as counselling is not provided until he is eligible for parole. He is a person who has spent more than a quarter of his life in prison and states that on his release he would not know how to live like a normal person. As people of goodwill how do we reach out to help people leaving prison who see no hope? PRODIGAL SONS NEED OUR HELP The Statement argues that it is time for all Australians to revisit the needs of prisoners, their loved ones and those who work with them. It is time to commit ourselves to reducing the number of Australians held in prisons and making better provision for ex-prisoners to become law abiding and constructive citizens. It is time to knock down the walls of social exclusion that increase the prospects that a person will end up in jail. In no way does the statement seek to justify crimes or minimise the terrible impact crime can have on innocent people. In the parable of the Prodigal Son it is easy to understand the anger of the hard working son who remained by his father’s side. This parable challenges us not to judge and condemn, but recognise that God has unconditional love for all people.”Again and again in the Gospel, we read how Jesus reached out to the marginalised and rejected, and called on his followers to do the same.” It is time that we do. The Statement and associated resources can be downloaded from the Tasmanian Catholic Justice and Peace website: www.hobart.catholic.org.au/TCJPC www.hobart.catholic.org.au


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FLY ON THE WALL

23

Buzzing around a happy bunch W

hen one of the Sacred Heart College Parents and Friends saw the photo of the group from a recent gathering, she quipped, “We are a happy bunch, aren’t we!” T h is is e x a c t l y t h e impression I gained from flying around them as they held a meeting in the College library one Monday evening. There were twelve of them, all women, although they assured me it’s not always so. Like most meetings I ’ve at tende d as your correspondent, the setting was fairly informal, but Current members of the Sacred Heart College Parents and Friends Association. efficient. The agenda was clearly set out on sheets around the tables fundraising ideas, changes to uniform, canteen along with copies of the minutes from the procedures, four term years, recycling of previous month – which, I found, are also on textbooks and safety concerns in neighbouring the College website in a Parents’ section. streets. Everyone present had a say at some When everyone had gathered and greeted point in the proceedings and no topic was each other, the president opened the meeting off-limits. by reading a prayer, welcomed everyone and took apologies. The format was a familiar one of confirming minutes, business arising from last month, correspondence, reports and various agenda items. Problems and recommendations are What was discussed was practical and referred to the college principal who is usually relevant. This is a forum where problems present at these meetings and who takes the and concerns can be aired frankly: toilet concerns of this important body very seriously. break policy, use of netbooks in classrooms, There was one staff member present tonight

who was acting as liaison. One useful initiative was a Q & A sheet (available on their website), compiled by the president from concerns raised by parents and answers provided by the college. Other schools can take note at www. shc.tas.edu.au/news-events/parents.html. The meeting was most convivial and productive and I’m sure everyone left afterwards feeling that it was time well spent to benefit all their children. Don’t be afraid to get involved in your school’s P&F! It may well be the easiest way to sort out any potential problems as well as a way to share good ideas and work together for everyone’s betterment and ... you might well find a happy bunch too!

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24 Volume 7 Issue 5 2011

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Call 1300 655 003 or visit www.catholicinsurances.com.au * $32 per kid, per year inclusive of GST and statutory charges. Prices based on a policy with one insured person. This Insurance is underwritten by Allianz Australia Insurance Limited (Allianz) ABN 15 000 122 850 AFS Licence No. 234708 and is arranged by Catholic Church Insurances Limited ABN 76 000 005 210 AFSL 235415, 485 La Trobe Street, Melbourne VIC 3000, as a promoter for Allianz. A Product Disclosure Statement (PDS) for insurance products can be requested by calling 1300 655 003; or online from www.catholicinsurances.com.au. Any advice here does not take into consideration your objectives, financial situation or needs, which you should consider before acting on any recommendations. You should read and consider the PDS before deciding whether to acquire any products mentioned. If you purchase this insurance, Catholic Church Insurances will receive commission on these insurance products as a percentage of the premium paid for each policy. Ask us for more details before we provide you with any services on these products. www.hobart.catholic.org.au


EDGEWAYS By Annie March

25

A shrunken God? I

f my God is small, I will inevitably try to shrink other people’s; I myself will remain puny, and seek to mould others to that puniness. One of my least favourite characters in Greek myth is the giant Procrustes, an inn-keeper with only one bed; tall travellers were lopped and short ones stretched to fit. Procrustes is a fundamentalist; he gets his power by stealing it from others. He’s the ultimate control freak; he describes the world as, say, a small orange square and bans all other configurations. I don’t care if someone believes the earth is a small orange square. What does matter is if they attempt to impose that belief – spiritual, political, economic, racial, cultural, sexual – on others. Religious fundamentalism is one of the scariest things on this planet; gods dressed up in jackboots to hide their own powerlessness and fear. The God of the Old Testament is frequently fundamentalist, giving the Children of Israel a divine mandate to ethnically cleanse Amorites, Canaanites, Hittites, Perizzites, Hivites and Jebusites. (I can say this without fear or favour. Genetic/genealogical research has revealed my solidly English father’s lineage to be of the kohen, the hereditary Israelite priesthood; my ancestors were probably right in there, ranting against the heathen). In our own time, Christian and Muslim extremists are mirror-images of each other, still trapped in a script dating from the Crusades when both sides were taught to view the other as the embodiment of evil, and promised treasures in heaven for slaughtering one another. The Crusades also unleashed antiJewish pogroms in Europe, when whole communities were burnt alive in their own synagogues. Today, anti-asylum seeker rhetoric arises from the same pernicious root. Rwanda, Ireland, Serbia, Sri Lanka, Gaza are all modern embodiments of Procrustes, armed now with cluster bombs and land mines. And then there’s environmental fundamentalism; by destroying our planetary life-support systems, we’re annihilating the future. We’re not just selling our own birthright for a mess of pottage, like Esau, but our children’s. Is this not the ultimate sin? There’s a control freak in all of us; it’s always salutary to walk through town and

see who I’m damning and excluding today. It takes conscious, unrelenting effort to keep pushing back my horizons, challenging my own boundaries to keep my heart from rusting over. I love the concept of entelechy, the sum of our potential; the entelechy of a caterpillar is a butterfly. One of the ways I try to enable that evolution in myself is to read steadily on science (knowledge of the seen) and theology (knowledge of the unseen). I like to enlarge myself, blow my circuits with facts like these. If you have a hundred pianos, each tuned an octave higher than its neighbour, the hundredth piano is made of light. Molecules of chlorophyll – the stuff that makes plants green – are identical to molecules of human blood except that chlorophyll has a magnesium atom at its heart and blood has iron. Doesn’t that make trees our cousins? It’s taken a year to begin to grasp the first two chapters of physicist Paul Davies’ book, The Goldilocks Enigma: why the universe is ‘just right’ for life. I keep falling flat on my face with awe. It seems we live in a multiverse, a staggering and infinite mosaic of universes whose laws of physics may be radically different from ours (rain falling upwards? time non-existent?); that mathematical laws underpin everything – beetles, sunflowers, spring, galaxies; and that ninety percent of the universe is made of ‘dark matter’ and ‘dark energy’ that no-one

“We live in a vastness, a mystery beyond our wildest imaginings. My jackboots don’t stand a chance.”

www.hobart.catholic.org.au

knows what is. We live in a vastness, a mystery beyond our wildest imaginings. My jackboots don’t stand a chance. “…there comes a moment when the risk of staying tightly in bud is more painful than the risk of blossoming.” Anon. At the theological end of the spectrum, I’m currently in love with Jan Frazier’s When Fear Falls Away. It’s a luminous, humble account of an astonishing spiritual journey. An ordinary woman, struggling with a failed marriage, major health issues, a mortgage, thorny teenagers, finds herself almost overnight in the state of seamless, ecstatic communion with all life that I imagine Christ inhabited, and which the Buddhists call enlightenment. Many of us have glimpsed this state, through prayer, art, nature, making love. It’s the treasure that mystics of all traditions have long sought; Julian of Norwich when she became an anchorite, Rumi and Kabir in Islam, the Jewish Kabbalists. It’s where Jan Frazier now lives, every second of every day, in the peace that passes all understanding. I’m particularly moved by her realisation of how much room she’d given over to fear, and how spacious, how vast her being is without it. One of the reasons she wrote the book is because if the human and the divine can fuse in her, it can happen to each and every one of us. Meister Eckhardt says, “God is at home. We are in the far country.” Jan Frazier has come home. I for one am weeping with homesickness. “The tree in the seed, that art Thou. The running water, that art Thou. The sun in the sky and all that is, that art Thou.” Hindu scripture.


26 Volume 7 Issue 5 2011

PASTORAL LIFE

Valuing lives and stories M

t St Vincent Nursing Home and Therapy Centre in Ulverstone operates from the philosophy that each person has inestimable worth in their own right, and this value is not assessed by their usefulness or by the contribution they can make to their family and/or society. Every resident, regardless of the extent of their disability, is treated with respect and dignity. There is a chapel and an auxiliary of local volunteers. There are older and younger residents. It’s not just for the aged, but for anyone in need of the care they provide. John Speight, who suffers from cerebral palsy, came to the Home at 27 years of age and

Freda Hughes

has been there for 42 years. His cheery face and playful banter brighten up the corridors. Sandra Stanton, who recently featured in the Advocate newspaper, is only 49 years old. Freda Hughes may be 80 years old, but she knits a square a day. Every resident has a story to tell. For instance, Elma Appleby owes her John Speight unusual name to being called after her mother’s maiden name. The residents and their stories are all valued and cared for by the friendly and qualified staff. The St Vincent de Paul Society took over the former Ulverstone Convalescent and Nursing Home on January 1, 1969, and renamed it Mt St Vincent Nursing Home. On November 30, 2001, Mt St Vincent Nursing Home took over Adaihi Nursing Home as well. The Home is managed by a Committee of Management selected by the St Vincent de Paul Society led by the chairperson. It is the only nursing home run by the Society in Tasmania and is part of the Society’s ‘hand of love’. The facility is in a tranquil rural setting and boasts a hydrotherapy pool and lovely gardens. Residents are assured of being safe and well provided for in an environment where every effort is made to ensure their happiness.

www.hobart.catholic.org.au

Elma Appleby


PASTORAL LIFE

27

Acolyte Les Ennis ... faithful servant N

ot many of us are still working at ninety, but Les Ennis – born Leslie Warwick Ennis on February 9, 1921, at Montagu in the far North-West is! He’s busy serving the Church as an Acolyte at Our Lady of Lourdes in Devonport and intends to stay working until he dies! Acolytes were more common at one stage, but in Devonport now there are just two, Tony Muir and Les. They were commissioned by Archbishop Guilford Young to support the priests by setting up before and assisting during Mass. Les has seen many priests come and go at Devonport – among them were Fathers Tom Bresnehan, Peter Nicholls, Mark Freeman, Denis Allen, Terry Yard and now there are Fathers John Girdauskas and Felix Ekeh.

“Through his service to others and his calm presence, this gentle and faithful man is a visible sign of the continuing presence of Catholic practice and ethos...” There have been many changes in the Church, too. From Latin when young Leslie was taught to serve at Mass by his uncle, to all the changes of The Second Vatican Council – which Les is happy to endorse – to the present situation of girls serving and a priest from Nigeria presiding. Les has been an acolyte for over 23 years and a Minister of the Eucharist for nearly 40 years. As well as that he is a cheerful greeter of those who enter Our Lady of Lourdes church. Les started life on a dairy farm and attended the local school at Montagu. As a young boy, he spent a lot of his time with the priests and the Church has been a major part of his life. Not interested in the life of a farmer,

Les Ellis (L) pictured with Fr Felix Ekeh.

he set off to work in Launceston at the age of fourteen. He had stints in the Army and the Railway. In 1959, he resigned from the Railway and bought a cane farm in Bundaberg, where he lived for two years. When he returned to Launceston, he worked at Paterson’s Furniture Store, eventually moving to Devonport in 1969 as the manager of the Paterson’s store there. On the doorstep of the church one Sunday morning in 1945, Les met Audrey Smith and her mother. They invited him home that day and... Les and Audrey were married in 1946. They were together happily for 28 years until Audrey, who did not enjoy good health, died. They had four children: Murray, Gerard, Joy and Mary. Ironically, Joy is now a dairy farmer, www.hobart.catholic.org.au

the calling that Les rejected; Mary is a nurse and Murray and Gerard both teach. Les has been president of the Holy Name Society, a member of The Lions Club, first president of the Parents and Friends at Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic School, member of the Knights of the Southern Cross and the St Vincent de Paul Society. This year he received a plaque recognising 50 years service with the Knights of the Southern Cross. Through his service to others and his calm presence, this gentle and faithful man is a visible sign of the continuing presence of Catholic practice and ethos in one part of Tasmania.


28 Volume 7 Issue 5 2011

PASTORAL LIFE

Fifty years of service: An enduring mission T

he Society of Christian Doctrine (SDC) will celebrate fifty years in Tasmania in November 2011. Founded by St George Preca in Malta in 1907 as a catechetical movement of lay members, the Society of Christian Doctrine began its work in Australia in 1952. On the invitation of Archbishop Sir Guilford Young, ministry was set up in Hobart in 1961, with three Maltese members settling in Hobart. Besides the cross culture tensions the members experienced, these were challenging days for them as their expressions of faith were often misunderstood. The members however always viewed themselves as part of the wider Church; evangelization for all, especially the young. Under Maurice Mifsud’s leadership, they persevered and today we are able to give thanks for the enduring work over fifty years. The ministry had its base from the community house at Lower Sandy Bay, known as Preca Centre, and the first meetings began in the now demolished St John’s church on Main

Road, Glenorchy. Following the collapse of the Tasman Bridge in 1975, the mission increased on the eastern shore in Warrane and surrounding areas. Over the years the dynamics of the ministry have changed from supporting Catholic families in the early days, pre-evangelization and education in faith in the 1970s through to the 1990s. Today the emphasis is on smaller groups who seek the faith. Archbishop Guilford Young, champion of lay initiatives, who was a mentor and avid supporter of the SDC in Hobart, visited the generalate of the SDC in Malta during a break in Vatican Council II. During a Mass in 1986 to celebrate 25 years of the SDC’s mission in Hobart, he said that the work of the members was impossible to measure for they came quietly and asked for nothing. During the 1980s, the SDC was growing Australia-wide and was able to extended its mission to Brisbane – a member from Hobart formed the foundation group for this new ministry.

Faith, tradition... and understanding the Catholic way. A century of caring is the foundation that has led generations of Tasmanian Catholic families to Graham Family to arrange the funeral of a loved one. Knowing and understanding the strong faith and tradition by which Catholics celebrate life itself and the lives of those who have passed on are values of great significance. Put simply, it is “the Catholic way”. As Catholics, Ann and Paul Graham, Directors of Graham Family, know and respect these values. Nothing could be more important... in your time of need. Enquire about LifeTrust, our own pre-paid funeral plan.

Phone 24 hours (03) 6278 2722 enquiries@grahamfamilyfunerals.com.au www.grahamfamilyfunerals.com.au www.hobart.catholic.org.au

Br Ben Brooks, Hobart Centre coordinator.

In 2009, Charles Caruana left to retire in Malta. Maurice (who died in 2010), Charles, and the members continued to work tirelessly. Now the legacy has been passed onto local members to continue. This leaves a challenge as members joining the SDC are not forthcoming. Although much reduced in numbers, the SDC in Hobart still remains devoted to reveal the faith as a welcoming place of action, not just words. A Mass to give thanks will be celebrated at St Canice Church, Lower Sandy Bay on Saturday, November 12, commencing at 11am. All are welcome.


PASTORAL LIFE

29

Five minutes with Maureen Clarke Chaplain, Mersey Community Hospital

H

aving been a midwife most of her life, caring for sick neonates and premature babies, has helped chaplain Maureen Clarke settle into her role as a hospital chaplain with the Mersey Community Hospital at Latrobe in the north-west of Tasmania. As a sixteen year old, Maureen started her nursing training at St Vincent’s Hospital in Launceston in the 1960s. She then went on to complete her midwifery training in Melbourne. Always thinking she would enjoy being a hospital chaplain, Maureen graduated from her chaplaincy training in 2002. Working as a part-time chaplain, she continued her midwifery until 2005 when she retired. In 2010, Maureen took on the role of coordinator at the Mersey Hospital, with the support of four chaplains of various faiths. Chaplaincy is a very important role, supporting the emotional and spiritual health of patients (who often feel vulnerable) facing

up to issues which are connected with illness. Chaplaincy or pastoral care is personal and individual. Chaplains feel very privileged to be part of people’s lives. Maureen is a member of Spiritual Care Australia, the professional association for chaplains. The Tasmanian Launch for Spiritual Care Australia was in Hobart If you, orheld someone you’re caring for, need some extra assistance at home, our Community Care Services can help. in July this year. Spiritual Care Australia Our carers visit homes in the Hobart, Devonport, Burnie, Georgetown, Wynyard and chaplains work in Somerset hospitals, areas, helping with a wide range of personal and home based care. (For DVA clients, we’re a contracted Veterans Home detention centres, schools, Care service provider - please call 1300 550 450 for an assessment.) prisons and welfare agencies, With the right level of assistance, you can stay in your own home nursing homesthat and your the Australian confident care needs will be met. (We also operate independent livingForces. units and residential care facilities.) Defence

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30 Volume 7 Issue 5 2011

CELEBRATIONS

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KIDS’ PAGE

31

Jesus’ law of love Jesus’ law of love Jesus’ law of love 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year A 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year A 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year A

Show your love Show your Show your love love

your

your neighbour your neighbour neighbour

Whenever we show kindness, love and Whenever we show kindness, kindness, loveGod. and respect forwe others, we are loving Whenever show love and respect for others, we are loving God. Draw picturewe of are yourself respect foraothers, lovingdoing God. Draw aa picture picture of yourself yourself doing something that shows love fordoing God. Draw of something that shows love for God. something that shows love for God.

I show love for God when I .... II show show love love for for God God when when II .... ....

I show love for others when I .... II show show love love for others when I ....

Fill in the missing Fill missing Fillinin the the missing words to complete words to complete words to complete the story. the thestory. story. love love love second second second God God God answered answered answered yourself yourself yourself teacher teacher teacher heart heart heart first rst fifirst test test test commandment commandment commandment

Mt 22:34-40 Mt22:34-40 22:34-40 Mt

An expert in the Jewish An An expert law tried toin_the _ _ Jewish _ Jesus. law tried to _ _ _ _ Jesus. lawasked, He He He_asked, “_ _ _ _ _ _ , what is the “_ _ _ _ _ _ , what is the “_ most_important most _most _ _ _important _______?” __ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ? ”

Jesus _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ : “Love the Lord your “Love the Lord your _ _ _all _ _your __ ______:: “Love _Jesus _ _ with _ _ _ ,the soulLord andyour your , soul soul and _ _ _ with and mind.” Thisallisyour the ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ,and most the __ __ __ __ __ and and most mind.” Thiscommandment. is the important Themost ______ important commandment. The commandment. The _ __ __much __ __ __ is like it : “ _ _ _ _ your neighbour_ as your neighbour as much much is like : “ _________your as as youitlove _ _ _neighbour _ ”. as you love _ _ __ __ __ __ __ __ ”.”.

Solutions on page 32 www.hobart.catholic.org.au

© Creative Ministry Resources 2005 © © Creative Creative Ministry Ministry Resources Resources2005 2005


Lights, camera, action! 32 Issue 65 2010 2011 30 Volume Volume 7 6 Issue

LIFESTYLE

new to DVD titles. He is the director of the Australian Catholic Film Office

Toy Story 3

The other toys, who have felt neglected for teaching and warning young viewers. There are allusions everywhere to the years, are appalled when, in a mix up, they are Voiced by Tom Hanks, Most books are available Fullers, and the almost thrown out. They decide to take asylum horrors of World War II,from present day refugees, Tim Allen, Joan Cusak Most books are World available from in Ulverstone. Window on the Bookshop in the Sunnyside Daycare Centre. Initially this and of those and Don Rickles. Fullers,the andplight the Window on the who need to looks perfect, but they soon discover this is escape the rule of dictators. Director: Lee Unkrich. World Bookshop in Ulverstone. For those who a concentration camp for toys run by the prefer just to be entertained, that’s on 103 mins. Rated PG. offer too with action and humour in tyrannical Lot’s-O-Huggin Bear. ver 15 years, Pixar, the Woody takes charge and leads his friends abundance. ‘Why Jesus?’ For each parable there are three a difficult parable and the painting embraces revolutionary animation production and colleagues in a daring jail break, and then Pixar has become the world leader in the complexity of the subject complemented pages which include the biblical text, a written house, has given us eleven feature films finds them a new and appreciative home CGI animation, having won 24 Oscars and by an insightful written reflection. (see p 3 of reflection and a reproduction of a painting including A Bug’s Life, Monsters Inc, Finding to live. numerous other awards around the world. this magazine) illustrating parable. Toy Story 3 more Nemo, Ratatouille and Up. These films have I cannot the recommend It all began with the first Toy Story in 1995, and A Tasmanian author, Marianne Gill-Harper’s I first browsed through the book and been as popular with adults as they are highly. It is family entertainment of the the look and polish in this third chapter of this dedication and effort has resulted in a book was captivated by the reproductions of the with children. highest order. Written by Lee Unkrich, Michael particular series is even better than the other which creatively uncovers the significance stunning and inspiring art works. I read the Among the most popular has been their Arndt, John Lasseter and Andrew Staton, two. Pixar just gets better and better. and relevance of the parables. I love this book titlemultilayered of the parable and just gazed on Toy Story series, and Toy Story 3 does not You do not have to have seen Toy Story 1 this film hasthen as much fun and and thoroughly recommend it. the art work appreciating the disappoint. It is terrific. and 2 to enjoy this film, but I guarantee that emotion for adults as it does forwonderful children. I would love to see the body of work creations. Marianne Andy is now seventeen and is packing Each character holdsGill-Harper’s interest andpaintings appeal, are all on seeing this latest instalment you will want presented as an installation with the actual not literal interpretations directly illustrating up his room as he prepares to move to of them grow and develop and even the back to catch up on what you have been missing all Parables of Jesus of Nazareth paintings exhibited alongside the texts. I hope the parables. Rather they are magical works university. He has to decide what to do with story of the evil bear is poignantly handled. these years. Find a child to share with if you Paintings and written reflections by this happens. (We’ll keep you posted, Ed.) of The art which me3to think abouttoo, the his childhood toys, to take them, throw them valuesenabled of Toy Story are excellent must, but do not miss seeing this disarmingly Marianne Gill-Harper Reviewer: Kaye Green parables with a new sense of wonderment out or put them in the attic. Andy decides attending to the weighty issues of tyranny moving film. *It is available at Koorong Books, Hobart and ISBN: 9780977534616 and awe. Subsequently I went back and read to take Woody (Hanks) Fr and Richard Leonard between When Angels Cookwith him to college. and oppression with a fine Asbalance a March Hare Reviewer Launceston, Fullers Bookshop, Hobart, or by RRP: $34.95 the biblical text and the written reflection and and direct contact transformation with the author at maz@maztaz.com Traditional Italian cooking for body and soul Dances of personal cultural yet again enjoyed the art works.Annie March his eighty page full-colour Author: Sister Germana’s Cucina hard-back Author: My favourite image isPublisher: of a net full of fish book St consists of reproductions Publisher: Paul’s Publications, (02) 9394 of 3400 Walleah Press, walleahpress.com.au and is the painting created for the parable paintings and written reflections on 21 of James Frecheville). At the film’s opening, ISBN 9781921032745 ISBN: 97818770010156 RRP:Young $29.95Joshua is implicated, because Pope Animal KingdomRRP: $34.95 about good and bad fish. “The kingdom of Jesus’ parables. had got himoffering to steal the used as bait in the quiet, introverted deal of with Starring: ister Ben Germana is Italy’s Margaret Fulton. Translated into fifteenJoshua has he to author this idiosyncratic is acar regular contributor God is like a net let from downainto a lake to catch There is a Guy Prologue which puts Jesus in trap. The police seeking to avenge the his mother’s death heroin overdose, Mendelsohn, Pearce, languages and with two million copies sold in Italy alone, hers to The Tasmanian Catholic and there are echoes of somemurder of her all kinds of fish. The good fish are collected context and attempts to explain why He ofmore. their colleagues see young, inexperienced and he turns for help to his grandmother, Joel Edgerton and Jacki is an essential bible for lovers of traditional Italian cooking. columns here, but much taught in parables and there is an Epilogue, but theCody bad are thrown away.” Itbrings is certainly asherself the one of the infamous Janine This him Weaver. Director: David The hardcover book is attractive and the recipes are short,(Jacki simpleWeaver). Annie compiled this bookJoshua as gift to formember her 60th birthday. As soon Cody family from whom they might–be into contact with his three uncles, from whom Michôd. mins.accompanied by some mouth-watering photographs. and easy113 to read, as I’d read it once, I wanted to read it again, but – be warned it isable not admissions. his mother tried to shield him. There’s Rated MA15+. Sister Germana’s food is simple yet elegant: Frittata verde ehad insalata to everyone’s tasteaand ittoisobtain certainly not an apologia for Catholicism, The events that spirituality lead Joshuaand to eventually fourth memberFlan) of the Cody gang, Barry (Joel mistall (Frittata with aknows tossed salad); Cavolfiore (Cauliflower although Annie’s relationship with Catholic the Church Melbourne aboutFlan thedisorealise how deeply he has been drawn into Edgerton), but as the only one to realise the and called the gracefully Benedette is integral to theand book. As well(Mussels as containing interesting The reader is then introduced to themes ‘Walshnamed Street Cozze murders’, when dalla Vernaccia the murderous web are, in a Shakespearian futility of their old ways, he reckons more ‘blessed’ with Vernaccia – a Tuscan As writers, a MarchitHare is a very apt title, you’ll discover from reading Muslim Annie’s readable text by 36 expert features such asasthe growth of Monasticism, two young police constables werewhite lured wine). to kind of way, inevitable. The ordinariness of money can be made in the stockmarket. A highlight on each page is Tips from Sister Germana’s Cucina – often frank account of her breakdowns and struggles to overcome mental hundreds of magnificent illustrations, conquests, the building of cathedrals, parish their deaths in Walsh St, South Yarra in 1988. the characters’ lives makes the story all the Andrew ‘Pope’ Cody (Ben Mendelsohn) and coupled with a humorous hometruth: “To get children to eat liver you illness. It’s personal, it’s erudite and it’s challenging. It mixes letters to the describing Christian life and cultures during life in the Medieval Church, pilgrimages and David Michôd’s engrossing drama Animal more chilling, and you and areison the of your his brothers, Stapleton) and can tell this story. that There were some shy peas who were afraidCraig to be(Sullivan Guardian Weekly with music and fantasy fiction autobiography and two millennia. Eminent contributors include crusades. Also covered the riseedge of Religious Kingdom echoes infamous crime. seat as the climax approaches with potential Darren (Luke Ford), are low-intellect career alone but then the liver arrived, strong and rich in iron... and the peas general musing about life. Annie’s philosophies and political leanings Dr Noel Roberts, formerly a professor at Orders and Catholic Mysticism. Michôd, who also wrote the screenplay, felt safe. So too willnew all those eat peas and liver: will become are on along hergrand delightful use ofoflanguage whimsy. criminals, specialising in armed robbery and thethey University of Tasmania – show, an author ofwithfor Latertragedy. sections the bookand describe the brings something to thewho all-too-familiar graphics areRev lovely, and given such a diverse mix of material, the strong and courageous” 208). Michôd directs withexpansion assurance and style, trafficking drugs. Popeand isThe intheology hiding because publications in science and story of the Faith’s in various ‘underbelly’ depiction(p of underworld overall design draws everything together quite coherently. There are There are special chapters suit various readers: When without back on gratuitous or members ofPerera, the police Robbery Dr Dudley who Armed was professor of Squad Biblical parts offalling the world, including the violence beginnings characters. Hisalso family of criminals, the to Codys, four ‘dendrites’ and sections within the dendrites with titles such as: Grandparents babysit; When Children have no appetite and When other excesses to milk audience emotions. have sworn to kill him, and this vendetta and philosophical studies at the National of Anglican, Catholic and Protestant life in are anything but glamorous and ‘cool’. They ‘transforming’, ‘ravelling’, ‘birthing’ and younasty live alone. In the end, the‘harrowing’. film stands as a stark account with the corrupt policeSri dominates theover Codys’ Seminary, Ampitiya, Lanka, for 30 Australia. are bits of work, and their mother, the Annie believes she has a ‘vocation for heresy’, sowork Iand wouldn’t read this When little angels cook is designed for kids with some adult of crime corruption the be corrosive lives. years and now is Parish Priest at BridgewaterThis and outstanding can highly archetypal underworld matriarch, proves to book if you are afraid of having your beliefs challenged, and yet, for supervision. Coccole di Patate (Potato Cuddles) : Gnocchi shells with effect of revenge. is general confronting, When one of theirparish. number is executed Brighton-Claremont recommended for It the readerwith and Christianity, The Illustrated be more cold-bloodedly ruthless thanGuide any of tomato and mozzarella cheese are a special treat for four and the thinking Catholics, it is worth following Annie’s journey into Catholicism frequent coarse andmore its pervasive by their foes, Pope’s revenge is swift. Thepolice vast sweep of topics is covered in for students wholanguage wish to learn about the them, despite her maternal exterior. to 2000 Years of the Christian Tramezzini Del Perdonothat (Pardon sandwich) is an offering from cheeky to read such gems as ‘The Eucharist, distillation of encyclopedic theand luminosity air of menace, but it is a powerful entirelyin Leaving a car with doors wide open in a nine parts, with glossary and index. Included story of the Church. Almost The key element sets Michôd’s Faith children to their parents! Reviewer: Pip Atkinson and fragrance and mystery and anguish of all creation, continued to are The Beginning of the Christian Era, scope, it abounds in striking coloured pictures, believable drama – for this reviewer, the best suburban street after midnight, he lies in wait treatment apart is telling the story through the ISBN: 9781921209369 anchor me at depth.’(p 117) and ‘Catholics are right; the mystery is so Invasions, and Prayer, Reform, New well-selected to illustrate aspects of every age Australian crime movie since Lantana. for whateverPower constables come to investigate character of the crims’ House. 17-year-old nephew, nday unday in in Ordinary Ordinary Time, Time, Year Year AA Publisher: Millennium immense it must mediated by Jim ritual, made homeopathic in the Worlds, Revolution, Global Missions,that Unity and be Reviewer from the Mr time ofMurphy Jesus until the present. Joshua (a most impressive debut by teenager and summarily executes them. RRP: $85.00. sacraments so humans can approach it in safety.’ (p 142) Conversion, Retrospects and Prospects. After Admirable is the fascinating treatment of Annie’s blogofasamarchhare.org is a worthy with details of illennium House, Sydney, the publisher discussing aspects of the life and times Christ a very large canvas.adjunct, This publication would he missing missing AnAnexpert expert in in the the Jewish Jewish Jesus answered : “Love the Lord your Jesus answered : “Love the Lord your www.hobart.catholic.org.au to purchase the book included. ofOrdinary Christianity, Illustrated Guide 30th Sunday in Time, Year The A and the New Testament,where the comprehensive make an excellent present (it would become a to complete complete law tried toto test Jesus. law tried test Jesus. God with your heart, soul and mind.” God with allall your heart, soul and mind.” .ry. Annie is a talented writer and this book is her gift, just toorher sixty to He 2000 Years of the Christian Faith, is to be work goes on to highlight Councils and Creeds, treasured, often-used gift)not to family friends. what asked, “Teacher, He asked, “Teacher, what This the first and most important This is is the first and most important old but the also to us. highly commended for making availableThe is is the most important the most important the expansion Faith in self, Europe, It deserves to find a place in libraries, including commandment. The second like : Catholicyear commandment. second is is like it it : of

Between the lines

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Fill in thehandsome missing commandment?” commandment?” “love your neighbour as much as youof “love your neighbour as you An 511-page expert in the treasure Jewish Jesus answered :much “Love the Lord your house of asdevelopment Patriarchates and Papacy, and Johnson those of schools, colleges and universities. Reviewer: Mary-Anne dnd words a to complete law tried to test Jesus.love God with all your heart, soul and mind.” love yourself”. yourself”. the cult of the Blessed Virgin Mary. Reviewer: Fr Terry Southerwood knowledge and inspiration. the story.

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He asked, “Teacher, what is the most important commandment?”

This is the first and most important commandment. The second is like it : “love your neighbour as much as you www.hobart.catholic.org.au love yourself”.


LIFESTYLE LIFESTYLE

Lights, camera, action! 30 Volume 6 Issue 6 2010

Toy Story 3 Diary of a Voiced by Tom Hanks, Wimpy Kid

LIFESTYLE The other toys, who have felt neglected for Zachary Gordon). Greg is a small but smart, years, are appalled when, in a mix up, they are witty lad who is a talented cartoonist and almost thrown out. They decide to take asylum aims to be famous one day – but for the time in the Sunnyside Daycare Centre. Initially this being is “stuck in middle school with a bunch looks perfect, but they soon discover this is of morons”. a concentration camp for toys run by the It’s his goal to be class favourite, but he tyrannical Lot’s-O-Huggin Bear. soon finds that his confident assumptions Woody takes charge and leads his friends of his Jesus?’ own likeability superiority arethree not ‘Why For eachand parable there are and colleagues in a daring jail break,efforts and then necessarily to pages whichshared includeby theothers. biblicalHis text, a written finds them a new andheappreciative home connect with those wants to impress reflection and a reproduction of a painting to live. generally come to nothing, while the kids illustrating the parable. I cannot recommend Toyhe Story 3 more who seek him out are those looks down I firstIt browsed through the book and highly. is family entertainment of the on. Ain’t it the way? was captivated by the reproductions of the highest Written by his Lee chubby, Unkrich, Michael Gregorder. decides that daggy stunning and inspiring art works. I read the Arndt, Johnfrom Lasseter and Andrew best friend elementary school,Staton, Rowley titlemultilayered of the parable and then just gazed on this film as much fun (Robert Capron), is has a hindrance toand his the art work appreciating the wonderful emotion for ambitions, adults as itwhich does for children. new-found seems to be creations. Marianne Gill-Harper’s Each character holds interest andpaintings appeal, all confirmed when older students gang upare to not literal interpretations directly illustrating of them grow and develop and theinback deny them lunchtime seats ateven a table the the parables. Rather they are treats magical works story of canteen. the evil bear is poignantly handled. school Greg even Rowley of The art which enabled me think abouttoo, the dreadfully by letting him take the punishment values of Toy Story 3to are excellent parables a new sense of wonderment for one ofwith his misdemeanours. attending to the weighty issues of tyranny andThe awe. Subsequently I went and read movie charts his upsback and downs and oppression with a fine balance between thedealing biblical text andsibling the written reflection and in with rivalry, making friendships, girls, loyalty, social pressures, yet again enjoyed the art works. My favourite image is of a net full of fish and is Frecheville). the painting At created for the parable James the film’s opening, aboutintroverted good and bad fish. has “Thetokingdom of quiet, Joshua deal with God is like a net let down into a lake to catch his In mother’s death from aanheroin overdose, fact, there is quite amount of nice all kinds of fish. The good fish are and he turns for help to his grandmother, romanticism and sentiment in thiscollected version but theCody bad are has thrown away.” is showing certainly Janine (Jacki Weaver). ThisItbrings him of Arthur. Brand no difficulty in

Between the lines

Tim Allen, Joan Cusak Starring: Zachary and Don Rickles. Gordon, Robert Director: Lee Unkrich. Capron, Rachael 103 mins. Rated PG. Harris and Devon ver 15 years, Pixar, the Bostick. Director: Thor revolutionary animation production Freudenthal. house, has given us eleven feature films Rated PG (infrequent language). including A Bug’s Life,coarse Monsters Inc, Finding 91 minutes. Nemo, Ratatouille and Up. These films have been popular with adults as they are hisasamiable, nonabrasive preteen withcomedy children.is based on the book of the Among popular has been their same namethe bymost American cartoonist-author Toy Story series, and Toy Story 3 does Jeff Kinney which spawned a seriesnot of disappoint. It is terrific. sequels that have racked up sales of some is now seventeen and is packing 28Andy million. up Its hislandscape room asishe prepares to middle themove periodto in Parables of Jesus ofschool, Nazareth university. He hassystem to decide whatelementary to do with the US education between Paintings and written reflections by his childhood toys,and to take them, throw them (primary) school high school, labelled Marianne Gill-Harper “theorawkward transition between and out put them in the attic. Andychild decides ISBN: 9780977534616 teenager”. The wimpy diarist of the title is to take Woody (Hanks) with him to college. RRP: $34.95 sixth-grader Greg Heffley (played with a refreshing lackpage of precocity by 12-year-old his eighty full-colour hard-back book consists of reproductions of paintingsKingdom and written reflections on 21 of Animal Jesus’ parables. Starring: Ben There is a Guy Prologue which puts Jesus in Mendelsohn, Pearce, Arthur context and attempts Joel Edgerton Jacki to explain why He Starring Russelland Brand, taught in parables and there is an Epilogue, Weaver. David JenniferDirector: Garner, Helen Michôd. 113 mins. Mirren, Nick Nolte, and Rated MA15+. Luis Guzmán.

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Director: Justin Winer. ll Melbourne knows about the soRated PG (Mild sexual called ‘Walsh Street murders’, when references, coarseconstables were lured to two young police language and violence). 110 minutes. their deaths in Walsh St, South Yarra in 1988.

I

David Michôd’s drama Animal t’s thirty yearsengrossing since Dudley Moore was Kingdom echoes that infamous crime. the cheerful, alcoholic ne’er-do-well, Michôd, the screenplay, Arthur, the who Newalso Yorkwrote billionaire. It’s thirty brings something new to the all-too-familiar years since John Gielgud’s Oscar-winning ‘underbelly’ depiction of underworld performance as Arthur’s butler and nanny, characters. Hisreason familynot of criminals, theupdate. Codys, Hobson. No to have an are Russell anything but glamorous and Brand. After making his‘cool’. nameThey as a are nasty bits of work, and mother, the comedian, Russell Brand hastheir been appearing archetypal matriarch, proves as an actorunderworld in films as diverse as Get Him to to Christianity, The Illustrated Guide be more cold-bloodedly ruthless than any of the Greek and The Tempest. He gave his voice them, despite her maternal for central Easter inexterior. Hop. Generally, to the 2000 Years ofBunny the Christian The key element that sets Michôd’s he sounds the same, a distinctive British Faith treatment telling thecan story through the accent andapart toneisthat often get away with ISBN: 9781921209369 humorous murder. He uses it again in Arthur, character of the crims’ 17-year-old nephew, Publisher: Millennium House. but is much more indebut his performance. Joshua (a most impressive by teenager RRP:there $85.00.

M

illennium House, Sydney, the publisher of Christianity, The Illustrated Guide

into with his three uncles, fromside whom the contact irresponsible and indulgent of his mother shield him. a Arthur. But,had he istried alsoto convincing inThere’s showing an underlying (whichBarry he hasn’t fourth memberintelligence of the Cody gang, (Joel bothered developing) andone the to change Edgerton), but the only realisefrom the As well asascontaining interesting and philandering nitwit to falling genuinely in love futility of their old ways, he reckons more readable text by 36 expert writers, it features as well as showing a kindness to Hobson who money can be in the stockmarket. hundreds of made magnificent illustrations, (after her change to Prospera in The Tempest) Andrew ‘Pope’ Cody (Ben Mendelsohn) and describing Christian life and cultures during is now played by Helen Mirren, Arthur’s his brothers, Craig (Sullivan Stapleton) and two millennia. Eminent contributors include devoted(Luke but not exactly no-nonsense career nanny. Darren Ford), are low-intellect Dr Noel Roberts, formerly a professor at Arthur’s mother – a steely performance by criminals, specialising in armed robbery and the University – an author of Geraldine Jamesof– Tasmania has had little time for her trafficking drugs. Popeand is intheology hiding because publications in science and Rev spendthrift son who embarrasses her no end. members of the police Robbery Dr Dudley who Armed waseither professor of Squad Biblical She offers Perera, an ultimatum: he marry the have sworn to kill him, andatthis vendetta and philosophical studies the National ambitious Susan (Jennifer Garner) or be cut off with the corrupt police dominates theover Codys’ Seminary, Ampitiya, Lanka, 30 from his inheritance. BySri chance, hefor encounters lives. years and nowGerwig), is Parish Priest at BridgewaterNaomi (Greta an illegal tour guide When Central one of Station theirparish. number is executed Brighton-Claremont at Grand and is charmed and by their police foes, Pope’s revenge is swift. The vast sweep of topics is covered in then falls in love. Will he marry and keep the Leaving a car with doors wide open in a nine parts, with glossary and index. Included money? Will Susan’s father (a gnarled Nick are The Beginning of the Christian Era, suburban street after midnight, he lies in wait Nolte) threaten him with his electric saw? Invasions, Power and Reform, New Could his mother everPrayer, change her mind? for whatever constables come to investigate Worlds, Revolution, Global Missions, Could Naomi really return Arthur’s Unity love? and and summarily executes them. Conversion, Retrospects and Prospects. After discussing aspects of the life and times of Christ www.hobart.catholic.org.au www.hobart.catholic.org.au and the New Testament, the comprehensive

33 31

FrRichard RichardLeonard Leonardpresents presents Fr newto toDVD DVDtitles. titles.He He isis the the new directorof ofthe theAustralian Australian director CatholicFilm FilmOffice Office. Catholic

teaching and warning young viewers. peer acceptance and other issues that will There are allusions everywhere to the shape his character, and it’s not revealing too horrors of World War II, present day refugees, Most books arethat available from at the end as a much to say he emerges and of those who need to Fullers,the andplight the Window on the better-equipped human being. escape the rule of dictators. For those who World Bookshop in Ulverstone. Director Thor Freudenthal, working from prefer just to be entertained, that’s on a deft script by Jackie and Jeff Filgo, Gabe offer too with action and humour in Sachs and Jeff Judah, keeps it gently amusing abundance. throughout andand avoids the worst gross a difficult parable the painting embraces Pixar has become the world in behaviour that bedevils many an leader American the complexity of the subject complemented CGI animation, having won 24 Oscars and film the denizens of schoolyards. by anabout insightful written reflection. (see p 3He of numerous other awards around the world. also gets agreeable, natural performances this magazine) Itfrom all began with the first Toyhis Story in 1995, Gordon, Capron young cast,and and A Tasmanian author,and Marianne Gill-Harper’s the look and polish in this third chapter of this makes excellent use of author Kinney’s cartoon dedication and effort has resulted in a book particular is even bettersequences than the other creations series in short animated that which creatively uncovers the significance two. Pixar just gets better and better. pepper the movie. and relevance of the parables. I love this book You doisnot to have Toy Story 1 There onehave puerile storyseen thread revolving and thoroughly recommend it. and 2 toaenjoy film, but I guarantee that around piece this of mouldy cheese that middleI would love to see the body of work on seeing thissays latest you willtouch want school lore noinstalment student should presented as an installation with the actual to catch up on what have kind, been but missing all because it bodes illyou of some on the paintings exhibited alongside the texts. I hope these Findisaengaging child to share if you wholeyears. the film andwith satisfying this happens. (We’ll keep you posted, Ed.) familybut entertainment that teaches in a must, do not miss seeing this disarmingly Reviewer:fashion Kaye Green palatable some significant life lessons. moving film. *It is available at Koorong Books, Hobart and Reviewer: Murphy Reviewer FrJim Richard Leonard Launceston, and Fullers Bookshop, Hobart, or by direct contact with the author at maz@maztaz.com

Young Joshua is implicated, because Pope had got him to steal the car used as bait in the trap.Russell The police seeking to avenge murder Brand is always good atthe one-liners of their colleagues see young, inexperienced or toss-away funny and ironic lines and Joshua as plenty the onehere member of the there are to keep theinfamous audience Cody family from whom they might able amused and on-side. Helen Mirrenbe clearly to obtain admissions. enjoys herself being strict, being indulgent, commenting Arthur’s behaviour The eventswaspishly that lead on Joshua to eventually – and instructing him how to make tea with realise how deeply he has been drawn into The reader is then introduced to themes a tea bag. Luis Guzmán isinArthur’s amenable the murderous web are, a Shakespearian such as the growth of Monasticism, Muslim chauffeur (even to dressing ordinariness as Batman and kind of way, inevitable. of conquests, the buildingThe of cathedrals, parish Robin and driving a bat mobile). And the NYPD the livesChurch, makes the story all the life characters’ in the Medieval pilgrimages and showschilling, amazing tolerance andthe understanding. more and you are on edge of your crusades. Also covered is the rise of Religious Greta Gerwigapproaches has the difficult job of seat as the with potential Orders andclimax Catholic Mysticism. persuading us that Arthur is worth loving for grand Latertragedy. sections of the book describe the despite his fickle past. She does it very nicely Michôd directs withexpansion assurance in and style, story of the Faith’s and makes Naomi a pleasing, ordinarilyvarious downwithout falling back including on gratuitous violence or parts of the world, the beginnings to-earth character. other excessesCatholic to milk audience emotions. of And Anglican, and Protestant life in Arthur’s drinking and resolutions. In the end, the film stands as a stark account Australia. After a failed AA meeting where Hobson of crime and corruption and the corrosive This outstanding work be highly strongly but gently chides him,can he offers noneffect of revenge. It is confronting, with recommended for the general reader and stop comment on his progress. frequent coarse language and its pervasive forAnd students who wish to learn more about the then, final credits and a new version air of menace, but it is a powerful and entirely story of the Church. Almost encyclopedic in of Arthur’s theme that won the Best Song scope, it abounds in striking coloured pictures, believable drama – for this reviewer, the best Oscar way back then. well-selected to illustrate aspects of every age Australian crime movie since Lantana. Reviewer: Fr Peter Malone MSC. from the Mr time ofMurphy Jesus until the present. Reviewer Jim Admirable is the fascinating treatment of a very large canvas. This publication would make an excellent present (it would become a


34 Volume 7 Issue 5 2011

OBITUARY

Gracious, generous lady of faith M

ieko Carr was a very special lady - known, loved and admired by many. Her sister Emiko and her niece Keiko flew out from Japan to care for her in her final couple of weeks and then say their tearful farewells. They returned to Japan and Mieko hung onto life until the early hours of the following morning of September 20, 2011. Frequently visited by friends – fellow residents of Guilford Young Grove and many of her priest friends, she slipped peacefully away to meet her Maker whom she loved and served so well. Her 86 years of life, beginning in Japan in 1925 till the time of her death, were filled with faith, work and involvement in many spheres of life and activity. Mieko kept two large scrap books full of newspaper clippings and information of her many adventures in Japan in her early days and in Tasmania for the last 50 plus years: Evidence of numerous citations, certificates of great variety, photos of civic receptions, meetings with high dignitaries, involvement with Hobart business people, reference to her translation work in Court and elsewhere for the Japanese fishing fleet, her long association with the Japan/Australia association and the furthering of the twin cities between Hobart and Yaizu. Even today there’s a very strong sister city association. Photos showed Mieko as a very striking young Japanese lady ... but there was something more than physical beauty. Something beautiful from within was a hallmark of her whole life. She was so gracious to all who knew her – close friends and strangers alike. In Japan in the post-war years, a young Tasmanian man called Len (Curly) Carr who was working as a manager of a Country Club for American ex-Servicemen met Mieko and fell in love with her. It was also in Japan that Len introduced her to the Catholic faith. He then swept her off her feet and brought her to live in the distant and very foreign land of Tasmania. It must have been strenuous for her away from her own culture, language and way of life. Len, apart from many other things, taught her the love of cricket and right up to recent times she followed with great interest the high and lows of the game. She proudly kept his well worn bat at the door of her unit at

25.5.1925 – 20.9.2011 We will miss her kindness, thoughtfulness and generosity in untold ways.

loved Mieko from the times long ago when she, along with fellow parishioner Jane Cook, provided flowers and decorations for the church. Her floral arrangements were meticulously crafted and especially beautiful. It is said there are so many photographs of her arrangements that she could have published her own book. Mieko for many years was very involved with her community at St Joseph’s. Not only did she adorn the sanctuary with her stunning flower arrangements, she was involved in many ways - in welcoming people to Sunday Mass and she also valued her involvement in her Family Group. Mieko became a much loved friend of the Passionist community. Despite having no children herself, kids seemed to relate well to her and many of these children and families continued to visit her at her home at the Grove, where Mieko lived for the past eleven years. There, as sacristan to St Canice’s Church and the GYG chapel, she was a constant until it became too much for her over the past six months. She was a companion and friend to all the villa, hostel and nursing home folk. She was also a hidden worker at Credo, the Catholic Bookshop opposite St Joseph’s, until its closure. We will miss her kindness, thoughtfulness and generosity in untold ways. But more than anything else it was her Catholic faith and love of God and neighbour that she is most remembered and revered. We thank God for the gift of Mieko.

Guilford Young Grove. The bat and some of his trophies are now on display at the Tasmanian Cricket Museum located in the Bellerive Oval complex. As a translator, her care of and support for the Japanese tuna fleet as friend and helper to thousands of seamen was at its height in the 1960s and 1970s. She often appeared at the courts to come to their aid. It was estimated that she assisted some 14,000 sailors. On at least one occasion, Mieko’s translation duties took her out to the fishing fleet, and it was said that she had been seen to be climbing up the rope ladders with the best of them! There was much more to Mieko than simply being a demure little lady! There will be a Memorial Service for Mieko at St Joseph’s In 1979 she was prominent in the Hobart Church, Hobart on Saturday, November 5 at 10am, after celebrations of the Emperor’s birthday which her ashes will be laid to rest next to her beloved Len. which got coverage in the Japanese papers, too. In 1980 she received a certificate of appreciation from the Japanese Foreign Minister for her efforts to encourage the Japanese language here in Tasmania. Mieko was also invited to Japan as a guest of the Japan Tuna Fisheries. The St Joseph’s parish community Mieko pictured with other Credo volunteers in 1998 – taken at a special Thank you Mass. in Hobart knew and www.hobart.catholic.org.au


OBITUARY

35

A shining light safe in God’s hands By Darlene’s daughter, Emma Riley.

D

arlene Ann Haigh was a woman of strength, determination and dignity, and a woman who loved her adopted home, the City of Hobart. These qualities still being evident until the very last moments of her journey in this life when in the early hours of August 15, 2011, she lost her battle with breast cancer, surrounded by family. We were especially blessed to have Fr Quinn, in the absence of Fr Nichols who had been visiting Darlene until his departure overseas, with us on her last Friday night and returning to be with us all in her final minutes on earth. It was while saying the Glorious Mysteries of the Holy Rosary of the Blessed Virgin Mary, in the decade named The Assumption, that Darlene entered Eternal Life, on the Feast of the Assumption of Our Lady. Her death on the Feast of Assumption was very fitting for a woman who throughout her life held a close affinity with Our Lady. Throughout her home there were beautiful figurines and pictures of Mary and in pride of place in Darlene’s garden surrounded by her beloved roses was a sandstone statue of Our Lady of Lourdes. One of her favourite things to listen to in past years was the Blessed Pope John Paul II reciting the rosary in Latin. Her cassette tape broke a few years ago but thankfully for YouTube we enabled her to still hear him over the last couple of days of her life. Her affinity with Pope John Paul II extended to the Marion cross on her coffin, something which only came to fruition through the help of Brian Andrews of the Pugin Foundation. Many people remember Darlene as an Alderman of the City of Hobart. Her funeral at St Mary’s Cathedral, planned herself in the last few weeks, was a celebration of her public life. A long-standing friend and colleague, Roger Viney, gave her eulogy with the Lord Mayor, providing a moving tribute. Her achievements as an Alderman are numerous. As mentioned by Roger and the Lord Mayor she set in train a more open decision making process in Council’s planning committee; she supported Council’s moves towards greater community services for young people, including Youth Arc. Darlene was also chairman of the Tulip Festival and she also championed the physical extension of Salamanca Market. The great love of her life was however the restoration of Hobart’s historic trams and the re-establishment of a working tramway. As the Lord Mayor said: ‘she

would travel absolutely anywhere to recover lost pieces of our historic trams. I know, because she would ring me and ask if I was up for a road trip to Mt Seymour near Oatlands to look at Tram No 39, or to go with her to look at tram poles in various back yards in New Town! I also remember many phone calls to home for assistance on everyday matters. While she struggled in the last few months, she treated every request as important and put all her efforts into resolving the problem no matter how small or big. She always remained firm to her beliefs of what was the right or wrong thing and as recognised by many people, stood proudly by her political independence. The Lord Mayor recognised in his tribute that “A feisty woman who spared no one when campaigning for a better deal”, while Roger reminded us that while she could be described as a “little prickly” you always got a straight answer and never left you wondering. In her final few months, when defiantly she would never publicly admit that her health was failing, she would rest at home all week so that she still could attend Council meetings. We also remember the Darlene of family. Darlene (or Darla as she was known) was born into a family of nine, with seven sisters and one brother. Educated at Sacred Heart Convent School in Ulverstone, she left school to work with her older sister Molly before moving to Hobart in 1961. She then met and married Tony Haigh at St Mary’s Cathedral in 1963. One of my aunts at her burial in Ulverstone remembered with love the birth of Darlene’s three daughters, Amanda, Joanne and Emma (me) and the times together with Tony they spent staying with Nanny Amy and Pop Ken over holidays and spending time with the extended family. Of one memory of Darlene and Tony with Aunty Chrissie and Darrell floundering near Dolphin Sands, Tony and Darrell had the correct spears but Darlene and Chrissie successfully used toasting forks! She provided love, support and strength for Tony and we three girls throughout the course of their marriage and when Tony became an Alderman of the City of Hobart in 1972 was by his side through all the success and challenges. It is fair to say that after the death of Tony

[she] stood proudly by her political independence.

30.8.1940 – 15.8.2011 in 1986, she redefined herself. Left with the challenge of seeing my sister Joanne through to adulthood, supporting my eldest sister Amanda, who was 21 at the time and bringing me up as a single parent, her strength and determination only increased. As a married woman and mother myself, it is only now that I can truly understand what it would have taken. As my sister Joanne and her husband Daniel had children she became a loving and loved ‘Narnie’ to Anna, Alex and Gina. They all remember with great fondness how, if they were home sick from school, she would run out at lunch with a pie and vanilla slice to help them feel better! Indeed an excessive amount of food at any family gathering was her hallmark. After birthdays, Christmas, Easter lunch there were enough leftovers of pavlova and trifle (something that the grandchildren are always telling us we just can’t replicate) for breakfast, lunch and dinner the next day! I h av e s o m a ny personal memories of her that I couldn’t possible begin to tell them; of sides that not everyone was privilege to witness. My defining memory is of strength in the face of considerable adversity. In 2007 when challenged by a second bout of breast cancer, constant chemotherapy, a major operation and a major stroke she fought on even in the face of persecution by others. She survived that for another four years and was there to meet her fourth grandchild, Chloe, who is now old enough to remember her. Darlene was a shining light and while her substantial presence in our lives will never be filled, particularly for her family, we know that she is now safe in God’s hands.

[As] ‘Narnie’ to Anna, Alex and Gina ... (if they were home sick) she would take them a pie and vanilla slice to help them feel better!

www.hobart.catholic.org.au


36 Volume 7 Issue 5 2011

OBITUARY

Jack

n August this year, two much-loved brothers, from a large family of ten children, were lovingly farewelled by their respective families. Jack and Terry O’Rourke grew up in Cygnet and were the sons of Aileen (Benson) and Hilary O’Rourke. They loved life in Cygnet and always fondly recalled their childhoods, even though it was the Depression. They had a firm grounding in the Catholic faith from their parents, which guided and shaped their lives.

Terry

I

Jack O’Rourke

Terry O’Rourke

Jack was born in 1925, the first son of Hilary and Aileen. Jack would regale his own children with adventurous stories of Cygnet life: fruit picking over the summer, dogs, horses, cows, ducks, being chased by neighbouring bulls, his mother’s fear of both snakes and swimming. Central to these stories was the constant theme of family prayer and the church. Jack won a bursary to attend St Virgil’s College in 1938. He proved to be a great student who found it easy to learn and study. His prowess at football came to the fore at school where he excelled in this endeavour. Upon leaving school he had brief employment at EZ working and training in chemistry, a short interlude as teacher monitor but found neither to his liking. Answering ‘the call’, he enrolled in and attended the seminary in Werribee. He loved his time there and made life-long friends. Returning to Tasmania Jack focused on football and family. He played in the historic Cygnet team in 1947 which won all of its matches that year as well as challenge matches with premiers from other Leagues in the State. He went on to play for North Hobart for several years, winning the Best and Fairest in 1949. Jack met and married Margaret Lillian Wickham when she was on a working holiday in Cygnet and they were devoted to each other for the next 45 years. Jack and Margaret moved to Queenstown to coach football and work in the mine office. This was the pinnacle of his football career. He loved hearing the stories of ex-teammates in later years about how he terrorised the opposition and led his teams to historic and famous victories. In 1958 Jack brought his family to Ulverstone where he worked for International Canners (now Simplot). His football career continued as coach of the Under 19s who managed to win seven premierships in a row. He ended his involvement as president of the club in the 1980s. In the late 1960s Jack started his own business selling real estate which proved very successful. He opened two offices in Devonport and Ulverstone in partnership with George Waterhouse, and later Dennis Leary and Jim Woodhouse. In his later life he loved golf and fishing and shared these passions with long-time friend Tony Bellchambers. He was passionate about his garden and shared the joy with his family. He worked tirelessly for the Sacred Heart Parish in Ulverstone and lived his faith by attending every Mass possible, joining the Knights of the Southern Cross, being a member of the Parish Council, and president of the local St Vincent de Paul Society. He took Communion to the sick and elderly and was a friend to everyone. Primarily, he was a family man. He raised his family in partnership with Margaret, loving and supporting them with all of their ambitions and passions particularly education and sport. He was a great umpire, referee, tutor, coach, and chauffeur. Jack lived alone for nineteen years after Margaret died. He loved his family and they loved him. He is survived by his sons, Robert and John and daughters Aileen, Marian, and Margaret, twelve grandchildren and twelve great grandchildren. He is sadly missed.

Terry was born in 1929, the fifth of Hilary and Aileen’s ten children. Terry was taught by the Sisters of St Joseph at the local Catholic primary school, and numbered many of them as his friends throughout his life. In 1942, a bursary saw Terry begin boarding at St Virgil’s College. He made lifelong friends among the boarders and remained associated with St Virgil’s right through his life as an active member of the Old Virgilians Association. It was at St Virgil’s that Terry developed his skills as a footballer, eventually playing in the Tasmanian Amateurs and coaching many school teams and local clubs as a young man. Following two years at the ANM factory at Boyer, Terry went to university and so embarked on the route that would see him become a teacher in 1953 and take him all around the state as teacher and later vice principal and principal of many government high schools. His first posting saw him back in his home town at Cygnet Area School, then to Huonville High and, shortly after, King Island High. In 1958 he began his long association with Burnie when he was appointed to Parklands High. Taroona and George Town postings followed before he was promoted to Vice Principal at Huonville High in 1967. There, Terry met a young art teacher, Barbara Williams, from Launceston and at the end of that year they married in the Church of Apostles. They went on to have five daughters: Angela, Julia, Rosemary, Melissa and Fiona; bringing them up in Huonville, then Queenstown in 1973, where Terry was appointed Principal and from 1975 onwards, their Turner’s Beach home. Terry was back working in Burnie as Principal of Burnie High in 1975, where he remained until his retirement in 1989. He always held the Burnie community closely in his heart. Many members of his own family, including his mother, were now living on the North -West Coast. Terry also forged strong links with his children’s schools: Sacred Heart Convent School in Ulverstone, and Marist Regional College in Burnie. Terry was a deeply religious man, devoted to the Mass and the rosary. He was an active parishioner in the Ulverstone Sacred Heart Parish (now part of the Mersey Leven Parish) for over 35 years and for many years Barbara and Terry volunteered as mentors in the FOCCUS Engaged Couples Program. Terry was a great recorder of life’s connections. He wrote daily in his diary, he had been composing his memoirs for his children and his last big achievement was to self-publish the book Recollections of a Centenarian, honouring the stories of his mother Aileen, who was such a influence on his life. Terry loved people, and his family and friends remember with love and affection, his detailed conversations, his loyal interest in others, his recording and nourishing of relationships, his faithful correspondence and his prodigious memory of people, which allowed him to weave so many connections. Terry was farewelled at Sacred Heart Church, Ulverstone with a concelebrated Mass on August 11, just a few days after the funeral of his beloved brother Jack.

22.6.1925 – 2.8.2011

27.9.1929 – 6.8.2011

www.hobart.catholic.org.au


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Tasmanian Catholic - Volume 7 Issue 5 2011  

Tasmanian Catholic - Volume 7 Issue 5 2011

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