SLR Sustainability In Local Retail Guide

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CONTENTS

BROUGHT TO YOU BY SLR MAGAZINE ARE YOU DOING ANYTHING SUSTAINABLE THAT YOU WANT TO SHARE WITH US? CONTACT US AT INFO@55NORTH.COM

4 INTRODUCTION: IT’S TIME TO PLAY YOUR PART – AND BE SEEING DOING IT 6 COMMUNICATING WITH YOUR CUSTOMERS: WHAT TO SAY AND HOW TO DO IT 7 COMMENT: CARING FOR YOUR COMMUNITY

Coca-Cola European Partners Sustainable Packaging Manager Gordon McSkimming calls on retailers to help clean up our villages, towns and cities.

8 52 INSPIRATIONAL SUSTAINABILITY IDEAS

52 fantastic ideas to inspire you to as you seek to reduce your store’s impact on the environment.

21 COMMENT: A WORLD WITHOUT PACKAGING WASTE

Trystan Farnworth, Director of Sustainability at Britvic, envisages a world without packaging waste and discusses how Britvic aims to achieve that goal.

22 THOUGHT LEADERSHIP: COCA-COLA EUROPEAN PARTNERS

Local retailers in Scotland have a real opportunity to play a leading role in driving sustainabilityand the key is in working closer with suppliers, wholesalers and customers says Nick Brown, Head of Sustainability at CCEP.

24 COMPANY SPOTLIGHT: TOMRA

Five ways to make your Reverse Vending Machine work harder for you.

26 COMPANY SPOTLIGHT: BRITVIC

Evolving smart packaging choices involves educating consumers, says Britvic.

28 COMPANY SPOTLIGHT: KP SNACKS

KP Snacks has been working hard to improve the environmental impact and health credentials of its products, says Marketing Director Kevin McNair.

31 MARKET RESEARCH: SUSTAINABLE SHOPPING HABITS

Edinburgh-based 56 Degree Insight finds an increasing number of Scots seeking out more environmentally-friendly products.

32 MARKET RESEARCH: FOOD WASTE AND BEYOND

IGD highlights how the industry is taking big progress on cutting food waste.

34 COMPANY SPOTLIGHT: TENNENT’S

Scottish institution Tennent’s is spending over £14m to eradicate single-use plastics and make the brewer carbon neutral.

36 COMPANY SPOTLIGHT: ENVIPCO

Deposit Return made easy, and how you can turn reverse vending into a growth opportunity for your store.

38 COMPANY SPOTLIGHT: VEGWARE

Plant-based disposable cups and other single-use consumables are a great way to close the sustainability loop. SUSTAINABILITY HANDBOOK 2020 I 3


WELCOME

It’s time to play your part – and be seen doing it FOR COMMUNITY-FOCUSED RETAILERS, SUSTAINABILITY IS ONE OF THE MOST CRITICAL CHALLENGES THAT WILL FACE THEM IN 2020 AND LONG INTO THE FUTURE. THE TIME HAS COME FOR US TO FULLY ENGAGE WITH THAT CHALLENGE, AND SHOW OUR SHOPPERS THAT WE ARE ENGAGING WITH IT.

BY ANTONY BEGLEY, PUBLISHER, SCOTTISH LOCAL RETAILER Sustainability matters. That’s a straightforward fact. It was arguably the biggest societal and political issue in 2019 and it’s going to be just as critical this year – and for every year that lies ahead, for that matter. The science is clear, despite what Donald Trump might believe, and the stark reality is that we all have a part to play in approaching that challenge with passion, energy and creativity. As local retailers with strong, long-standing and deep-rooted bonds with your local community, it’s arguable that there is more onus on local retailers to engage with that challenge than on any other industry. If we truly care about the communities we serve, it’s up to us to grab that nettle with both hands and show everyone around us that we are aware, we do care and we’re doing something about it. And if that societal or moral argument doesn’t persuade you, then a much more pragmatic one may get your interest: sustainability matters to your shoppers. There is abundant data available now that tells us very clearly that shoppers are paying more and more attention to the sustainability credentials of both the brands they buy and the retailers they buy them from. That’s true across all of the age groups, but it’s particularly acute at the younger end of the spectrum, the Generation Z. According to recent Kantar research, a massive 82% of 25-34-year olds check a brand’s commitment towards sustainability before making a purchase. Additionally, 76% of all consumers said they had boycotted buying certain brands, had switched brands in the last 12 months or were thinking of doing so because of that brand’s environmental policies. 4 I SUSTAINABILITY HANDBOOK 2020

In other words, your shoppers are increasingly aware of the sustainability credentials of the brands you stock - and also of the sustainability credentials of your store. Here’s the thing, though: take a look around 100 convenience stores in Scotland and you would very probably struggle to find any reference to sustainability. Check their social media posts and you’ll likely come up empty-handed too. Which is odd, especially considering that all local retailers already do a massive amount of sustainability work. Most of you recycle your food waste and your plastic and cardboard packaging, for instance. Yet when was the last time you saw that fact communicated to shoppers? The danger here is that local retailers, the group with arguably the most to gain from adopting more proactive sustainability practices, often looks like the group least inclined to both adopt them and communicate them to shoppers. Producers are falling over themselves to reformulate packaging to minimise plastic waste, as you will discover within this Handbook. Wholesalers are making great strides to reduce their carbon footprints. End user consumers have sustainability at or near the top of their personal agendas. Yet retailers appear to be lagging behind – which is a very dangerous place to be. With competition from big retailers and the online fraternity stiffer than ever, surely our sector needs to be doing all that it can to stay in tune with its shoppers, rather than basically ignoring enormous issues like sustainability?


WELCOME

INTRODUCTION ANTONY BEGLEY / PUBLISHER / SCOTTISH LOCAL RETAILER

Shoppers have more retail options than ever to choose from and many of these channels are working very hard at improving their carbon footprint – and shouting about it to consumers. Sustainability issues are already affecting purchasing decisions and that trend is only going to grow. If you want to not only retain the customers you have but potentially attract new ones to your store, sustainability must be more than an afterthought. It will require to be hardwired into your strategy and you will have to execute that strategy diligently and carefully. Getting greener doesn’t necessarily involve additional cost. It can, of course, but it can also help reduce costs which ultimately improves profits. But the discussion will probably move on from just reducing energy bills and using less fossil fuels. In fact, it probably already has. The new battleground is winning the hearts and minds of shoppers. Fortunately, our sector once again finds itself in the box seat. We already know our shoppers in a way that no other sector does. We already have deep, personal relationships with them, relationships that supermarkets and discounters can only dream of. So we have a decent platform to build from. It’s now up to us to start building. Perhaps it might help to simply change how you view sustainability. Many retailers perhaps view it as a challenge, a problem to be overcome. Look at it more as an opportunity and it might make more sense to you. Building a strong sustainability strategy and sharing it with your shoppers is probably more straightforward than you think. You are already doing a lot of great work, even if you don’t think of it under the label ‘sustainability’. And more and more of the products coming into your store have improved carbon footprints. A little POS, a few social media posts, a new bit of exterior signage highlighting your credentials and you could find yourself seeing new shoppers coming to your door because they want to buy from a business that cares, a business that has a purpose that isn’t exclusively self-serving and financial. A business that cares about the community it serves and the world in exists in. In other words, the good old-fashioned definition of a local retailing outlet.

SUSTAINABILITY MATTERS TO YOUR SHOPPERS Recent Kantar research has once again confirmed that sustainability is a massive issue for shoppers – and it is beginning to have a significant impact on their buying decisions: which products to buy and where to buy them from. Q Plastic epidemic – 53% of consumers rank the overuse of plastic and other types of packaging as one of their top three environmental concerns. More women than men are concerned about it (58% v 49%), with 45-64-year-olds expressing most concern across all age groups (60%). Q Taking responsibility – Almost 90% of consumers agree that brands need to take more responsibility for the waste their products create. Q Younger generations – Those most concerned with global warming are 16-24-year-olds with 65% ranking it as one of their top three concerns; of those, over one-third said it was their number one concern. Q Buying decisions – 82% of 25-34-year-olds say they sometimes or always check a brand’s commitment towards sustainability before making a purchase. Q Boycotting brands – 76% of consumers said they had boycotted buying certain brands, had switched brands in the last 12 months or were thinking of doing so because of that brand’s environmental policies.

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COMMENT

COMMUNICATING WITH SHOPPERS ANTONY BEGLEY / PUBLISHER / SCOTTISH LOCAL RETAILER

Say it loud, say it clear! IT’S NOT ENOUGH THAT YOU’RE TAKING YOUR SUSTAINABILITY CHALLENGES SERIOUSLY YOU ALSO HAVE TO BE TELLING YOUR CUSTOMERS ABOUT WHAT YOU’RE DOING.

Building sustainability into the very fabric of your business is critical but it’s just as important that you let your customers know that you’re on it. More of your shoppers want to hear your story and hear what you are doing to help tackle sustainability issues at the heart of their communities. This needn’t be expensive or time-consuming. All that’s required is a slight shift of focus and an awareness of the the importance of sharing the progress you are making. Here are some things to consider:

HOW TO COMMUNICATE?

Social media – effective and cheap, a great way to talk to existing and potential shoppers. Yes, shout about deals, competitions or community work, but don’t forget to highlight any sustainability improvements as they arise. These could mean dedicated posts, or just tweaking planned posts to add a sustainability angle. Exterior – More people see the outside of your shop than the inside. Why not have a banner made or use some poster sites to highlight your commitment to the environment and what you’re doing about it? Interior – You could create POS or signage to highlight any sustainability developments you are implementing. Print some ‘100% recycled and recyclable posters or shelf talkers.

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WHAT TO TALK ABOUT?

Working out what to tell your shoppers can appear daunting but if you break it down you might find that you have a lot more to say than you imagined. Stuff you’re already doing - you’re already (or should be!) recycling all of your food waste, cardboard and plastic packaging. You’ve already massively reduced the amount of single-use plastic bags you sell. Create some in-store POS and stick some posts on Facebook. Maybe you also have a battery recycling point? Maybe you offer coffee grinds as compost? Maybe you’ve switched from plastic to paper straws or done away with them altogether? Stuff that other people are doing - another great source of ‘content’ is the work already being doing by your suppliers and your wholesaler. When a soft drinks company changes its bottles to 100% recycled, why not tell your shoppers? If another supplier stops using plastic packaging and replaces it with cardboard, piggy back on that. Stuff you want to do - Talk to shoppers about things you are thinking about doing. Maybe you’re planning to install a DRS machine soon? Perhaps you’re thinking about dumping your non-recyclable coffee cups? Ask your shoppers for their opinion and at very least they will see that you’re thinking about these things.


COMMENT

WORKING WITH YOUR COMMUNITY GORDON MCSKIMMING, SUSTAINABLE PACKAGING MANAGER, COCA-COLA EUROPEAN PARTNERS

The Great British Spring Clean: Caring for your community

Litter is an issue in communities all over Great Britain, with around 30 million tonnes collected from our streets every year.1 This year Coca-Cola European Partners (CCEP) is once again a supporting partner of Keep Britain Tidy’s Great British Spring Clean (20th March to 13th April) – the country’s biggest clean-up initiative – and is urging retailers to host clean-ups of their own. Last year, more than half a million people took part in the Great British Spring Clean, cleaning up 4,308 tonnes of litter from towns and cities across the country.2 CCEP hosted 28 clean ups across GB with more than 300 colleagues and also enabled around 2,100 litter picking hours with its free litter picking kits which were sent to customers. We’ve seen what a great impact the Great British Spring Clean can have in communities across the country and we want to help make it bigger and better this year. This year we plan to mobilise even more of our teams to take part in litter clean-ups including colleagues from our manufacturing site in East Kilbride. We will continue to raise awareness of the initiative to encourage our customers to join in so together we

can make an even greater impact across the whole of Scotland. As hubs of your communities, with strong relationships with local residents, you are ideally placed to bring people together and help organise community clean-ups. The initiative provides a fantastic opportunity to engage customers, working with them to take care of the environment whilst also driving the local link between your customers and your store. Retailers interested in hosting a community cleanup can visit the sustainability section of CCEP’s trade website cokecustomerhub.co.uk to download a free ‘Guide to Hosting a Community Clean-Up’, as well as an editable poster to display in-store to raise awareness of an organised litter pick event. There is also a quick link to the Great British Spring Clean website for retailers to register their event. The first 50 retailers to register their event by clicking on the correct CCEP drop down on the Great British Spring Clean website will receive a free CCEP ‘clean-up kit’, which includes litter pickers, gloves and high-vis jackets – so it’s important to get in early! SUSTAINABILITY HANDBOOK 2020 I 7

1 WWW.KEEPBRITAINTIDY.ORG/LOCAL-AUTHORITIES/REDUCE-LITTER/GENERAL-LITTER 2 WWW.KEEPBRITAINTIDY.ORG/GET-INVOLVED/SUPPORT-OUR-CAMPAIGNS/GREAT-BRITISH-SPRING-CLEAN

COCA-COLA EUROPEAN PARTNERS (CCEP) IS ONCE AGAIN A SUPPORTING PARTNER OF THE GREAT BRITISH SPRING CLEAN 2020, AND CALLING ON RETAILERS TO GET BEHIND ITS EFFORTS TO CLEAN UP TOWNS AND CITIES ACROSS THE COUNTRY.


INSPIRATIONAL IDEAS

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JOIN THE GREAT BRITISH SPRING CLEAN

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One way to have a positive impact on your local community is by joining Keep Britain Tidy’s Great British Spring Clean 2020 (20th March to 13th April). Sponsored by Coca-Cola European Partners (CCEP), the project saw more than half a million people take part last year, cleaning up more than 4,300 tonnes of litter Nick Brown, Head of Sustainability at CCEP, said: “As hubs of your communities with strong relationships with local residents, retailers are ideally placed to help organise community clean-ups and bring people together.” You can download a free ‘Guide to Hosting a Community Clean-Up’ from the address below. WEB: WWW.COKECUSTOMERHUB.CO.UK/ SUSTAINABILITY/

GET A GRIP ON BIODEGRDABLE GLOVES

With more forecourt shoppers keen to use disposable gloves, GripHero has launched a new ‘Oxo-Biodegradable’ variant of its ATEX certified anti-static handprotection. It has also released a range of bins to help complete the forecourt recycling loop.

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The business says it has slashed the volume of single use hand-protection plastic being used by forecourts by an average of 55%. That represents 490 tonnes of plastic waste per year that could be avoided if all forecourts across the UK installed GripHero. Additionally, GripHero’s research shows that 76% of drivers would be more likely to use a forecourt with hand-protection on every nozzle handle. WEB: WWW.GRIPHERO.COM/SUSTAINABILITY

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COFFEE CUP ‘POST-BACK’ RECYCLING SERVICE An inclusive post-back recycling service will help boost coffee cup sustainability. Frugal Cup has partnered with recycling company First Mile to offer customers an inclusive RecycleBox recycling service.

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Customers ordering any two cases of Frugal Cups will automatically be offered the service, where they can put their used cups in the box in which they were delivered, to be collected by First Mile’s RecycleBox courier network and correctly recycled. The RecycleBox can be filled with hardto-recycle items or items that that are not traditionally recycled through household or commercial waste services. WEB: WWW.RECYCLEBOX.CO.UK

APP-BASED WATER REFILL SERVICE

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Spar wholesaler A.F. Blakemore & Son has become the first convenience retailer to join the Refill campaign to help reduce plastic waste which makes us an app to help customers search for places where they can fill up water bottles for free. The company has registered 68 of its Spar stores on the app, which is run by City to Sea and which features over 25,000 refill stations nationwide. With a simple tap, app users can find a local refill station and get fresh drinking water on the go, eliminating the need to purchase a new plastic bottle with every drink. The app has been downloaded 260,000 times and is used by 30,000 users on average per month. WEB: WWW.REFILL.ORG.UK/


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RECYCLE BAGGED SNACK PACKETS WITH KP SNACKS

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KP Snacks is involved in a nationwide recycling scheme for crisp, bagged nuts, popcorn and pretzels packets in partnership with TerraCycle. The scheme is simple and free to use and has already collected over 2.5 million snack packets. The packets are then recycled to create different plastic products. To encourage collection, KP and TerraCycle offer charity points based on the number of bags collected which can be redeemed by collectors for a variety of charitable gifts or a direct payment to a non-profit of their choice. Since launch, the scheme has raised over £7,700 for charity.

FERERRO LEADS THE WAY ON PALM OIL

Consumer concerns over deforestation and exploitation-free palm oil have been addressed by Ferrero which was recently listed first out of 173 companies on the WWF’s ‘Palm Oil Buyers Scorecard’.

The WWF said: “only one company, the consumer goods manufacturer Ferrero, has scored over 20 points (out of the maximum 22), sending an encouraging signal to the rest of the industry that sustainable and deforestation-free palm oil is achievable.” Ferrero says it remains fully committed to securing a 100% deforestation-free, and exploitation-free palm oil supply chain.

WEB: WWW.KPSNACKS.COM/ PACKPROMISE

ASDA TO TRIAL ‘SUSTAINABILITY STORE’

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Asda will launch a ‘sustainability store’ in Leeds in May that will trial a number of initiatives including allowing shoppers can fill their own containers with loose food including rice, pasta, cereals, fruit, veg and tea. The company currently uses about 65,000 tonnes of plastic a year and is aiming to reduce that by 15% by February 2021. The store will also offer plastic-free bouquets of flowers and will feature a reverse vending machine. Black plastic, which is difficult to recycle, will be removed from the company’s own label ranges and Asda will stop selling single-use coffee cups.

WEB: WWW.ASDA.COM/CREATING-CHANGE-FORBETTER/BETTER-PLANET

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WEB: WWW.FERREROCSR.COM/

BRITVIC JOINS CONSORTIUM TO TACKLE PLASTIC WASTE

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Britvic has joined forces with other global businesses to promote a ground-breaking recycling technology known as BP Infinia, that means opaque and difficult to recycle PET plastic waste can be made into new plastic again and again, with no loss in quality. Since 2017, Britvic has removed more than 1,500 tonnes of plastic from its supply chain with 100% of its plastic bottles, glass bottles and cans now recyclable. The company has also entered into a long-term agreement with Esterform, one of the UK’s leading producers of recycled PET. WEB: WWW.BRITVIC.COM/SUSTAINABLEBUSINESS

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TOMRA UNVEILS SMALL FOOTPRINT RVM

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Scottish retailers have apparently inspired the design of a new compact machine from global reverse vending leader TOMRA. On visiting stores in Scotland, TOMRA saw that many retailers would face a challenge with space and also heard feedback from the industry as talks on a deposit return scheme for Scotland began to gather pace. Now it has created a new compact machine, the ‘TOMRA M1’ concept, which will begin to roll it off the production line before the Scottish Government officially launches a DRS in 2021. The TOMRA M1 is space efficient and can handle all three materials that are likely to be included in the Scottish DRS system – glass, PET bottles and cans. WEB: WWW.TOMRA.COM/EN-GB

MULLER REMOVES PLASTIC STRAWS

School children at Sunnyside Primary School in Glasgow have helped Müller become the first dairy company in the UK to offer fresh school milk with paper straws.

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The school worked with the dairy company to trial Müller’s new paper straw, which is attached to its recyclable school milk cartons. Müller’s new paper straw is fully recyclable and has been developed in partnership with Tetra Pak. It is made from Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified paperboard. The company is undertaking further trials which if successful, will see all its school milk producing sites switch to paper straws, eliminating 48 tonnes of plastic every year. WEB: WWW.MULLER.CO.UK/ABOUT-MULLER/BEINGSUSTAINABLE/

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BELU FIRST TO GO 100% RECYCLED

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Social enterprise Belu has, it says, become the first UK water company to make all of its plastic bottles from 100% recycled plastic bottles, and they are also 100% recyclable after use. The 100% recycled material used generates 75% less carbon emissions than aluminium and is easily recycled unlike a carton.

By moving to manufacturing 100% recycled PET plastic, Belu estimates that it will generate about 60% less carbon emissions than a comparable virgin bottle and about half that of a typical aluminium can (which contains 70-73% recycle content). Belu gives 100% of its profits to WaterAid. WEB: WWW.BELU.ORG/

FROZEN FOOD CAN HELP REDUCE CARBON Did you know that stocking frozen food can help reduce your carbon footprint? Frozen food can be transported much more efficiently than fresh, often generating much less carbon emissions.

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Similarly, freezing a crop such as peas for instance, ensures the entire crop is available for sale as sometimes excess fresh crops need to be ploughed back into the field or left to rot simply because of their short shelf life. Additionally, as frozen food is usually ‘flash frozen’, the use of additional preservatives is reduced or even eliminated. Fresh produce loses vitamins during storage, but freezing vegetables locks in crucial vitamins and minerals. WEB: WWW.BFFF.CO.UK/SUSTAINABILITY/GUIDANCE/


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LOSE THE ALUMINIUM LIDS

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Thanks to Walki-Lid from packaging specialist Walki, dairy products can now be packaged completely sustainably – without aluminium. Arla, the world’s largest dairy cooperative, is now using Walki’s paperbased lid material for some its products.

Walki is one of the few suppliers of aluminiumfree, flexible, paper-based lid material for single-portion cups. The product can be fully recycled in the normal paper recycling process and when it comes to the CO2 balance, Walki-Lid is significantly better than aluminium.

WEB: WWW.WALKI.COM/ SOLUTIONS/PRODUCTS/ FOODRETAILTRANSPORTPACKAGING/LIDS

SCOTMID TRIALS REFILL STATION

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The Scotmid store in Stockbridge, Edinburgh has opened its first-ever refill station where customers can fill up on different dry products such as pasta, couscous and dried fruit provided by Glasgow-based co-operative, Greencity Wholefoods.

The trial, which also involves products ranging from coffee beans to soap powder, has been met with strong approval from local members and customers. Scotmid also encouraging customers to bring their own containers such as Tupperware or jars to transport the products purchased. WEB: WWW.SCOTMID.COOP/2019/11/SCOTMIDINTRODUCES-REFILL-STATION-AT-STOCKBRIDGESTORE/

ALDI SCRAPS SINGLE USE FRESH BAGS

Aldi is trialling reusable bags for loose fruit and vegetables as part of its efforts to cut single-use plastics. All 90 stores in Scotland will offer the bags.

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The drawstring bags are made from recycled plastic bottles and will be sold for 25p each. If introduced nationally, the initiative will remove the equivalent of 113 tonnes of singleuse plastic from circulation each year. Aldi is on track to have all own-label packaging recyclable, reusable or compostable by 2022. WEB: WWW.ALDI.CO.UK/ABOUT-ALDI/CORPORATE-RESPONSIBILITY/ RESOURCES-FOR-OUR-PRODUCTS/PRODUCT-PACKAGING-AND-WASTE

DOVE MAKES PLASTIC COMMITMENT

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Unilver UK&I has moved all of its Dove brand products globally to 100% recycled plastic bottles and has also adopted new plasticfree packaging for its Dove beauty bar, saving enough virgin plastic each year (20,500 tonnes) to circle the earth 2.7 times! The move is being supported by in-store activations and a digital, social and influencer campaign, to generate awareness amongst consumers about this initiative. Globally, Dove is following a no plastic / better plastic / less plastic strategy, subject to technical feasibility. It has also committed to helping collect and process more plastic packaging than it sells. WEB:WWW.DOVE.COM/UK/STORIES/ABOUT-DOVE/ PLASTICS-COMMITMENT

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COKE TURNS OCEAN PLASTIC INTO BOTTLES

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Coca-Cola has produced its first ever sample bottle made using 25% recovered and recycled marine plastics, showing that even ocean debris can be recycled. The bottles show the transformational potential of revolutionary enhanced recycling technologies, which can recycle previously used PET plastics of any quality back to highquality plastic that can be used for food or drink packaging, including material that would previously have been sent to landfill. The sample is the first ever plastic bottle made using marine plastic that has been successfully recycled for use in food and drink packaging. WEB: WWW.COCA-COLA.EU/NEWS/MARINE-BOTTLE

BIRDS EYE TARGETS SUSTAINABLE SOURCING

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Birds Eye has been encouraging shoppers to explore how its fish is sustainably sourced with a new initiative and an on-pack promotion. More than 4,000 Ocean Explorer ceramic plates and Ocean passports were won, celebrating the fact that Birds Eye UK has met its goal of 100% Marine Stewardship Council and Aquaculture Stewardship Council labelling – independent guarantees around responsible seafood sourcing. Families were also encouraged to explore how their fish is sustainably sourced and to find out more about sustainable fishing through the Birds Eye Fish Provenance Tool. WEB: WWW.BIRDSEYEPLATE.CO.UK/

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CELEBRATE ‘WONKY’ VEG Symbol group Nisa has helped shoppers recalibrate their view of ‘perfect’ fruit and veg by running promotions that celebrate fresh produce of all shapes and sizes.

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Nisa is helping its independent retailers tackle the nationwide issue of food waste by rolling out a range of wonky fruit and vegetables into stores thanks to its “Marvellous Mis-shapes” event. The promotion featured a range of ‘misshaped’ autumnal root vegetables and fresh produce from the Co-op own brand range. Research shows that sales of misshapen produce tripled in the UK from 2017 to 2018, which means an increasing market of consumers are actively looking for these products whilst they are out shopping. WEB: WWW.CORPORATE.NISARETAIL.COM/CORPORATE-SOCIALRESPONSIBILITY

WALKERS LOSES WEIGHT Walkers has reworked the packaging on some of its popular range of family snacks to reduce the average weight of its outer packaging by 30%.

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As well as freeing up valuable space for retailers in-store, the move also improves the carbon footprint of the products. The new compact packaging can still be recycled as part of Walkers crisp packet recycling scheme, which has already seen more than three million crisp packets collected for recycling. More than 12,000 public locations have signed up to collect used crisp packets, making it the largest and fastest growing scheme of its kind.

WEB: WWW.WALKERS.CO.UK/RECYCLE


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SUSTAINABILITY ON A PLATE

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For retailers with a food to go operation, why not consider an eco-friendly option for your disposable plates? The Wholeleaf Company manufactures of a unique, ecologicallyfriendly range of disposable plates and cutlery that uses naturally fallen Indian palm leaves to make disposable plates, bowls or platters. The company already serves a growing client base including organic food recipe specialists restaurant chain, Wahaca and private members clubs like Soho House and The Goring Hotel, as well as direct-to-consumer sales through its website.

BIOFASE BIODEGRADABLE STRAWS AND CUTLERY

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If you have a food-to-go offering, a great way of reducing your reliance on single-use plastics is to adopt new fully biodegradable straws and cutlery from Biofase. Made from seeds, these products are the first to created from fully renewable and sustainable sources. The full range is PLA- and BPA-free and the products break down rapidly and naturally reintegrate back into the earth’s carbon cycle. Made for and distributed by 4eco, Biofase products are extra strong and durable are suitable for hot and cold food. They also have a low carbon footprint and help reduce plastic pollution by 60%. WEB: WWW.4ECO.UK.COM

WEB: WWW.THEWHOLELEAFCO.COM

FORK OUT ON RENEWABLE CUTLERY

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Vegware manufactures an extensive range of 300+ plant-based food and drink packaging, all designed to be commercially composted with food waste where accepted. Its cutlery, tableware, hot and cold drinks cups, bags to go and takeaway packaging are made from plants using renewable, lower carbon, recycled or reclaimed materials. Compostables are a practical solution for single-use food-contaminated packaging, allowing food businesses to achieve their sustainability goals.

Vegware’s composting collection service has trade routes to commercial composting facilities within most of Scotland. WEB: WWW.VEGWARE.COM

HARNESSING WIND POWER

Accolade Wines, the UK’s largest wine company, has achieved a UK first with the installation of a 2.5MW wind turbine at its Avonmouthbased distribution centre, Accolade Park.

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The 130m-high turbine will save 2,540 tonnes in CO2 equivalent emissions every year, meeting over 50% of the site’s electricity needs. Accolade Wines is the only UK business to achieve this under a tenant, not landlord agreement. On-site wind generation has historically been implemented by those that own their own property and Accolade Wines required the approval of both the local planning authorities and the site owners. WEB: WWW.ACCOLADEWINES.COM/ENVIRONMENT/

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SPAR REVAMPS WATER RANGE Spar UK relaunched its Silverbrook Falls Water bottle last year so that it is now made of up to 51% recycled plastic – an innovation that shows the symbol group’s dedication to the environment.

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Spar’s eight-strong still and sparkling water range has been revamped with a new label design to provide a contemporary look, whilst also communicating the recycled plastic content in a bid to tackle single-use plastics. The company will save almost 130 tonnes of plastic every year with the changes to the packaging and the range continues to be in growth. WEB: WWW.SPAR.CO.UK

LOOSE FROZEN PRODUCE TICKS ALL THE BOXES Field Fare offers a great alternative to prepack frozen veg with a loose frozen fruit and veg solution that lets shoppers to simply scoop what they need into biodegradable bags or their own container.

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The range includes over 80 lines including premium Grade A fruit and veg, frozen within hours of harvesting. Also included are fish, baked goods and international specialities. The solution also lets retailers expand their eco-credentials by offering ‘Bring Your Own container’ initiatives, enabling customers to weigh their empty, reusable pots, fill, re-weigh and pay for the difference between the two. WEB: WWW.FIELD-FARE.COM

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ECO REFRIGERATION OPTIONS

26 #

Refrigeration is one of the most significant costs facing all local retailers. One of the easiest ways to both reduce this cost and improve your carbon footprint is by installing more eco-friendly chillers. Pastorfrigor’s integral Genova Panorama MCT unit has won a number of environmental awards and typically uses 47% less energy than a standard glass door integral multideck. That’s a saving of £440 per year for a 2.5m section alone. It’s also very quiet, with the running noise is as low as 52DbA. Additionally, the cabinet only increases the ambient temperature by two degrees per 2.5m section, making it a valid alternative to a remote unit. WEB: WWW.PASTORFRIGORGB.COM/MICROCHANNEL-TECHNOLOGY

NUDGE SHOPPERS IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION

28 #

Since last year, Allied Bakeries has been ‘nudging’ shoppers in the right direction by including a recycling logo along with the consumer call to action ‘please recycle me’ to the front of pack across its Kingsmill and Burgen brands to help increase awareness that bread bags can be recycled.

All Kingsmill and Burgen bread bags are fully recyclable through collection points at larger retailer stores across the country. In 2018 Allied reduced of the amount of plastic packaging used in a year by 240 tonnes – simply by reducing the thickness of Kingsmill bread bags. WEB: WWW.KINGSMILLBAKERY.CO.UK/ ARTICLES/RECYCLING-REVELATIONS


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TIME TO ‘TAKE IT BACK’

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Keep Scotland Beautiful has joined forces with Glasgow City Council and some of the country’s biggest coffee Gl as go w retailers to increase cup recycling rates in Glasgow. Mo vem en t The #TakeItBack initiative points Glaswegians to 65 A city-wide collaboration coffee chain stores in the city centre that will take back any cup for recycling. This is a much-needed solution for single-use cups, which currently are not accepted by the city’s blue on-the-go recycling bins.

Cu p

Surveying carried out by the charity found that 70% of Glasgow’s coffee drinkers were keen to recycle their cup, but only 12% were able to do so properly. #TakeItBack is part of the charity’s Cup Movement in Glasgow campaign. WEB: WWW.KEEPSCOTLANDBEAUTIFUL.ORG/ TAKEITBACK

GET BEHIND GLOBAL REFILL DAY

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WE DON’T WASTE WORDS. WE WON’T WASTE PLASTIC.

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News UK is on track to remove all 800 tonnes of single-use plastics from its products by mid2020, replacing inner and outer polybagging with compostable alternatives or removing them completely. In October The Sun TV Mag removed its inner plastic polybagging, removing 350 tonnes of single-use plastic per year from the Saturday issue. The move followed The Times and The Sunday Times removing all single-use plastic outer polybagging. The Saturday and Sunday Times inner magazine polybagging will start to be replaced by paper-banding early this year. WEB: WWW.THESUN.CO.UK/

SUB ZERO HEROES

32 #

Retailers are being urged to back the #GotTheBottle campaign to ditch single use plastic by getting involved in Global Refill Day in June this year. As part of the awardwinning campaign, the public are now being urged to stop buying single-use plastic water bottles and switch to refillable ones.

Packaging innovators Touch partnered with Nestlé Ice Cream last year to develop a reusable, durable stainless steel container for HäagenDazs, to be used within the new Loop circular shopping platform. Loop, developed by waste management experts TerraCycle, offers consumers the opportunity to shop smart with a focus on waste-free products and packaging.

Consumption of bottled water has doubled over the last 15 years, with over 7 billion plastic water bottles used each year in the UK. Retailers and the public can support Global Refill Day by switching from single-use to a reusable bottles and sharing their commitment on social media, by telling the world they’ve #GotTheBottle to prevent plastic pollution.

The pack design brings Häagen-Dazs into a brave new – waste-free – world yet retains the integrity of the brand and product. The packaging combines a reduction of impact on the environment with superior consumer experience, thus hopefully compelling consumers to change the way they access products.

WEB: WWW.REFILL.ORG.UK/A-GLOBAL-REFILL-DAY/

WEB: WWW.NESTLE.COM/MEDIA/NEWS/NESTLEHAAGEN-DAZS-LOOP-REUSABLE-PACKAGING-INITIATIVE

SUSTAINABILITY HANDBOOK 2020 I 15


INSPIRATIONAL IDEAS

50 INSPIRATIONAL IDEAS 33-40 ARE YOU DOING ANYTHING SUSTAINABLE THAT YOU WANT TO SHARE WITH US? CONTACT US AT INFO@55NORTH.COM

CEREAL THRILLERS

Cereal giant Kellogg’s recently teamed up with Salford brewery Seven Bro7hers in an innovative initiative to turn leftover Corn Flakes, Rice Krispies and Coco Pops into beer.

33 #

The limited-edition range of beers was made from waste products from Kellogg’s Manchester cereal factory. These flakes are considered too big, small or overcooked – and therefore have not passed the brand’s quality control – and would have previously gone to animal feed. The brewer used the cereals to replace some of the wheat grain in the beer mix. Additionally, 10p from each can sold was donated to food distribution charity FareShare. WEB: WWW.SEVENBRO7HERS.COM/KELLOGGSVARIETY-PACK/

‘TOO GOOD TO GO TO WASTE’ APP

Too Good To Go is the world’s largest B2C marketplace for surplus food, enabling retailers to dispose of food that is close to sell by date by listing it on an app and selling it at a discounted price.

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Rikesh Patel of Buggsi’s Nisa Local in North Kensington was among the first to sign up and says the platform is working well. “It isn’t about making money, I see it as a way of getting rid of food rather than throwing it in the bin,” he says. The ‘magic bags’ of mixed products are ordered online and collected in store. Rikesh has reduced waste costs on fresh by about 50% by using the app. WEB: WWW.TOOGOODTOGO.CO.UK

16 I SUSTAINABILITY HANDBOOK 2020

NISA CUT LOOSE

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Nisa has helped its retailers tackle the issue of single use plastic and food waste in their stores through the integration of electronic scales with its Evolution EPOS solution. The solution allows retailers to stock loose fruit, vegetables, cereal, pasta, nuts and pulses and use more environmentally friendly paper bags.

The solution has already been adopted by Nisa University of York and uses bar codes printed out on stickers that then scan in at the till. The scales are easy to install, requiring only power and access to the network. The EPOS link is there so when a price is changed it will transmit relevant changes to the scales so there’s no need to change prices twice in different systems. WEB: WWW.CORPORATE.NISARETAIL.COM/CORPORATE-SOCIALRESPONSIBILITY

QUORN URGES ‘STEP IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION’

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The UK’s top selling meat free brand Quorn has launched a new campaign to help consumers take a ‘Step in the Right Direction’ when it comes to sustainable food choices, in the fight against climate change.

Spearheaded by a multi-million pound ‘Step in the Right Direction’ TV campaign, the brand is also introducing Carbon Trust certified footprint data for over 60% (by volume) of its top selling products to the Quorn website. The aim is to help people understand the environmental impact of the foods they buy, and Quorn is calling on other food brands to do the same. WEB: WWW.QUORN.CO.UK


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‘PLASTIC ALERTS’ SHOWS THE WAY

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Mobile technology experts Ubamarket offer an innovative feature that can help retailers improve their sustainability credentials. ‘Plastic Alerts’ lets customers shop according to the recyclability and environmental footprint of different products, and lets them scan packaging for information on whether it can be widely recycled or not. The Ubamarket app allows customers to scan their shopping as they go, guiding them to the products in store and letting them skip the till queues by paying in-app. ‘Plastic Alerts’ works by displaying the plastic content of all scanned items, allowing them to choose a more environmentally-friendly alternative. WEB: WWW.UBAMARKET.COM/UBAMARKET-LAUNCHES-PLASTICALERTS/

CO-OP COMMITS TO 100% RECYCLABLE PACKAGING

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The Co-op will only use 100% own-brand recyclable packaging by summer 2020. Everything from ready meal trays and crisp packets to sandwich cartons and film will be recyclable via a kerbside collection or a closed-loop in house scheme. The company will also lead the largest-ever UK-wide scheme to recycle plastic film, which local councils do not currently collect. The Coop makes over 750 million pieces of plastic film each year and will develop its own national collection programme. After a spring store trial, the scheme will be rolled out nationally across the retailer’s store estate by the summer. WEB: WWW.THENEWS.COOP

SWA CHAMPIONS SUSTAINABILITY

The Scottish Wholesale Association has chosen “working with its members to invest in the future sustainability of the wholesale industry” as one of its key agenda themes for this its 80th anniversary year.

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The SWA will discuss the issue at a one-day conference at Doubletree by Hilton Dunblane Hydro in Perthshire on 1 October followed by a Highland gala banquet at Stirling Castle that evening. The Association aims to inspire a new generation of wholesalers to take an active role in protecting and developing the industry.

WEB: WWW.SCOTTISHWHOLESALE.CO.UK

ASDA STRIKES FOODBANK DEAL

40 #

Food from Asda will help provide meals for thousands of vulnerable people across Scotland, thanks to a new partnership with surplus food redistribution charity FareShare. The Scottish Government has given FareShare additional funding of up to £1m to help people struggling with food insecurity to deal with the additional pressures caused by Brexit. The funding is enabling Asda to provide thousands of meals by delivering staple ambient and frozen food to FareShare’s warehouses at cost price – meaning no profit is being made by Asda. This is in addition to the surplus food the retailer already donates from all its stores and distribution centres in Scotland. WEB: WWW.FARESHARE.ORG.UK/GIVING-FOOD/ WHO-WE-WORK-WITH/OUR-WORK-WITH-ASDA/

SUSTAINABILITY HANDBOOK 2020 I 17


INSPIRATIONAL IDEAS

50 INSPIRATIONAL IDEAS 41-48 ARE YOU DOING ANYTHING SUSTAINABLE THAT YOU WANT TO SHARE WITH US? CONTACT US AT INFO@55NORTH.COM

ENERGY SAVINGS HIT £2K A YEAR

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The Village Store is a family owned retail business in Caldercruix, a village about 20 miles east of Glasgow in North Lanarkshire. Owner Jaspel Singh contacted Resource Efficient Scotland for help saving energy, with particular focus on upgrading the store’s refrigeration and lighting.

An adviser from Resource Efficient Scotland noted some of the existing chill units had open displays, which typically have poor energy efficiency rates. They also suggested replacing fluorescent lighting with LED flat panels. It was estimated that making the changes would save £2,012 every year, equating to 4.5 tonnes of annual carbon savings. WEB: WWW.RESOURCEEFFICIENTSCOTLAND.COM

WESTONS CUTS 10,000 FOOD MILES Westons Cider has cut 10,000 food miles by turning leftover apple waste into the carbon dioxide that gives its ciders their added sparkle.

43 #

The Herefordshire-based cider maker has created a ‘complete circle’ for its CO2 requirements after seeking out a new sourcing solution following last year’s severe shortages, which left other major beer and cider producers without the ability to carbonate their drinks. The company now effectively generates its own CO2 from what is left of the apples after fermentation (known in the industry as pomace), meaning it no longer needs to take deliveries of CO2 from further afield.

WEB: WWW.WESTONS-CIDER.CO.UK

18 I SUSTAINABILITY HANDBOOK 2020

TANGERINE CUTS PLASTIC

Tangerine Confectionery has launched a redesign of its classic XXX Extra Strong mint range, changing the brand’s packaging to cardboard to help reduce plastic use.

42 #

The new cardboard packaging features an updated design, with a bold graffiti style to modernise the brand, and help communicate the punchy flavour and strength of XXX Mints. The rebrand helps modernise XXX Mints and create a brand which clearly demonstrates XXX’s uniquely powerful mint flavour, while providing a more ethical, plastic-free packaging solution.

WEB: WWW.TANGERINEUK.NET

INTEREST-FREE ENVIRO LOANS AVAILABLE

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If you are keen to improve your sustainability credentials but are short of cash shortterm, Resource Efficient Scotland offers interestfree SME loans for resource efficient measures. Not only will this help you reduce your bills, you’ll also receive 15% cashback.

Cutting operating costs not only helps margins but can also make you more competitive. The SME Loan provides unsecured, interest free loans from £1,000 up to £100,000 for the installation of energy efficient measures such as lighting and heating upgrades, double glazing, wate reduction, water saving, insulation and more. WEB: WWW.RESOURCEEFFICIENTSCOTLAND.COM/SMELOAN


INSPIRATIONAL IDEAS

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SCOTTISH CIDER BUSINESS PLANTS 5,000 TREES

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DITCH THE ‘UNWANTED EXTRAS’

46 #

Scottish cider company Lost Orchards has set about replanting apple orchards and to date have already planted 5,000 trees on their East Adamston Farm. The company already grows blackcurrants for Ribena and produces Katy apples which are then turned into cider.

Zero Waste Scotland is urging consumers to take a stand against ‘unwanted extra materials’ in their daily lives like straws, single use sachets, disposable stirrers, coffee cups and freebies. The organisation is asking shoppers to actively and pointedly refuse such items when they shop, to let retailers and producers know the item is not wanted.

The orchard was first planted in 2012 and the company plans to plant another 15,000 trees by 2025. The company has formed a grower group who have helped plant trees with the aim of providing zero food miles home-grown apples for the company’s cider for years to come.

Four fifths of Scotland’s carbon footprint is generated through the heat and energy required to grow, make, process, transport and provide materials that are often tossed aside at the end of their life. This could be reduced dramatically by addressing our single-use habit, plastic or otherwise.

WEB: WWW.LOSTORCHARDS.CO.UK

GUARDIAN PLANS CARBON NEUTRAL FUTURE

WEB: WWW.ZEROWASTESCOTLAND.ORG.UK

47 #

Guardian Media Group, which owns the Guardian and Observer titles, has pledged to reach net zero carbon emissions as a business by 2030. The news organisation has also promised to “prioritise and give prominence” to its environmental journalism and never allow its reporting to be influenced by commercial or political interests. It has also pledged that its wider environmental reporting will always be rooted in scientific fact, and to use language that recognises the severity of the crisis. WEB: WWW.THEGUARDIAN.COM/UK

SOURCE LOCALLY TO REDUCE FOOD MILES

Sourcing Scottish, regional and local products is an excellent way of setting your store apart from the competition, supporting the local economy and improving your sustainability credentials.

48 #

One simple way of achieving this is by stocking a range of locally produced products and by shouting about them both in-store and on social media. Research carried out in November on behalf of the Scottish Retail Food & Drink Awards by 56 Degree Insight found that 57% of shoppers would choose local products to minimise food miles and 63% would choose products with minimal and recyclable packaging. WEB: WWW. SCOTTISHRETAILFOODANDDRINKAWARDS.COM

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INSPIRATIONAL IDEAS

50 INSPIRATIONAL IDEAS 41-52 ARE YOU DOING ANYTHING SUSTAINABLE THAT YOU WANT TO SHARE WITH US? CONTACT US AT INFO@55NORTH.COM

SHOPPERS WILL PAY THE PREMIUM With the growth of the importance of sustainability to consumers and the growth of home delivery in local retailing, new research shows that shoppers are prepared to pay more, and wait longer, for greener delivery options.

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GET INVOLVED IN 50TH WORLD EARTH DAY April 22nd this year marks the 50th anniversary of the world’s first Earth Day and represents a good opportunity for retailers to celebrate the sustainability work they do in their stores and local communities.

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A new report from ParcelHero has found consumers have moved beyond cheaper and faster home deliveries and are instead increasingly focused on ‘handier’ – more local – or greener deliveries.

As Earth Day marks 50 years, nature and the environment are faced with enormous challenges from loss of biodiversity, pollution, degradation of our ecosystems, and climate change.

Some 74% of shoppers are happy to wait longer for purchases if it means the delivery method is more sustainable. This is in sharp contrast to the current ‘super-fast’ strategies adopted by many online and larger retailers,

This year’s event is the perfect time for retailers, citizens, institutions and organisations everywhere to demonstrate their shared demand for bold, transformative change.

WEB: WWW.PARCELHERO.COM

BUXTON COMMITS TO RECYCLED PLASTIC

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Nesté Waters’ Buxton brand has announced that its entire range of waters will be made from 100% recycled plastic by 2021. A recycled 750ml and 1ltr Buxton bottle was launched at the end of last year and the rest of the brand’s portfolio will transition to used plastic packaging (rPET) over the next year or so.

The changes will significantly reduce the amount of virgin plastic in circulation, although the company highlights that the availability of a domestic UK supply of recycled plastic is still relatively limited. Today, the rPET used for Buxton bottles has to be sourced outside of the UK but the company is working hard to improve the situation. WEB: WWW.BUXTONWATER.CO.UK

20 I SUSTAINABILITY HANDBOOK 2020

WEB:WWW.EARTHDAY.ORG/EARTH-DAY-2020/

DITCH THE ‘BEST BEFORE’ LABEL UK retailers and major brands have made “good progress” in helping households cut food waste with a quarter of all pre-packed fresh produce now carrying no date label, in line with the latest guidance, according to a study by sustainability charity Wrap.

52 #

The report noted progress on date labels, product life, pack size and storage and freezing advice. Wrap visited almost 60 supermarkets and examined 2,000 of the most frequently wasted food products. Wrap found three retailers have completely removed Best Before labels on some fresh produce. It now recommends removing Best Before dates from fresh items, where appropriate. WEB: WWW.WRAP.ORG.UK


COMMENT

SUSTAINABLE PACKAGING TRYSTAN FARNWORTH, DIRECTOR OF SUSTAINABILITY, BRITVIC

Creating a world where great packaging never becomes waste PACKAGING IS AN INTRINSIC PART OF MODERN LIFE AND WITH ITS GROWTH HAS COME AN UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCE – PACKAGING WASTE. MORE NEEDS TO BE DONE ABOUT IT. AS AN INDUSTRY LEADER, WE PLAY A CRUCIAL ROLE IN DEALING WITH THIS ISSUE HEAD ON AND WITH PACE. IT’S ONE OF OUR TOP BUSINESS PRIORITIES.

In 2018, Sir David Attenborough opened people’s eyes to the worldwide plastic pollution situation and according to social movement, Global Citizen, 88%1 of people who saw ‘Blue Planet II’ have now changed their lifestyles. What does it mean for retailers? A focus on sustainability is absolutely crucial to long term business success. Sustainability and impact on the environment are increasingly influencing consumer purchase decisions. A study showed that nearly half (48%) of people view it as ‘very important’3 when polled, while customers and business leaders identified the three most important sustainability issues as waste management, sustainable packaging and ethical sourcing4. Sustainability around plastics is a key trend with 98% of business leaders creating plans to reduce their company’s consumption4. That’s why Britvic has developed a “4Rs” packaging strategy – we will reduce, recycle, reframe and reinvent packaging. “Reduce” is all about making sure our packaging is as good as it can be and that it’s as light as possible. For example, by switching from steel to aluminium cans we’ve saved 8,000 tonnes of packaging weight per year. We also ensure 100% of all our factory waste is diverted from landfill, and we’ll remove at least 500 tonnes of packaging weight in 2020 by lightweighting our plastic bottles. “Recycle” means that we make sure all our packaging is recyclable,

supporting a well-designed GB wide deposit return scheme and step-changing the use of recycled content in our packaging. We’ve created a partnership and invested £5M to secure the long-term supply of UK sourced recycled PET (rPET) plastic for our bottles, so you’ll start to see products from Britvic hitting the shelves from this Spring with up to 100% rPET content. We’re really excited about this and consumer reaction to it will be really positive. “Reframe” focuses on being the partner of the trade on sustainable packaging - in the same way we did with the Soft Drinks Industry Levy (or “sugar tax”). This is why in 2020 all our trade and consumer advertising will carry a strong recycling ‘nudge message’. “Reinvent” means that we’re working on creating a different future. It’s about exploring new technologies, and so we’ve joined like-minded global businesses - Danone and Unilever - to promote a ground-breaking recycling technology that will help bring about a circular economy for plastics. It also means exploiting our strength in dispense soft drinks and squash to minimise packaging per serve. Our double concentrate Robinsons products are good example of this. We are under no illusion that as a leading business we have a significant responsibility to protect the environment, but we believe that through our actions we’re able to help convenience retailers in their ambitions. SUSTAINABILITY HANDBOOK 2020 I 21

1. HTTPS://WWW.GLOBALCITIZEN.ORG/EN/CONTENT/88-BLUE-PLANET-2-CHANGED-DAVID-ATTENBOROUGH/ 2. HIM CONSUMER POLL 2018 3. CGA BRAND TRACK 2018 4. CGA BUSINESS LEADERS SURVEY 2018

TRYSTAN FARNWORTH, DIRECTOR OF SUSTAINABILITY, BRITVIC


THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

Let’s work together to lead the way on sustainability LOCAL RETAILERS IN SCOTLAND HAVE A REAL OPPORTUNITY TO PLAY A LEADING ROLE IN DRIVING SUSTAINABILITY IN 2020 AND BEYOND – AND THE KEY IS IN WORKING CLOSER WITH SUPPLIERS, WHOLESALERS AND CUSTOMERS.

BY NICK BROWN, HEAD OF SUSTAINABILITY AT COCA-COLA EUROPEAN PARTNLERS (CCEP) The issue of sustainability will remain at the forefront of our industry this year – that’s a given. Increasing consumer awareness and media scrutiny around environmental issues means that it is more important than ever for suppliers and retailers to consider the impact our actions have on the world around us. There is a real opportunity for local retailers in communities across Scotland to play a leading role in driving sustainability. Already a force for good in their local communities, retailers can help to raise public awareness about the challenges, and more importantly, how to overcome them. Retailers so often sit at the heart of their local area and enjoy unique relationships with their shoppers, meaning they are perfectly placed to engage people in environmental issues and encourage positive behaviour, 22 I SUSTAINABILITY HANDBOOK 2020

such as making sure packaging is properly recycled. But it’s also a two-way street. While retailers should help to educate their shoppers, they also need to challenge suppliers on sustainability efforts, and encourage them to stock and promote those products that make the biggest difference. It’s also a good opportunity to communicate this to your customers. If a supplier is investing in campaigns to help shoppers understand what to do with their packaging, then use it in your store. What are you doing with your back of store waste? Are you working with a waste management company who are properly recycling the waste they collect from you? All these details can help to drive greater consumer buy-in. CCEP has worked hard to decarbonise its products over the last few years. Since 2017, we’ve

only used renewable electricity to make our products and we have invested in new designs for our coolers and vending machines to use less energy – and we are looking to keep going further. Retailers can support by making sure they are using the most efficient equipment, which crucially can also help reduce electricity bills in their outlets. A close relationship and strong communication between suppliers and retailers are vital to ensuring


THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

COCA COLA EUROPEAN PARTNERS NICK BROWN, HEAD OF SUSTAINABILITY, COCA-COLA EUROPEAN PARTNERS

that the industry achieves its sustainability goals. At CocaCola European Partners (CCEP) we’re doing what we can to help retailers lead by example and promote positive behaviours in communities across Great Britain. We’re using our brands to urge more people to recycle with ‘Please Recycle Me’ on all on-the-go bottle caps. We’ve also launched large-scale advertising campaigns like our recent ‘Sending Plastic Around in Circles’ campaign,

as well as point of sale for convenience retailers to use instore to encourage recycling of our soft drinks packaging. With the detailed planning for a Deposit Return Scheme (DRS) in Scotland getting underway this year, it’s also important that all parties come together as a collective voice to make sure the scheme works for everyone. We all have an opportunity to change the way beverage packaging is sold and collected, increasing

recycling and reducing littering in our communities. Local retailers can be at the heart of these efforts, providing simple and quick return options for people consuming products on-the-go. It will take some time for the DRS to be fully operational but there is much that can be done to improve the sustainability of packaging in the meantime. CCEP is leading the industry in the eco-design of packaging with the use of recycled PET and deploying campaigns to encourage the public to recycle and curb littering. CCEP has changed the packaging for Sprite from green to clear to make it easier to recycle too. glacéau smartwater is also now the first major water brand to be using bottles made of 100% recycled plastic across its whole range, and our ongoing support for campaigns from Keep Britain Tidy and Keep Scotland Beautiful are mobilising an army of people in the battle against litter in our communities. All of this is the right thing to do – both from a social and a business standpoint. But telling staff and customers that you stock the most sustainable products in the most sustainable packaging, sold from the most sustainable coolers is a compelling story. Above this, highlighting that you are helping to make your local area cleaner and making it easier for them to recycle will ultimately reinforce your position as a force for good in the local community. As the eyes of the world turn towards Scotland in November for COP26, we hope retailers will take hold of this momentum and keep a sustainable future front of mind. SUSTAINABILITY HANDBOOK 2020 I 23


F I V E WAY S

to make your reverse vending machine work harder for you

Scotland’s deposit return scheme (DRS) is set to launch in 2021. As the countdown to its roll-out begins, retailers are considering how to prepare for the scheme, including the choice of a reverse vending machine (RVM) as one major consideration. While an RVM’s primary use to retailers will be for collecting and counting containers, plus fraud prevention, there are ways to maximise its benefits in store. Mark Brill – UK VP Sales and Marketing for TOMRA Collection Solutions – believes reverse vending machines can be more than just a collection tool for containers. Here, he explores five ways to make your RVM work harder for you and your customers.

2

GET YOUR COMMUNITY TALKING

1

MAKE IT VISUAL

The outside panels of the RVM can be used for messages and/or adverts, which are often achieved either by vinyl wrapping or magnetic panels. As many new customers may not have used an RVM before, we recommend that retailers reserve at least the front-facing panels for essential information. This could be information on the type of containers that it will accept and instructions on how to use the machine. Any remaining space, often on the sides, can be used for other messaging. This could be your own in-store advertising for offers and events, or could even be rented out to local companies, bringing in extra revenue. There is also the option of utilising the RVM’s screen for similar messaging or even video content which can be regularly updated.

Instead of redeeming their deposit for a voucher, customers can be given the opportunity to donate their refunds to charity. Retailers can select one local charity, or even multiple organisations to give their customers a choice. By supporting causes close to the hearts of local residents, retailers can benefit from creating a strong sense of community around their store.

3

CREATE A GREAT RECYCLING EXPERIENCE

By making the most of data collected by your RVM, TOMRA can work with you to provide valuable insights about your customers’ habits. This could include: when your busiest days and times are, how many deposits have been donated to each charity and the number of containers that are typically returned in each transaction. These insights can help you to continually improve customers’ experiences in your store, such as ensuring high availability of the machine by emptying the bin ahead of busier times.

4

DON’T MISS OUT ON DIGITAL-SAVVY CONSUMERS

Tech-savvy consumers make up an ever-growing percentage of

shoppers these days. They can be attracted in bigger and more regular numbers to your store by creating a seamless digital experience. Solutions such as paperless transactions, flexible payout methods and personalised apps such as the exclusive ‘myTOMRA’ platform make the whole experience much more convenient and simpler to use.

5

MAKE THE MOST OF REMOTE NOTIFICATIONS

Using TOMRA’s Notify+Assist app you can receive instant remote notifications, such as when the bin is full or the door is open. This means that you can focus on running your store and the app will tell you when the machine needs attention. Notify+Assist can also give automated help to store staff operating the machine with quick instructions so that they can get back to serving customers. All of this ensures that your RVM runs smoothly and helps to create a seamless experience for your customers.

Some features mentioned may incur additional charges.



To find out more, visit tomra.com/uk or email tcs.uk@tomra.com


Learn more at tomra.com/uk

We make deposit return systems work for everyone. TOMRA reverse vending machines collect 40 billion containers every year, keeping bottles in the Clean Loop and out of the oceans.

We look forward to helping retailers in Scotland get ready for the forthcoming deposit return scheme.


THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

Smart packaging choices – educating consumers

BY TRYSTAN FARNWORTH, DIRECTOR OF SUSTAINABILITY, BRITVIC

As a retailer, it is worth knowing the facts when it comes to packaging and being able to answer any customer questions, particularly on plastics. Whilst plastics have been under scrutiny of late for the impact they can have if they leak out of the economy and into the environment, in many instances the most sustainable form of packaging will be plastic of some kind. Britvic recently conducted bespoke research to compare different packaging formats and identify their relative environmental impact, specifically isolating the packaging (primary, secondary and tertiary) and excluding the liquid. There is a variation in the environmental performance between packaging types (based on a 250ml serve measure): TOTAL PACKAGING WEIGHT FRESH WATER CONSUMPTION GLOBAL WARMING POTENTIAL2 – EQUIVALENT DISTANCE DRIVEN IN A CAR

GLASS BOTTLE PET BOTTLE ALUMINIUM CAN (275ML) (500ML) (330ML) 186.1G 28.7G 20.4G 0.399 LITRES 0.226 LITRES 0.452 LITRES

(ASSUMING PETROL CAR, 2016 UK

AVERAGE NEW CAR CONSUMPTION)

1,001 M

‘THINK GLOBAL, ACT LOCAL’ APPROACH

360 M

300 M

As a convenience retailer you may be thinking that you don’t have the scope to make the changes 26 I SUSTAINABILITY HANDBOOK 2020

The latest research by CGA1 identified

outlined in terms consumers’ top four sustainability of partnering with priorities: organisations to 1. Ethically sourced food and drink create your own 2. Environmentally friendly packaging initiatives, but it 3. Reduce carbon footprint can be easier than 4. Donate to social, ethical and green you think. A simple causes step could be to engage with and prioritise suppliers who are like-minded and share your ambitions. All of Britvic’s aluminium cans, PET and glass bottles are 100% recyclable and by finding other soft drinks suppliers who can credibly make the same claim, you can convert your chiller into a fully recyclable space. It gives you a strong message to share with your shoppers through point of sale material, for instance. Over time you can apply this approach to other categories across your store. Communications to your shoppers is key. Are they aware of everything you’re doing to minimise your impact on the environment? Q Can you create a space in your store where you can highlight all your actions to shoppers, including potentially buying your electricity from 100% renewable sources? Q Could you install a free water refill station and then encourage a trade-up sale by stocking Robinsons Squash’d – the UK’s no1 pocket squash brand3


THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

BRITVIC TRYSTAN FARNWORTH, DIRECTOR OF SUSTAINABILITY, BRITVIC

which has a very low packaging per serve ratio? Q Could you offer your own branded re-usable bags, or if not already, could you introduce a charge for plastic bags? Q Could you have segregated waste bins in/outside your store to help segregate waste to maximise recycling? Simple steps, but ones that can make a significant impact on the reputation of your store, making it easier for shoppers to draw a distinction between you and your competition. Collaboration is key to deposit return scheme success. We now await the final legislation from the Scottish Government on the proposed Deposit Return Scheme (“DRS”). Britvic is a committed supporter of a welldesigned GB wide DRS for PET and metal can beverage containers of all sizes. To achieve a world

PASSING THE COST ON? Ethical sourcing, eco-friendly packaging and greener energy all costs time and money. Like-for-like sales and profit margins are under intense pressure which poses the question: Can some or all of the extra costs associated with a more sustainable business be passed on to consumers? The response for convenience retailers is extremely complex. Those consumers most concerned about sustainability are more likely to have the money to spend on it than the average shopper. Local stores need to be sensitive to the demographic of the communities they serve, so as not to alienate anyone.

OF ALL BRITVIC’S CANS AND BOTTLES ARE RECYCLABLE

100% OF ALL MANUFACTURING ELECTRICITY COMES FROM RENEWABLE SOURCES

21%

REDUCTION IN MANUFACTURE CARBON EMISSIONS RELATIVE TO PRODUCTION PROUD FOUNDING SIGNATORY OF UK PLASTICS PACT

where great packaging never becomes waste, we see DRS as perhaps the biggest single move the industry can make. Together, we all have a chance to create something world class. However, it’s critical that any DRS must have the very specific needs and complexities of the convenience sector in mind. We understand the complexity that DRS brings for every part of the value chain, and last year we brought a number of organisations and retailers together to debate the topic for a round table session, which included Scottish retailer representation. We’re also working with Scottish trade bodies including the SGF and the SWA to ensure we lobby effectively together. The key point that everyone agreed on was the need for clear communication to change consumer behaviour and we remain close to developments in order to find ways in which we can support retailers. For DRS to be world class, collaboration is essential. Views on DRS are varied in the industry, however we must all come together to make this a success. Britvic will be hands on every step of the way. SUSTAINABILITY HANDBOOK 2020 I 27

1. CGA BRAND TRACK SURVEY 2019 2. THE LIFECYCLE PACKAGING CARBON FOOTPRINT FOR ONE SERVING OF EACH PRODUCT IS EQUIVALENT TO DRIVING THE ABOVE DISTANCES. ASSUMING PETROL CAR. IN 2016, THE UK AVERAGE NEW CAR FUEL CONSUMPTION WAS 5.4LITRES PER 100KM, THIS EQUATES TO 0.151KG CO2/KM. 3. NIELSEN RMS, TOTAL COVERAGE, VALUE SALES, 52W/E 25.01.19

100%


COMPANY SPOTLIGHT

KP SNACKS KEVIN MCNAIR, MARKETING DIRECTOR, KP SNACKS

Our taste for good

WITH A PORTFOLIO OF SOME OF THE BESTLOVED SNACK BRANDS IN THE INDUSTRY, KP SNACKS HAS LONG WORKED HARD TO IMPROVE BOTH THE ENVIRONMENTAL AND NUTRITIONAL BENEFITS OF ITS PRODUCTS.

KEVIN MCNAIR, MARKETING DIRECTOR, KP SNACKS

PACKPROMISE

Over the past few years, there has been a shift in the level of consumer concern about food packaging with over half of consumers (53%) saying they have become more concerned than they were1. As part of its pacKPromise; a three-stage plan to reduce the company’s packaging impact on the environment, KP is striving to make all its plastic packaging recyclable, reusable or compostable by 2025. At the same time, the company has been actively reducing its packaging. Most recently it reduced the dimensions of Tyrrells 150g sharing bags, cutting packaging by 14% and saving an estimated 69 tonnes of material annually. By optimising case sizes to fill retailer shelves without the need for unpacking, new stackable cases are expected to increase pallet efficiency by 14,000 pallets while also reducing logistics-based emissions by taking 280 lorries off the road over the course of a year. The move follows a significant investment in KP Snacks’ Ashby facility to achieve a 23% reduction in the amount of packaging required on Hula Hoops Multipack, saving 11.2 tonnes of material annually. Kevin McNair, Marketing Director at KP Snacks, 28 I SUSTAINABILITY HANDBOOK 2020

says: “We’re committed to lessening the environmental impact of our activities and the investment we’ve made in reducing plastic across our portfolio is just the first step in this process.” To make recycling more accessible for consumers, KP Snacks has also partnered with TerraCycle® to launch the first nationwide recycling scheme for bagged nuts, popcorn, crisps and pretzels packets.

HEALTHY SNACKING

As a part of its ‘Taste for Good’ commitment KP Snacks has also been working on improving the health credentials of its products. With 34% of shoppers looking for healthy snacking products and 49% saying they would choose crisps or savoury snacks over a sugary option, KP Snacks is responding to this rising demand with an increased portfolio of snacks to suit every consumer occasion2. KP Snacks has a 32-strong portfolio of products coming in at under 100 calories. The portfolio includes Hula Hoops Puft, popchips, Skips, POMBEAR and Penn State pretzels, providing more better for you snacking options without compromising on big flavour – perfect for consumers who are looking for a tasty healthier product to share and for retailers looking to capitalise on the ‘Better for You’ trend. Kevin McNair comments: “Consumers are becoming more conscious. They want products that are better for them, and also better for the environment. The healthy snacking occasion is growing in value at +10.4% which is much faster than other categories, and 29% of CSN consumers look for healthier types of snacks either all or most of the time3. Brands need to be aware of this and adapt to meet these needs. We’re proud of our extensive under 100 calories portfolio that offers retailers a range of great tasting products and formats to meet consumer needs.”

1 INCPEN & WRAP: UK SURVEY 2019 ON CITIZENS’ ATTITUDES & BEHAVIOURS RELATING TO FOOD WASTE, PACKAGING AND PLASTIC PACKAGING 2&3 MINTEL 2018

KP Snacks has manufactured some of Britain’s bestloved and most iconic snack brands for over 70 years. The leading snacks business prides itself in its commitment to doing good for consumers, the environment, local communities and its people. KP Snacks calls its approach to responsible business ‘Our Taste for Good’. As a part of this commitment, KP Snacks has been increasing the number of permissible snacks within its portfolio, whilst working to improve the environmental impact of its products.


thE kp snacKs nuts, popcoRn, crisPs anD PretzEls pAcket recyCling progRamme iN ® PartnErshiP witH terraCycle wWw.KpsnacKs.com/PackpRomise ®



MARKET RESEARCH

CONSUMER INTEREST IN SUSTAINABILITY DUNCAN STEWART, MANAGING PARTNER, 56 DEGREE INSIGHT

Consumer interest opens a world of opportunity for local retailers

2019 FELT LIKE A WATERSHED YEAR IN TERMS OF CONSUMER INTEREST IN ALL THINGS SUSTAINABILITY WHICH OPENS UP A WHOLE NEW WORLD OF OPPORTUNITIES FOR RETAILERS WILLING AND ABLE TO MEET THE DEMANDS OF THE MODERN SHOPPER.

DUNCAN STEWART, MANAGING PARTNER, 56 DEGREE INSIGHT

While environmental concerns have been in the public’s consciousness for many years, 2019 felt like the year that the world woke up to the urgency of the climate emergency. A number of factors were key to raising public awareness from coverage of Greta Thunberg and David Attenborough and the Extinction Rebellion protests to the wildfires in Brazil and Australia and the record temperatures in the UK. In September Ipsos MORI’s UK Issues Index recorded the highest ever levels of concern for the environment while Scottish Government stats recorded a similar picture in Scotland – over two thirds of the population now agree that the ‘climate change is an immediate and urgent problem’ – a considerable increase from less than half of the population just five years ago. But how do these rising levels of concern impact upon our day to day lives and shopping behaviours? Research from 56 Degree Insight in late 2019 showed that while most Scots were willing to take the steps which were easy to do (e.g. recycle household waste) and over twothirds would like to be able to do more, far fewer were willing to make changes which involved sacrificing time or money or with a negative impact on their lifestyle.

Scots are looking to producers and retailers to make the changes required to allow them to have a more environmentally friendly shop, whilst continuing to enjoy products that they love. Specifically the 56 Degree Insight survey found that: Q 63% would be more likely to choose products which have minimal, recyclable packaging Q 57% would be more likely to choose local products with fewer food-miles

Q 56% would like to find more products with a clear provenance

The increased interest in eating plant based meals is also hard to miss. The 56 Degree Insight research showed that while just 4% of the Scots had moved wholesale to a vegan diet by late 2019, many more were adopting a flexitarian diet, reducing their meat consumption and eating plant based meals more often. Indeed, recent research suggests that almost nine in ten plant-based meals were consumed by non-vegans. These trends suggest a clear opportunity for the convenience retail sector to help consumers to find the more environmentally friendly products they seek – whether that’s plant based options, locally sourced produce or products where the manufacturer has made changes to reduce packaging. SUSTAINABILITY HANDBOOK 2020 I 31


MARKET RESEARCH

Food waste and beyond: how our industry is shaping the sustainability agenda SINCE 2017, IGD HAS BEEN WORKING COLLABORATIVELY ACROSS THE FOOD AND CONSUMER GOODS INDUSTRY TO HELP BUSINESSES REDUCE THE FOOD WASTE THEY CREATE. ALAN HAYES OUTLINES WHAT’S HAPPENED SO FAR AND LOOKS AT OTHER SUSTAINABILITY INITIATIVES THAT ARE MAKING A DIFFERENCE IN OUR INDUSTRY.

ALAN HAYES, HEAD OF TECHNICAL PROGRAMMES, IGD The food and drink we consume forms the single biggest part of our sustainability impact and our contribution to climate change; bigger than the emissions created from travel and from the energy we use at home. According to not-for-profit organisation WRAP, approximately one-third of all the food produced in the world is lost or wasted and if food waste was a country, it would be the third-largest contributor of carbon emissions after the US and China (FAO 2015). Therefore, reducing food waste is very important in efforts to address climate change. September 2019 saw the first anniversary of IGD and WRAP’s ground-breaking Food Waste Reduction Roadmap, developed to help food and consumer goods companies adopt a consistent approach to Target, Measure and Act on the food waste they create. The roadmap aims to help the UK achieve both the (UK) Courtauld Commitment 2025 targets, and the (international) United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 12.3. The Roadmap is hugely ambitious, and the UK was the first country in the world to set a nationwide plan of this size, scale and ambition.

WHERE WE ARE NOW

Currently, 171 UK food businesses have committed to target, measure and act on food waste, representing more than half of the UK food industry by turnover. Many are already providing evidence to WRAP of their work to reduce waste. In addition, more companies than ever are reporting their food waste data publicly. 32 I SUSTAINABILITY HANDBOOK 2020

The 122 businesses now reporting on their waste have a combined turnover of more than £220bn and generate over 1.1 million tonnes of food waste in their own operations. This shows what a difference can be made when industry works together, even in such a short timeframe. There is still a great deal of work to do, but the progress to date has been significant. Perhaps the most encouraging aspect of working on the roadmap has been its range and scope, across all areas of the food and grocery industry – retail, manufacturing, agriculture and primary production, hospitality and foodservice, and beyond. IGD and WRAP have also worked closely with supportive organisations such as trade bodies, which have been vital to access other companies that want to reduce their food waste.

BUSINESSES TAKING THE INITIATIVE

UK government, through the Resources and Waste Strategy launched in 2018, has committed to introduce mandatory reporting for food waste, once it has completed its consultation. If mandatory reporting is introduced, those already committed to the roadmap would have a head start, as Defra has put the roadmap and its approach at the heart of its proposals for mandatory reporting. In the meantime, both manufacturers and retailers are voluntarily taking huge strides to act on food waste reduction, including some companies that are publishing their food waste data publicly. Other recent developments across the food industry include a notable increase in the charitable redistribution of surplus edible food through


MARKET RESARCH

HOW OUR INDUSTRY CAN SHAPE THE FUTURE ALAN HAYES, HEAD OF TECHNICAL PROGRAMMES, IGD

companies such as FareShare. Technology has also made a difference. Apps like Too Good To Go, offered by HEMA in the Netherlands, have helped to match up food due to be discarded with consumers looking for a bargain. Meanwhile, Olio has been a major success in the UK, and Karma has made a big impact with restaurants in the past year. We have also seen the introduction of ‘wonky vegetables’ as a way of selling produce previously deemed not suitable for sale. Some promotions pair these products with recipe ideas to show different ways of preparing and cooking a wide variety of food items. Along the chain, manufacturers and suppliers have been making use of a process known as ‘waste valorisation’, which means the reprocessing of waste or discarded materials to create a new product with its own market value. This could be something simple such as recycling old newspapers into tissues, or it could mean turning used cooking oil into energy. Mexican company Biofase has even been making cutlery from avocado stones.

BEYOND FOOD WASTE

We know from our research that shoppers are keen for change in many more areas. Some 84% of shoppers now see the environmental impacts of their food purchases as important (IGD ShopperVista, September 2019). When IGD carried out research into shoppers of the future, one of the key trends

that emerged was their desire to be more ‘socially conscious’. Influential programmes such as The Blue Planet have inspired more than half of shoppers to make changes that support the environment (The Future of Foodservice Packaging, Footprint & BaxterStorey). Many businesses have been forced to think fast and adapt to these changes, with smart retailers and manufacturers finding new products that solve environmental problems before they become the next big news item. Innovations in packaging are announced almost every week. From Carlsberg’s beer bottles made of paper to Halo’s compostable coffee capsules, businesses are thinking differently to meet changing consumer expectations.

WHAT NEXT?

Our industry has made great strides on the important issue of food waste, but we are not complacent. Reducing food waste is a long-term journey and we recognise there is more we can, and will, be doing in the future. Beyond food waste, if consumers continue to place an emphasis on sustainability and their environmental impact, then we believe the retail and FMCG industries will be in a strong position to roll out many more innovative products and processes to meet this demand. To be clear, there are huge opportunities for our industry to continue shaping the sustainability agenda in the months and years ahead.

Alan Hayes is Head of Technical Programmes at IGD, a research and training charity for the food and grocery industry. Hayes leads the development and delivery of programmes at IGD in supply chain collaboration, technology and sustainability. He provides leadership and direction for these programmes, in addition to managing a broad range of stakeholder engagement across the entire food and grocery industry in the UK.

SUSTAINABILITY HANDBOOK 2020 I 33


COMPANY SPOTLIGHT

TENNENT’S MARTIN DOOGAN, GROUP ENGINEERING MANAGER, C&C

Tennent’s commits £14m to green initiatives ICONIC SCOTTISH BREWERY TENNENT’S IS SPENDING IN EXCESS OF £14M ON A SERIES OF GREEN INITIATIVES THAT WILL ERADICATE SINGLE-USE PLASTICS BY NEXT YEAR AND MAKE THE COMPANY CARBON NEUTRAL BY 2025.

MARTIN DOOGAN, GROUP ENGINEERING MANAGER, C&C

As one of Scotland’s best known and most loved brands, Tennent’s has committed to leading from the front by committing a huge investment in excess of £14m to a number of major environmental initiatives. The iconic company has pledged to eradicate single-use plastics by 2021 and stop using all plastics by 2025. It has also committed to become fully carbon neutral by 2025. From this spring, all cans of its famous Tennent’s Lager, which are made at the Wellpark Brewery in Glasgow, will be packaged in cardboard rather than the traditional plastic rings. Shrink-wrap will also be phased out, and new equipment will aim to make the production process more sustainable. A newly-built water treatment plant – which uses anaerobic digestion – is also now operational at Wellpark. This allows for the on-site treatment of waste water generated as a by-product of brewing. The facility also generates bio-gas, which is used to help heat the brewery. Plans are also being made to ensure that all the brewery’s energy will come from renewable sources by 2025. 34 I SUSTAINABILITY HANDBOOK 2020

Boldly leading the way in the UK brewing industry, Tennent’s was the first brewer to join the UK Plastics Pact which aims to rethink the design and use of products to cut down on the use of plastic. A new carbon capture facility is also planned at Wellpark, which will save the equivalent CO2 emissions of 27,000 flights from Glasgow to London each year. Additionally, the by-products of beer production at Wellpark are already entirely recycled for use as animal feed or organic compost, meaning Wellpark has sent zero waste to landfill since 2014. Martin Doogan, Group Engineering Manager at Tennent’s parent company C&C, said the company was acting “decisively” against climate change. He added: “It’s a leap in the right direction – but we’re not complacent and we’re not finished. We will continue to seek out ways to minimise our environmental impact across our entire business, from our transport fleet, to international deliveries. “Our commitment is to lasting environmental change; in our company, in our industry and beyond.”


Tennent’s Lager Sustainability Campaign

Tennent’s Lager has launched a consumer campaign outlining our commitment to sustainability from grain to glass via a series of Social Films, Out of Home Advertising across Central Scotland, a Trade/ Consumer PR campaign and strategic environmental partnerships including The UK Plastics Pact and 2050 Climate Group. Our pledges include:

£14m investment Ongoing commitment to local sourcing and waste management Promise to eradicate single-use plastic by 2021 New anaerobic digestion plant and carbon capture at Wellpark Brewery in Glasgow Energy from renewables and carbon neutral by 2025 First brewer to join The UK Plastics Pact Partnership with 2050 Climate Group To find out more and watch the film, please visit www.tennents.co.uk/sustainability The Tennent’s Lager Team.

TENNENT’S AND THE RED T ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF THE C&C GROUP


COMPANY SPOTLIGHT

ENVIPCO SPENCER ROBERTS, MANAGING DIRECTOR, ENVIPCO UK Pantone 7734

Pantone Cool Grey 11

Deposit Return Scheme made easy

In Scotland we consume over 2 billion single-use drink containers every year. Many of these end up being left on the streets as litter and quite often end up in landfill sites or are incinerated. The issue here is two fold, firstly we pollute our beautiful country with non-biodegradable materials and the second is we waste valueable resources that could be recycled and used over and over again. The Scottish Government has decided to implement a Deposit Return Scheme (DRS) to encourage consumers to return these empty drink containers for recycling. The consumer will be charged a deposit when they purchase a drink and will have that deposit refunded once they return it. Simple but effective. Other countries using a Deposit Return Scheme achive recycling rates over 90%. The easiest way to collect these returned drink containers is to use a Reverse Vending Machine (RVM). Simply, this machine accepts the container, confirms what it is (check barcode, check dimensions, check weight, etc), compacts the material to enable

efficient storage and waste collection and then authorises the return of the deposit with a voucher. The voucher can then be scanned at the checkout to reduce the customers shopping bill or create a cash credit. Finally, the machine reports all of the data back to the System Administrator, who then credits the Retailer for all of the deposits returned to consumers and pays the Retailer a Handling Fee as compensation for the service they are offering. For the Retailer, the Reverse Vending Machine fully automates this whole process, without it, everything has to be done manually at the counter. At Envipco, we have spent 40 years designing and manufacturing Reverse Vending Machines and have been at the fore front of developments over the years. We have a full range of RVM’s from industrial sized machines down to our market leading Flex RVM, designed specifically for the Convenience sector.

CONTACT US TO HELP YOU PREPARE FOR THE DEPOSIT RETURN SCHEME AT: WWW.ENVIPCO.COM/CONTACT_US.PHP

36 I SUSTAINABILITY HANDBOOK 2020



COMPANY SPOTLIGHT

VEGWARE WWW.VEGWARE.COM

Compostables: the key to recycling everything Vegware is the global specialist in plant-based compostable food and drink packaging. They have been manufacturing eco-friendly products since 2006. Based in Edinburgh, the company now sells to 70 countries.

THE CHALLENGE

Conventional packaging can create recycling challenges by mixing plastic with card. Add in food contamination, and recycling is even less likely. Vegware’s plant-based disposables can be composted alongside food waste. Here, food contamination isn’t a problem. Additionally, using compostable packaging improves the quality of dry mixed recycling, as foodcontaminated items are separated.

SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS

Vegware’s range of over 300 eco disposables includes hot and cold cups and lids, straws, cutlery, bags to go, tableware and a vast variety of takeaway containers. The brand offers practical and stylish packaging designs that help showcase food first.

CLOSE THE LOOP IN SCOTLAND

Vegware’s Scottish Close the Loop composting collection service turns client’s used Vegware, with food scraps, into high-grade compost in under 12 weeks. From June 2017 to December 2019, Vegware’s Close the Loop has collected and commercially composted 292 tonnes of used Vegware packaging, the equivalent of 16.9 million coffee cups, within Scotland Commercial composting benefits the environment as it: Q diverts post-consumer waste from landfill Q creates a product for agriculture Q returns nutrients to soil Q improves soil structure Vegware’s Environmental team is Waste Management Consultants, they can advise on how your business can join the circular economy. Their expertise incorporates education at all stages, and includes bin signage, posters, banners and staff training. Vegware’s objectives are increasing recycling rates and business access to commercial composting. They have the deepest set of compostability certification in the sector, which is an independent guarantee their products can be processed in the correct facilities.

The company provides product samples, so you can try before you buy. Interested in learning more? Contact Vegware at sales@vegware.co.uk or +44 (0)3333 055 404. More information can be found by visiting their website, vegware.com.

38 I SUSTAINABILITY HANDBOOK 2020

1 BIOCYCLE, 2016: HTTPS://WWW.BIOCYCLE.NET/2016/08/15/COMPOSTABLE-PRODUCTS-POSTCONSUMER-FOOD-SCRAPS/ 2 WWW.THEGUARDIAN.COM/ENVIRONMENT/2018/JUL/23/UKS-PLASTIC-WASTE-MAY-BE-DUMPED-OVERSEAS-INSTEAD-OF-RECYCLED

THE SOLUTION


PACKAGING MADE FROM PLANTS Vegware foodservice packaging is made from renewable, lower carbon, recycled or reclaimed materials. It’s also all designed to be commercially composted with food waste.

CLOSE THE LOOP IN SCOTLAND In 2017, Vegware launched its own composting collection service, Close the Loop. We collect clients’ used Vegware and food waste for commercial composting. In under 12 weeks, it turns to nutrient-rich compost for farmers’ fields. Our collection service is competitively priced and completely flexible with no contract tie-ins. Close the Loop is available in most of Scotland, with many clients offering a bring-back scheme to capture used Vegware takeaways. Contact our Environmental team to learn more.

Sustainable solutions The earth has finite resources. Disposables are used for such a short time, so it makes sense to switch to renewable materials, reserving conventional plastics for applications where they can’t be easily replaced. We have an extensive range of products available to suit all your grab-and-go needs – including hot cups, cutlery, bags to go and a wide range of takeaway containers.

Get in touch! +44 (0)3333 055 409 | environmental@vegware.co.uk | vegware.com |

@vegware


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