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DOCILITY TO THE HOLY SPIRIT FALL 2020 A MAGAZINE OF THE ARCHDIOCESE OF DETROIT



FALL 2020 VOLUME 2: ISSUE 2 P U B L I S HER

The Most Rev. Allen H. Vigneron, Archbishop of Detroit EX E C U TI VE E DITO RS

Father Stephen Pullis Edmundo Reyes ED I TO R I N C HIE F

Christine Warner M A N AGI N G E DITO R

Casey McCorry A RT D I R E C TO R

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

Paul Duda

A D V E RTI SING MANAG E R

Michelle St. Pierre I L LU S T R ATO RS

Hope Acquilano Jessica Amsberry Diego Diaz Mike Marshall

5 ABOUT THE COVER AND CONTRIBUTORS 7 A MESSAGE FROM THE ARCHBISHOP

P HOTO GR A P HE RS

Matthew LaVere Michael McQuillen Melissa Moon Thomas Shannon Joseph Skipinski Naomi Vrazo Valaurian Waller Grant Whitty CO N T R I B UT ING W RIT E RS

Joe Boggs Pete Burak Kathleen M. Carroll Carly T. Flynn Daniel Gallio Dr. Mary Healy Dr. Daniel Keating Father Francis Therese Krautter Kate Lochner Cristin Luea Father Brian Meldrum Curtis Simpson

FE ATU R E S 8

LIVING WITNESS Stronger together

14 REAL TALK What makes your parish community unique? 18

DOCILIT Y TO THE HOLY SPIRIT We need power

Elizabeth Martin Solsburg V I C E P R ESIDE NT AND E DITO RIAL D IRECTOR

Rachel Matero GR A P HI C DE SIG NE R

Innerworkings PRINTING

EM A I L U S : utgmagazine@aod.org V I S I T U S O NL INE : unleashthegospel.org F O L LO W U S O N FAC E BO O K, INSTAGRAM T W I T TE R AND YO UT UBE : @utgdetroit

Unleash the Gospel (USPS XXXXX) is a membership publication of the Archdiocese of Detroit, published quarterly by the Archdiocese of Detroit, 12 State Street, Detroit MI 48226-1823. Application to Mail at Periodicals Postage Pending in Detroit, MI and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Unleash the Gospel, 12 State Street, Detroit, MI 48226-1823. ©2020 Unleash the Gospel, Archdiocese of Detroit.

42 CONVERSATIONS WITH GOD Your mission from God 44 PRAYER 101 So great a cloud of witnesses 46 PRAYING WITH THE CHURCH FATHERS St. Augustine

D I S CI P LE S 50 FAMILY CHALLENGE Using your hearts, hands and voices

22 DOCILIT Y TO THE HOLY SPIRIT “To each is given the manifestation of the Spirit”

54 GOING DEEPER Practicing discernment

26 DOCILIT Y TO THE HOLY SPIRIT Docility to the Holy Spirit

58 PURSUING HOLINESS Staying connected and growing together

Patrick O’Brien P R ES I D E NT AND C E O

P R AYE R

CU LTU R E 30 POETRY Veni Creator On Nature & Grace 32 SACRED PL ACES Mother of all peoples 38 OUR HISTORY The patron ‘Saint’ of Detroit basketball

D E TR OI T 60 UNLEASHED QUESTIONNAIRE Alex Jones 62 PHOTO ESSAY The Church in Detroit’s response to the time of coronavirus


Bold Beginnings

NEW MARRIAGE PREPARATION PROCESS l e a r n .e g w d e troit.org

Marriage Coaching Ministry HELP FOR COUPLES

a od .org / ma rria g ecoa ching

The First Years and Beyond CATHOLIC MARRIAGE NEWSLETTER

a od .org / ma rria g e/ news letter


TO GET TO KNO W OUR CONT RIBU T I NG WRIT ERS SOME MORE, WE ASKED T H E M:

What is your favorite spiritual book?

J OE BOG G S : One of my favorites is a book written by apologist Jimmy Akin called The Fathers Know Best: Your Essential Guide to the Teachings of the Early Church. It’s an incredible collection of what the earliest followers of Christ believed, taught and wrote. DOCILITY TO THE HOLY SPIRIT FALL 2020 A MAGAZINE OF THE ARCHDIOCESE OF DETROIT

DESIGNED BY MIKE MARSHALL

THE COVER “Today, the New Evangelization can only be carried out through a radical openness to the leading of the Spirit: preceding every initiative with prayer for his guidance, constantly allowing ourselves to be led by him and obeying his promptings and inspirations.” (Archbishop Allen H. Vigneron, Unleash the Gospel pastoral letter, Marker 3.4) The theme of this issue, Docility to the Holy Spirit, explores the Holy Spirit as the force driving the Church’s mission and the source of the gifts and graces we need to fulfill our personal mission. The cover depicts the surging of the Holy Spirit that takes place within us, in our archdiocese and beyond when we let our lives and work be powered by the Spirit.

P ETE B U RA K : The Fulfillment of All Desire by Ralph Martin. KATHLEEN M. CA RROLL: I always turn to St. Francis de Sales’ Introduction to the Devout Life. Whenever I open the book, I seem to find the counsel I need at that very moment. D R. MA RY HEA LY : One of my favorites is Life in Christ: A Spiritual Commentary on the Letter to the Romans, by Father Raniero Cantalamessa. A LEX J ONES : Definitely The Way of Perfection by St. Teresa of Avila. D R. DA NI EL K EATI NG : One of my favorite books is Transformation in Christ, by Dietrich von Hildebrand. I find the meditations on life in Christ incredibly deep — I can come back to them time after time and find sources of profound inspiration for the spiritual life. FATHER FRA NCI S THERES E K RA U TTER: The Conferences by John Cassian. KATE LOCHNER: One of my favorite spiritual guides is a book I initially found intimidating, Archbishop Fulton Sheen’s Life of Christ. I like learning about the historical context around various parts of Jesus’ life as well as other prominent figures from the time. CRI S TI N LU EA : Sober Intoxication of the Holy Spirit by Father Raniero Cantalamessa, preacher to the papal household. Father Cantalamessa, like a close friend, guides you towards deeper understanding of the incalculable and indwelling power of the Holy Spirit and how it can transform your life. FATHER B RI A N MELD RU M: One of my favorite spiritual guides is the book He Leadeth Me by Father Walter Ciszek, SJ. Anyone looking for the presence of God in these difficult times and praying for the ability to do God’s will in any situation will find Father Ciszek to be a courageous spiritual companion and guide. FATHER S TEV E P U LLI S : Apologia Pro Vita Sua by St. John Henry Newman.

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THE MOST REV. ALLEN H. VIGNERON Archbishop of Detroit DetroitArchbishop @DetArchbishop @DetroitArchbishop

DEAR JOYFUL

MISSIONARY DISCIPLE! I N H I S E N C YC L I CA L , O N T H E H O LY S P I R I T I N T H E L I F E O F T H E C H U R C H A N D T H E W O R L D ( D O M I N U M E T V I V I F I CA N T E M ) , S T. J O H N PA U L I I TA U G H T T H AT T H E DAY O F P E N T E C O S T H A S N E V E R H A D I T S S U N S E T: While it is an historical fact that the Church came forth from the Upper Room on the day of Pentecost, in a certain sense one can say that she has never left it. Spiritually, the event of Pentecost does not belong only to the past: the Church is always in the Upper Room that she bears in her heart. In the Archdiocese of Detroit, we committed in 2014 to immerse ourselves in the ongoing mystery of the Upper Room when we began to pray for a new Pentecost. By the grace of God, we have seen that prayer blossom with great fruit here in the Archdiocese of Detroit, in Synod 16 and in everything that has unfolded since we embraced our identity of a Church on mission.

We are not the same diocese we were six years ago when we began this journey. God has been at work in us, in our communities, in our parishes and in our schools. We have learned to walk with apostolic boldness and confidence in God. We are committed to working in a spirit of innovation and collaboration. And most importantly, we have resolved to place Christ and his mission above all else, adopting a docility to the Holy Spirit to follow wherever he leads us. This commitment has become critically important in the past few months as we have faced unprecedented health and

economic challenges in our local Church and wider society. We have been called to adjust our path and renew our structures to better align ourselves for mission amid the challenges we face. If our mission to unleash the Gospel is to continue bearing fruit, we need radical openness to the leading of the Spirit, preceding every initiative with prayer for his guidance, constantly allowing ourselves to be led by him and faithfully obeying his promptings and inspirations. Like the apostles in the Upper Room, we are recipients of God’s overflowing, abundant grace and are equipped by him to live as his disciples. We are living a New Pentecost because Pentecost never truly ended. It is the story of the Church and her people in every age; it is our story as we receive from the Holy Spirit the gifts and graces we need to fulfill our mission. In this issue of Unleash the Gospel, we will explore the power of the Holy Spirit in our lives and the blessings available to those who follow. I would like to thank our readers for joining us on this journey, and our generous donors and advertisers who support the publication and mission of this magazine. May it continue to serve as a valuable source of inspiration and formation for us all. Come Holy Spirit and renew the face of the earth!

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LI VING WITNE SS

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KATE LOCHNER, WRITER • MATTHEW LAVERE, PHOTOGRAPHER


IT WAS A TRIP TO EUROPE WITH HER BROTHER AND UNCLE THAT SHAPED SHERRY ZEITER’S OUTLOOK ON HUMANITY. SHE DESCRIBES LAYING EYES ON MICHAELANGELO’S DAVID FOR THE FIRST TIME AT 17: “HE WAS SO BEAUTIFUL, AND YOU COULD SEE EVERY VEIN AND I STOOD THERE AND I CRIED AND I CRIED AND I CRIED, BECAUSE IT WAS SO AWESOME AND OVERWHELMING AND I THOUGHT ... ‘THAT’S MARBLE. THERE’S NO BRAIN, THERE’S NO HEART, THERE’S NO SOUL, AND IT MOVED ME LIKE THIS? I HAVE TO START LOOKING AT PEOPLE LIKE THAT BECAUSE GOD MADE THEM. HE WAS BEAUTIFUL, BUT HE WAS STONE.’”

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SHE POINTS TO THE YOUNG WOMAN SITTING ON HER RIGHT AND THROUGH A SMILE SAYS, “THIS GIRL’S GOT A HEART.” THE YOUNG WOMAN IS KAITLYN BOST, AND HOW THE TWO CAME TO LIVE TOGETHER UNDER ONE ROOF HAS DIVINE PROVIDENCE WRITTEN ALL OVER IT OR, AS SHERRY DESCRIBES — IT IS “BIZARRE.” Sherry Zeiter, twice-widowed and a longtime resident of Clawson, met Beth Collison, founder of Mary’s Mantle, by chance. During a casual outing to a local Catholic bookstore, Sherry began talking with a woman who would introduce herself as Beth. After it was revealed she knew Sherry’s little brother, the pair connected. It was then that Beth asked if Sherry had heard of her organization, Mary’s Mantle, a Catholic program that offers residence to homeless expectant women. The two parted ways as any small-talking pair does, but they would soon reconnect. Impressed and inspired by the program, Sherry, not long after meeting Beth, sent in an application to Mary’s Mantle and thought she’d spend her time rocking the babies of the moms who were a part of the program. But there was another plan at work.

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“Next thing I know, I got a phone call. ‘Sherry, we have this beautiful young lady who’s having a hard time in her brother’s basement. Maybe you could take her in once a month, just for weekends and you two do something,’” Sherry recounts. Without hesitation, she agreed. Kaitlyn Bost fell on hard times when her mother tragically died in front of her when she was 18. After a few visits to a community shelter, living with her boyfriend and spending some time on the street, Kaitlyn found out she was pregnant. Not believing abortion was an option for her, Kaitlyn found Mary’s Mantle and, despite a complicated and difficult pregnancy, she welcomed a beautiful baby boy and offered him for open adoption. When Kaitlyn arrived at Sherry’s home for the first time, they explained there was an instant

connection: “She comes in, walks around and goes, ‘Can I move in?’ And I said yes. We’ve been together since,” Sherry says. “We fight like cats and dogs,” Sherry jokes, “but we love each other.” The transition was smooth but not perfect as they each had to figure out how to accommodate one another’s expectations as well as balance out a medical condition that Kaitlyn has.


KATE LOCHNER

- SHERRY

is a writer and mom. Most of her professional career has been spent in marketing and content creation. She loves exploring her home state of Michigan and currently resides in the Metro Detroit area with her husband and three children.

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When told that it takes a person with a special sort of spirit and heart to welcome an essential stranger into her home, Sherry echoes the sentiment of her late grandfather, who always told her, “Everyone’s a stranger until you meet.” The pair have been together for almost two years and, after developing a loving, fostering relationship, Kaitlyn is learning about the Catholic faith, how to cook and various aspects of healthy living. Though they both explain how difficult it is to meet new people when in your 20s, Kaitlyn has found a sense of belonging and community in both Guardian Angels Parish in Clawson and St. Anastasia’s Parish in Troy.

A PILL AR IN HER COMMUNIT Y A deep love for the Clawson community is in Sherry’s blood. Her parents and grandparents lived in Clawson, and her family was formative in getting Clawson’s local Catholic church, Guardian Angels, established in the area. It was her grandfather who dug the first hole for the building of the church and her maternal grandparents who bought the statues and the tabernacle. Her uncle was the first priest ordained at the parish and, bringing it full circle, another uncle is currently stationed at Guardian Angels as a deacon. Clawson was Kaitlyn’s home from age 10 to 18, too. She lived only blocks away from Sherry, yet “had no idea who she was.” She went to the schools where Sherry’s son-inlaw taught. For Sherry, a welcoming and inclusive community is just a trademark of the city she and her family have called home. For as long as she can remember, “It’s always been that way.”

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COMMUNIT Y AT HOME Sherry is working to build a communal spirit within her own home with Kaitlyn. Her spirituality and religious beliefs help shape the day-to-day living for her and Kaitlyn. “I have this great devotion to guardian angels because they’ve helped me, I talk to them all the time, believe me, and I thank them all the time.” It’s through this devotion she stays connected to others through prayer: “I’ll say right out loud, ‘Send a legion of guardian angels to so-and-so.’” And it’s through this devotion she prays for Kaitlyn and her spiritual life. “She gets legions sent to her,” Sherry shares. “Or if she’s sad, I’ll say please tell Kaitlyn’s guardian angels to wrap their wings tighter around my girl.” Kaitlyn’s contributions around the house help to form the familial-like bond Kaitlyn and Sherry share. Last August, Sherry unexpectedly injured her toe, which put her in the hospital and caused months of moving with great difficulty. Kaitlyn was there to care for her — keeping the house, helping with meals and aiding Sherry in whatever way she could.

“If it wasn’t for her, I’d still be having difficulty moving around. She was an angel,” Sherry says. As for what’s next, Kaitlyn still beams with pride when talking about her son. As she pulls out her phone to show a picture of him, she says, “He’s the cutest little guy you will ever see.” Having an open adoption, she’s able to see him every so often and is sent pictures of him. Currently, she and Sherry are comfortably settling into a new routine after Sherry’s injury last summer and Kaitlyn coming out of a medical scare due to a health condition earlier this year. Sherry explains they are looking into ways for Kaitlyn to finish her education and for her to continue to thrive in her health and areas of interest. An unlikely pairing? Maybe. But tucked away in the heart of Clawson, the lessons of a European trip ring back and echo throughout their day-to-day living, all because a young woman decided to start looking at the people around her as God calls us all to, with a warm, welcoming spirit. With love.


- SHERRY

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RE A L TA LK What I think makes the St. Mary’s Parish community unique is the fact that it is truly a community. Not only does the parish offer its members several opportunities to be involved internally, including a men’s prayer breakfast, assorted Bible studies and ways to serve the parish itself, but also what it does to serve the Monroe community as a whole. We provide home-cooked meals to the needy through God Work’s Dinners, participate in civic fundraising events and, since we are located in the main hub of our downtown, when there are large events, we always open our doors to the public and are welcoming to guests. We are also unique in that, by design or not, we are the successful prototype of the next phase of Unleash the Gospel, “Families of Parishes.” We have already teamed up with St. John the Baptist here in town to share resources such as clergy, the lay faithful and parishioners as a way of expanding our community. - MICHAEL COCHRAN, ST. MARY’S PARISH, MONROE

PARISH

WHAT MAKES YOUR I would describe my parish community as diverse and vibrant. I grew up being part of this community and have always felt a strong connection to everyone because of how inclusive its members are. The Basilica of Ste. Anne de Detroit hosts many events throughout the year where people from all over the world are invited to celebrate their diversity and customs. One of our main events is our annual novena to Ste. Anne where every night a different culture is celebrated. People are encouraged to wear traditional clothes, display traditional dance, share ethnic foods and even Mass is said bilingually. Our community members are here every night to make sure that all visitors are welcomed and assist with any needs. Over the years, we have incorporated other traditions and celebrations from the input of our member. As a result, our Day of the Dead celebration keeps growing every year. It is truly a great feeling to be a member of a parish of such warm-hearted individuals who have been part of this community over generations. - YULIANA BAPTISTA, BASILICA OF STE. ANNE DE DETROIT

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St. Timothy’s is a community-focused parish. I was raised in the Methodist Church, but as an adult joined the Baptist Church. My wife was raised in the Catholic Church and my daughter was baptized in the Catholic faith. After 23 years of marriage, I decided it was time for my wife, daughter and I to attend the same church as a family. My wife and daughter were attending St. Timothy, so I decided it was time for me to attend one Sunday Mass to feel and sense if this was the right place of comfort for me. To my surprise, there were so many members who approached and greeted me after the service. I felt so comfortable that I attended each Sunday service after, although I was not Catholic at the time. In 2015, I entered RCIA at St. Timothy’s and became Catholic. St. Timothy’s parishioners form a unique bond to help address and serve the focused needs of our community in Trenton. Our parish serves the Downriver community through countless ministries: the Food Pantry, Giving Tree, the Trenton Knights of Columbus 3615 who collect donations for those with disabilities, Cross Catholic Outreach, IHM Sisters, St Louis Center, Sacred Heart Major Seminary, Penrickton Center for Blind Children, Angel’s Place, Franciscan Sisters and the Ultrasound Initiative. It is clear each member in the parish has been placed there by God to help best support and spread the word of Jesus Christ, and also address the community’s needs. - JEWELL MAGEE, ST. TIMOTHY’S PARISH, TRENTON

COMMUNITY I have been a parishioner of Holy Name Church in Birmingham, Mich., for 12 years. I compare Holy Name spiritually and artistically to a diamond with many facets. Holy Name Parish has these very important characteristics: it has great leadership, it fosters spiritual maturity and it has a plan for discipleship and evangelization.

UNIQUE?

The details orchestrated by Holy Name Parish’s staff are the little things that shake up the ordinary in our parish life. Whether it is the liturgy, religious formation, a service project or a welcoming meal after attending a presentation, these creative gestures are what people remember and get them coming back for more. The details make it happen! Our parish doors swing wide open to convey a hospitable spirit, literally and figuratively. The stranger becomes a guest. People linger and engage with one another. We welcome any kind of input that makes our parish alive with new energy. Communal life abounds at Holy Name Parish. Formation is an active and vital part of every facet of the parish. Our outreach to the body of Christ is practiced as we respond as God’s disciples and act as God’s instruments. This example of a guiding light and love comes from our pastor, Monsignor John Zenz. He is our shepherd, our leader; he serves according to the grace God has given him. He is a beacon of light in the darkness. - PATTI KOVAL, HOLY NAME PARISH, BIRMINGHAM

MELISSA MOON, MICHAEL MCQUILLEN, PHOTOGRAPHERS

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I am 15 years old and a parishioner of Ss. Cyril and Methodius. One of the things that I find unique about our church is the opportunity it gives to young men, allowing us to serve during Mass in a very special way. Ss. Cyril’s and Methodius has developed a system that trains youths for serving at the altar. I was blessed with the privilege of beginning when I was just 6. The system allowed me to understand the Order of the Mass and the reasons behind some of the more technical aspects of the Mass. It has also shown me the importance of my actions during Mass, because as a server your every movement is viewed by the entire church. This is actually very helpful, because it prepares us to be the Christian examples God calls us to be. However, I would know none of this without the patient guidance of the many priests and older servers who have spent much of their time and energy training us. Now that I am older and more experienced, I have been given the opportunity to train the newer servers, just as my mentors before me, bringing everything full circle. I am very grateful for this unique gift that the Lord has given through Ss. Cyril and Methodius. - ISAIAH AGUSTIN, SS. CYRIL AND METHODIUS PARISH, STERLING HEIGHTS

St. Mary’s is a vibrant, loving and welcoming Catholic family located in the heart of Royal Oak dedicated to living the Gospel of Christ. There is a great love of Mass, adoration and opportunities to receive the sacrament of confession. The ability to spend a weekday morning in front of the Lord in adoration and to receive the Eucharist is truly a gift. The opportunities for fellowship are abundant. For families, young and established, there is a vibrant moms and tots group and the ever-growing St. Mary’s Catholic School. As a young adult, I have been able to attend young adult Masses, sports nights and one of our many Scripture-based small groups. St. Mary’s is truly a spiritual home where parishioners are able to use their spiritual gifts as a building up for the church. As Archbishop Vigneron would say, there are many shallow entry points to invite others, along with the invitation to grow closer to the Lord at St. Mary’s. - BRIDGET MOLNAR, ST. MARY’S CATHOLIC CHURCH, ROYAL OAK

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WE need POWER The Holy Spirit gives each of us the power we need to evangelize and spread the Gospel — as long as we’re willing to open our hearts and cooperate. THERE ARE FEW THINGS MORE FRUSTRATING THAN BEING TOLD TO DO SOMETHING BUT KNOWING, DEEP DOWN, THAT YOU AREN’T ADEQUATELY PREPARED. THINGS WE LONG TO ACCOMPLISH CAN BE LEFT UNDONE AND UNTRIED BECAUSE OF A LACK OF CONFIDENCE, TRAINING, EXPERIENCE, COURAGE, SKILLS OR INTELLIGENCE. OCCASIONALLY, STRENGTH OF WILL OR HOLY OBEDIENCE CAN HELP US INITIATE ACTION TOWARD AN IMPORTANT OR COMMISSIONED GOAL, BUT WE ARE REMINDED ABOUT ALL THAT WE LACK, CAUSING DISCOURAGEMENT AND STAGNATION TO REPLACE ENERGY AND HOPE.

We know that making disciples is intrinsic to the Church’s deepest identity. We know our baptism has grafted us into the body of Christ and therefore made us responsible to help fulfill his mission to seek and save the lost. We know that Jesus’ death and resurrection have won the war over sin and death, and the Good News of the Gospel has the power to transform hearts and lead people from darkness to light. And yet, knowledge and belief are not enough. We need power.

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‘THE PROMISE OF THE FATHER’ Think about the first disciples. These men and women experienced the best catechesis, faith formation and liturgical prep in the history of the Church. Their pastor, DRE, director of evangelization and head liturgist was Jesus Christ. He taught, fed, served, astounded, confounded, inspired and ultimately commissioned them to go and do likewise. Even having received and experienced so much, these disciples were given a task beyond their capacity. Therefore, Jesus instructed them “not to depart

from Jerusalem, but to wait for ‘the promise of the Father about which you have heard me speak; for John baptized with water, but in a few days you will be baptized with the Holy Spirit.’ … But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit comes upon you, and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, throughout Judea and Samaria and to the ends of the earth.” (Acts 1:4-5,8) Jesus didn’t calm the apostles by promising them a packet of evangelization materials; instead, he essentially said, “You will receive divine power and then you’ll do it.” He trusted in the training, the grace and the experience of the previous three years of walking with him. He was excited to send the Spirit and get them moving. Jesus fully understood that the challenge was greater than the apostles could handle; yet he confidently predicted they would accomplish their mission by being clothed with power from on high.

WAIT WITH INTENTION — THEN ASK FOR MORE Imagine the Upper Room a few moments before the fire of the Spirit descended upon the disciples. The first two chapters of Acts describe the scene: The men were gathered in one place doing exactly what Jesus had asked of them — waiting and praying. While the disciples are often depicted as huddling fearfully in the Upper Room, Scripture doesn’t tell us whether they were scared. (Though fear, anxiety, nervousness and impatience undoubtedly filled many of their hearts.) Presumably, many of us have already experienced the waiting portion of this story. As we wait upon the Lord to reveal himself in various aspects of our lives, sometimes he asks us to pause a little longer, and sometimes he asks us to adjust how

PETE BURAK, WRITER • MIKE MARSHALL, ILLUSTRATOR


PETE BUR AK is the director of i.d.9:16, the young adult outreach of Renewal Ministries. He is a graduate of the Franciscan University of Steubenville and has a master’s degree in theology from Sacred Heart Major Seminary. Pete speaks on discipleship and evangelization is the co-director of Pine Hills Boys Camp. He is the cofounder of the Millennial Church Conference, a monthly columnist for Faith Magazine, and a member of the USCCB Young Adult Advisory Committee. Pete and his wife Cait have four children.

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we wait. Remember that as we anticipate the promise of the Spirit, we need to wait intentionally, not passively. We need to consciously open our hearts, ask for more and then accept him when he comes. There is a time for waiting and a time for doing, and it’s remarkable how quickly things changed for the first disciples. One moment they were devoting themselves to prayer; the next moment, they were filled with the power of the Spirit, speaking new tongues, glorifying God and going out to fulfill the great commission. Similarly, our efforts toward evangelization must be preceded by a posture that is wide open, full of faith and peacefully and patiently asking for more of the Spirit. Our baptism and confirmation ensure that the same Spirit that fell on those first disciples lives in us. All the grace, insight and power necessary for revival are hidden in the hearts of the children of God. The question is not whether the Holy Spirit is with us, but whether we cooperate with him.

THE SPIRIT IN ACTION In the apostolic exhortation Evangelii Nuntiandi, Pope St. Paul VI bluntly states that the role of the Holy Spirit is the work of mission. He writes, “Evangelization will never be possible without the action of the Holy Spirit.” Talk about a provocative and challenging statement from the vicar of Christ! Paul VI clearly insists that the faithful rely on the action of the Holy Spirit because evangelization is pointless and fruitless without the Spirit. Ignoring or minimizing the Holy Spirit’s role in the new evangelization is like setting out to make fresh bread by gathering all the ingredients and preheating the oven — but ignoring the yeast and wondering why the bread won’t rise. After the Pentecost explosion, Acts of the Apostles reveals the ongoing and sustaining power the Holy Spirit provides the Church. The next time you read through Acts, take note of how often the Holy Spirit is mentioned. Spoiler alert — it’s a lot! Peter on Pentecost, Stephen

before his martyrdom, Peter before the Sanhedrin, Philip with the Ethiopian, Peter with Cornelius, Paul confronting the magician and Paul converting the Ephesians are just a few examples of the disciples allowing themselves to be led and empowered by the Holy Spirit. The Church would not have grown — and will not continue to grow — without her individual members cooperating with the power of their baptism and confirmation. We cannot withstand persecution (first three centuries of the Church), rebuke false teachings (St. Athanasius against the Arians), convict hearts (St. Thérèse of Lisieux), innovate mission (St. Francis Xavier), unpack truth (St. Thomas Aquinas), oppose corruption (St. Catherine of Siena) and demonstrate power (St. Vincent Ferrer) without the Holy Spirit. As throughout the whole history of the Church, still today Jesus pours out his Spirit on those who ask, and this freely offered gift transforms the world.

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The nine principles of St. Paul’s teaching on the charisms of the Holy Spirit — and what they mean for each of our lives. THERE ARE NO MORE POWERFUL TOOLS FOR EVANGELIZATION THAN THE CHARISMS, GIFTS BY WHICH THE HOLY SPIRIT EQUIPS THE CHURCH AND EVERY CHRISTIAN FOR OUR MISSION TO BE CHRIST’S WITNESSES IN THE WORLD. YET MANY ARE TRYING TO LIVE THE CHRISTIAN LIFE WITHOUT CHARISMS! TRYING TO FULFILL OUR MISSION WITHOUT USING CHARISMS IS LIKE TRYING TO TRAVEL BY PUSHING THE CAR INSTEAD OF DRIVING IT.

To use charisms effectively, it is important to learn what Scripture teaches about them. What are charisms? First, they are distinct from the sanctifying gifts of the Spirit listed in Isaiah 11: wisdom, understanding, counsel, fortitude, knowledge, piety and fear of the Lord. Catholic tradition holds that these gifts are given to every Christian at baptism and confirmation, for the purpose of making us holy. (CCC 1831) The charismatic gifts, or charisms, in contrast, are distributed by the Holy Spirit in different measures to different people. They are not primarily for personal sanctification but for building up the body of Christ. They are, by definition, gifts to be given away, gifts to be used for others. No one has all the charisms, precisely because we need one another, just as the organs in the human body cannot function without one another. (1 Cor 12:17-21) Charisms are also distinct from human talents. A charism is not a natural ability but a supernatural gift of the Holy Spirit. It either enables a person to do what is humanly impossible (for instance, prophecy or healing) or it elevates a natural gift like teaching or hospitality to a supernatural level of efficacy. In 1 Corinthians 12:8-10, Paul lists some of the more obviously supernatural gifts such as healings, prophecy and miracles. In other passages, he lists gifts that seem more ordinary but are no less important, such as service, teaching, exhortation, contribution, administration and acts of mercy. (Rom 12:7-8)

DR. MARY HEALY, WRITER • MIKE MARSHALL, ILLUSTRATOR

PAUL’S RICH TEACHING ON CHARISMS CAN BE SUMMED UP IN NINE PRINCIPLES. 1) CHARISMS ARE MANIFESTATIONS OF THE SPIRIT. Charisms are “manifestations of the Spirit” because they make the presence and power of the Holy Spirit evident. (1 Cor 12:7) Every time you exercise a charism, God the Holy Spirit is operating through you. Charisms are not something we own or control; we cannot give a prophecy or heal someone whenever we feel like it. Rather, we are like a musical instrument on which the Holy Spirit plays according to his will and his timing. The more we are surrendered to him, the more freely he will play.

2) EVERY CHRISTIAN RECEIVES ONE OR MORE CHARISMS. “To each is given the manifestation of the Spirit.” (1 Cor 12:7; Eph 4:7) There is no unemployment in the kingdom of God! Every Christian has an indispensable role in the mission of the Church, and everyone is equipped by the Holy Spirit at baptism and confirmation with charisms in order to fulfill that role. Yet sadly, many people don’t exercise their charisms because many are not even aware they have them and have not been taught to use them.

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October, 6th 2020

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3) CHARISMS ARE GIVEN FREELY. We are given charisms by the very fact of being baptized into Christ, not because we deserve them. (1 Cor 12:13) Charisms are therefore not a measure of holiness. Jesus warned that on the last day, “Many will say to me on that day, ‘Lord, Lord, did we not prophesy in your name? Did we not cast out demons in your name? Did we not do mighty deeds in your name?’ Then I will declare to them solemnly, ‘I never knew you; depart from me, you evildoers’” (Mt 7:22). This warning demonstrates that it is possible to exercise a charism and yet be outside of God’s will. So we should never assume that a powerful charism such as healings or miracles is a sign of holiness. Even the high priest Caiaphas, who wished to put Jesus to death, prophesied. (Jn 11:49-50) In Numbers, even a donkey sees a heavenly vision! (Num 22:23-33) It follows that we should not be reluctant to ask for a charism because we are unworthy. If God can speak through a donkey, he can use each of us. It is also true, however, that the more united we are with the Lord, the more freely the Holy Spirit will be able to operate through us.

4) THE PURPOSE OF A CHARISM IS TO BUILD UP THE BODY OF CHRIST. Charisms are “for the common good.” A charism is a gift that is to be passed on to others; it is not for the personal benefit of the one who receives it. If you have a gift for music that lifts people’s hearts to God, that gift is not for you, it is for others. If someone else has a gift of exhortation, it is not for her, it is for you and others. However, Paul does make an exception for the gift of tongues as a prayer language: “Whoever speaks in a tongue builds himself up.” (1 Cor 14:4)

5) CHARISMS ARE EFFICACIOUS FOR EVANGELIZATION. Charisms are often signs by which God himself confirms the Good News we proclaim. (Heb 2:4) Paul experienced in his own life the power of supernatural charisms to touch people’s hearts and convince them of the truth of what he preached. His miracles wrought many conversions: “For I will not dare to speak of anything except what Christ has accomplished through me to lead the Gentiles to obedience by word and deed, by the power of signs and wonders, by the power of the Spirit [of God].” (Rom 15:18-19) Even today, many people have been converted by experiencing a healing or a deliverance from demonic oppression.

6) CHARISMS ARE TO BE EAGERLY DESIRED. Paul says, “Strive eagerly for [or ‘be zealous for’] the greatest spiritual gifts.” (1 Cor 12:31; 1 Cor 14:1) We should not be reluctant to pray for, desire and practice using charisms out of a false sense of humility. Since a charism is a gift to be given away, my charism is not about me. It is about the person the Lord wants to touch through me. “Ask and it will be given to you; seek and you will find; knock and the door will be opened to you.” (Mt 7:7)

(1 Cor 12:7)

7) ALL HAVE A RESPONSIBILITY TO EXERCISE THEIR CHARISMS. Using the charisms we have been given is not optional. The world and the Church need them. Paul exhorts, “Since we have gifts that differ according to the grace given to us, let us exercise them: if prophecy, in proportion to the faith; if ministry, in ministering; if one is a teacher, in teaching; if one exhorts,

in exhortation; if one contributes, in generosity; if one is over others, with diligence; if one does acts of mercy, with cheerfulness.” (Rom 12:6-8) The First Letter of Peter gives similar advice: “As each one has received a gift, use it to serve one another as good stewards of God’s varied grace.” (1 Pt 4:10)

8) THE ROLE OF LEADERSHIP IN THE CHURCH IS TO CALL FORTH CHARISMS. The role of leaders in the Church is not to do all the ministry but “to equip the holy one for the work of ministry, for building up the body of Christ.” (Eph 4:12) Equipping the members of the Church for ministry includes teaching about charisms, discerning them, calling them forth, guiding them, correcting mistakes and overseeing their harmonious interaction. Paul emphasizes that leaders are not to hinder charisms but foster them. “Do not quench the Spirit. Do not despise prophetic utterances. Test everything; retain what is good. Refrain from every kind of evil.” (1 Thes 5:19-22)

9) LOVE IS ‘THE WAY.’ At the center of Paul’s teaching on charisms is his great hymn to love in 1 Corinthians 13. “Strive eagerly for the greatest spiritual gifts. But I shall show you a still more excellent way. If I speak in human and angelic tongues but do not have love, I am a resounding gong or a clashing cymbal ….” (1 Cor 12:31-13:1) This provides the foundational principle on which to discern and pastor the exercise of charisms. It is not a question of choosing between charisms and love — rather, charisms are the tools of love. Love is the standard; love is the aim of every use of a charism.

DR. MARY HEALY is professor of Scripture at Sacred Heart Major Seminary and a bestselling author. She is a general editor of the Catholic Commentary on Sacred Scripture and author of two of its volumes, The Gospel of Mark and Hebrews. Her other books include Healing and Men and Women Are from Eden. Dr. Healy is chair of the Doctrinal Commission of Catholic Charismatic Renewal International Service (CHARIS) in Rome. She was appointed by Pope Francis as one of the first three women ever to serve on the Pontifical Biblical Commission.

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to the WHEN I STARTED MY FRESHMAN MATH CLASS IN ALGEBRA, I THOUGHT IT WAS A PIECE OF CAKE, THE ANSWERS CAME QUICKLY AND EASILY. MY TEACHER, HOWEVER, WOULD NOT ACCEPT THE ANSWERS ALONE. “SHOW YOUR WORK” WAS THE CONSTANT REFRAIN I HEARD. SHE WANTED ME TO THINK THROUGH THE PROBLEMS STEP BY STEP SO THAT I COULD BE CONFIDENT ABOUT GETTING THE RIGHT ANSWERS. I HATED DOING IT, BUT SHE WAS RIGHT. IT HELPED ME FORM GOOD ALGEBRAIC HABITS THAT PAID OFF LATER THAT YEAR AND BEYOND AS I PROGRESSED THROUGH TRIGONOMETRY AND INTO CALCULUS. FATHER STEPHEN PULLIS, STL, WRITER • MIKE MARSHALL, ILLUSTRATOR

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Could hospice help someone you know?

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Forming good habits is an essential part of a good life. Parents want their children to develop good habits like brushing their teeth, saying “please” when they ask for something or sharing their toys. Teachers want to develop good habits in their students. One of the good habits called for in the Unleash the Gospel pastoral letter is “docility to the Holy Spirit.” “Docile” comes from the Latin word docere (to teach). Being docile means being teachable. We can think about it as being attentive to the instructor, having our ears attuned to the teacher’s voice and our pen and paper ready to take notes. It means an attitude of receptivity to what the teacher offers. This posture and attitude imply a realization that the teacher offers something which I do not have and is good for me. Docility to the Holy Spirit means that I look to the Holy Spirit — the Spirit who is the love between the Father and the Son in the internal life of the Trinity — for the wisdom to be faithful to Jesus Christ. The example of the early Church is a window into how we can form and live out this good habit. While the Church was praying and fasting, we read, in the Acts of the Apostles, they had a conviction of a word from the Holy Spirit: “Set apart for me Barnabas and Saul for the work to which I have called them.” So they did just that: “They laid hands on them and sent them off. So they, sent forth by the Holy Spirit, went down to Seleucia and from there sailed to Cyprus.” (Acts 13:2-4) One common question is: “How can I be certain it is the Holy Spirit?” If I knew for sure that it was God asking me to do this thing, I would do it. But that’s not how the Holy Spirit usually works. He does not knock us over the head. We can use the same tools for discerning that we read about in Acts. Are we praying and fasting, asking the Holy Spirit to reveal his will to us? Are we praying and fasting together? If we want to hear the voice of the Holy Spirit, we need to declutter our spiritual lives. This means carving out time for God and actively working to be free from distractions. No one will ever be perfectly distraction-free, but the more we set ourselves “like flint” on the Lord in prayer, the more ready we will be to hear his word. There is tremendous power in fasting

FAT HE R ST E P HE N P U LLI S , S T L is the director of evangelization and missionary discipleship for the Archdiocese of Detroit and serves as a weekend associate at St. John Vianney Parish in Shelby Township and as an adjunct spiritual director at Sacred Heart Major Seminary.

as well. It is a prayer of our bodies that helps to focus our minds and creates a physical hunger that emulates our spiritual hunger. Fasting is a time-tested method of clearing away distractions to hear the Holy Spirit. Docility ultimately means that I have to step out in faith once I have some degree of certainty in the Holy Spirit’s will for me. We are called to “walk by faith and not by sight.” St. Paul’s words are a reminder that God’s will is rarely made manifest to us in some absolute way. It requires trust in him and stepping out into the unknown. Because God is gentle with us, he often moves us gradually. He calls for small acts of trust and builds on our cooperation; he invites us to greater faith. Thus, we learn to be docile to the Holy Spirit in degrees: “The person who is trustworthy in very small matters is also trustworthy in great ones; and the person who is dishonest in very small matters is also dishonest in great ones.” (Lk 16:10)

We are upon such a moment of growing docility to the Holy Spirit. In light of the work of Synod 16 and the call to embrace the identity of a missionary archdiocese, Archbishop Vigneron is leading us to enter a new way for our parishes to relate to each other. The deeper level of cooperation and sharing of resources will require all of us to grow in trust in the Lord. The Holy Spirit is not a safe spirit, and we do not know the challenges this new model of Families of Parishes will bring. But we know that docility to the Holy Spirit means fearlessly saying yes to whatever he asks of us. The work of the Church is nothing less than the salvation of souls and winning the world back for Jesus. Our work of parishes entering into families means that we are embarking on a new era in the Archdiocese of Detroit. We do not have the luxury of knowing the will of the Holy Spirit “for sure.” Instead, we trust that he guided us through Synod 16 and continues to guide us through our chief shepherd, our archbishop. I have every confidence that the work we are doing through Families of Parishes is a genuine movement of the Holy Spirit, inviting us to trust more deeply in him and be transformed into the diocese he wants us to be, poised to proclaim Jesus as Lord for the next generation. The work to unleash the Gospel is a long process involving not simple solutions but calling for a “renewal of structures to make them Spirit-led and radically mission-oriented.” (Unleash the Gospel pastoral letter, Foundational Conviction) We cannot do this without docility to the Holy Spirit. Come Holy Spirit, teach us and guide us.

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POETRY

VENI

CREATOR Come, Holy Spirit, bending or not bending the grasses, appearing or not above our heads in a tongue of flame, at hay harvest or when they plough in the orchards or when snow covers crippled firs in the Sierra Nevada. I am only a man: I need visible signs.

BY CZES L A W MI ŁOSZ Considered one of the greatest poets of the 20th century, Miłosz was a Polish-American poet and diplomat who survived the German occupation of Warsaw during World War II. His poetry explores issues of morality, politics, history, his experience of war and his Catholic faith.

I tire easily, building the stairway of abstraction. Many a time I asked, you know it well, that the statue in church lifts its hand, only once, just once, for me. But I understand that signs must be human, therefore call one man, anywhere on earth, not me — after all I have some decency — and allow me, when I look at him, to marvel at you.

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HOPE ACQUILANO, ILLUSTRATOR


ON NATURE & GRACE Are we but mindless, Lord? sniffing at a thin layer of dust before our noses wishing for sustenance for something sweet

outside of ourselves

Have we no nature but that of the dogs as you float over our heads, some heady white bird we hunt in the mist of the existential evening? Or is turned over? That you all knowing of our concupiscence having already descended through this earthly realm to save us

is it possible that you hover below us as well

and that even as we tickle the gutter with our noses

you look at us and cut the darkness

BY CA RLY T. FLYNN Carly T. Flynn is a Pacific University MFA graduate living just outside of New Orleans with her family. She’s published in Ponder Review, Borderlands: Texas Poetry Review, Cagibi Journal, Pittsburgh Poetry Journal and Louisiana Literature.

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R E

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LES

DANIEL GALLIO writes from Ann Arbor, where he is a member of St. Francis of Assisi Parish.

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OP

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SACRE D PL ACES

Pilgrims rest beside an image of Our Lady of Guadalupe on Dec. 11, 2018, the eve of her feast day at the Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe in Mexico City. (CNS/ Carlos Jasso, Reuters)


Before Our Lady appeared to Juan Diego, missionaries had little success evangelizing Mexican Amerindians, who deeply resented the religion of their Spanish conquerors. After she appeared, the miraculous portrait she left behind inspired 9 million Amerindians to embrace baptism and the Catholic Church. “Her image brings us together as Hispanics and Catholics,” says Gabriela Sakmar, who leads the Federation of Our Lady of Guadalupe Societies for the Archdiocese of Detroit. “We call her La Morenita, the dark-skinned lady, as a way of affection. We have a heavenly mother with whom we can identify.” Our Lady of Guadalupe is considered the mother of the Mexican people, but she also called herself the “Mother of all peoples.” The lessons of her visitation are meant for every nation and time — especially that faith in Christ can bring reconciliation between ethnic groups in conflict.

RADIANT AS THE SUN

THE BASILICA HOSTS 20 MILLION PILGRIMS PER YEAR, THE MOST VISITED CATHOLIC SHRINE IN THE WORLD. PILGRIMS COME, SOME CRAWLING ON THEIR KNEES, TO VENERATE THE TILMA, OR CLOAK, OF ST. JUAN DIEGO. UPON THIS SACRED RELIC IN 1531, THE BLESSED MOTHER IMPRINTED HER IMAGE: AN OLIVE-SKINNED MAIDEN OF INDIAN AND SPANISH BLOOD WHO FORESHADOWS THE UNIQUE ETHNIC BLEND OF THE FUTURE MEXICAN NATION.

DANIEL GALLIO, WRITER

The beautiful lady listened patiently to her “littlest son,” her “Juan Dieguito,” as he explained why he could not carry out her latest request. “I am only a man of the fields, a poor creature. You have sent me to a place I do not belong,” expressed a despairing Juan Diego. Earlier that morning, Juan Diego Cuauhtlatoatzin, a Chichimecan Amerindian, had almost finished the nine-mile walk from his home to the Franciscan monastery near Mexico City. It was the Spanish feast day of the Immaculate Conception, Dec. 9, 1531. The 57-year-old convert to Catholicism looked forward to attending Mass on this special day. As he circled the western slope of a hill called Tepeyac, Juan Diego heard music like the singing of a thousand birds. A voice called his name, drawing him to the summit. There stood a young lady. “He was astonished at her splendor. Her dress was radiant as the sun,” describes the Nican Mopohua, the earliest account of the event. The beautiful lady had a simple request: Ask the bishop of Mexico City to build a chapel on this very hill to give praise to her son Jesus and where she will hear the cries of the suffering. “Go give your best effort to this task,” she said. In his episcopal palace, the aristocratic Bishop Zumárraga listened to Juan Diego with disbelief.

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‘LET NOTHING DISTURB YOU’ And now, this poor man of the fields found himself before the brilliant lady a second time with the sorry news. “I earnestly beg you, my lady, to send one of the noblemen, respected and esteemed, so your mission will be accomplished.” Again, the lady listened patiently — but answered with a motherly dose of tough love. “Listen, my littlest one! Understand I have many servants I could send. I strictly command you from my heart to go again tomorrow and see the bishop. And tell him again that I, the ever-virgin, holy Mary, Mother of God, am sending you.” The bishop listened more attentively this time. But still ... could Juan Diego ask the lady for proof that she is the Immaculate Virgin? Juan Diego returned a third time to Tepeyac with the bishop’s response. “Very well, my dearest child, come back here tomorrow so that you can take to the bishop the sign of truth he has asked for.” The next day, though, Juan Diego followed his heart and tended to his dying uncle Juan Bernardino. The day after, Dec. 12, the long walk to find a priest took Juan Diego past Tepeyac again. “First, I have to call the priest,” he thought as he chose the eastern path to postpone encountering Our Lady. “My poor uncle is anxiously awaiting him.” But the Mother of God has good eyes. She came down from the summit and met Juan Diego for a final visitation. After hearing his explanation, the Immaculate Virgin spoke words that have comforted millions through the centuries: “Am I, your Mother, not here? Are you not in the folds of my mantle? Let nothing else disturb you.” The Blessed Mother then performed four miracles. She instantly healed Juan Bernardino. She revealed to him her name: Our Lady of Guadalupe. Next, she caused out-of-season flowers to bloom on the rocky summit, which the Blessed Mother delicately arranged in Juan Diego’s body-length tilma. Lastly, most miraculously, she impressed her image onto the tilma, “The only true portrait of the Mother of God in existence,” suggests author Francis Johnston.

CHAPEL FOR OUR LADY As the brilliant flowers tumbled to the floor of the bishop’s palace, and the imprint of the beautiful lady exploded from Juan Diego’s rough agave cloak, Bishop Zumárraga fell to his knees in awe — but also in remorse for having doubted this gentle man. Zumárraga immediately built a small chapel on Tepeyac to display the precious tilma. He invited Juan Diego to live there, caring for the chapel and the thousands of pilgrims who came to venerate the image, Indians and Spaniards together. St. Juan Diego died in 1548. His body is lost to history, but his spirit of hospitality continues at today’s National Basilica.

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The ORIGINAL : Our Lady of Guadalupe, Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe, outside Mexico City. Photo courtesy of Prayitno Photography.


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FOOTSTEPS OF JUAN DIEGO Whichever day you visit the basilica complex — informally called La Villa de Guadalupe — you will be among enthusiastic pilgrims from all over the world. Still a beloved place for the Mexican people is the Old Basilica, home of the tilma for 266 years. Built on a former lakebed, the basilica began to sink and had to be closed. It is now open again as a perpetual adoration chapel. The enormous New Basilica replaced the Old Basilica in 1975. The upper floor has nine chapels; the crypt floor has 15,000 devotional niches. The tilma of Our Lady is viewed here from moving walkways that pass under the icon. “The tilma is a wonder, beautiful and perfect,” Gabriela exclaims. “It hides many symbols that speak to different cultures and generations. It continues to evangelize and convert.” Follow the footsteps of Juan Diego up Tepeyac hill through gorgeous gardens to the Templo del Cerrito. Built in 1666, it marks where Our Lady appeared three times to Juan Diego and where the heavenly flowers bloomed. On Tepeyac’s eastern side, the Capilla del Pocito (1791) commemorates the Blessed Mother’s fourth appearance to Juan Diego. You can dip into an ancient well and take home water with presumed healing powers. Surrounding the basilica’s immense plaza is the Capuchin parish, the Chapel of the Indians that includes the foundation of the first chapel and the Basilica Museum. Consider a trip to the Chapel of the Fifth Apparition, in Tulpetlac. It sits over the ruins of Juan Bernardino’s home. Pope St. John Paul II designated it a World Center of Healing.

INTERCESSOR FOR LIFE Gabriela visited the national shrine many times as a child growing up in Mexico. But she credits one pilgrimage as an adult for a miraculous personal healing. Gabriela and her husband, Joseph Sakmar, were unable to conceive, even after consulting many doctors. They happened to be at the national shrine the day Pope St. John Paul II died, April 2, 2005. “I prayed very hard to Our Lady of Guadalupe for a child, also invoking the intercession of the Holy Father,” she recalls. Two years later, the couple welcomed son Nathaniel and soon after daughter Maria. In 2013, the entire Sakmar family came to the shrine in a pilgrimage of gratitude. “She is a miracle worker,” states Carmen Ochoa, leader of the Guadalupano Group at St. Anastasia Parish in Troy. Carmen says she felt special comfort and love from Our Lady after her mother passed away. An experience shared by many, Gabriela relates, “is finding in Our Lady the mother they lost.” “Our Lady of Guadalupe is a living mother who never abandons us,” group member Claudia Ortiz agrees. “She is always advocating for us in front of the heavenly Father. She teaches us the way to be saved.”

WHAT DOES THE TILMA MEAN? Since indigenous Americans communicated using picture writing, the Blessed Mother chose to communicate her love and solidarity with them through an image filled with symbols. • Her olive skin tone indicates she is a mestiza, of Amerindian and Spanish blood. She prefigures the blended ethnicity of the future Mexican nation. • Downcast eyes and folded hands mean she is not a goddess but a worshipper of God. • Medallion with a cross below her neckline shows the legitimacy of the Christian religion of the Spaniards. • She is surrounded by clouds, meaning she comes from heaven. Stars on her mantle indicate she is greater than the stars the Aztecs worshipped. • Black ribbon above her waist indicates she is pregnant. A jasmine flower, a sign of divinity for the Amerindians, overlays her womb. • Our Lady blots out the sun. She is greater than the sun god to whom the Aztecs’ rulers offered human sacrifice. • She stands upon and crushes the crescent moon, a symbol of the Aztec moon god. And, most miraculously: • The tilma is made of cactus fiber that decays within 30 years. After 480 years, it is still intact. (Even a terrorist bomb blast in 1921 could not damage it.) •M icroanalysis reveals 12 persons reflected in both pupils, as if she is looking down at the scene the moment Juan Diego unfurls his flowers before an astounded Bishop Zumarraga. • S cience cannot explain the image. It is not paint. It is not printing or photography, as neither was invented yet. It is a miracle.

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OUR HISTORY

OF

DETROIT BASKETBALL In a difficult time,

Detroit’s kids found refuge in a Catholic school basketball gym.

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AS A MEMBER OF THE NOWLEGENDARY FAB FIVE, DETROIT NATIVE AND UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN FRESHMAN JALEN ROSE WAS JUST BEGINNING TO MAKE HIS LASTING IMPACT ON THE GAME OF BASKETBALL. AFTER ONE OF THE 1992 TOURNAMENT GAMES, A REPORTER ASKED HIM HOW HE ACQUIRED HIS KNACK FOR “TAKING THE RIGHT SHOT, MAKING THE RIGHT PASS, GETTING THE BALL TO THE RIGHT PLAYER, AFTER FEWER THAN 40 GAMES IN COLLEGE.” Rose immediately responded with the place and the coach that played a formative role in his development as a basketball player and as a young man: “It started at St. Cecilia’s. We had a coach there, Sam Washington. He didn’t just send you out there to play. He worked on developing you, teaching the game.” To fully understand the impact of St. Cecilia’s Gym on Detroit’s West Side, you have to go back more than 50 years to a period in the Motor City’s history that many would like to forget. During the last days of July in 1967, Detroit looked like the ruins of an urban war zone. The shattered glass of storefront windows covered sidewalks, the remains of automobiles smoldered on Grand Boulevard and the National Guard patrolled Detroit’s neighborhoods. In the wake of the Detroit Riots, Sam Washington, the athletic director at St. Cecilia’s Parish, was thinking first about the safety of his children and other kids in the neighborhood. Schools were out

for summer break and these kids were used to playing ball in the parks and streets, often late into the night. Following the riots, however, a wave of violence gripped Detroit and a 9 p.m. citywide curfew was now being strictly enforced by law enforcement. That’s when St. Cecilia’s leadership made a monumental decision that forever altered the course of basketball history in Detroit. With the full support of Pastor Father Raymond Ellis and Associate Pastor Father Ed Olszewski, Washington led efforts to revamp the parish’s dilapidated gym. Volunteers from the neighborhood, including many teenagers known for their summertime “mischief,” pitched in. Some repainted the locker room, cafeteria and kitchen. Others focused on the condition of the gym’s hardwood floor, which needed to be stripped, sealed and re-varnished. A few weeks later, Washington unlocked the doors of the renovated St. Cecilia’s gym and invited all

JOE BOGGS, WRITER • PHOTOS BY VALAURIAN WALLER

the neighborhood kids, regardless of whether they or their parents attended the parish. For the remainder of that summer, Detroit’s kids found refuge in a Catholic school basketball gym they simply called “The Saint.” Soon enough, St. Cecilia’s gym was attracting middle school and high school kids by the dozen, including some of the most promising basketball talent Detroit had to offer. “We’d have maybe 100 kids showing up each Monday, Wednesday and Friday to play,” Washington told the Detroit Free Press back in 1969. Washington organized springtime and summer basketball programs and leagues for hundreds of participants. Curiosity and fanfare grew; what started as a temporary haven for a neighborhood experiencing crisis started attracting big names and talent. Just a few years after the opening, Dave Bing — an all-star shooting guard and a future mayor of Detroit — was going through a contentious contract dispute with the hometown Pistons. Prohibited from using the same court as his professional teammates, Bing was invited to hone his legendary skills on St. Cecilia’s hardwood. The future hall of famer practiced there for several weeks as neighborhood teens looked on with delight. Once the dispute was settled, Bing donated his $2,500 fine to Sam Washington’s basketball programs. This cemented the Saint’s enduring legacy as a proverbial proving ground for the region’s most promising basketball talent. Top high school and college players from Detroit and beyond started making regular athletic pilgrimages to St. Cecilia’s. Among them was a

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Youth play basketball in St. Cecilia’s Gym, 2012. (Photo provided)

lanky high school kid from Lansing named Earvin “Magic” Johnson, a University of Indiana guard named Isiah Thomas, George Gervin (a rising star at nearby Martin Luther King Jr. High School who went on to enjoy a lengthy Hall of Fame professional career), Jalen Rose, Steve Smith, Derrick Coleman, B.J. Armstrong and Chris Webber — all future NBA All-Stars. “I’ll never forget the first time I took Chris,” stated Mayce Webber, the father of the collegiate and NBA superstar. “He came into the gym and had this look on his face like he was in heaven.” Dick Vitale, now the beloved voice of college hoops, also referred to St. Cecilia’s gymnasium as “Hoops Heaven,” a place where basketball greats seemingly appeared out of nowhere. Division 1 coaches also flocked to the West Side gym in hopes of establishing a relationship with an under-the-radar recruit or a sure-fire blue-chipper. Despite the amazing talent that stepped foot on the court almost daily, Sam Washington never lost sight of what was most important. He affectionately called the hundreds of teens who came through the Saint’s basketball programs “his kids” and they

I’LL NEVER FORGET THE FIRST TIME I TOOK CHRIS, HE CAME INTO THE GYM AND HAD THIS LOOK ON HIS FACE LIKE HE WAS IN HEAVEN.” — MAYCE WEBBER, THE FATHER OF NBA SUPERSTAR CHRIS WEBBER

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The exterior of St. Cecilia’s gym in Detroit.

in turn called Washington their “Godfather.” Many of these Detroit teens grew up in single-parent homes, lacked consistent access to food or struggled in school. Washington told the Free Press that it was not uncommon for neighborhood boys, some of whom were Division 1 athletes, to “come to my office to cry and beg and wish they could read and write and spell.” Accordingly, St. Cecilia’s began to offer tutoring services in the 1980s. Jalen Rose, a St. Cecilia’s student at the time, noted, in an interview with Unleash the Gospel, that growing up in Detroit in the 1980s was tough. The city’s predominantly Black neighborhoods were being devastated by the crack cocaine

epidemic, as law enforcement targeted addicts just as vigorously as drug dealers. Most of the families Jalen knew were “broken,” with fathers or other family members incarcerated for low level drug offenses. Jalen’s mom Jeanne Rose knew her son needed guidance and a place of refuge growing up in this environment. Rose explained, “My mother wanted to make sure I benefited from [Washington’s] leadership.” While a middle school student at St. Cecilia’s, Jalen spent much of his spare time at the Saint, performing “odd jobs” like sweeping the gym floor and running errands for Washington. He became a “mascot of sorts” for some of the older local


high school players like Smith, Coleman and Armstrong. To this day, Rose still cherishes the work ethic and discipline he learned in St. Cecilia’s gym. “To see other players constantly in the gym putting work in for the love of the game, not just what the game could reward you with, was truly a life lesson for all to witness,” Rose said. Rose also fondly remembered the spiritual leadership of Monsignor Thomas Finnegan, the longtime pastor at St. Cecilia. Finnegan, an athlete growing up, was known to be constantly involved around the Saint: doing yard work around the gym, climbing scaffolding to paint the walls of the basketball court. Vitale noted that “Father Finnegan was really an extension of what that program was all about, always giving, and giving and giving.” Monsignor James Robinson, the first Black rector at the Cathedral of the Most Blessed Sacrament, told the Free Press back in 2000 that he was thoroughly impressed at how Finnegan immersed himself fully in African-American culture. “He thought Black and he felt Black,” shared Robinson.

The Saint was shaken to its core in the 1980s. On Nov. 8, 1988, Washington suffered a stroke working at St. Cecilia’s and died a few weeks later. At his funeral, it seemed that all of Detroit’s neighborhoods and suburbs converged on St. Cecilia’s Church. Mitch Albom made note of the wide diversity of people filling the pews, “They came from all over, white, black, old, young, basketball players, kids in sneakers, little girls, mothers, fathers, coaches.” To Finnegan, this was no surprise. “Sam had the ability to mend and heal people ... he was so well-known and well-loved by athletes, coaches, parishioners, people on the street,” he told the Free Press. Since Washington’s death, the Saint has faced its share of difficulties. The 2008 economic recession and Detroit’s filing for bankruptcy in 2013 were powerful indicators of the financial turmoil gripping the Motor City. The population drain out of Detroit in the 1990s and 2000s had major effects on St. Cecilia’s. Many inner-city kids and teens who formerly sought refuge at the

Saint relocated to the suburbs with their families. Simultaneously, the rise of travel AAU (Amateur Athletic Union) basketball in the spring and summer months kept up-andcoming basketball players occupied elsewhere. In 2011, St. Cecilia’s elementary school was closed due to slumping enrollment. A couple of years later, St. Cecilia’s merged with neighboring St. Leo, forming the new Parish of St. Charles Lwanga. And with the current COVID-19 outbreak prompting the cancellation of most recreational gatherings and events in Southeast Michigan, St. Cecilia’s gym will likely remain empty for the rest of this summer. Yet, the Saint — with its beautiful rose window, imposing brick facade and its storied history — continues to inspire hope for better days ahead. Plans to expand and renovate the gym are in the works, stated St. Charles Lwanga’s pastor, Father Ted Parker, in a recent online Archdiocese of Detroit forum that discussed the Church’s teaching and response to racism. St. Cecilia’s gym was and still is more than just a basketball gym to those who played there. It embodies the enduring love and selfless dedication of the Washington family, the St. Cecilia community and many others who provided a sanctuary for neighborhood kids who not only desired athletic training but also guidance and help during their most troubling times.

JOE BOGGS, a parishioner at St. John the Baptist in Monroe, currently serves as the co-chair of the Evangelization & Catechesis Committee for the Monroe Vicariate. He has been married to his wife, Bridget, for six years and teaches history at a public high school in Perrysburg, Ohio.

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CONVERSATIONS WITH GOD

YOUR MISSION

FROM GOD

molokai St. Damien of Molokai shows us how to change the world, and ourselves 42

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DON’T WAIT FOR OPPORTUNITY TO KNOCK Nothing about St. Damien’s work with the lepers of Molokai was supposed to happen. It was his older brother, Pamphile, who was selected for a mission to the Sandwich Islands. But when his brother fell too ill to travel, Damien seized his chance. He wrote to his order’s superior general and pitched the idea with an irresistible angle, begging him to “not throw away the passagemoney.” When his orders came through, his confreres were shocked. Damien had not yet even been ordained a priest! As he hurriedly prepared for his voyage, Damien had a photo taken of himself to leave with his mother — he knew she would never see him again in this life. He left with it a note, asking her to pray that “we may have courage to fulfill the holy will of God, everywhere and at all times.” REFLECT AND PRAY: When we are discerning God’s will for our lives, we can’t wait for a bolt of lightning or a dramatic sign from above; we have to seek out the work meant for us. Rather than praying for a sign or some direction, try praying for the courage to serve God wherever there is an opportunity to help others.

BE SERIOUS ABOUT YOUR WORK From his first days as a novice, St. Damien distinguished himself as an energetic and tireless laborer. One biographer notes, “The great interest he took in his work made him a subject of joy to his superiors.” When he landed in Hawaii, his work ethic became even more impressive. He once scrambled over three craggy mountains to find a remote outpost. When he arrived, “his hands were torn and lacerated, and the blood flowed freely; his feet, too, were wounded, for the boots that

should have protected them were cut and rendered almost useless by the hard treatment they had received.” His persistence was a hallmark of his ministry and it developed an almost superhuman strength in him. “The natives are in constant wonder at it; they think it a miracle when they see Father Damien carrying a beam of wood up the hill all by himself, which three or four of them together could scarcely lift,” one observer noted. REFLECT AND PRAY: A life of holiness is not all candlelit contemplation. St. Damien poured his energy into any worthwhile task that presented itself to him — building a school or a chapel with his bare hands, caring for patients with his limited medical knowledge and creating gardens to provide food for his community. What good work is right at the tip of your fingers? Pray for the wisdom and strength to begin to do the work right in front of you.

GO BEYOND YOUR COMFORT ZONE The lepers of Molokai waited years for a priest; the mission was deemed too difficult for anyone. When Damien volunteered to go, he was supposed to serve for a short time, as part of a rotating roster. The fear of contagion and the lawless danger of the colony were powerful deterrents. But these were nothing compared to the assault on the senses a visit to Molokai would supply. St. Damien wrote candidly about his first exposure: “When I first said Mass to this people, my stomach was rebellious and I was compelled, at times, to go to the windows at either end of the sanctuary to inhale a breath of pure air, and as the time approached for consecration, to be followed by the Communion, I was filled with a dreadful horror, for fear

KATHLEEN M. CARROLL, WRITER • DIEGO DIAZ, ILLUSTRATOR

that after having received the sacred elements I might reject them.” He took up smoking, not out of vice, but because the odor of his pipe helped to mask the pervasive stench of human putrefaction. In time, his senses became inured, as he wrote, “But that is all of the past, and I am now scarcely cognizant of these conditions once almost unbearable.” At his own request, Damien was assigned to Molokai permanently. REFLECT AND PRAY: We know that holy men and women are capable of miracles far beyond ordinary people like us. But we honor the saints not because they do what others can’t, but because so often they do what others won’t. No one wanted the risk and misery of ministering on Molokai, but St. Damien transformed that community by doing what no one else wanted to do — even when he himself didn’t want to do it. Is there a place in your life that you’ve been avoiding because it’s distasteful? Do you need to build bridges in a damaged relationship or spend more time with a distant relative, neighbor or co-worker? Sometimes God is waiting for us, right behind the door we’re most reluctant to enter.

KATHLEEN M. CARROLL is the editor of Comboni Missions magazine and the director of communications for the Sisters of Divine Providence. Formerly editorial director of Franciscan Media, she has authored five books and edited more than 1,000 on Catholic life, saints and spirituality.

ST. DAMIEN OF MOLOKAI St. Damien of Molokai was born Jozef de Veuster in Belgium in 1840. The youngest of seven, he followed two older brothers into the priesthood as a member of the Society of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary (also known as the Picpus Fathers). He devoted his life to missionary work among the Hawaiian lepers, providing spiritual, physical and emotional comfort to those suffering from the incurable disease for 16 years before contracting leprosy. He died on the island in 1889. He was canonized by Pope Benedict XVI in 2009 and is the patron of outcasts and those suffering from leprosy.

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PR AYER 101

So great

of

YOU CAN TELL A LOT ABOUT PEOPLE BASED ON THE COMPANY THEY KEEP. LOOK AT OUR LORD AND HIS TWELVE APOSTLES. PETER WAS RATHER HARD-HEADED, THE BROTHERS JAMES AND JOHN WERE SOCIAL CLIMBERS, THOMAS HAD HIS DOUBTS AND SIMON THE RELIGIOUS ZEALOT AND MATTHEW THE IMPERIAL TAX COLLECTOR WERE PRETTY FAR FROM EACH OTHER ON THE POLITICAL SPECTRUM. STILL, JESUS CALLED THEM TO FOLLOW HIM AND WALK IN HIS COMPANY. JESUS SAW EACH OF THEM FOR WHO THEY WERE AND, BY THE HELP OF HIS MERCY AND GRACE, ULTIMATELY WHO THEY COULD BE. AS OUR LORD CALLED THESE INDIVIDUALS TO JOURNEY IN FAITH TOGETHER AS APOSTLES, JESUS CONTINUES TO CALL EACH ONE OF US TO A LIFE OF HOLINESS IN COMMUNITY WITH OTHERS: THE COMMUNION OF SAINTS. ON OUR FAITH JOURNEY WE NEVER TRAVEL ALONE, BUT ARE ENCOURAGED BY “SO GREAT A CLOUD OF WITNESSES” WHO HAVE GONE BEFORE US, COMPETED WELL, FINISHED THE RACE AND KEPT THE FAITH. (HEB 12:1)

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THE SAINTS ALL HAVE THEIR STORIES The apostles provide only a few quick examples, but you can easily find similar themes running throughout the great “cloud of witnesses” that the Church calls the communion of saints: holy men and women, apostles, martyrs, virgins, pastors and religious throughout the ages. God’s work in the lives of the saints is something beautiful to behold; he takes ordinary men and women and gives them the extraordinary grace to persevere in “running the race.” The saints did not start at the finish line (many started far, far from it!), but in the end, through their faith in Jesus Christ, they were awarded the crown of life. Or, to put it another way, Jesus Christ is the king who wears a crown of victory adorned with the

multifaceted jewels of his saints. The life of every saint shows forth a different facet of what life in Christ looks like. The saints seek no glory for themselves, but teach us to give glory to God. The saints do not look for praise for their deeds, but teach us to praise God by our deeds.

THE SAINTS ALL HAVE THEIR STRUGGLES The aspect of Jesus’ life that all the saints knew and felt was sacrifice — the resurrection is promised, but only through the cross. The saints all found the courage to take up their crosses in union with Christ, their Savior. While their sufferings were not always the same as those of Christ (see Col 1:24), the saints knew that they were not alone in their sufferings. They knew that

FATHER BRIAN MELDRUM, WRITER • NAOMI VRAZO, PHOTOGRAPHER


FATHER BRIAN MELDRUM was ordained a priest for the Archdiocese of Detroit in 2015 and served as the associate pastor at Our Lady of the Lakes Parish in Waterford. Before attending Sacred Heart Major Seminary, he was a music minister and theater director and member of St. Thecla Parish in Clinton Township. He is currently studying sacred Scripture at The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C.

LET US PRAY THAT GOD WILL RAISE SAINTS IN OUR TIME Christ was mysteriously present to them in their times of need with a savior’s compassion (in the truest sense of the word com-passion, “to suffer with”). The saints teach us to persevere through struggles, hold firm to the faith and pursue holiness in every aspect of our lives. While some saints suffered in body, “washed their robes and made them white in the blood of the Lamb,” (Rev 7:14) others suffered through emotional crises, disappointments in relationships, loss of family and friends and trials of faith.

THE SAINTS ALL HAVE THEIR SPECIALTIES The Church names many of the saints as patrons for various countries and peoples, professions and occupations, items and objects

of daily life. Maybe a heavenly patron was chosen for you when your parents picked your first or middle name, or maybe there is a saint associated with your birthday, baptism day or wedding anniversary. Many Catholics choose a patron saint who inspires them or whom they want to imitate for their confirmation. The saints we choose or the ones chosen for us are neither accidental nor coincidental: they are part of God’s providence for us. The saints are not distant, idle or fair-weather friends who occasionally grace our lives with their presence. They continually intercede for us and plead our cause before the face of God. At Mass, we join in the song of the angels and saints who are present as our earthly liturgy joins with and points toward the heavenly one.

PRAYERS THAT GOD WILL RAISE SAINTS IN OUR TIME O God “you are glorified when your saints are praised … and in their struggle the victory is yours.” (Preface II of Holy Martyrs) PRAY: In communion with the saints who gave their lives, the martyrs, we pray for those who continue to suffer persecution for the sake of God’s kingdom, for those who take up their crosses daily and for those who lay down their lives for their friends. O God, “you strengthen the Church by the example of the holy lives of your pastors, teach us by their words of preaching and keep us safe in answer to their prayers.” (Adapted from the Preface of Holy Pastors)

PRAY: In communion with the saints who shepherded our Church, the holy pastors, we pray for those who lead our Church today over rough and stormy seas to the safe harbor of our heavenly homeland, and for a strengthening in the universal call to holiness for all and the vocation to ordained ministry in the church. O God, in your saints “it is right to celebrate the wonders of your providence, by which you call human nature back to its original holiness and bring it to experience on this earth the gifts you promise in the new world to come.” (Preface of Holy Virgins and Religious)

PRAY: In communion with the saints who found the pearl of great price in Jesus, the holy virgins and religious, we pray for a renewed consecration and spirit of holiness among all people, and for Christian men and women to be as a leaven in the world to raise those who are lowly to see the heights of God’s glory.

Remember that the goal of our every effort to unleash the Gospel is to make disciples and then to make saints. Archbishop Vigneron said it best: “The long-range hope is that we’re going to have just an incomparable number of beatifications and canonizations of men and women, and young people, and priests, and monks, and sisters and everybody from the Archdiocese of Detroit. So many people, we won’t have enough days for their feast day.”

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P RAYING WITH T HE C HUR CH FATHER S

St. Augustine ON THE CHURCH AS THE

‘WHOLE CHRIST’ 46

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JESSICA AMSBERRY, ILLUSTRATOR


ST. AUGUSTINE ON THE

(354-430) OFFERS A REMARKABLE VISION OF THE CHURCH AS THE “WHOLE CHRIST” (IN LATIN, TOTUS CHRISTUS). THROUGH HIS MEDITATION ON SCRIPTURE, AUGUSTINE RECOGNIZED THAT IF WE ARE TRULY THE BODY OF CHRIST AND INDIVIDUALLY MEMBERS OF THAT BODY, THEN IT MUST BE TRUE TO SAY THAT THE CHURCH IS THE “WHOLE CHRIST,” HEAD AND BODY TOGETHER. In these sermon selections, Augustine explains what he means by this striking expression, “the whole Christ.” It doesn’t mean that somehow Christ is blended with us such that we lose our distinct identities. Christ remains perfect in who he is, both as God eternal and as the man Jesus Christ who has now ascended bodily to the Father. Christ doesn’t need us, the Church, to be perfect and complete. But we need him, and so he has chosen — in his mercy — to attach us to himself in an organic way, so that we might live fully in him. Christ is the vine and we are the branches. (Jn 15:1) We have no life apart from him, but if we remain in the vine, we have life and bear fruit. Thus, the Church is more than just a collection or loose fellowship of those who follow Christ. By his grace and through the indwelling Holy Spirit he has made us his body — his “members.” He has so identified himself with us, that when Saul is actively persecuting Christians, Jesus says to him: “Why are you persecuting me?” (Acts 9:24) For Augustine, then, the head (who is Christ) and the members (who are Christians) make up the “whole Christ” as one single entity. This is a deep and wonderful vision of the identity of the Church.

CO M M E N TARY BY D R . DA NI EL K EAT I NG Dr. Daniel Keating is an author and professor at Sacred Heart Major Seminary.

‘whole Christ’ Our Lord Jesus Christ, brothers and sisters, as far as I have been able to tune my mind to the sacred writings, can be understood and named in three ways. … The first way is: as God and according to the divine nature which is coequal and coeternal with the Father before he assumed flesh. The next way is: when, after assuming flesh, he is now understood from our reading to be God who is at the same time man, and man who is at the same time God, according to that pre-eminence which is peculiar to him and in which he is not to be equated with other human beings, but is the mediator and head of the Church. The third way is: in some manner or other as the whole Christ (totus Christus) in the fullness of the Church, that is, as head and body, according to the completeness of a certain perfect man (Eph 4:13), the man in whom we are each of us members. The third way is how the whole Christ is predicated with reference to the Church, that is as head and body. For indeed head and body form one Christ. Not that he isn’t complete without the body, but that he was prepared to be complete and entire together with us, too, though even without us he is always complete and entire, not only insofar as he is the Word, the only-begotten Son equal to the Father, but also in the very man whom he took on, and with whom he is both God and man together. All the same, brothers and sisters, how are we his body, and he one Christ with us? … How are we members of Christ, with the apostle saying as clearly as can be, “You are the body of Christ and its members”? (1 Cor 12:27) All of us together are the members of Christ and his body; not only those of us who are in this place, but throughout the whole world; and not only those of us who are alive at this time, but what shall I say? From Abel the just right up to the end of the world, as long as people beget and are begotten, any of the just who make the passage through this life, all that now — that is, not in this place but in this life — all that are going to born after us, all constitute the one body of Christ; while they are each individually members of Christ. Without him, we are nothing, but in him we too are Christ. Why? Because the whole Christ (totus Christus) consists of head and body. The Head is he who is the Savior of his body, he who has already ascended into heaven; but the body is the Church, toiling on earth.

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FAMILY CHALLENGE

and From the oldest to the youngest, each family member can act on the seven corporal works of mercy.

LAST YEAR, MY HUSBAND JON AND I FELT A PROMPTING FROM GOD TO TAKE OUR FAMILY TO SERVE DINNER AT OUR LOCAL HOMELESS SHELTER. WE BROUGHT IT UP TO THE KIDS AND WERE A LITTLE TAKEN ABACK BY THE PROTESTS AND CRIES OF, “IT’S FRIDAY MOVIE NIGHT! WE’RE GOING WHERE?” THE OBJECTIONS FINALLY PETERED OUT AND OFF WE WENT.

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The root word of mercy in Latin is misericordia, meaning “misery” and “heart.” We can look at mercy as “giving your heart to the miserable.” When someone steps out and offers a hand of mercy — showing God’s love — it’s a game-changer. It can bring hope and joy to a discouraged soul. The corporal works of mercy tell the despairing, “God cares about you. He’ll provide for you.” And God uses us as his hands and voice. He needs us to be his conduit. But our hearts were also changed by serving our brothers and sisters in that shelter. On one hand, you could feel the hurt and sorrow in the room, but there was an air of hope in the faces we saw. We went there to serve food to the hungry, but we walked away with gratitude and deeper faith in God’s provision.

CRISTIN LUEA, WRITER • THOMAS SHANNON, PHOTOGRAPHER


M

Y A D N O

CRISTIN LUEA is a Jersey girl replanted in Michigan with her husband, daughter and five sons ages 14, 13, 11, 9, 7 and 4. She occasionally finds time to read her favorite authors, Shauna Niequist and Father Walter Ciszek. Cristin is a member of the Work of Christ, a covenant community of disciples on mission.

FEED THE HUNGRY READ: Mt 25: 31-35

Now for a real-life mom confession: As a mother of six, I know how busy life can get. Even though we place a high priority on family time, sports and activities can consume much of our time. Although this is a seven-day challenge, I encourage you to look at your calendar and decide when you can schedule time to sit down for family discussions and do the activities. This might be a challenge. Putting down our life to help another is easier said than done. But Jesus tells us in Matthew 25:40, “Whatever you did for one of these least brothers of mine, you did for me.” Our children are not going to be formed just by osmosis, it requires intentional teaching put into action to help form our children’s relationship with God. Our investments in their lives of faith are never wasted.

REFLECT: Ask your children to imagine walking over to the pantry and it’s completely empty. Then open the fridge and it’s totally bare. Thirteen million American children live in food-insecure households; how can we show those children that God cares about them? ACT: Littles: Help mom make dinner for the family. Say “yes” to whatever task mom assigns. Adolescents: Serve a meal at your local homeless shelter.

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GIVE DRINK TO THE THIRSTY READ: Mt 25:35 REFLECT: Ask your children to close their eyes. Imagine being in a hot, dry desert. Your throat is dry and it’s hard to swallow. Then picture someone walking up to you and handing you a big glass of icy cold water and saying, “This is from God. He loves you.” Would you be grateful? Would it make you more likely to believe that God cares about you? ACT: Littles: Challenge each person to offer a drink to the other members of the family throughout the week. Adolescents: Keep bottled water near the front door for delivery men or other workers who come to your house.

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GIVE ALMS TO THE POOR

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READ: Mt 6:1-4 REFLECT: Giving away our money is hard, but that’s OK. Sacrifice tells God we love him more than our possessions. God doesn’t want us to be attached to money or tell everyone how generous we are. As a family, discuss the different organizations where you currently donate, or can consider donating. ACT: Go through clothes and games and fill a bag to donate. Be sure to include at least one item that is a sacrifice to donate.

THURSDAY SHELTER THE HOMELESS READ: Mt 25:37-40 REFLECT: Imagine walking down the street and seeing Jesus sleeping on a park bench. His clothes are tattered and his beard is dirty. Would you want to help him? How does helping the homeless help Jesus? ACT: Littles: Go shopping to pick out your favorite foods to donate to a food bank or shelter. Adolescents: Contact your local shelter to see what their practical needs are. Post about the shelter on social media and organize donation deliveries with your friends.

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FRIDAY VISIT THE SICK READ: Jas 5:14 REFLECT: When was the last time you were sick and had a hard time getting out of bed? When we are old or sick, what things will be hard to do? When someone steps in to help us, they show us God’s love.

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ACT: Littles: Visit your grandparents to spend time with them and help them with chores or other household tasks. Adolescents: Contact an elderly couple in your parish and offer an afternoon of unpaid yard work.

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VISIT THE IMPRISONED READ: Heb 13:3 REFLECT: Jail is not the only prison people live in. How would you feel if you lived alone? How can we share hope with the lonely? ACT: Littles: Draw and mail cards to your local nursing home. Be creative in your artwork! You can even become pen pals with an elderly person to share stories and brighten their day. Adolescents: Attend an activity time at your local nursing home. Talk to your children honestly about what to expect, but stress the reality that these are “grandmas and grandpas” who need a smile to show God’s love. Encourage them to ask the residents questions about what life was like when they were younger.

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BURY THE DEAD READ: Tb 1:16-17 REFLECT: Praying for the dead is how we honor them. Pray for your family members who have gone to heaven. ACT: Buy or pick flowers. Visit a cemetery and place them on tombstones that look untended and pray for their souls. “May the souls of the faithful departed, through the mercy of God, rest in peace” is a good petition to pray.

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GOING DEEPER

Practicing MENT DIS

CERN

CHILDLIKE ... BUT NOT IRRESPONSIBLE Part of growing up and becoming adults is learning how to think through the decisions we make. As Christians, the same holds true. The freedom of the Gospel is not the freedom from having to figure

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anything out because “it is all in God’s hands now.” Jesus tells us to be childlike, but St. Paul exhorts us to put childish ways aside. (1 Cor 13:11) Jesus rebukes Peter for thinking as men do and not as God does, but then he entrusts his Church to St. Peter to “bind and loose” with discernment. (Mt 16:19, 22-23; Mt 18:18)

Children do not usually exercise good judgment due to inexperience. Similarly, a new Christian doesn’t have the experience needed for Christian discernment. (1 Cor 3:2) Christian discernment is learned with time and practice. Falling in love propels our lives forward with passion so we can discover a

FATHER FRANCIS THERESE KRAUTTER CSJ, WRITER • GRANT WHITTY, PHOTOGRAPHER


person we can remain committed to. The fervor and excitement of new Christian life are an extraordinary grace meant to train us to seek ordinary grace — God’s help — no matter what.

DISCERNMENT: NATURAL AND SUPERNATURAL

FATHER FRANCIS THERESE KRAUTTER, CSJ is a religious priest with the Congregation of St. John. He has lived in Denver, Colo., with three other members of his congregation since 2015. He is the parochial vicar and music director of All Souls Catholic Parish and works in the chaplaincy at Mullen High School. You can follow him on Twitter (@ftherese) or find more of his writing at ftherese.csjohn.org.

Discernment happens in the rational part of our soul. Human decisions like moving houses, or investing time and resources, require thinking before acting. We are influenced by our feelings, but we need clear reasons before we act. Christian discernment also happens in the rational part of our soul. The decision to pray isn’t based on how we feel, it is based on what faith requires. The difference between human and Christian discernment is the end objective. Human prudence prioritizes human happiness and the goods that contribute to it. Christian prudence prioritizes eternal happiness and the goods that make eternal life possible. These two objectives constantly present us with choices. The law of charity is more demanding than human happiness, but not against it. The “law of the flesh,” however, is against charity and human happiness. (Rom 8:1-21) Discernment discards pleasures that tempt but also decides on goods both human and divine. I had a decisive moment of conversion as a student at the University of Texas at Austin. I realized — by the grace of God — that this life is short, and eternity is long. I could build my life on sand, which would suddenly and unexpectedly slide out from under me, or I could build on rock and prepare for heaven, “Yet I live, no longer I, but Christ lives in me.” (Gal 2:20) Christ is my life, the seed of eternal life in my soul, but I still

have plenty of decisions to make. I still have to eat. What I eat, when I eat and how much I eat are human decisions that should be guided by faith. I don’t eat just to survive happily in this world. Human decisions have to take the divine purpose of my life into account, “So whether you eat or drink, ... do everything for the glory of God.” (1 Cor 10:31) Being led by the Spirit means allowing our natural discernment to be elevated by grace. Grace does not destroy our nature; it perfects it and prepares it for eternal glory.

‘DISCRETION’ AND DISCERNMENT: THE DESERT FATHERS The Desert Fathers were the first experts on the subject of discernment. Christian wisdom propagates through time in a special way — we have not become wiser than our fathers. Instead, the Church, with ever-increasing insight, teaches the same wisdom more profoundly. In every age, the Church clarifies and exposes the old more completely. The Gospels are the source. No writing has more wisdom than the Gospels, because Christ, “the wisdom of God” speaks in person. (1 Cor 1:24) Similarly, the teaching of the Desert Fathers is a source for the discernment of spirits. The Conferences by Cassian are a collection of the remembrances of St. John Cassian during his visits with the Desert Fathers where readers can find authoritative teachings on spiritual warfare and the activity of evil spirits. St. Ignatius’ rules for discernment are all found in the conferences and St. Benedict’s Rule is based almost entirely on Cassian’s Conferences and Institutes. The Conferences are surprisingly readable because they are organized as a series of interviews and have interesting stories throughout. The first conference is about the purpose of the spiritual life — union with God — and the goal we need to strive for to

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achieve union: purity of heart. In the second conference about discernment, Abba Moses uses the word discretion for the special grace of discernment. Order is important: first, our intention and purpose must be clear, then we can discern the right way to go about things. Purity of heart can be attained in many ways, but all require “discretion.” Abba Moses tells several instructive stories on discretion: a monk tricked by a demon into believing he needed to be circumcised, Abba Moses himself unable to overcome gluttony until he finally confessed sneaking food to his Abba, a bad elder who shamed a novice seeking relief from his temptations and evil thoughts was himself put to shame.

WISE COUNSEL NEEDED Abba Moses recalls St. Anthony’s words that to gain discretion we must first submit our thoughts to a wise elder. We must become like children and learn from those who have already walked the narrow path. We must confront the reality of temptation and human weakness. Cassian concludes that humility is the key to gaining discretion: the practice of submitting my own judgments to an elder trains me to submit them to God. We see this process in action at the end of the second conference. After 200 years of trial and error, the Desert Fathers finally settled on the right measure of fasting: two biscuits every day eaten after sunset. Changing the amount, frequency or kind of food always led to problems. Scrupulosity and laxism are both symptoms of poor discernment, which can be healed by humble submission to wise counsel. How can we apply the wisdom of the Desert Fathers to our own lives? The first story about the monk who circumcises himself demonstrates fervor’s tendency to lead us to unhealthy extremes. The enemy of our soul can use our fervor against

us, so we have to humbly submit what seems like a great idea to the right person and to wise counsel. It might seem like a great idea to eat nothing for a whole week as a way to fast, but discretion requires us to talk it over with the right person (our spouse, our pastor, our superior) and/or seek wise counsel (spiritual director). The second story is about Abba Moses himself and fervor’s opposite: self-indulgence. He explains how we get stuck in vicious cycles of self-indulgence and sin by keeping it all hidden from the right person. Discretion requires us to humbly confess our temptations and our sin so as to be liberated. Making a good confession regularly means humbly exposing exactly the sins and temptations that we are ashamed of and feel powerless against. Doing so prevents the enemy from continuing to use them against us. The last story about the old monk who shamed the younger monk is important. For some very strange reason, we may still come across people who should be able to provide wise counsel, but instead heap disgrace upon the ones they should be helping. If a priest berates someone in the confessional and leads them to despair, Abba Moses sees it as God’s providence that the priest himself would fall into the same sin he self-righteously disdains. We should not despair if “grey hairs” deceive us and the one we turned to for spiritual counsel turns out to be a bad egg. We can trust that God will provide the right person for us when we need them. With experience, practice and grace, we become wiser and full of discernment. When we are called, let us pass it on with charity.

HUMAN PRUDENCE PRIORITIZES HUMAN HAPPINESS AND THE GOODS THAT CONTRIBUTE TO IT. CHRISTIAN PRUDENCE PRIORITIZES ETERNAL HAPPINESS AND THE GOODS THAT MAKE ETERNAL LIFE POSSIBLE.”

FOR MORE READING: THERE ARE MANY FREE TRANSLATIONS OF THE CONFERENCES BY CASSIAN AVAILABLE ONLINE, INCLUDING AT: NEWADVENT.ORG, CCEL.ORG OR GOOGLE BOOKS.

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PURSUING HOLINESS

and CURTIS SIMPSON, JR. is a single father of two children — Curtis III and Kameryn — ages 14 and 6. As a lifelong, cradle Catholic, Curtis places a high importance on faith in God, family and education. Curtis has a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Baker College and a master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling from Wayne State University. He is also a certified rehabilitation counselor (CRC) and is a member of the American Counseling Association (ACA), a professional counseling organization who endorses highly qualified and educated counselors. In fall 2020, Curtis will continue his education at Sacred Heart Major Seminary, pursuing a lay ecclesial minister certification, and thereafter, he will further his education with a master of arts degree in pastoral studies (M.A.P.S). Curtis is a member of Corpus Christi Parish, where he also works full-time as the director of Christian service. Curtis also works as the programs administrator for the Northwest Detroit Youth Coalition, a local nonprofit whose primary focus is to empower, enhance and engage the lives of young people in Northwest Detroit through summer camps, programs and activities that are designed to build self-esteem and character engagement skills. He is also an active member of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul, serves as the financial secretary for the Knights of Peter Claver, is a member of the Corpus Christi Parish Young Adult Team and is a member of Corpus Christi Parish’s Leadership Team.

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HO W DO YOU CARVE OUT TIME F OR YOUR PERSONAL FAITH DEVELOPMENT? DO YOU HAVE A PRAYER SCHEDULE? CU RT I S: For me, carving out time for personal faith can be challenging. I have to make a dedicated effort and be obedient to God by “sticking to my schedule.” I used to be under the impression that I had to spend a ton of time reading my Bible and reciting traditional Catholic prayers, but I have learned that spending moments with God doesn’t have to be organized or detailed. When I wake up in the morning before my kids, I spend 10 minutes in bed praising God for all that he has given me and all that he has done for me. I ask for special intentions for my family (work family is also my family), my friends, my church community, our Church, government leaders and our world. Then I open my Bible and ask the Holy Spirit to guide me to what it is that I need to know or hear for the day, and then I end my prayer in complete silence. This silence is a time that I dedicate to hearing God’s voice and discerning what it is God wants me to do for the day. This is critical in building my relationship with God, and in order for me to do this, I need to know and recognize his voice. For me, the only way to know his voice is to sit in silence and listen. In the afternoon, I take another five minutes to sit in silence, usually in front of my makeshift sanctuary (which includes a Bible, a small candles and a crucifix on a small table) and read an excerpt or two from a devotional and take a moment to pray to God for the strength to get through the day, the courage to be a missionary disciple and the wisdom to positively touch people who are searching for Jesus! In the evening, my children and I spend time reflecting on our day, thanking Jesus for the gifts we have been blessed with, and then we join hands together and sing the “Our Father.” You would be surprised how much more connected we are after our prayer and reflection time.

HO W DO YOU BAL ANCE YOUR CATHOLIC FRIENDSHIPS WITH THOSE OF OTHER FAITHS? CU RT I S: I believe it is very important to broaden your circle of friends and build relationships outside of the Catholic faith, but to stay rooted in the faith with friends of the same beliefs and practices. As the Christian service director at Corpus Christi Parish in Detroit, we put a lot of energy into Christian service and outreach initiatives in our community. One of our pillars is community engagement and partnering with everyone — no matter their religious preference. For example, for the past two years, we have partnered with the National Council of Jewish Women of Southeast Michigan. As we celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ, our Jewish sisters and brothers are usually out doing a Mitzvah.

DIEGO DIAZ, ILLUSTRATOR

On Christmas day after Mass, we deliver food and gifts to families in our community who are in need with volunteers from the parish, but also with our Jewish sisters and brothers. Consequently, I have made lifelong friends who are eager to bring love to our community and explicitly walk side by side with us as we conquer social injustices that are plaguing our society. These opportunities would not have been possible if we did not open our arms and welcome our sisters and brothers from another faith to join us on the journey!

HO W DO I MAKE PEOPLE WHO HAVE FELT HURT OR OFFENDED BY CHURCH TEACHINGS FEEL WELCOME IN MY CHURCH COMMUNIT Y? CU RTI S : “He who does not love does not know God, for God is love.” (1 Jn 4:8) I believe that everyone I meet should sense a drawing to Christ from me out of love. I generally welcome people by looking at them in their eyes and greeting them with a smile and a hug. It actually is a practice that is mirrored by everyone at my parish. When I try to show goodness, kindness, meekness of heart, patience and understanding to everyone in spite of my feelings, regardless of what happened to them. There is no way we can give love when we are tempted to anger, judgment, impatience, seeking answers before a question is asked, believing the worst and giving up on the person. But when we deny those feelings and rejoice, humble ourselves, bear their burdens and endure all things — that is true love, and true love lays down its natural reactions that are a part of human nature and it expects nothing in return.

WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO YOU TO BE CATHOLIC? CU RTI S : For me, to be Catholic is to understand that God does not want us to be alone and he wants us to know that our lives are very connected. We can do this by listening to a friend who is going through a difficulty, helping a person who you may not even know, volunteering your time for a worthy cause, sharing something positive or simply smiling at someone. This allows us, as Catholics, to be connected to the universal family of God. Through our baptism, we become members of Christ, reborn as daughters and sons of God, incorporated into the Church and made sharers in the mission. (CCC 312, 1213) That’s one of my favorite lines — “sharers in the mission.” We are not alone on this journey, we are all very connected as we each “carry our own cross” on mission together. We each play a particular role in unleashing the Gospel to bring more people to come to know Jesus!

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UNLEA SHE D Q UESTIONNA IR E

IN 2018, WORKING WITH A TEAM OF YOUNG CATHOLICS THAT INCLUDED FELLOW NOTRE DAME GRADUATES ERICH KEREKES, ALESSANDRO DISANTO, ABBY FREDRICKSON AND BRYAN ENRIQUEZ, ALEX JONES LAUNCHED HALLOW, A MOBILE APP THAT HELPS USERS DEEPEN THEIR SPIRITUAL LIVES THROUGH GUIDED CATHOLIC MEDITATION AND CONTEMPLATIVE PRAYER. THE IDEA CAME ABOUT WHEN JONES, AGNOSTIC AT THE TIME, WAS A CONSULTANT. HE BEGAN USING HEADSPACE, A SECULAR MEDITATION APP, BUT ALWAYS FELT LIKE IT WAS LEADING HIM TOWARD A DEEPER

alexjones

SPIRITUAL EXPERIENCE. HE BEGAN TALKING TO THE TEAM, AND THEY QUICKLY DISCOVERED THE BEAUTY OF CATHOLIC CONTEMPLATIVE PRAYER. IT CHANGED THEIR LIVES. THEY LAUNCHED THE APP IN DECEMBER 2018, AND IT’S NOW THE NO. 1 CATHOLIC APP ON APPLE’S APP STORE, WITH MORE THAN 80,000 DOWNLOADS AND THOUSANDS OF FIVE-STAR REVIEWS.

WHAT WAS THE LAST BOOK YOU READ? Currently reading The Life of St. Teresa of Avila, and it is changing my life. She also happens to be Hallow’s patron saint.

WHAT IS YOUR BIGGEST FEAR? Elephants. (It’s a long story — I’ll tell it to you over a beer.)

WHAT IS YOUR BIGGEST PET PEEVE? My wife has super cold hands and she sneaks up on me and sticks them on my back to warm them. It is the absolute worst!

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DIEGO DIAZ, ILLUSTRATOR


WHOM DO YOU ADMIRE?

WHAT WORDS DO YOU USE TOO MUCH?

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE HOBBY OR PASTIME?

Going to have to go with either St. Teresa of Avila again or St. John of the Cross. They’re just such phenomenal Christian mystics and have such deep and beautiful spiritual lives. As far as living folks, probably my dad. He’s just taught me so much about what it means to have fun, to love well and to work hard.

Dope, as in cool or awesome — not the other older meaning. There’s a new company that just prints “God is Dope” on T-shirts and sweatshirts, and it was my favorite Christmas gift.

Hanging out with my newest nephew and godson, Ben. It’s pretty crazy how amazing children can be.

IF YOU HAD UNLIMITED RESOURCES, WHAT WOULD YOU DO?

WHAT GIVES YOU THE MOST HAPPINESS? Prayer and my wife. I really am a pretty lucky guy. I’m quite a bit happier than I deserve.

WHAT DO YOU VALUE THE MOST IN YOUR FRIENDS? Humor. It just makes life a lot more fun and makes sure you don’t take anything too seriously.

WHO IS YOUR FAVORITE AUTHOR?

WHAT’S THE FIRST THING YOU DO WHEN YOU WAKE UP IN THE MORNING?

Dostoevsky. Tough to beat The Brothers Karamazov. Probably only understood half of it, though.

Pray, then — like every other millennial — look at my phone.

WHO IS YOUR FICTIONAL HERO?

OK, I guess we’re getting a little heavy on St. Teresa of Avila, but definitely hers. Either that or her favorite, St. Joseph’s: “I do not remember even now that I have ever asked anything of him which he has failed to grant.” — St. Teresa of Avila

WHAT TALENT OR SKILL DO YOU WISH YOU HAD?

The Iron Giant, 100 percent. First movie I ever cried at. Definitely not the last.

WHAT IS YOUR BEST QUALITY? I like to say, and I believe it to be true, that the only good things I’ve done in my life are ask God for help and ask others for help. That’s probably my best quality.

The stories from our Hallow users we get back telling us how the app has changed their lives and helped them grow closer to God. But that’s not any of my doing — just the team’s and God’s.

WHAT IS THE BIGGEST RISK YOU’VE TAKEN?

WHAT IS YOUR VISION OF HEAVEN?

WHAT KEEPS YOU UP AT NIGHT?

Turning down a job at a great consulting firm to try to build Hallow and help people pray. In the end, it wasn’t a crazy risk, though, and God was there with me through it. He made working on Hallow pretty tough to turn down.

I’ve only ever had one, and it was when my cousin passed away at 45. It was of him running into the arms of my grandmother and hugging … so, I guess hugs.

Just trying to do everything I can to let Hallow and our mission be successful.

WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST JOB?

Probably as a good son, husband and father, and that I tried to do what God asked me to.

Help as many people pray as possible. It’s changed my life, and I just deeply want for other people to get to share in it.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE FEAST DAY?

WHAT IS YOUR EARLIEST MEMORY? I remember falling off a swing and into the mud when I was crazy young, but that’s all. I have a terrible memory. I can hardly remember what I ate for breakfast!

WHAT VIRTUE DO YOU MOST ADMIRE IN OTHERS? Humility. It’s just such a tough one to get right and so powerful when you see it in folks.

Hmmm … that’s tough. There’s a lot, but I really wish I were detail-oriented, and I really wish I were amazing at public speaking.

WHAT ARE YOU MOST PROUD OF?

I was a golf caddie in high school at the local golf course. Actually pays pretty well, but was definitely tiring!

WHICH SAINT DO YOU TURN TO FOR INTERCESSION THE MOST? Ha-ha, apologies for the repetitive answers, but St. Teresa of Avila. Seriously, she’s done so much for me and for the Hallow team. There are too many stories to count.

HOW DO YOU DEFINE A “MISSIONARY DISCIPLE”? Someone listening to God in their life and responding with action.

HOW DO YOU WANT TO BE REMEMBERED WHEN YOU DIE?

WHAT IS YOUR LIFE MOTTO OR MANTRA?

My wedding ring … though my wife gets mad since I play with it all the time.

Well … either “Livin’ the dream” — it’s just a more fun answer to “How are you?” than “Fine” — or our Hallow mission: “To let God hallow my life.”

WHAT IS YOUR MOST EMBARRASSING MOMENT?

WHAT MAKES YOU LAUGH?

There are too many to count, but I once gave a talk to eight college students and two of them fell asleep right in front of me. That was pretty bad.

My wife. I don’t like to admit it, but she’s pretty funny.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST CHERISHED POSSESSION?

HOW DO YOU DEFINE SUCCESS? Heaven.

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PHOTO E SSAY

CORONAVIRUS TH E PEO PL E OF THE ARCHD I O CE SE OF DET R O I T HAVE PROVEN TH EI R R ESILIEN CE TIME AND T I ME AGAIN IN TH E FACE OF SE E MINGLY I NS U R MOUNTABLE C HA LLENGES. IN THE TI M E O F T HE CORONAVI RU S PA NDE MIC, THEY HAV E PR O VE N THIS ONCE AGA IN. WITH THE N ECES SA RY LIMITATION S AND R EST RICTION S TO P R OT ECT THE SAFE T Y OF ALL, PA R I SHE S COMMUN I T I ES, PASTORS AND CAT HO LI C MIN ISTRIE S HAV E A DA P TE D. FROM DRI V E-T H RU CON FESS I O NS A ND PARKING LOT AD O RAT I O N, THE CHURCH OF D ET RO I T F OUND CRE AT I V E W AYS TO ADHE RE TO SO CI A L DISTAN CIN G AND HEA LTH GUIDE LIN E S WHI LE CO N TIN UING TO S ERVE T HE FAITHFUL.

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Starting in March when public Masses were temporarily suspended, Sunday Mass was broadcast live from the Cathedral of the Most Blessed Sacrament for the faithful to watch from home, either online or on television. In this photo, Archbishop Vigneron gives a special blessing for the Archdiocese of Detroit after Easter Sunday Mass at the cathedral.

VALAURIAN WALLER, PHOTOGRAPHER


Archbishop Vigneron celebrates Mass in an empty Cathedral of the Most Blessed Sacrament during the first live broadcast in March. Every Sunday while public Masses were suspended in the Archdiocese of Detroit, Mass was livestreamed from the cathedral for faithful to watch from home, either online or on TV.

Local Catholics gather outside of the cathedral for adoration and the archbishop’s blessing on Easter Sunday.

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THIS IS A PROVIDENTIAL TIME FOR US TO WITNESS TO OUR SURE CONFIDENCE IN JESUS AS LORD OF HISTORY, TO MANIFEST TO THE WORLD THAT WE FACE THIS CHALLENGE WITH

- A R CH BI SHOP ALLEN H. VIG NE RON, 1 0 GU I D E P OS TS F OR C HRI S T IA N S IN T H E T IME O F T H E CO R O N AV IRUS PA N DE MIC

A man waits for confession outside the chapel at St. Bonaventure Monastery on Detroit’s east side in March. The Capuchin Franciscan friars, known for hearing dozens of confessions daily, are keeping their normal schedule, but urging people not to congregate in the waiting area.

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Father Eric Fedewa leads eucharistic adoration in the parking lot at St. Basil the Great Parish in Eastpointe in April.

People pray in their cars as Father Eric Fedewa leads eucharistic adoration in the parking lot at St. Basil the Great Parish in Eastpointe in April.

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Led by Bishop Donald Hanchon, Catholics gather near the statue of Black Jesus at Sacred Heart Major Seminary in June to pray the Rosary for an end to racism.

A woman prays with other Catholics by the statue of Black Jesus at Sacred Heart Major Seminary to pray the Rosary for an end to racism.

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Shrine Catholic High School senior Claire Cerone, with her parents Sarah and Shane Cerone, received a yard sign and visit from administrators of the Royal Oak school as they prepared for graduation. Despite the pandemic’s limitations on social gatherings, schools across the Archdiocese of Detroit creatively honored the class of 2020.

Shrine senior Noah Gappy receives a graduation package from Father Joe Lang as part of the school’s effort to recognize the class of 2020.

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Volunteers prepare bags of food to distribute to the community at St. Peter Parish in Mt. Clemens.

Catholic Charities of Southeast Michigan held a food distribution drive to support families during the pandemic.

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Valid on initial consultations only. Some restrictions apply. Must present ad. Expires 10/31/20.