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V I S I T :

W W W . K A P E L E . C O . Z A

FRIDAY 22 January 2010 NO. 1894

FTW1391

MAKING THE WORLD A SMALLER PLACE

FREIGHT & TRADING WEEKLY

The Freight Community’s Weekly Newspaper for Import / Export decision makers – on subscription

Piracy scourge hits shippers’ pockets Surcharges introduced to cover cost of diverting ships By Alan Peat The need for shipping lines to take preventative measures against pirate attacks is now costing shippers extra on their freight charges. And several shipping lines are taking action. As part of its move to protect against pirate attacks in the north-western Indian Ocean, MSC has imposed a piracy surcharge on cargoes bound from the Indian sub-continent to East and South Africa. While the early official notification from MSC head office indicated the surcharge being levied on the southbound sailings, Glen Delve, Durban-based marketing manager for the line, is certain that it will also apply to outbound cargoes from SA. The US$95/TEU surcharge, he told FTW, is to help cover the cost of diverting the ships to a course further out to sea, primarily in the piracy-prone area off the coast of Somalia and the eastern entrance

to the Gulf. “We are now steaming outside the recognised piracy hot spots,” Delve said. “And the diversion of these vessels obviously costs us more in bunker fuel costs and additional fast-steaming time to maintain our scheduled sailings.” The surcharge, he added, will help to compensate for this deviation cost. Similar information has been released to FTW from the AP Møller Group – which includes the two shipping lines Maersk and Safmarine. “We have been constantly monitoring the situation in the Gulf of Aden and the area off the Somali coast,” said Maersk SA MD, David Williams. “Preventing piracy attacks is at the forefront of our considerations, to ensure the safety and security of our crew, vessels and our customers’ cargo.” And, with the increased piracy activity in the area, his line has been forced to further increase the safety

measures taken by the vessels sailing in this region. According to Williams these measures included: • Several smaller vessels

having been replaced by larger and faster vessels to reduce the risk of successful boardings and hijackings; • Sailing distance having been increased again and

vessels now sailing even further away from the Somalia coast line; • Additional security precautions having been To page 20

South-easter batters Cape Town terminal schedule

Quieter times in Cape Town harbour … A howling south-easter thwarted business for almost ten hours last week, resulting in a delay of 105 to one of the arriving vessels. See full story on page 17.

As an integrated logistics and service provider, Logwin develops comprehensive solutions for industry and commerce - especially the AUTO industry. With staff of 8,600 at 400 locations in 44 countries, Logwin offers contract logistics, international air + ocean and road + rail freight services. Logwin's customised logistics solutions help create sustainable growth for its customers. To find out more about Logwin's JIT and JIS services, log on to www.logwin-logistics.com

Logwin Air + Ocean South Africa (Pty) Ltd. Head Office Johannesburg Phone: +27 11 976 7600. Email: airocean.za@logwin-logistics.com FTW4328


2 | FRIDAY January 22 2010 FREIGHT & TRADING WEEKLY

Editor Joy Orlek Consulting Editor Alan Peat Assistant Editor Liesl Venter Advertising Carmel Levinrad (Manager) Yolande Langenhoven Jodi Haigh Divisional Head Anton Marsh Managing Editor David Marsh

Correspondents

Durban Terry Hutson Tel: (031) 466 1683 Cape Town Ray Smuts Tel: (021) 434 1636 Carrie Curzon Tel: 072 674 9410 Port Elizabeth Ed Richardson Tel: (041) 582 3750 Swaziland James Hall jhall@realnet.co.sz

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DUTY CALLS A weekly summary of the main changes to the South African tariff dispensation and amendments to customs and excise legislation. Email dutycalls@nowmedia.co.za.

Airport Charges – 01 April 2010 In a December 2009 Government Gazette the Airports Company of South Africa Limited (Acsa) announced the airport charges that it will levy from 01 April 2010. Air Traffic Charges – 01 April 2010 In a December 2009 Government Gazette the Air Traffic and Navigation Services Company Limited announced the air traffic service charges that it will levy from 01 April 2010. Trade Statistics – November 2009 On 30 December 2009 the South African Revenue Service (Sars) published November 2009 trade statistics detailing a trade deficit (imports exceeding exports) of R2.5 billion. This brought the trade

deficit for the year, 01 January 2009 to 30 November 2009, to R29.18bn compared to R62.89bn for the same period in 2008. With only the December 2009 trade statistics to be published, there is one certainty that the trade deficit will be lower than that of 2008, but there will be a trade deficit nonetheless. Rule Amendments – SADC Origin Protocol In a Government Gazette notice dated 31 December 2009, Sars announced an amendment to Rules 49B to the Customs and Excise Act which relate to the Southern African Development Community (SADC). Rule 49B relates to the Treaty of the South African Development Community and Protocols Concluded under Article 22 thereof. The amendments relate

to the issue of origin. Draft Customs Control & Customs Duty Bill – 35 Days Today, 22 January 2010, there are only 35 days left for you to comment on the Draft Customs Control Bill, and the Draft Customs Duty Bill, which were first published on 30 October 2009. You will recall that the two draft Bills form the legislative platform for changes to people, policy, processes and technology which will be delivered under the Customs Modernisation programme. Action Required – Your Reminder At the request of readers we will remind you of those issues on which comment is due. For ease of reference the issue in which the original notice was published is provided in brackets. • Tariff applications relating to (i) the proposed reduction in the rate of customs duty

on self-copy paper; (ii) the proposed increase in the rate of customs duty on glycerol; and (iii) the proposed increase in the dollar-based reference price for wheat, in respect of which comment is due by 29 January 2010 (Duty Calls – 15 January 2010). • The amendment of the Rules to the Customs and Excise Act relating to form DA90. Form DA90 is titled “Claim in respect of Excise Duty and Fuel Levy on Motor Fuel used by Diplomatic and Other Foreign Representatives in terms of Items 602.01, 602.02 and 640.1 of Schedule No. 6 to the Customs and Excise Act, No.91 of 1964”, on which comment is due by 29 January 2010. (Duty Calls – 15 January 2010).

Note: This is a noncomprehensive statement of the law. No liability can be accepted for errors and omissions.

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FRIDAY January 22 2010 | 3

Customs puts single bond on the agenda Larger customers stand to benefit more than smaller players By Joy Orlek In the interests of streamlining Customs procedures in South Africa, there’s a big initiative from Customs to introduce a single bond rather than the variety of bonds required for different purposes. Currently, if a customer wants to move goods within each port, they need to open up an account at each port and have a deferment bond. The idea now is to introduce a system that would cut down the need for a different guarantee

in each port and each customer would now hold one national bond. This single bond would encompass warehouse guarantees, road bonds and others. And while this would be advantageous for Customs, practically speaking there are different views. The feeling is that this may benefit larger players while smaller players would come unstuck because it would affect their cash flow capability. “At the moment they have different accounts at different ports, which means they have different

payment dates and can therefore use the money as it comes in to pay other accounts. With only one national bond it could affect their cash flow,” says Lombard Insurance’s Dean Burscough. “If they miss a payment date there are strict penalties.” Customs has been talking about the proposal for a few years. “Practically they can’t implement it immediately, but it’s now on the agenda and could be introduced in a few years’ time,” says Lombard’s Francis Kingston.

Dean Burscough ... ‘This single bond would encompass warehouse guarantees, road bonds and others.’

Bridging the gap between academia and the ‘real world’ Bridging the gap between studying and working in the logistics and transport field is the thinking behind the recent signing of a Memorandum of Understanding by Ciltsa and the University of Pretoria. The Chartered Institute of Transport and Logistics: South Africa (Ciltsa) and the Department of Business Management at the University of Pretoria (UP) have signed an MoU aimed at closer co-operation between the two institutions for the benefit of the transport sector. “Our members have a wealth of expertise across the supply chain that enhances the academic component of learning, resulting in students receiving an all

round education which makes them employable at the end of their studies,” says Ciltsa national president Barlow Manilal. Students are often not exposed to the working environment of their chosen career until after they graduate from university, says Manilal. “Thus, their expectations of the work environment and the reality are worlds apart and they are often not prepared for the adjustment. One of the initial projects is the launch of a mentorship programme that will see BCom option supply chain management students benefiting from an exchange of information from seasoned professionals within logistics and transport,” he said.

Joining forces ... Catherine Larkin (executive director of Ciltsa), Barlow Manilal (Ciltsa president), Prof Carolina Koornhof (Dean of the Faculty of Economic and Management Sciences). Standing from left: Wesley Niemann (BCom option Supply Chain Management programme coordinator) and Prof Gideon Nieman (head of the Department of Business Management).

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4 | FRIDAY January 22 2010

Under-declaration continues to dog textile industry By Joy Orlek Despite SA Revenue Service’s best efforts, under-valuation of clothing and textile imports from the Far East remains a major issue of contention for the industry. Sars has been vocal about its get tough attitude on under-valuation and the abuse of rebate and other trade schemes, but it remains a problem, according to Textile

‘Declared landed prices are still extremely depressed.’

Federation executive director Brian Brink. “There was a bit of a blitz before Christmas over 12 months ago and they relaunched the get tough campaign in April last year. “Clearly there are good intentions but the question is whether these are followed through properly.” The bottom line, says Brink, is that the declared landed prices are still extremely depressed. “We’ve had meetings with senior guys and they are honestly trying to do something, but if you look in

the marketplace we don’t see any improvement. “It’s not an easy problem to solve and Sars has taken on board many of the concerns, but they need to follow through on that.” Quotas on Chinese imports, which were terminated two years ago, were seen as a means of addressing the industry’s concerns. But rather than stemming the flow of cheap imports, these continued to flow into the country from a range of obscure destinations – with China replaced by the likes of Myanmar, for example.

Diversification pays off for NGL Group ‘The essence is being able to deliver at all times’ By Liesl Venter Quinton de Villiers and Mark Scott dream big. In less than three years they have turned their dream of owning their own logistics company into a reality that is growing beyond their wildest dreams. What was once just NGL Logistic Solutions now is the NGL Group of Companies. “We have been very disciplined in our approach and have a strong will to survive,” says De Villiers. “We have continued to see growth from the first day we opened our doors and various factors have contributed to that. We started as a two-man band and throughout the past

three years we have remained committed to our vision and that is to always strive to improve.” The NGL Group of Companies now includes four subsidiaries – NGL Logistics Solutions, which provides clients with an overall logistic solution for all their transport needs, NGL Fleet Services, an overnight and same day delivery service, NGL Investments and Holdings as well as Labour Solve, a company that provides contract labour. “We have diversified extensively in recent times,” says De Villiers, “but that has been part of our strategy. We have never believed in forcing

Mark Scott and Quinton de Villiers of the NGL Group of Companies hard at work at their offices in Jet Park, Boksburg … ‘We don’t make promises we can’t keep.’

all the various sectors into one company because one size does not fit all, but rather in satisfying our customer needs by creating entities that can address their requirements.” A major contributor to the success is ensuring each company has the necessary expertise on board, says De

Villiers. “Mark and I have worked together for many years and we know what we are capable of. We don’t make promises we can’t keep. Therefore we make sure there are people in our team that can make our clients’ requests come true. It is essential to be able to deliver at all times.”

The decision to start their own company is starting to pay off as they continue to see growth, but no matter how big their empire grows, they still share an office, where they continue to bounce ideas off each other, develop new schemes and implement new plans.

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FRIDAY January 22 2010 | 5

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6 | FRIDAY January 22 2010

Piracy report reveals extent of the problem Level of violence to crew has also increased By Liesl Venter Piracy on the high seas is on the increase with last year’s staggering figures pointing to the highest level of piracy in six years. According to the ICC International Maritime Bureau’s (IMB) Piracy Reporting Centre, a total of 496 incidents of piracy and armed robbery occurred in 2009. And with attacks more frequent and violent across the globe, experts are warning shipmasters and owners to be aware. The last time piracy figures crossed 400 incidents was in 2003. 2009 is also the third successive year in which the number of reported incidents has increased. There were 239 incidents in 2006, 263 in 2007 and 293 in 2008. A statement released by the IMB this week reveals that 153 vessels were boarded worldwide, while 49 were hijacked. There were 84 attempted attacks and 120 vessels fired upon compared to 46 ships fired upon in 2008. A total of 1052 crew were taken hostage, while 68 crew were injured in the various incidents and eight crew were killed. “The level of violence towards the crew has increased along with the

number of crew injuries,” said IMB director, Captain Pottengal Mukundan. “We strongly urge all shipmasters and owners to report all incidents of actual and attempted piracy and armed robbery to our piracy centre. This is the first step in the response chain and vital in ensuring that adequate resources are allocated by governments in dealing with the problem.” Mukundan says while there has been a significant shift in the area of attacks off Somalia – a total of 111 vessels were

targeted by Somali pirates resulting in 42 hijackings in 2008 – the number of incidents almost doubled in 2009. “The number of successful hijackings is

‘The Nigerian attacks are much more violent in nature than Somalia.’ however proportionately less and this can be directly attributed to the increased presence and coordination of the international navies along with heightened awareness

and robust actions by the masters in transiting these waters.” A total of 28 incidents were reported for Nigeria in 2009. Vessels attacked included general cargo, bulk carriers, reefers and all types of tankers. The majority of the incidents were related to the oil industry, according to the report. “The Nigerian attacks are much more violent in nature than Somalia, localised with the capacity to attack vessels and installations from further from the coast. The incidence of violent

attacks against ships has also spilled over into neighbouring states.” Other areas where piracy remains problematic is the South China Seas where 13 incidents were reported, while incidents in the Singapore Straits increased to nine attacks. Bangladesh and Indonesia also suffered at the hands of pirates. “There were also several incidents along the South American coast where countries affected are Peru, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Haiti and Venezuela.”

Incidents of piracy

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FRIDAY January 22 2010 | 7

TRADE FINANCE, RISK MANAGEMENT, DANGEROUS GOODS

Shrinking reinsurance capacity pushes up rates … and they’re unlikely to drop this year By Joy Orlek In an industry under pressure last year as a result of the recession, companies could ill afford additional insurance costs – but there was little option against a background of shrinking reinsurance capacity. “The biggest challenge for us in 2009 was reinsurance capacity,” says Lombard Insurance’s Dean Burscough, who looks after the company’s general and commercial business related to customs bonds and guarantees required by the likes of Transnet Freight Rail and the port authorities. “For us to issue any type of insurance guarantee we need the backing of reinsurers. These are mostly European-based and they went through a very tough time in the

European market. “We struggled to gain capacity from them – and whereas we have typically used five reinsurers, last year we had to go to nine.” In addition, they raised their rates significantly – and this had to be passed onto the clients. “The increase in rates has had nothing to do with Lombard,” says Burscough, but was related to capacity and the economic crisis. It was a worldwide issue, and our customers were largely understanding. “We made a point of explaining the situation, and since we had not increased rates for some time, they generally accepted it as a once-off necessity.” And Burscough believes it will be some time before rates come down. Adding further challenge to the insurance industry

was the issue of bad debts. “It was the worst year ever for bad debts,” said Lombard’s Menso Kwint. “Companies were struggling and import volumes were down 30% – all of which impacted on all our clients’ turnovers.” And adding to the misery was the rand dollar exchange rate. “At the end of 2008 we were 10 to 1; in 2009 we were below eight so the rand income of clearing agents was lower than the previous year – and with overheads in rands life was not easy.” Looking to the year ahead, Burscough is not expecting huge growth in the economy. “There’s unlikely to be fireworks for a while. We hope imports increase a bit – and that is probably likely because there has been a de-stocking to a certain extent.”

Menso Kwint ... ‘Worst year ever for bad debts.’

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8 | FRIDAY January 22 2010

TRADE FINANCE, RISK MANAGEMENT, DANGEROUS GOODS

‘Be sure that you’re Incoterm-savvy’ By Alan Peat

Containers in port ... you need to be covered for the value of the goods as well as the customs duties and VAT.

South Africa records an annual total of 1.5-billion tonnes of trade goods – and all this needs to be moved at some stage in its life. Says Andrew Robinson, maritime legal specialist at attorneys Deneys Reitz and chairman of SA’s Maritime Law Association (MLA): “There is a longstanding, although ill-advised tradition amongst exporters to negotiate sales on completely inappropriate Incoterms. “The current set of terms was last amended and revised in 2000, and there is some talk of a new set appearing in 2010,” he said. Robinson suggests that it is useful to remember that, whichever Incoterm is used, it must be clearly stated that it is an Incoterm 2000 – failing which, in the event of any dispute, it will be necessary to try to establish what the particular term employed means, according to the law applicable to the contract. “In addition,” he said, “it is important to remember that the Incoterms do not deal with questions of passing of ownership of goods. At best, the Incoterms deal with the place where risk of loss or damage to the goods will pass from the seller to the buyer. “In the absence of any contractual arrangements

to the contrary the position in SA law is that ownership will only pass once the goods have been delivered by the seller to the buyer and the buyer has actually paid for those goods. “If that common law arrangement does not suit you, then you need to make it very clear when it is that the parties intend ownership to pass.” Movement-in-bond is another area of special note for shippers. “It is necessary to ensure

‘The insured cannot keep the cargo in storage in Durban simply because it is cheaper.’ that, as seller or buyer, you have adequate insurance not only for the value of the goods but also for any customs duties and VAT that you may be obliged to pay in the event that the cargo is stolen, hijacked or otherwise lost whilst moving in-bond,” said Robinson. “Unless the goods have been destroyed, and this can be adequately substantiated, then the buyer or seller will be liable to pay duties and VAT unless the in-bond movement can be acquitted in accordance with the Customs & Excise Act.” Also, in order to move the goods in-bond, carriers are obliged to obtain suitable security in order

to cover any exposure that they may have for the nonacquittal of the goods. This leads to the subject of in-transit insurance. According to Robinson, the standard Institute Cargo Clauses “A” – the so called “all risks” clauses – contain terms that will provide cover for cargo whilst it is in the ordinary course of transit. “However,” he added, “it is not uncommon for cargo to be detained in the port pending its movement to final destination. “The obligation, however, is on the party with an interest in the goods to prevent any unnecessary delays in getting the goods out of storage and on to the ultimate destination.” This also means that the insured cannot, for example, keep the cargo in storage in Durban simply because it is cheaper to keep the goods stored there than have them cleared and released, unpacked and stored as breakbulk rather than containerised cargo. “If the goods were to be lost or damaged in circumstances where the goods were being stored other than in the ordinary course of transit,” said Robinson, “the underwriters may well be able to argue that no cover attached at the time because the goods were being kept in storage – NOT in the ordinary course of transit.”

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10 | FRIDAY January 22 2010

TRADE FINANCE, RISK MANAGEMENT, DANGEROUS GOODS

HIV and crime are key risk factors for the decade ahead When you are assessing risk factors related to cargo movement you need to think like a lawyer, politician, sociologist, forwarder, transporter and more all rolled into one, according to Sue Wood, operations director of Cargocare Freight Services. “Much of the risk going forward is due to factors outside of our control,” she told FTW, “but the implications of these events have to be taken into account in your risk management.” In consultation with company MD Roland Raath, a list of major factors of the moment was compiled. “Some new risks are arising, like global climate change and piracy on the Horn of Africa,” said Wood. “In terms of climate change, you have to think about the last decade of weather, with things like tsunamis and higher sea

levels and the risks these pose to vessels and ports. “And, apart from the hijacking of ships off the coast of Somalia and the entry to the Gulf, you also have the potential for piracy at congested African ports – where vessels are just sitting ducks. “Then there’s the issue of vessel ageing and safety standards not being adhered to. This, of course, has been heightened due to the global economic crisis.” But, while these are events on the global stage, Wood emphasised that risk factors also extended closer to home. “These local factors affecting us include SA Revenue Service (Sars) and other government decisions,” she said, “and issues arising from policy determinations by Transnet, the department of trade and industry (dti) and Eskom. “We would also have to add the local implications of decisions coming from the

International Air Transport Association (Iata) and the SA Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) affecting the global movement of air cargo to and from SA.” Wood believes that all these organisations are significant pressure points, and that any changes in their strategic direction or regulations can become a risk to the business. “You have to keep your ears to the ground to pick up on them, and respond effectively.” The Cargocare crystal ball is a bit cloudy this year, according to Wood. “I think that a big risk is going to be the difficulty of market prediction in 2010,” she added, “probably even more difficult than last year. “But the two biggies that should really be at the top of the list would be HIV and crime, and we’re addressing both actively.” The two company executives also agreed

Sue Wood ... ‘A more complex risk for the freight forwarding industry would be supply chain integration.’

that another, much more complex risk for the freight forwarding industry would be supply chain integration. “That is the biggest risk, but its successful solution will offer the biggest reward.” A long-term, but real

concern that deserves mention is the whole oceanfreight scenario, according to the two executives. They are convinced that global warming and supply chain developments will eventually pressurise international sea cargo movement downwards, according to Wood. “Meanwhile,” she added, “countries are building unnecessary extra port capacity – with a current global 40% underutilisation of existing facilities – and everbigger ships. “In this scenario, the lines are trying like crazy to reduce their overcapacity of smaller vessels that are coming to the end of their lives. This as they forecast that demand will keep dropping – and their 10-year projections are normally pretty accurate. “Anyway, that’s one that’ll come later rather than sooner – I hope.”

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12 | FRIDAY January 22 2010

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Tight inventory control is key By Alan Peat “Security not only involves every step in the movement of goods,” says Bob Garbett, MD of Professional Risk and Asset Management, “but also requires close examination and proactive action in those areas which do not involve the actual transportation.” An example of this, he added, was that employee theft reported in a 2007 document from the giant US supermarket chain, Walmart, exceeded loss from shoplifting by a whopping 50%. “A gang armed with guns can easily steal thousands. A gang armed with pens can just as easily steal millions – and the prison terms are shorter,” said Garbett. “The rate at which companies have suffered losses illustrates the size of the problem,” he added. “Property loss of stock and fixed assets in Africa and the Middle East occurred in a staggering 46% of companies compared to 28% in North America.” And cargo theft is on the increase. It occurs across a range of freight forwarding and storage operations but, according to Garbett, the greatest risk is during ground truck transportation or when vehicles are in the process of being loaded or unloaded. “The losses to owners and insurers are very large,” he said, “with worldwide costs estimated to exceed US$30-billion per year. It is interesting that much cargo theft remains unreported – largely due to the fact that the precise point of disappearance of cargo in the supply chain cannot be pin-pointed.

Bob Garbett ... Cargo theft is on the increase.

“The illegal sale of stolen cargo undercuts prices in legitimate businesses and also affects small businesses with limited stock that operate on a just-in-time basis.” Strategies for reducing cargo theft vary from one situation to another – and even from one product to another. “The costs of implementing some of the more sophisticated targethardening security controls – such as increased security manpower, cameras and radio frequency detector (RFD) – may be too high for some freight forwarding companies. “However, tight inventory controls are within the region of most small businesses.”

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FRIDAY January 22 2010 | 13

TRADE FINANCE, RISK MANAGEMENT, DANGEROUS GOODS

‘Cutting corners is not an option for dangerous goods’

Trade index raises red flags

Cross-border shipments add further challenge In the transporting of dangerous goods, cutting corners is not an option, according to Hazel Briggs, managing director of HB Services, a Johannesburgbased local and crossborder freight consolidator that specialises in the transportation of hazardous chemicals. Most transporters felt the effects of the downturn in the economy during 2009, she told FTW – with the result that everyone has become increasingly aware of costs. “Some industries may be able to cut corners,” she added, “but not the transportation of chemicals – be they hazardous or otherwise. “There are so many checks and balances to

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consider when transporting chemicals, that even a small deviation could be a recipe for disaster.” Briggs also suggested that the temptation maybe to try “a cheaper haulier”. But, she questioned, “does this person’s vehicles comply with the rigorous checks that they will experience at HB Services’ warehouse when loading?” The company monitors all vehicles arriving to deliver and collect cargo from the warehouse and has a detailed check-list with which all trucks must comply. “Suppliers delivering to our premises are turned away if the necessary Trem cards and safety data sheets are not available,” Briggs added.

Hazel Briggs … ‘Many checks and balances to consider when transporting chemicals.’

HB Services also has a further monitoring procedure in place when it is consolidating a load. This, Briggs told FTW, to ensure product compatibility. An uninformed transporter may fail to check. And certain products may be loaded on the same truck – that should be a metre apart from other chemicals belonging to a

different category. Briggs also stressed that transportation cross-border on less-than-perfect roads was very challenging – and she felt that suppliers needed to be assured that their load would arrive at destination on-time and in perfect condition. “Permits are required to carry chemicals in other countries,” she said, and arriving at a border without these in place can cause costly delays – and even expose the cargo to other hazards, such as pilfering. “I would strongly recommend that suppliers always consider what could go wrong and then ensure that they are making use of professionals who will try their utmost to ensure that it doesn’t.”

South Africa is definitely not out of the woods yet in terms of economic recovery if the Trade Activity Index (TAI) is anything to go by. According to the SA Chamber of Commerce and Industry, the TAI for December declined to 42 from 51 in November. And while this drop is considered to be seasonal, the decline of the TAI was greater than it had been in 2008. Economists this week have continued to warn South Africans that economic recovery will be slow following the global economic meltdown in 2008.


14 | FRIDAY January 22 2010

Customs reassessment process creates anomaly in insurance industry By Joy Orlek Against a background of diminished cargo volumes, there was a strange anomaly in the insurance industry, Lombard’s Francis Kingston told FTW. “Lombard did not see its exposure reduced. “In fact it increased slightly,” said Kingston – and

that’s related to a Customs reassessment process. “A lot of our clients are very hesitant to do anything with their current facilities because it could mean they will be re-rated. “As soon as they are reassessed, if they apply for an increase or even a decrease, their guaranteed requirements will change

significantly depending on the assessment that customs gives them. So many were reluctant to change their current facilities and even though volumes were down they did not reduce their facility with customs over fear that guarantee requirements would change. “If anything we were probably getting income

on unutilised guarantees because of the reluctance to change.” Looking to the year ahead, Kingston believes growth will be very client-specific – “Certain niche markets will fly,” he told FTW. Francis Kingston … ‘Lombard did not see its exposure reduced.’

Positive predictions drive optimism in auto industry Africa market predicted to grow by 49% By Ed Richardson Government intervention has put the global auto industry in a position to power itself out of the recession, and to grow by around 50% between 2010 and 2014, according to the latest

PricewaterhouseCoopers (PWC) survey of the sector. “Because of the industry's powerful economic multiplier effect, the auto manufacturing sector is considered by many as simply too important to be allowed to fail – especially during

periods of recession. In Europe, for example, it is estimated that two million are employed directly in the industry, with 12 million more employed indirectly,” says PricewaterhouseCoopers auto expert Calum MacRae.

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by the 137% increase predicted for Eastern Europe and 73% for North America. China – which was the only market to grow in 2009 – is expected to continue driving a 48% growth in the AsiaPacific market.

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FRIDAY January 22 2010 | 15

Botswana Consolidators plans network expansion Celebrating a 10-year milestone By Liesl Venter 2010 is proving to be a year of new beginnings for Botswana Consolidators. The company has not only moved into new premises, but also made some key new appointments. According to owner Kitty Hewitt, the new premises in Spartan on the East Rand are already proving to be a worthwhile investment. “We moved in over the Christmas period but only officially started working from here in the first week of January – it has been a bit of an adjustment, but it is a definite improvement.” Not only do they now have significantly more space, but the premises also provide safe parking for the company’s fleet of trucks. “The building was purchased at auction and suits our needs perfectly. The yard is bigger as is the warehouse which fits in well with our plans for the coming months.”

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New Spartan premises … bigger yard and bigger warehouse.

Hewitt and her team are geared up to take Botswana Consolidators to the next level. Celebrating its ten-year anniversary in March, the company is set to expand its network further into

Africa in 2010. To help facilitate this, Wayne Pepler, an expert on Zambia with many years of industry experience, has joined the team as warehouse manager. In the interests of

improving service levels, Lizelle Malherbe is heading off to Botswana to manage and control the distribution on the Botswana side. “We have also bought some new vehicles and by extending

our fleet we can now do more express deliveries.” The company has applied for a bonded warehouse to bolster its international clearing and shipping offering.


16 | FRIDAY January 22 2010

Expect more Customs container stops ahead of Soccer World Cup Retail industry supportive of Sars’ efforts to combat illegal imports By Alan Peat There’s been a loud complaint about SA Revenue Service’s frequent container stops from an FTW reader, who accused the customs authorities of using reputable importers as a convenient revenue generator. Our complainant told us that one of his clients, who has been importing footwear for 30 years and is considered an accredited importer by Sars, has been consistently having containers stopped in recent months. “They search it,” he said, “you pay for it. And there’s a delay, which has all sorts of implications. “If they never find anything, why do they keep picking on that client? “Could it be because

it’s a revenue generator for them – and, if it’s a reputable client, they know they will be paid?”

‘Sars has put a ‘hit team’ on the job, and they are doing just that.’ That could be a possibility, but what is certain is that footwear and clothing imports have long been high up on the list of Sars’ suspect products – due to the frequency of under-valuation of container-loads of these goods, and other illegal practices involving them. (See story on page 4). It is also known that the customs authorities have recently sent a notice to clients informing them that imports of sports clothing

and footwear would be specially targeted in the run-up to this year’s Soccer World Cup. This, said Sars, as a double check to verify that they are Fifa-authorised products and as the usual check on valuation and the like. Continuing our research of the issue, FTW also contacted the major forwarder, UTi, which we had been told had a similar problem to our complainant – with an unusual number of containers being stopped recently. Dave Liebenberg, the company’s national customs liaison manager, told FTW that they also had some major players in the footwear industry as clients, and that they were having containers continually stopped at SA’s land border posts.

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FRIDAY January 22 2010 | 17

A meeting was held with Sars on the subject, and Liebenberg told FTW that the authorities’ reasoning for this was that they had been stopping accredited customers’ containers (amongst others) to give them a verifiable check on importers’ trustworthiness. And, sure enough, soon after this meeting, UTi’s container figures showed that the situation had reverted to the random search frequency. “We checked our records of the stock movement for the affected clients,” Liebenberg said, “and found that Sars had gone back to the normal once-ina-while stoppages.” FTW also contacted Edcon looking for their impressions of the frequency of container stoppages. The group is rated as one of the leading clothing, footwear and textiles (CFT) retailing groups in southern Africa

– trading through 10 retail formats, and having over 1 000 stores in SA, Botswana, Namibia, Swaziland and Lesotho. Martin Deal, Edcon’s logistics executive, told us that his group – and the clothing/footwear retail industry in general – had noted more frequent stoppages. “Nothing dramatic,” he said, “but a bit of a general increase across-the-board.” Part of this he attributed to complaints from the embattled local clothing/ footwear manufacturers that they were being increasingly hit with under-valued and other illegal imports flooding the country. This has been a subject of meetings, with the SA manufacturers and retailers talking to the SA Clothing and Textile Workers’ Union (Sactwu) – which had raised the “cheap imports” problem.

Perishable Specialists u Clearing & Forwarding u Imports & Exports u Airfreight u Transport u Supply Chain Management

According to Sactwu, more than 70 000 jobs have been lost in the industry since the beginning of 2003. And they cited competition from cheap goods from China (where export manufacturers enjoy huge export subsidies and other tax benefits) and other vastly under-priced imports as the main reasons for these local job losses. Deal told FTW that the retail industry recognised the problem raised by illegal imports, and was fully supportive of ways of combating them. “And,” he said, “one of the only ways such checks can be done is through stopping more containers for a search. Sars has put a ‘hit team’ on the job, and they are doing just that.” Although it has meant an increased level of stops, the retailers have no objections, Deal added, provided that the number is not allowed to get out of control.

u

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South-easter batters Cape Town terminal schedule From page 1

By Ray Smuts A howling south-easter thwarted business for almost ten hours at Cape Town Container Terminal last week, the knock-on effect, as usual, telling. The wind unleashed its vehemence for 9.45 hours on January 12/13 and even though a number of vessels arrived later than scheduled, delays nevertheless mounted. One of the terminal’s four main berths is still out due to upgrading. Maersk Dryden arrived two hours late on January 11 and berthed January 16, for a total delay of 105 hours. Maersk Derice arrived 12 hours late on January 15, anticipated berthing January 19, for an overall delay of 112 hours. Delays to Nicolai

Maersk (arrived 2.1 hours late) were of the order of 72.9 hours, and MSC Marina, a January 14 arrival, some 53 hours late. MOL Cullin arrived 5.3 hours late, delayed 53 hours in total, according to fresh terminal data. Moshe Motlohi, the Mother City terminal’s new executive succeeding Oscar Borchards, was to have assumed duties on January 1 but for now the man at the helm is procurement manager, Neville February. FTW caught up with the affable Motlohi at week’s end when he confirmed a welcome current break before taking on the demanding new Cape Town position on February 1. * Motlohi was until recently business unit executive at Durban Container Terminal.

u

u

u u

u

u

u

Tel: (021) 530 9841 u Fax: (021) 531 5909 email: mario@tsc-log.co.za


18 | FRIDAY January 22 2010

New procedures introduced for cargoes to and from Nigeria Heavy penalties for non-compliance Effective since last Monday (January 11), the Nigerian Ports Authority (NPA) has implemented a cargo tracking note (CTN) system for all cargoes shipped to and from any Nigerian port, according to Hariesh Manaadiar of Diamond Shipping Services. A letter from the NPA released to FTW reads: “every commodity loaded or unloaded (import/ export), at or with Nigeria as the final destination has to, prior to shipment, obtain a cargo tracking note or international cargo tracking document from a Nigerian Ports Authority representative at all ports around the world.” And it further added that Antaser Afrique was

designated by the Federal Government of Nigeria as the sole representative of Nigerian Ports Authority and the only authorised agent to issue a cargo tracking note. In turn, Manaadiar told FTW that Diamond Shipping Services had been nominated as the only Antaser Afrique sub-agent in SA able to issue these cargo tracking notes. “The CTN has to be issued at the loading port and CTN numbers should be inserted in the bill of lading (BoL) and cargo manifests,” he added. “Shipments without a CTN are subject to heavy penalties.” All costs for the CTN need to be paid prior to the certificate being issued.

The Port of Apapa ... container tracking note mandatory for all cargo shipped to or from Nigeria.

According to Manaadiar, the document fee is Eur50 per CTN – and one CTN is to be issued for each bill of lading (BoL). For shipments from loading places other than Europe and Africa, a fee of Eur70 is being charged.

Under “tariff per shipment” a full container load (FCL) is Eur50/TEU; roll-on, roll-off (roro) is Eur50 per vehicle up to 5-ton unit weight, and Eur100 per vehicle over 5-ton unit weight. This tariff to be paid for each and every

chassis number mentioned on the BoL. Consolidated cargo costs Eur5 per weight measure (wm) – with a minimum of Eur50 per CTN. Conventional/breakbulk is Eur5 per wm – with a minimum of Eur50 per CTN.

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FRIDAY January 22 2010 | 19

Last week’s top stories on www.cargoinfo.co.za and raw material product ranges

Container traffic collapse at Port of Amsterdam Container traffic at the Netherlands’ second largest port of Amsterdam declined 53% to 200 000-TEUs in 2009 from 425 000 in 2008.

Tread carefully in 2010’ – economist FNB chief economist Cees Bruggemans has one word on how to approach 2010 before it has properly begun – soberly. “We may have left the pits of hell, but we did so at an enormous cost of added unemployment, huge financial losses, global output forgone and large additions to national debts,” says Bruggemans. “A price has been paid, is being paid and will still be paid for all the follies

Logistics major scores medical contract in Chile Roche Chile has appointed Kuehne + Nagel to manage its national distribution centre, involving warehousing and distribution services for medical, promotional

of recent decades, and possibly for the rescue effort, too, as some claim. “Until such time that recovery is fully vested, treat our budding revival kindly and gently, nurture it, for it remains very fragile.” Local fruit exporter installs state of the art packing facility Cape Town-based Colors Fruit has installed a state of the art sorting facility at its Paarl pack house following a strategic alliance with Greefa Europe, one of the largest international designers

and manufacturers of fruit sorting machines.

reports, the Port in Morehead City, one of the deepest on the American East Coast, had to call in explosive experts following the incident. A forklift is believed to have punctured the boxes containing the explosive during off-loading.

Forklift mishap closes port A major American port was forced to close after nine containers of highly explosive material spilled at the facility. According to media

OBITUARY FTW1879SD

Untimely death of BP Freight co-founder

Tiger Africa Transport Reliable Local & Cross Border Road Freight

By Joy Orlek Brendon Sundelowitz, co-founder of BP Freight, died suddenly on January 11 after suffering a heart attack while returning home from holiday. Born on February 5, 1970, he attended Sandringham High School where he excelled at sport – particularly cricket and rugby. He was also a keen golfer. His involvement in the overborder freight industry spanned 18 years – and it was a field about which he was passionate. He started BP Freight with friend

Brendon Sundelowitz

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and colleague Peter Loram 13 years ago and together they have nurtured its growth and success. He never shied away from hard work and believed in putting his all into any project he undertook. “He was outgoing, popular with suppliers and clients – and the life and soul of any party,” said Loram. He was always accessible to the staff at FTW, generously sharing his depth of industry knowledge and expertise whenever called upon to do so. He leaves his wife Wendy and 7-year-old twins Tazmin and Jaden.

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20 | FRIDAY January 22 2010

MBG denies arrest of first vessel major ports. Alioth has been in Cape Town for nearly seven weeks, lying outside the port for much of the time. But an NPA charge would become applicable for subsequent in-port dues. NPA procedure is for cash customers like MBG Shipping to settle their accounts before a ship is allowed to sail. MBG’s sole director, Ian Wicks, is on record that the new service will kick in no later than January 20. This issue goes to press on January 19.

Oil rig equipment flies to Mexico By Carrie Curzon

the likes of Mitsui OSK Line (MOL) not having any sort of piracy surcharge. According to MD Chris Suchard, the line’s Far East service is routed via Singapore, and therefore its course across the Indian Ocean is well south of the pirate stricken area of northeast Africa. Much the same story at Pacific International Line (PIL), according to SA MD Ivan Naik. The furthest north on the East African coast that the line’s ships sail is to Dar es Salaam in Tanzania and Mombasa in Kenya, which Naik suggested was an area only infrequently pestered with pirates. “We service the Gulf via Singapore and Jebel Ali in the United Arab Emirates (UAE),” he said – with the ships’ courses on this routing also relatively clear of the pirate-stricken region in the Gulf entrance. “The line’s principals haven’t indicated anything about a piracy surcharge yet,” Naik added.

BUNKER WATCH (Fuel Prices) Last week

A 34t RHA (riser handling assembly) being loaded onto a charter plane at Cape Town International, with another in the background.

required to transport the riser joints from either side of the rig to well centre when the riser is run to seabed. "The derrick structure is 160 feet wide, and the only way to bring in the riser is

with the RHAs,” Bottomley told FTW. “There are only seven of these ‘riser handling assemblies’ in the world,” he added, which is why it was necessary to move them by air.

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Cape Crating loaded up two charter planes at Cape Town International last week with 135 tons of oil rig equipment bound for Mexico. The cargo was refurbished by Belmet Marine, Cape Town, and the project managed by Sean Abbott of Cape Crating for Ceva Logistics who chartered the planes. An Antonov cargo plane was loaded with 85t, while another 50t of cargo was transported in a 747 cargo plane. Co-owner of Cape Crating, Owen Bottomley, explained that the riser handling assembly (RHA) was an integral part of the drilling system as it was

Durban

MBG Shipping, the fledgling new reefer service between South Africa/ Europe and West Africa, this week categorically denied its first vessel, Alioth, was placed under arrest prior to the inaugural sailing from Cape Town. At week’s end harbour master Captain Ravi Naicker told FTW the vessel was “under arrest” but supplied no corroborative details, which led me direct to MBG. My question to

general manager, Pamela Yerushalmy, was whether Alioth is, or had been, under arrest. Her response was a categoric: “No”. She declined to entertain further questions. The sheriff of Cape Town, which usually effects ship arrests in such eventualities as unpaid repair, bunker or chandling bills, is not familiar with the name Alioth, a spokesman suggesting the “arrest” might have to do with monies owing to the National Ports Authority, landlord of the country’s

From page 1 taken, although the group will provide no specific details on these measures. To cover all these extra costs, the shipping group decided to implement an increase in its emergency risk surcharge (ERS). “This increase applies to all cargo to/from countries in East Africa and the Indian Ocean Islands. “However, the cargo from the Far East to Mauritius and Madagascar is exempted due to different deployment routing.” And, according to Kerry Rodrigues, business performance analyst for Maersk SA, from January 1 this has directly affected SA shippers. This is on the SA-Middle East-Indian sub-continent route where the EMS is US$25/TEU and US$50/ FEU. On the Middle EastIndian sub-continent-SA leg it will be US$75/TEU and US$150/FEU – but only for cargoes passing the Gulf. Different deployment routing is also the reason for

Cape Town

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Updated daily on Cargo Info Africa – www.cargoinfo.co.za

INBOUND BY DATE - Dates for sailing: 25/01/2010 - 08/02/2010 WBAY CT

January 2010

Name of ship / voy

Line

PE

EL

Name of ship / voy

Line

WBAY CT

PE

EL

Aalborg 1002

GAL

-

26-Jan

-

-

01-Feb 08-Feb

Maersk Jamestown 1001

MSK/SAF

03-Feb

-

-

-

-

Alexandra Rickmers 943E

CSC/HLC/MBA

-

-

-

-

04-Feb

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Maersk Jubail 1003

MSK/SAF

27-Jan

-

-

-

-

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Amber Lagoon 0204

MAC

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Maersk Jurong 1003

MSK/SAF

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02-Feb

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-

25-Jan

-

Arnis 281

PIL

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08-Feb

Atlantic Impala 915

CSA/HLC

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-

-

-

-

30-Jan

Barrier 56

MOL/MSK/OAC/SAF

-

-

-

-

25-Jan

05-Feb 08-Feb

DBN RBAY

DBN RBAY -

Mate 1002

MSK/SAF

-

-

-

-

-

Mol Ability 2101B

MOL

-

-

-

-

02-Feb

-

-

MOL Caledon 102A

CHL/DAL/MOL/MSK/SAF/TSA

-

06-Feb

-

-

-

-

Blue Sky 92/10

ASL

-

30-Jan

-

-

-

-

Mol Delight 3507A

MOL

-

-

-

-

03-Feb

-

Bosun 120

CSV/KLI/MIS/PIL

-

29-Jan

-

-

-

-

Mol Destiny 3106B

MOL

-

05-Feb

-

-

-

-

Brilliant 10A

MSC

-

-

-

-

08-Feb

-

Mol Honor 2003B

MOL

-

-

-

-

29-Jan

-

Brilliant 9A

MSC

-

-

-

-

28-Jan

-

Mol Silver Fern 0101

MOL

03-Feb

-

-

-

-

-

Buxmaster 714W

GSL

-

-

-

-

28-Jan

-

Mol Solution 3404A

MOL

-

-

-

-

27-Jan

-

City of Beijing 312E

HSD/MSK/NDS/NYK/SAF

-

-

-

-

07-Feb

-

Mol Unifier 0002

MOL

-

-

-

-

01-Feb

-

City of Shanghai 313W

HSD/MSK/NDS/NYK/SAF

-

-

-

-

27-Jan

-

MOL Wisdom 3030B

MOL

-

29-Jan

-

-

-

-

Clara Maersk 1001

MSK/SAF

28-Jan

-

-

-

-

-

Monte Alegre 950E

MSK/SAF

-

-

06-Feb

-

08-Feb

-

CSAV La Ligua 1003

CSV

-

-

-

-

04-Feb

-

CSCL San Jose 0011W

CSC/HLC/MBA/SMU

-

-

-

-

27-Jan

-

CSCL Santiago 0010E

CSC/HLC/MBA

-

-

-

-

29-Jan

-

Golden Isle 0202

MAC

-

-

-

-

-

25-Jan

Grand Orion 28A

MOL

-

-

-

Gustav Schulte 0002

CSV

-

-

-

-

01-Feb

-

Hanihe 104E

COS/EMC/HSD/MBA

-

-

-

-

25-Jan

-

Hanjin Gothenburg 1001

CSV

-

-

-

-

25-Jan

-

Hansa Augustenburg 068

NDS

-

29-Jan

-

-

25-Jan

-

Hoegh Brasilia 25

HOE/HUA

-

-

-

-

08-Feb

-

Hoegh Masan 23

HOE

-

-

-

-

28-Jan

-

Horizon 19N

MOL/MSC/MSK/OAC/SAF

-

-

-

-

28-Jan

-

HS Humbolt H1002A

MSC

-

-

-

-

03-Feb

-

Ital Festosa 0842-024W

COS/EMC/HSD/MBA

-

31-Jan

-

-

27-Jan

-

Ital Fulgida 0839-015E

COS/EMC/HSD/MBA

-

-

-

-

08-Feb

-

Ital Massima 0838-017E

COS/EMC/HSD/MBA

-

-

-

-

01-Feb

-

29-Jan 28-Jan

-

Jasper S 20

EAS/SCO

-

-

-

-

05-Feb

-

Jing Po He 098W

COS/EMC/HSD/MBA

-

07-Feb

-

-

03-Feb

-

-

30-Jan

-

-

-

02-Feb

-

Msc Chaneca 39A

MSC

-

-

-

-

26-Jan

-

Msc Chaneca 40A

MSC

-

-

-

-

06-Feb

-

Msc Laura 6A

HLC/HSL/LTI/MSC

-

-

26-Jan

-

28-Jan

-

Msc Leila 92A

MSC

-

-

-

-

04-Feb

-

Msc Loretta H1001A

MSC

-

-

-

-

27-Jan

-

Msc Magali 463a

MSC

-

-

-

-

30-Jan

-

Msc Noa 947

MSC/MSK/SAF

-

-

04-Feb

-

30-Jan 02-Feb

Msc Panama 47A

MSC

-

-

-

-

02-Feb

Msc Panama 48A

MSC

-

07-Feb

-

-

-

-

Msc Stella 11A

HLC/HSL/LTI/MSC

-

07-Feb

-

-

-

-

Msc Venezia 12A

HLC/HSL/LTI/MSC

-

31-Jan 03-Feb

-

05-Feb

-

Nele Maersk 1003

MSK/SAF

-

26-Jan

-

-

-

-

28-Jan

-

Pac Antila 278

PIL

-

28-Jan

-

-

31-Jan

-

Pac Aries 280

PIL

-

-

-

-

25-Jan

-

Pacific Express 9814

PRU

-

-

-

-

29-Jan

-

Purple Beach 0203

MAC

02-Feb 31-Jan

-

Queen Sapphire CO001

WWL

-

-

04-Feb 05-Feb 06-Feb

-

Ridge 48

MOL/MSK/OAC/SAF

-

-

-

-

Safmarine Andisa 0912

MSK/SAF

-

03-Feb

-

Safmarine Concord 1001/1002 SAF

-

-

-

-

29-Jan

-

Kota Azam AZM083

PIL

-

-

-

-

29-Jan

-

Kota Jasa JAA175

MOL/PIL

-

08-Feb

-

-

-

-

Kota Permas 029

CSV/KLI/MIS/PIL

-

07-Feb

-

-

01-Feb

-

Kota Sabas 020

CSV/KLI/MIS/PIL

-

-

-

-

07-Feb

-

-

-

-

01-Feb

05-Feb

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

MSC

-

-

26-Jan

MSC

Msc Borneo 25A

-

-

-

Msc Aurelie 7R

-

-

MOL/PIL

-

-

-

Kota Wirawan WRN967

-

06-Feb

-

02-Feb

04-Feb

01-Feb

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

30-Jan

NDS

LMC

-

- -

MSK/SAF

LMC

-

- -

Niledutch Shenzen 065

Jolly Bianco 002

PIL

MSK/SAF MSK/SAF

Nysted Maersk 1003

Jolly Marrone 277

Kota Wajar WRJ208

Monte Azul 949E Monte Rosa 003W

-

25-Jan 28-Jan

Lars Maersk 102A

CHL/DAL/MOL/MSK/SAF/TSA

-

-

26-Jan

-

30-Jan

-

Libra Copacabana 0292

CMA/CSV

-

-

-

-

27-Jan

-

Safmarine Mafadi 102A

CHL/DAL/MOL/MSK/SAF/TSA

-

Libra Mexico 1002

CSV

-

-

-

-

29-Jan

-

Safmarine Nyanga 1002

MSK/SAF

-

Lilac Roller 0801

MAC

-

-

-

-

31-Jan

-

San Alessio 0299

CMA/CSV

Maersk Bratan 1003

MSK/SAF

-

-

-

-

08-Feb

-

Saylemoon Rickmers 1002

CMA/CSV

Maersk Dabou 002W

MSK/SAF

-

-

-

-

30-Jan

-

Stellenbosch 1004

GAL

Maersk Davenport 1002

MSK/SAF

-

-

03-Feb

-

29-Jan

-

Troyburg YBU063

MOL/PIL

-

29-Jan 02-Feb

-

30-Jan

26-Jan 29-Jan -

06-Feb

-

-

06-Feb

-

-

-

-

-

25-Jan

-

27-Jan

-

-

30-Jan

-

-

03-Feb

-

-

06-Feb

-

-

-

-

-

25-Jan 30-Jan

-

31-Jan

-

-

-

-

UAF

-

-

-

-

06-Feb

-

Maersk Detroit 1002

MSK/SAF

-

-

05-Feb

-

UAFL Mauritius 507

Maersk Dubrovnik 1002

MSK/SAF

-

02-Feb 27-Jan

-

-

-

UASC Jubail AA476E

CMA/CSC/MBA

-

-

-

-

08-Feb

-

Maersk Durham 1002

MSK/SAF

-

27-Jan

-

-

-

-

UASC Khor Fakkan AA472E

CMA/CSC/MBA

-

-

-

-

25-Jan

-

Maersk Innoshima 1002

MSK/SAF

-

-

-

-

27-Jan

-

Umgeni 10

MOL/MSK/OAC/SAF

-

-

-

-

05-Feb

-

Maersk Ipanema 1002

MSK/SAF

04-Feb

-

-

-

-

-

Willi Rickmers 007

MSC/MSK/SAF

-

06-Feb

-

-

-

-

Maersk Jackson 1002

MSK/SAF

28-Jan

-

-

-

03-Feb

-

YM Ningbo 101E

KLI/NYK/PIL

-

01-Feb

-

-

-

-

-

-


Freight and Trading Weekly, Friday 22 January 2010

Easyfinder Guide to Agents EASIFINDER GUIDE TO AGENTS

AGENT

JHB 011

DBN 031

CT 021 510-7375

Africamarine Ships Agency

450-3314

306-0112

Alpha Shipping Agency (Pty) Ltd

450-2576

304-5363

Barwil Ship Services

285-0038

277-6500

-

201-4552

Bridge Marine

625-3000

460-0700

CMA CGM Shipping Agencies

285-0033

Combine Ocean

407-2200

BLS Marine

PE 041

RBAY 035

EL 043

PTA 012

WBAY 09264 64

Misc.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

421-5557

360-2477

797-9950

-

-

-

Saldanha Bay (022) 714-0410

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

386-0535

-

-

-

-

-

-

319-1300

911-0939

581-0240

797-4197

-

-

-

-

328-0403

419-8550

501-3427

-

-

-

-

-

Cosren Shipping Agency

622-5658

307-3092

418-0690

501-3400

-

-

-

-

-

CSAV Group Agencies SA

407-2288

328-0008

421-4171

-

-

-

-

-

-

Diamond Shipping

883-1561

570-7800

419-2734

363-7788

789-0437

-

-

-

Saldanha Bay (022) 714-3449

Eyethu Ships Agencies

-

301-1470

-

-

-

-

-

-

Mossel Bay

Freightmarine Shipping

407-2200

328-0402

419-8550

501-3400

789-1571

-

-

-

-

DAL Agency

881-0000

582-9400

405-9500

398-0000

-

700-8201

-

219-550

Mozambique (258) 21312354/5

Evergreen Agency (SA) (Pty) Ltd

574-9000

480-8600

419-9726

-

-

-

-

-

-

Galborg

340-0499

365-6800

402-1830

581-3994

788-9900

731-1707

-

202-771

Maputo (092581) 430021/2

Gearbulk

-

277-9100

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Global Port Side Services

-

328-5891

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0860 101 260

583-6500

0860 101 260

-

-

-

-

-

-

Hamburg Sud South Africa

615-1003

334-4777

425-0145

-

-

-

-

-

-

HUA Hoegh Autoliners (ISS-Voigt)

994-4500

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Hull Blyth South Africa

-

360-0700

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Ignazio Messina & Co

884-9356

365-5200

418-4848

581-7833

-

-

-

-

-

Hapag-Lloyd

(044) 690-7119

Independent Shipping Services

-

-

418-2610

-

-

-

-

-

-

Island View Shipping

-

302-1800

425-2285

-

797-9402

-

-

-

-

ISS-Voigt Shipping

285-0113

207-1451

911-0938

518-0240

797-4197

-

-

-

SaldanhaBay (022) 714-1908

John T. Rennie & Sons

407-2200

328-0401

419-8660

501-3400

789-1571

-

-

-

-

King & Sons

340-0300

301-0711

440-5016

581-3994

788-9900

731-1707

-

219-550

Maputo (0925821) 430021/2 -

Lagendijk Brothers Holdings Land & Sea Shipping LBH South Africa

-

309-5959

-

-

-

-

-

-

679-1651

539-9281

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

309-5959

421-0033

-

788-0953

-

-

-

Saldanha Bay (022) 714-1203

Lloydafrica

455-2728

480-8600

402-1720

581-7023

-

-

-

-

-

Macs

340-0499

365-6800

402-1830

581-3994

788-9900

731-1707

-

202-771

Maputo (092581) 430021/2

Maersk South Africa (Pty) Ltd.

277-3700

336-7700

408-6000

501-3100

-

707-2000

-

209-800

-

-

202-9621

419-3119

-

789-5144

-

-

-

-

Marimed Shipping

884-3018

328-5891

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Mediterranean Shipping Co.

263-4000

360-7911

405-2000

505-4800

-

722-6651

335-6980

-

-

Mainport Africa Shipping

Meihuizen International

616-0595

202-9621

440-5400

-

-

-

-

-

-

Mitchell Cotts Maritime

788-6302

302-7555

421-5580

581-3994

788-9933

731-1707

-

219-550

-

Mitchell Cotts Maritime NYK

788-4798

301-1506

421-5580

581-3994

788-9933

731-2561

-

219-550

-

Mitsui OSK Lines SA

601-2000

310-2200

402-8900

501-6500

788-9700

700-6500

-

-

-

Metall Und Rohstoff

302-0143

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Neptune Shipping

807-5977

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Nile Dutch South Africa

325-0557

306-4500

425-3600

-

-

-

-

-

-

NYK Cool Southern Africa

-

-

913-8901

-

-

-

-

-

-

Ocean Africa Container Lines

-

302-7100

412-2860

-

-

-

-

-

-

Panargo

-

335-2400

434-6780

-

789-8951

-

-

-

Saldanha (022) 714-1198

PIL SA

201-7000

301-2222

421-4144

363-8008

-

-

-

-

-

-

568-1313

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Phoenix Shipping (Pty) Ltd. Quotations RNC Shipping Safbulk

0860-777-999

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

511-5130

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

408-9100

-

-

-

-

-

Safmarine

277-3500

336-7200

408-6911

501-3000

-

707-2000

335-8787

209-839

-

Seascape

616-0593

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Sea-Act Shipping cc

472-6266

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Seaclad Maritime

442-3777

327-9400

419-1438

-

-

-

-

-

-

Southern Chartering

302-0000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Transmarine Logistics

450-2399

301-2001

425-0770

-

-

-

-

-

info@transmarine.co.za

Transocean Logistics

450-3314

306-0112

510-0370

-

-

-

-

-

-

Zim Southern Africa

324-1000

250-2222

425-1660/1/2

581-1896

797-9105/7/9

-

-

-

-

Abbreviations of Lines and Agents ASI ASL BEL CHL CMA CMZ CSA CSC CSV COS DAL DEL DML DSA ESA ESL FAY GAL GCL GRB GSL HLC HMM HSD HSL

Asiatic (Hull Blyth) Angola South Line (Meihuizen International/Seascape cc) Beluga Shipping (Mainport Africa Shipping) Consortium Hispania Lines (Seaclad Maritime) CMA-CGM (Shipping Agencies) Compagnie Maritime Zairose (Safmarine) Canada States Africa Line (Mitt Cotts) China Shipping Container Lines (Seaclad Maritime) CSAV (CSAV Group Agencies SA) Cosren (Cosren) Deutsche Afrika Linien(DAL Agency) Delmas Line (John T Rennie) Debala Mozambique Line (Mainport Africa Shipping) Delmas ASAF (Century) Evergreen Agency (SA) (Pty) Ltd Ethiopian Shipping Lines (Diamond Shipping) Faymon Shipping (Sea-act Shipping cc) Gulf Africa Lines (King and Sons) Global Container Lines (Freightmarine) Gearbulk Gold Star Line (Polaris Shipping) Hapag – Lloyd Eukor (Diamond Shipping) Hamburg Sud South Africa H Stinnes Linien (Diamond Shipping)

HOEGH Hoegh Autoliners (ISS Voigt) INM Intermarine (Mainport Africa Shipping) IRISL Islamic Repubic of Iran Shipping Lines (King & Sons) IVS Island View Shipping KEE Keeley Granite (Tern Shipping) KLI K.Line (Freightmarine) LAU NYK Cool Southern Africa LMC Ignazio Messina (Ignazio Messina) LNL Laurel Navigation Line (Polaris Shipping) MAC Macs (King & Sons) MAL Mainport Africa Container Line (Mainport Africa Shipping) MAR Marimed (Marimed Ship.) MAS Mascot Line (Marimed) MBA Maruba (Alpha Shipping) MAS Mascot Line (Marimed Shipping) MAU Mauritius Shipping Corporation (Alpha Shipping) MISC MISC Line (Bridge Marine) MSC Mediterranean Shipping Co. (MSC) MSK Maersk Line MOL Mitsui Osk Lines (Mitsui Osk Lines) MOZ Mozline (King & Sons) MOZ MOZIF (LBF) MUR MUR Shipping NDS Nile Dutch Africa Line B.V. (Nile Dutch South Africa) NVQ Navique (Tall Ships)

NYK (Mitchell Cotts – NYK Agency) OAC Ocean Africa Container Line (Ocean Africa) PHO (Phoenix Shipping) PIL Pacific International Line - (Foreshore Shipping) Pro ProLine (Bridge Marine) PRU Prudential Line (Alpha Shipping) Saf Safmarine (Safmarine) Sch Southern Chartering SCI Shipping Corp of India (Combine Ocean) SCO Sea Consortium (Bridge Shipping) SHL St Helena Line (RNC Shipping) SMU Samudera Shipping Line (African Marine Ships Agency) SSI Seacape Shipping Inc (Century Ships Agency) TOR Torm Line (Diamond Shipping) TSA Transatlantic (Mitchell Cotts) UAFL United Africa Feeder Line (Seaclad Maritime) UAL Universal Africa Lines (Seaclad Maritime) UASC United Arab Shipping Company (Seaclad Maritime) UNG Unigear (Gearbulk) WWL Wallenius Wilhelmsen (Barwil) Zim Zimstar (Zim Southern Africa) * Notice any errors? Contact Peter Hemer on Cell: 084 654 5510/Fax (011) 704-3015


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Contact CARMEL LEVINRAD on Tel:+27 11 214 7303 Fax:+27 11 327 4094 • Email: carmell@nowmedia.co.za

Outbound COMPILED AND PRINTED IN ONE DAY

Updated until 11am

18

January 2010

Updated daily on Cargo Info Africa – www.cargoinfo.co.za

OUTBOUND BY DATE - Dates for sailing: 25/01/2010 - 08/02/2010

To: The Far East and South East Asia Name of Ship/Voy/Line Maersk Durham 1003

Updated daily on http://www.cargoinfo.co.za

WBAY CT

MSK/SAF

-

29/1

PE -

EL DBN RBAY Loading for -

-

-

TPP 13/02,PGU 15/02,PKG 16/02,CWN 16/02,BLW 16/02,HKG 17/02,SUB 17/02,YOK 18/02,UKB 18/02,HUA 18/02,SRG 18/02,PEN 18/02, SHA 19/02,BUS 19/02,XMN 19/02,SGN 20/02,NGB 21/02,HPH 21/02,INC 22/02,TAO 25/02,OSA 25/02,NGO 25/02

Maersk Innoshima 1002

MSK/SAF

-

-

-

-

28/1

-

PKG 11/02,TPP 12/02

Bosun 120

CSV/KLI/MIS/PIL

-

29/1

-

-

-

-

PKG 12/02,SIN 14/02,HKG 18/02,SHA 20/02,BUS 26/02,INC 26/02,KEL 26/02,KHH 26/02,YOK 01/03,NGO 01/03,UKB 01/03

Csav Ranquil 0005

CSV

-

-

-

-

25/1

-

SIN 04/02,HKG 08/02,TAO 10/02,SHA 12/02,NGB 13/02,CWN 16/02

Maersk Dubrovnik 1003

MSK/SAF

-

5/2

30/1

-

26/1

-

TPP 20/02,PGU 22/02,PKG 23/02,CWN 23/02,BLW 23/02,HKG 24/02,SUB 24/02,YOK 25/02,UKB 25/02,HUA 25/02,SRG 25/02,PEN 25/02,

SHA 26/02,BUS 26/02,XMN 26/02,SGN 27/02,NGB 28/02,HPH 28/02,INC 01/03,TAO 04/03,OSA 04/03,NGO 04/03

UASC Khor Fakkan AA472E

PKG 06/02,HKG 11/02,BUS 14/02,SHA 16/02,NGB 18/02,CWN 20/02

CMA/CSC/MBA

-

-

-

-

26/1

-

Thai Bright 100

GRB/UNG

-

-

-

-

27/1

-

JKT 12/02,SIN 16/02,BKK 19/02

Hanihe 104E

COS/EMC/HSD/MBA

-

-

-

-

27/1

-

SIN 09/02,PGU 11/02,PKG 11/02,LCH 12/02,JKT 12/02,SUB 12/02,PEN 12/02,SGN 12/02,HKG 13/02,DLC 13/02,BLW 13/02,BKK 13/02,SRG 14/02,

MNL 14/02,SHA 16/02,UKB 16/02,TYO 16/02,XMN 16/02,HPH 16/02,NGB 17/02,NGO 17/02,OSA 17/02,BUS 19/02,YTN 20/02,TAO 21/02,

TXG 23/02,YOK 23/02,KEL 26/02,TXG 27/02

Safmarine Nyanga 1002

MSK/SAF

-

-

-

-

-

28/1

Msc Malta H1005R

MSC

-

-

-

-

29/1

-

TPP 11/02,SHA 17/02,NSA 22/02,HKG 22/02 KHH 14/02,SIN 16/02,XMN 23/02,SHA 24/02,CWN 25/02,HKG 26/02

MOL Wisdom 3030B

MOL

-

30/1

-

-

-

-

SIN 12/02,HKG 16/02

Niledutch Shenzen 065

NDS

-

-

-

-

30/1

-

SIN 11/02,SHA 12/03

Maersk Jackson 1002

MSK/SAF

Mol Honor 2003B

MOL

30/1

-

-

-

4/2

-

PKG 18/02,TPP 19/02

-

-

-

-

31/1

-

SIN 16/02

CSCL Santiago 0010E

CSC/HLC/MBA

-

-

-

-

31/1

-

PKG 11/02,SHA 17/02,NGB 18/02,XMN 20/02,SHK 21/02

Monte Azul 949E

MSK/SAF

-

-

31/1

-

2/2

-

SIN 14/02,HKG 18/02,NGO 23/02,YOK 24/02,BUS 27/02,SHA 01/03

Kota Sabas 021

CSV/KLI/MIS/PIL

-

-

-

-

31/1

-

PKG 17/04,SIN 18/04,HKG 22/04,SHA 24/04,BUS 30/04,INC 30/04,KEL 30/04,KHH 30/04,YOK 03/05,NGO 03/05,UKB 03/05

Maruba Simmons 942E

MBA

-

-

-

-

1/2

-

PKG 16/02,SHA 23/02,NGB 24/02,XMN 26/02,SHK 27/02

Kota Permas 029

CSV/KLI/MIS/PIL

-

7/2

-

-

2/2

-

PKG 21/02,SIN 22/02,HKG 26/02,SHA 01/03,BUS 06/03,INC 06/03,KEL 06/03,KHH 06/03,YOK 09/03,NGO 09/03,UKB 09/03

Maersk Davenport 1003

MSK/SAF

-

-

6/2

-

2/2

-

TPP 27/02,PGU 01/03,PKG 02/03,CWN 02/03,BLW 02/03,HKG 03/03,SUB 03/03,YOK 04/03,UKB 04/03,HUA 04/03,SRG 04/03,PEN 04/03,

SHA 05/03,BUS 05/03,XMN 05/03,SGN 06/03,NGB 07/03,HPH 07/03,INC 08/03,TAO 11/03,OSA 11/03,NGO 11/03

Gustav Schulte 0002

SIN 12/02,HKG 16/02,TAO 20/02,SHA 21/02,NGB 22/02,CWN 25/02

CSV

-

-

-

-

2/2

-

YM Ningbo 101E

KLI/NYK/PIL

-

2/2

-

-

-

-

SIN 13/02,HKG 18/02,SHA 21/02

Ital Massima 0838-017E

COS/EMC/HSD/MBA

-

-

-

-

3/2

-

SIN 16/02,PGU 18/02,PKG 18/02,LCH 19/02,JKT 19/02,SUB 19/02,PEN 19/02,SGN 19/02,HKG 20/02,DLC 20/02,BLW 20/02,BKK 20/02,SRG 21/02,

MNL 21/02,SHA 23/02,UKB 23/02,TYO 23/02,XMN 23/02,HPH 23/02,NGB 24/02,NGO 24/02,OSA 24/02,KHH 26/02,BUS 26/02,YTN 27/02,

TAO 28/02,TXG 02/03,YOK 02/03,KEL 05/03,TXG 06/03

TBN tbn

GRB/UNG

-

-

-

-

4/2

-

JKT 20/02

Mol Ability 2101B

MOL

-

-

-

-

4/2

-

SIN 20/02

Kota Wajar WJR209

PIL

-

-

-

-

6/2

-

SIN 19/02

HS Humbolt H1006R

MSC

-

-

-

-

6/2

-

KHH 22/02,SIN 24/02,XMN 03/03,SHA 04/03,CWN 05/03,HKG 06/03

-

6/2

-

-

-

-

SIN 19/02,HKG 23/02

6/2

-

-

-

-

-

PKG 25/02,TPP 26/02

Mol Destiny 3106B

MOL

Maersk Ipanema 1002

MSK/SAF

Monte Alegre 950E

MSK/SAF

-

-

7/2

-

-

-

SIN 21/02,HKG 25/02,NGO 02/03,YOK 03/03,BUS 06/03,SHA 08/03

Alexandra Rickmers 943E

CSC/HLC/MBA

-

-

-

-

8/2

-

PKG 20/02,SHA 26/02,NGB 28/02,XMN 01/03,SHK 03/03

City of Beijing 312E

HSD/MSK/NDS/NYK/SAF

-

-

-

-

8/2

-

SIN 20/02,SHA 27/02,SHK 02/03

Jasper S 21

EAS/SCO

-

-

-

-

8/2

-

PKG 13/03,XMN 19/03,SHK 21/03

USE THIS SPACE FREIGHT & TRADING WEEKLY

To Promote your services contact Carmel Levirad on Tel: +27 11 214 7303 Fax: +27 11 327 4094 Email: carmell@nowmedia.co.za


To: Mediterranean and Black Sea

OUTBOUND BY DATE - Dates for sailing: 25/01/2010 - 08/02/2010

Name of Ship/Voy/Line MOL Cullinan 101B

Updated daily on http://www.cargoinfo.co.za

WBAY CT

CHL/DAL/MOL/MSK/SAF/TSA -

25/1

PE -

EL DBN RBAY Loading for -

-

-

ALG 06/02,CAS 06/02,CAZ 09/02,LIV 09/02,ORN 09/02,BLA 10/02,VEC 11/02,FOS 13/02,NPK 13/02,AXA 14/02,GIT 14/02,PSD 14/02,

UAY 15/02,ASH 15/02,ASH 17/02,TUN 18/02,GOI 18/02,KOP 18/02,MAR 18/02,SAL 18/02,BEY 19/02,GEM 19/02,SKG 19/02,PIR 20/02,

IST 20/02,TRS 20/02,IZM 22/02,HFA 23/02,MER 23/02

Jolly Marrone 277

LMC

-

-

-

-

1/2

-

MRS 25/02,GOI 26/02,BLA 28/02,NPK 02/03,TUN 26/03,MLA 26/03,UAY 28/03,BEY 28/03,BEN 28/03,AXA 30/03,TIP 30/03

Msc Marina 638R

HSL/LTI/MSC

-

25/1

-

-

-

-

VEC 11/02,SPE 16/02,LIV 16/02,GOI 17/02,NPK 17/02,HFA 17/02,FOS 18/02,BLA 21/02,AXA 23/02

Dal Kalahari 101B

CHL/DAL/MOL/MSK/SAF/TSA -

1/2

-

-

-

-

ALG 13/02,CAS 13/02,CAZ 16/02,LIV 16/02,ORN 16/02,BLA 17/02,VEC 18/02,FOS 20/02,NPK 20/02,AXA 21/02,GIT 21/02,PSD 21/02,

UAY 22/02,ASH 22/02,ASH 24/02,TUN 25/02,GOI 25/02,KOP 25/02,MAR 25/02,SAL 25/02,BEY 26/02,GEM 26/02,SKG 26/02,PIR 27/02,

IST 27/02,TRS 27/02,IZM 01/03,HFA 02/03,MER 02/03

Lars Maersk 102B

ALG 20/02,CAS 20/02,CAZ 23/02,LIV 23/02,ORN 23/02,BLA 24/02,VEC 25/02,FOS 27/02,NPK 27/02,AXA 28/02,GIT 28/02,PSD 28/02,

CHL/DAL/MOL/MSK/SAF/TSA -

8/2

28/1

-

1/2

-

UAY 01/03,ASH 01/03,ASH 03/03,TUN 04/03,GOI 04/03,KOP 04/03,MAR 04/03,SAL 04/03,BEY 05/03,GEM 05/03,SKG 05/03,PIR 06/03,

IST 06/03,TRS 06/03,IZM 08/03,HFA 09/03,MER 09/03

Msc Loretta 8R

HSL/LTI/MSC

-

6/2

30/1

-

28/1

-

VEC 23/02,SPE 28/02,LIV 28/02,GOI 01/03,NPK 01/03,HFA 01/03,FOS 02/03,BLA 05/03,AXA 07/03

Jolly Bianco 002

LMC

-

29/1

-

-

8/2

-

MRS 03/03,GOI 04/03,BLA 06/03,NPK 09/03,TUN 01/04,MLA 01/04,UAY 03/04,BEY 03/04,BEN 03/04,AXA 05/04,TIP 05/04

31/1

-

-

-

-

-

ALG 15/02

-

7/2

4/2

-

2/2

-

VEC 22/02,SPE 27/02,LIV 27/02,GOI 28/02,NPK 28/02,HFA 28/02,FOS 01/03,BLA 04/03,AXA 06/03

-

4/2

-

8/2

-

ALG 27/02,CAS 27/02,CAZ 02/03,LIV 02/03,ORN 02/03,BLA 03/03,VEC 04/03,FOS 06/03,NPK 06/03,AXA 07/03,GIT 07/03,PSD 07/03,

Clara Maersk 1002 Msc Laura 6R

HSL/LTI/MSC

Safmarine Mafadi 102B

CHL/DAL/MOL/MSK/SAF/TSA -

UAY 08/03,ASH 08/03,ASH 10/03,TUN 11/03,GOI 11/03,KOP 11/03,MAR 11/03,SAL 11/03,BEY 12/03,GEM 12/03,SKG 12/03,PIR 13/03,

IST 13/03,TRS 13/03,IZM 15/03,HFA 16/03,MER 16/03

Jasper S 21

HFA 06/03,ASH 09/03,HFA 11/03,AXA 12/03

EAS/SCO

-

-

-

-

8/2

-

25/1

-

-

-

-

RTM 07/02,TIL 08/02,BIO 09/02,BRV 11/02,LEI 11/02,CPH 12/02,GOT 12/02,HMQ 12/02,OFQ 13/02,HEL 15/02,OSL 18/02

-

-

-

-

-

VGO 09/02,RTM 14/02,LZI 17/02,PFT 17/02,IMM 17/02,HUL 17/02,HMQ 20/02,ORK 20/02,DUO 20/02,BXE 22/02,KRS 22/02,LAR 22/02,

OSL 23/02,ANR 24/02,OFQ 24/02,CPH 24/02,GOT 24/02,GOO 24/02,GRG 24/02,HEL 24/02,HEL 26/02,KTK 26/02,STO 26/02,BIO 28/02

Msc Marina 638R

LZI 09/02,FXT 11/02,HMQ 13/02,BRV 14/02,ANR 15/02,BIO 16/02,RTM 17/02,LEH 17/02,LIV 18/02,VGO 21/02,HEL 21/02,LEI 22/02,

To: UK, North West Continent & Scandinavia MOL Cullinan 101B

CHL/DAL/MOL/MSK/SAF/TSA -

Green Cape 0107

MAC HSL/LTI/MSC

26/1 -

Updated daily on http://www.cargoinfo.co.za

25/1

-

-

-

-

Dal Kalahari 101B

CHL/DAL/MOL/MSK/SAF/TSA -

1/2

-

-

-

-

Golden Isle 0108

MAC

2/2

-

27/1

30/1

29/1

6/2

KTK 22/02,STO 24/02,KLJ 26/02,LED 01/03 RTM 14/02,TIL 15/02,BIO 16/02,BRV 18/02,LEI 18/02,CPH 19/02,GOT 19/02,HMQ 19/02,OFQ 20/02,HEL 22/02,OSL 25/02 VGO 21/02,RTM 27/02,LZI 02/03,PFT 02/03,IMM 02/03,HUL 02/03,HMQ 03/03,BXE 05/03,ORK 05/03,DUO 05/03,KRS 05/03,LAR 05/03,

OSL 06/03,ANR 07/03,OFQ 07/03,CPH 07/03,GOT 07/03,GOO 07/03,GRG 07/03,HEL 07/03,HEL 09/03,KTK 09/03,STO 09/03,BIO 13/03

Lars Maersk 102B

CHL/DAL/MOL/MSK/SAF/TSA -

8/2

28/1

-

1/2

-

RTM 21/02,TIL 22/02,BIO 23/02,BRV 25/02,LEI 25/02,CPH 26/02,GOT 26/02,HMQ 26/02,OFQ 27/02,HEL 01/03,OSL 04/03

Msc Loretta 8R

HSL/LTI/MSC

6/2

30/1

-

28/1

-

LZI 21/02,FXT 23/02,HMQ 25/02,BRV 26/02,ANR 27/02,BIO 28/02,RTM 01/03,LEH 01/03,LIV 02/03,VGO 05/03,HEL 05/03,LEI 06/03,

-

KTK 06/03,STO 08/03,KLJ 10/03,LED 13/03

Clara Maersk 1002

LZI 16/02,LEI 19/02

31/1

-

-

-

-

-

TBN Tbn

GRB

-

-

-

-

-

31/1

Msc Laura 6R

HSL/LTI/MSC

-

7/2

4/2

-

2/2

-

VGO 22/02,BIO 25/02,ANR 01/03 LZI 20/02,FXT 22/02,HMQ 24/02,BRV 25/02,ANR 26/02,BIO 27/02,RTM 28/02,LEH 28/02,LIV 01/03,VGO 04/03,HEL 04/03,LEI 05/03,

KTK 05/03,STO 07/03,KLJ 09/03,LED 12/03

Safmarine Mafadi 102B

CHL/DAL/MOL/MSK/SAF/TSA -

-

4/2

-

8/2

-

RTM 28/02,TIL 01/03,BIO 02/03,BRV 04/03,LEI 04/03,CPH 05/03,GOT 05/03,HMQ 05/03,OFQ 06/03,HEL 08/03,OSL 11/03

Serenity Ace 10A

MOL

-

-

-

8/2

6/2

-

VGO 23/02,ZEE 26/02,BRV 27/02

Pac Antila 278

PIL

-

28/1

-

-

31/1

-

MBA 07/02

Jolly Marrone 277

LMC

-

-

-

-

1/2

-

MPM 02/02,DAR 07/02,MBA 09/02

Barrier 57

MOL/MSK/OAC/SAF

-

-

-

-

27/1

-

MPM 28/01,BEW 30/01

Mol Silver Fern 0001

MOL

-

-

-

-

28/1

-

MPM 23/01

Msc Chaneca 40A

MSC

-

-

-

-

28/1

-

BEW 31/01

Msc Pilar 59A

MSC

-

-

-

-

28/1

-

MBA 02/02,DAR 09/02

Kota Azam AZM083

PIL

-

-

-

-

29/1

-

MPM 26/01

Jolly Bianco 002

LMC

-

29/1

-

-

8/2

-

MPM 08/02,DAR 14/02,MBA 15/02

Mol Honor 2003B

MOL

-

-

-

-

31/1

-

MPM 01/02

Msc Nefeli 23A

MSC

-

-

-

-

31/1

-

MBA 05/02,DAR 12/02

Brilliant 10A

MSC

-

-

-

-

31/1

-

BEW 02/02

Lilac Roller 0802

MAC

-

-

-

-

2/2

-

MPM 03/02,BEW 07/02

Ridge 49

MOL/MSK/OAC/SAF

-

-

-

-

2/2

-

MPM 03/02,MNC 07/02

Msc Magali 464A

MSC

-

-

-

-

3/2

-

MBA 08/02,DAR 15/02

Mol Unifier 0002

MOL

-

-

-

-

3/2

-

MPM 04/02

Mol Ability 2101B

MOL

-

-

-

-

4/2

-

MPM 05/02

UAFL Mauritius 508

UAF

-

-

-

-

6/2

-

MPM 28/02

Umgeni 11

MOL/MSK/OAC/SAF

-

-

-

-

7/2

-

BEW 10/02

Jasper S 21

EAS/SCO

-

-

-

-

8/2

-

DAR 12/02,MBA 16/02

Triton Ace 3A

MOL

-

-

-

-

8/2

-

MPM 11/02,DAR 14/02,MBA 15/02

To: East Africa

FTW15619SD

Updated daily on http://www.cargoinfo.co.za


OUTBOUND BY DATE - Dates for sailing: 25/01/2010 - 08/02/2010

To: West Africa

Updated daily on http://www.cargoinfo.co.za

Name of Ship/Voy/Line

WBAY CT

PE

EL DBN RBAY Loading for

Pac Antila 278

PIL

-

28/1

-

-

31/1

-

LOS 12/01,TEM 15/01,COO 18/01

MOL Cullinan 101B

CHL/DAL/MOL/MSK/SAF/TSA -

25/1

-

-

-

-

LPA 03/02

Jolly Marrone 277

LMC

Safmarine Onne 1001

MSK/SAF

Msc Marina 638R

HSL/LTI/MSC

-

-

-

-

1/2

-

DKR 06/03

25/1

-

-

-

-

-

MSZ 28/01,LOB 02/02,PNR 05/02,BSG 13/02,SSG 16/02,DLA 18/02,MAT 23/02,LBV 01/03

-

25/1

-

-

-

-

LPA 04/02,DKR 06/02,ABJ 07/02,TEM 09/02,APP 15/02,TIN 16/02

Dal Kalahari 101B

CHL/DAL/MOL/MSK/SAF/TSA -

1/2

-

-

-

-

LPA 10/02

Msc Sheila 52A

MSC

-

26/1

-

-

-

-

LAD 31/01,LOB 07/02

Safmarine Asia 1003/1004

SAF

-

28/1

-

-

-

-

ABJ 06/02,APP 08/02,TEM 10/02

Border 49S

MOL/MSC/MSK/OAC/SAF

-

29/1

-

-

25/1

-

LUD 31/01,MSZ 06/02,LOB 10/02

Boundary 24S

MOL/MSC/MSK/OAC/SAF

-

30/1

27/1

-

26/1

-

LAD 02/02

Kota Wirawan WRN967

MOL/PIL

-

27/1

-

-

-

-

TEM 04/02,COO 06/02,LOS 08/02,DLA 12/02

Hansa Augustenburg 068

NDS

-

30/1

-

-

27/1

-

PNR 03/02,LAD 10/02,BOA 10/02,MAT 11/02,SZA 13/02,LBV 13/02,CAB 14/02,DLA 14/02,LOB 17/02,MSZ 23/02

Safmarine Andisa 1001

MSK/SAF

-

5/2

-

27/1

1/2

-

MSZ 20/02,LOB 23/02,PNR 27/02,SSG 08/03,DLA 10/03,MAT 13/03,LBV 19/03

Lars Maersk 102B

CHL/DAL/MOL/MSK/SAF/TSA -

8/2

28/1

-

1/2

-

LPA 17/02

Msc Loretta 8R

HSL/LTI/MSC

-

6/2

30/1

-

28/1

-

LPA 16/02,DKR 18/02,ABJ 19/02,TEM 21/02,APP 27/02,TIN 28/02

Maersk Jubail 1003

MSK/SAF

28/1

-

-

-

-

-

ABJ 02/02,TEM 05/02,APP 08/02

CSCL San Jose 0011W

CSC/HLC/MBA/SMU

-

-

-

-

28/1

-

TEM 07/02,LFW 10/02,COO 12/02,TIN 16/02

Hoegh Trapeze 169

HOE

-

-

-

-

29/1

-

LAD 05/02,LOS 10/02,TEM 26/02

Kota Azam AZM083

PIL

-

-

-

-

29/1

-

LAD 05/02

Jolly Bianco 002

LMC

-

29/1

-

-

8/2

-

DKR 12/03

City of Shanghai 313W

HSD/MSK/NDS/NYK/SAF

-

-

-

-

30/1

-

LFW 07/02,TEM 10/02,LOS 12/02

Troyburg YBU063

MOL/PIL

-

31/1

-

-

-

-

TEM 09/02,COO 11/02,LOS 13/02,DLA 18/02

Buxmaster 714W

GSL

-

-

-

-

31/1

-

TEM 10/02,LFW 13/02,LOS 14/02,COO 21/02,TKD 23/02,ABJ 24/02

Mol Silver Fern 0101

MOL

3/2

1/2

-

-

-

-

ABJ 08/02,TEM 10/02,DLA 12/02

Blue Sky 93/10

ASL

-

2/2

-

-

-

-

LAD 09/02,SZA 11/02,MAL 13/02

Msc Laura 6R

HSL/LTI/MSC

-

7/2

4/2

-

2/2

-

LPA 15/02,DKR 17/02,ABJ 18/02,TEM 20/02,APP 26/02,TIN 27/02

Maersk Jamestown 1001

MSK/SAF

4/2

-

-

-

-

-

ABJ 09/02,TEM 12/02,APP 15/02

Safmarine Mafadi 102B

CHL/DAL/MOL/MSK/SAF/TSA -

-

4/2

-

8/2

-

LPA 24/02

Msc Panama 48A

LAD 14/02

MSC

-

-

-

-

5/2

-

Safmarine Concord 1003/1004 SAF

-

-

-

-

6/2

-

ABJ 17/02,APP 20/02,TEM 22/02

TBN 51000A

UAL

-

7/2

-

-

-

-

LAD 19/02,SZA 22/02,PNR 26/02,SSG 02/03

Kota Jasa JAA175

MOL/PIL

-

8/2

-

-

-

-

TEM 16/02,COO 18/02,LOS 20/02,DLA 25/02

To: Indian Ocean Islands

Updated daily on http://www.cargoinfo.co.za

Maersk Durham 1003

MSK/SAF

-

29/1

-

-

-

-

PLU 04/02

Maersk Dubrovnik 1003

MSK/SAF

-

5/2

30/1

-

26/1

-

PLU 11/02

Msc Malta H1005R

MSC

-

-

-

-

29/1

-

PLU 02/02,PDG 04/02,EHL 06/02,TMM 08/02,DIE 13/02,DZA 14/02,MJN 24/02

Maersk Davenport 1003

MSK/SAF

-

-

6/2

-

2/2

-

PLU 18/02

UAFL Mauritius 508

UAF

-

-

-

-

6/2

-

TLE 11/02,EHL 13/02,TMM 15/02,MAW 20/02,MUT 24/02

HS Humbolt H1006R

MSC

-

-

-

-

6/2

-

TMM 08/02,PLU 10/02,PDG 12/02,DIE 13/02,DZA 14/02,EHL 22/02,MJN 24/02

THIS SPACE

AVAILABLE FREIGHT & TRADING WEEKLY

To Promote your services contact Carmel Levirad on Tel: +27 11 214 7303 Fax: +27 11 327 4094 Email: carmell@nowmedia.co.za


OUTBOUND BY DATE - Dates for sailing: 25/01/2010 - 08/02/2010

To: North America

Updated daily on http://www.cargoinfo.co.za

Name of Ship/Voy/Line Msc Levina 834

WBAY CT PE

MSC/MSK/SAF

-

30/1

-

EL DBN RBAY Loading for -

-

-

NYC 17/02,BAL 19/02,ORF 20/02,CHU 22/02,FEP 23/02,NAS 24/02,MIA 25/02,POP 25/02,MHH 25/02,GEC 26/02,SDQ 26/02,TOV 26/02,

SLU 27/02,PHI 27/02,GDT 27/02,SJO 28/02,BAS 28/02,VIJ 28/02,RSU 01/03,PAP 01/03,KTN 01/03,HQN 02/03,BGI 02/03,STG 02/03,MSY 04/03

Hanihe 104E

COS/EMC/HSD/MBA

LAX 21/02,OAK 24/02,TIW 26/02,BCC 28/02

Atlantic Eland 916

CSA/HLC

Hoegh Trapeze 169 Safmarine Oranje 008

-

-

-

-

27/1

-

4/2

1/2

-

-

29/1

28/1

HOE

-

-

-

-

29/1

-

GLS 15/03

MSC/MSK/SAF

-

6/2

3/2

-

1/2

-

NYC 24/02,BAL 26/02,ORF 27/02,CHU 01/03,FEP 02/03,NAS 03/03,MIA 04/03,POP 04/03,MHH 04/03,GEC 05/03,SDQ 05/03,TOV 05/03,

MSY 21/02,HQN 28/02

SLU 06/03,PHI 06/03,GDT 06/03,SJO 07/03,BAS 07/03,VIJ 07/03,RSU 08/03,PAP 08/03,KTN 08/03,HQN 09/03,BGI 09/03,STG 09/03,MSY 11/03

Atlantic Impala 915

CSA/HLC

-

7/2

-

-

4/2

2/2

MTR 01/03,BAL 15/03,SAV 18/03

Msc Noa 947

MSC/MSK/SAF

-

-

3/2

-

8/2

-

NYC 03/03,BAL 05/03,ORF 06/03,CHU 08/03,FEP 09/03,NAS 10/03,MIA 11/03,POP 11/03,MHH 11/03,GEC 12/03,SDQ 12/03,TOV 12/03,

SLU 13/03,PHI 13/03,GDT 13/03,SJO 14/03,BAS 14/03,VIJ 14/03,RSU 15/03,PAP 15/03,KTN 15/03,HQN 16/03,BGI 16/03,STG 16/03,MSY 18/03

Ital Massima 0838-017E

COS/EMC/HSD/MBA

-

-

-

-

3/2

-

LAX 28/02,OAK 03/03,TIW 05/03,BCC 07/03

Stellenbosch 1009

GAL

-

-

-

-

6/2

4/2

MSK/SAF

-

29/1

-

-

-

-

To: Australasia Maersk Durham 1003

HQN 06/03,MSY 11/03,JKV 26/03

Updated daily on://www.cargoinfo.co.za FRE 18/02,AKL 23/02,TRG 24/02,NPE 25/02,LYT 25/02,LYT 26/02,TIU 27/02,POE 27/02,SYD 27/02,TRG 27/02,MLB 28/02,NSN 01/03,

NPL 01/03,BSA 04/03,ADL 04/03

Maersk Dubrovnik 1003

FRE 25/02,AKL 02/03,TRG 03/03,NPE 04/03,LYT 04/03,LYT 05/03,TIU 06/03,POE 06/03,SYD 06/03,TRG 06/03,MLB 07/03,NSN 08/03,

MSK/SAF

-

5/2

30/1

-

26/1

-

NPL 08/03,BSA 11/03,ADL 11/03

Hanihe 104E

COS/EMC/HSD/MBA

-

-

-

-

27/1

-

BSA 20/02,SYD 22/02,MLB 25/02

Msc Malta H1005R

MSC

-

-

-

-

29/1

-

FRE 13/02,ADL 14/02,MLB 18/02,SYD 21/02,TRG 25/02,LYT 27/02

Maersk Davenport 1003

MSK/SAF

-

-

6/2

-

2/2

-

FRE 04/03,AKL 09/03,TRG 10/03,NPE 11/03,LYT 11/03,LYT 12/03,TIU 13/03,POE 13/03,SYD 13/03,TRG 13/03,MLB 14/03,NSN 15/03,

NPL 15/03,BSA 18/03,ADL 18/03

Ital Massima 0838-017E

COS/EMC/HSD/MBA

-

-

-

-

3/2

-

BSA 27/02,SYD 01/03,MLB 04/03

Queen Sapphire CO001

WWL

-

-

4/2

5/2

6/2

-

FRE 18/02,MLB 23/02,PKL 25/02,BSA 27/02

HS Humbolt H1006R

MSC

-

-

-

-

6/2

-

FRE 21/02,ADL 22/02,MLB 26/02,SYD 01/03,TRG 05/03,LYT 07/03

To: Middle East, Pakistan, India and Sri Lanka

Updated daily on http://www.cargoinfo.co.za

Pac Antila 278

PIL

-

28/1

-

-

31/1

-

BQM 21/02

Jolly Marrone 277

LMC

-

-

-

-

1/2

-

JED 17/02,RUH 09/03,AQJ 14/03,MSW 14/03,PZU 14/03,HOD 15/03,AUH 19/03,DXB 21/03,KWI 21/03,NSA 21/03,BAH 24/03,BND 24/03,

DMN 24/03,DOH 24/03,MCT 24/03,BQM 26/03

Nele Maersk 1002

MSK/SAF

-

27/1

-

-

-

-

SLL 08/02,JEA 12/02,NSA 17/02

Maersk Jurong 1004

MSK/SAF

-

3/2

-

-

27/1

-

SLL 15/02,JEA 19/02,NSA 24/02

San Alessio 0299

CMA/CSV

-

27/1

-

-

1/2

-

JEA 13/02,BND 15/02,NSA 19/02

Hanihe 104E

COS/EMC/HSD/MBA

-

-

-

-

27/1

-

CMB 14/02,NSA 16/02

Jolly Bianco 002

LMC

-

29/1

-

-

8/2

-

JED 24/02,RUH 16/03,AQJ 21/03,MSW 21/03,PZU 21/03,HOD 22/03,AUH 26/03,DXB 28/03,KWI 28/03,NSA 28/03,BAH 31/03,BND 31/03,

DMN 31/03,DOH 31/03,MCT 31/03,BQM 02/04

Msc Atlantic 23A

NSA 10/02,IXY 13/02,BQM 15/02,JEA 17/02,SHJ 20/02,AUH 20/02,MCT 20/02,BAH 20/02,DMN 20/02,KWI 20/02,BND 20/02,DOH 22/02,

MSC

-

-

-

-

29/1

-

RUH 27/02

Hoegh Masan 23

HOE

-

-

-

-

29/1

-

JEA 10/02,UQR 12/02

Nysted Maersk 1004

MSK/SAF

-

-

-

-

3/2

-

SLL 22/02,JEA 26/02,NSA 03/03

Ital Massima 0838-017E

COS/EMC/HSD/MBA

-

-

-

-

3/2

-

CMB 21/02,NSA 23/02

Saylemoon Rickmers 1002

CMA/CSV

-

3/2

-

-

8/2

-

JEA 20/02,BND 22/02,NSA 26/02

Msc Aurelie 8A

MSC

-

-

-

-

5/2

-

NSA 16/02,IXY 18/02,BQM 20/02,JEA 23/02,SHJ 26/02,AUH 26/02,MCT 26/02,BAH 26/02,DMN 26/02,KWI 26/02,BND 26/02,DOH 28/02,

RUH 05/03

Jasper S 21

JIB 28/02,Suez 04/03,AQJ 07/03,CMB 27/03

EAS/SCO

-

-

-

-

8/2

-

Ital Florida 0841-017W

COS/EMC/HSD/MBA

-

26/1

-

-

-

-

MVD 04/02,BUE 05/02,SSZ 10/02

Mol Solution 3404A

MOL

-

-

-

-

27/1

-

SSZ 06/02,BUE 09/02,MVD 11/02,PNG 13/02,SFS 14/02,RIO 18/02

Hanjin Gothenburg 1001

CSV

-

-

-

-

27/1

-

SSZ 05/02,RIO 07/02,MVD 08/02,BUE 09/02,VIT 10/02,RIG 12/02,ITJ 13/02,SSA 14/02,PNG 15/02

Ital Festosa 0842-024W

COS/EMC/HSD/MBA

-

2/2

-

-

29/1

-

MVD 11/02,BUE 12/02,SSZ 17/02

Libra Copacabana 0292

CMA/CSV

-

-

-

-

29/1

-

ITJ 08/02,SSZ 10/02,PNG 12/02,RIG 15/02

Libra Mexico 1002

CSV

-

-

-

-

31/1

-

SSZ 07/02,PNG 08/02,RIO 09/02,ITJ 10/02,VIT 12/02,MVD 13/02,BUE 14/02,SSA 19/02

Maersk Dabou 002W

MSK/SAF

-

-

-

-

31/1

-

SPB 09/02,SSZ 11/02,BUE 14/02,RIG 17/02,PNG 21/02

Mol Delight 3507A

MOL

-

-

-

-

3/2

-

SSZ 13/02,BUE 16/02,MVD 18/02,PNG 20/02,SFS 21/02,RIO 25/02

Jing Po He 098W

COS/EMC/HSD/MBA

-

-

-

-

5/2

-

MVD 18/02,BUE 19/02,SSZ 24/02

CSAV La Ligua 1003

CSV

-

-

-

-

6/2

-

SSZ 17/02,RIO 19/02,MVD 20/02,BUE 21/02,RIG 22/02,VIT 22/02,ITJ 24/02,PNG 24/02,SSA 26/02

Monte Rosa 003W

MSK/SAF

-

-

-

-

7/2

-

SPB 16/02,SSZ 18/02,BUE 21/02,RIG 24/02,PNG 28/02

To: South America

Updated daily on http://www.cargoinfo.co.za

USE THIS SPACE FREIGHT & TRADING WEEKLY

To Promote your services contact Carmel Levirad on Tel: +27 11 214 7303 Fax: +27 11 327 4094 Email: carmell@nowmedia.co.za


FTW 22 Januray 2010