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COMMUNITY ACTIVISM-LAW ALLIANCE CLINICS IMPACT LOW-INCOME CHICAGOLAND RESIDENTS. 1


Impact. To have a strong effect on someone or something. What is CALA’s Impact?

Our work is not limited to legal services. At the core of CALA’s collaboration with our activist partners is our leveraging of their participation in social movements. Our lawyers work with our partners on large-impact social change projects. CALA’s community activism lawyering model ensures that communities and their members are directly involved in their own problem solving, not just individually, but as communities, through supporting their legal clinic and through participation in activism.

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HIGHLIGHTS

32 #Not1More deportation campaigns DIRECT LEGAL SERVICES TO:

1500+ Families SELF-HELP WORKSHOPS FOR:

750+ Clients EDUCATION TO:

750+ People COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT EFFORTS SUPPORTED:

52 Projects Thousands of people impacted

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Blanca 4


COMMUNITY ACTIVISM LAWYERING IMPACTS BY EMPOWERING COMMUNITIES TO UNITE IN SUPPORT OF THEIR MEMBERS. 5


Blanca’s Story Community Activism Law Clinic: Enlace Chicago CALA Staff Attorney: Chad Baker When Blanca walked into the Enlace legal clinic last winter, her world had just been shattered. Only days earlier, her partner had violently attacked and tried to kill her and her young daughter in their home. The partner that had been her main source of financial support was now in jail, and her daughter was recovering from both physical injuries and severe psychological trauma. Making the nightmare worse, Blanca’s landlord immediately sought to evict her because of the attack. After learning about her situation, Enlace and CALA worked together to support her on multiple levels.

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Enlace provided Blanca with housing assistance through their Hope Response Coalition and also connected her and her daughter to mental health services. Meanwhile, CALA Director of Community Partnerships Chad Baker quickly prepared and filed a lawsuit alleging, among other things, that Blanca’s landlord was discriminating against her as a survivor of domestic violence. The landlord eventually settled the case, allowing Blanca to live in the apartment rent-free for many months. That gave Blanca and her caseworker enough time to find the family new housing. Domestic violence is a community problem, and it demands a community response. Together, CALA, Enlace, and Blanca obtained enough stability so that she could begin rebuilding her life from horrible tragedy. Her strength and courage, and the ways in which the Little Village community came together, have been truly awe-inspiring.

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Maria, Oliver, Mayli 47 8


COMMUNITY ACTIVISM LAWYERING IMPACTS FAMILIES BY KEEPING THEM TOGETHER. 9


Maria’s Story Community Activism-Law Clinic: Organized Communities Against Deportation (OCAD) CALA Staff Attorneys: Nebula Li & Timothy Myers Maria and her two children, Oliver and Mayli, left Honduras fleeing violence in May 2014. They travelled thousands of miles, mostly by walking through Guatemala and Mexico, to get to the United States border. Maria was ordered deported in absentia, and given an ankle monitor, because immigration mailed her immigration hearing notice to an apartment whose residents had been mass evicted. Despite having no criminal record, being active in her community, and having two young children, Maria was labeled a priority for deportation to Honduras, where she and her children would not be safe.

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CALA Staff Attorneys Nebula Li and Timothy Myers worked with OCAD on Maria’s case and the cases of her two children. As a result of OCAD's community organizing and CALA’s legal representation, CALA and OCAD convinced the immigration court to reopen her case, had her removed from the ankle monitoring system, and eventually succeeded in having government immigration attorneys exercise prosecutorial discretion to administratively close her case with the aid of significant community pressure. Now Maria, Oliver, and Mayli are thriving together within a new community that supports them.

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Maya 12


COMMUNITY ACTIVISM LAWYERING IMPACTS BY PROTECTING THOSE THAT ARE FIGHTING AGAINST VIOLENCE. 13


Maya’s Story Community Activism-Law Clinic: Sex Workers Outreach Project (SWOP) CALA Attorney: Lam Ho Maya was one of the first clients at the SWOP clinic CALA opened in December 2014. She needed to get a divorce from her husband but had difficulty finding an attorney who would be respectful of and sensitive to her work. CALA’s ED, Lam Ho, helped her get a divorce without any cost to her. In June 2016, Maya was brutally assaulted—both physically and mentally—by her then-boyfriend. Her boyfriend threatened to use her work and her mental health challenges against her. He told her that a court would not believe her, and instead the judge would believe his lies.

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A CALA team represented her at a very contentious hearing for an order of protection, during which her ex-boyfriend and his friend tried to lie that Maya self-inflicted all the injuries she sustained. The CALA team was successful, and Maya was able to obtain an order of protection restraining her ex-boyfriend from being in contact with her—in any way. Maya feels safe again, and has moved on with her life without fears of being stalked or assaulted by him.

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Karina 16


COMMUNITY ACTIVISM LAWYERING IMPACTS FAMILIES BY REUNITING THEM ACROSS BORDERS. 17


Karina’s Story Community Activism Law Clinic: Enlace Chicago CALA Staff Attorney: Nebula Li Karina came to the Enlace clinic in Little Village on the southwest side of Chicago, confused, anxious and with a lot of questions. Karina’s story is similar to the millions of undocumented youth that have been able to obtain temporary relief through Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). Karina wanted to visit her grandfather, who was on his deathbed in Mexico. Due to her immigration status, she had never been able to see him face-to-face, but she spoke to him every month and desperately wanted to meet him in person before he passed.

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Law student intern Allison Hight and staff attorney Nebula Li were able to secure her permission to travel under emergency “advance parole,” which allowed her to leave the country, visit him in his final days, and return to the US safely. Upon her return, Karina said, “My entire family is so grateful! Thank you so much. You helped me make my dream come true through your service getting me Advanced Parole. The distance was really tough and it had been 18 years since any of my family members had been able to physically return to Mexico.”

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Noe

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COMMUNITY ACTIVISM LAWYERING IMPACTS THOSE THAT ARE OPPRESSED BY EMPOWERING. 21


Noe’s Story Community Activism Law Clinic: Organized Communities Against Deportation (OCAD) CALA Staff Attorneys: Chad Baker and Lam Ho Noe Adan is the proud father of a 4-year-old US citizen. He is also the partner of an American citizen, and he helps to raise her three citizen children. Noe found himself spending thirteen months in Dodge County Detention Center after making a right turn on a red light. For nearly two years, he had to maneuver the complex immigration court system by himself because he could not find an attorney to help him. Fortunately, at Dodge, another detainee referred Noe to OCAD for support. OCAD secured his release to reunite him with his family.

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Despite his citizen family and roots in the US, ICE was determined to deport him, in contradiction to their own removal priorities. CALA and OCAD worked together, using legal and organizing strategies to demand a stay of his deportation. OCAD and CALA empowered Noe to share his experiences at multiple rallies and press conferences. Eventually, OCAD and CALA convinced ICE to not deport Noe. Now, Noe is a leader in his community, using his bravery to help other undocumented immigrants. And he gets to see his daughter grow up.

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Community Workshops

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COMMUNITY ACTIVISM LAWYERING IMPACTS THOUSANDS BY EDUCATING THEM ON THEIR RIGHTS. 25


Forty-One New Americans – CALA and CTU help immigrants apply for U.S. citizenship Community Activism Law Clinic: Centro Trabajadores Unidos (CTU) CALA Staff Attorneys: All Before 9:00am on a Saturday morning, dozens of people from the South Chicago community had already gathered in the gymnasium of Gallistel Language Academy. They signed in and took seats in folding chairs under basketball hoops and chin-up bars. While they waited to see an attorney, they mingled and laughed with friends and neighbors. They had come to complete the forms they would need to ask for something most residents of Chicago take for granted: to be granted United States citizenship. On March 5, 2016, CALA and CTU teamed up to offer a self-help workshop to assist low-income immigrants to complete and file their applications for citizenship. 26


CALA and CTU have partnered to put on many citizenship and DACA workshops in the past two years, reaching hundreds of people. On March 5th alone, CALA and CTU assisted 41 people. Alderwoman Susan Sadlowski Garza stopped by to congratulate the applicants, and a local TV station covered the event for their nightly news. These workshops are part of CALA’s Self-Help Empowerment Workshops Program, which offers more than just legal services. They offer hundreds of folks each year the chance to understand their rights and the steps of the application process, and they take that knowledge with them back into their communities. Community volunteers sat with applicants and guided them through forms, under the supervision of CALA’s attorneys. Some of these volunteers are undocumented, and are not able to apply for citizenship, yet they gave up their Saturday to help their friends and neighbors apply for a benefit that a broken immigration system may prevent them from ever receiving themselves.

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MOVING FORWARD... We hope to keep changing how communities, community organizations, and activists approach the law. Through our collaborations, our community partners have incorporated our clinics and partnerships into their organizational structure and our legal services as part of their toolbox for social change. We hope to continue to bring lawyers into our communities and expose them to the advantages of our model. The attorneys that work and volunteer for us learn about how community activism lawyering can reach more people who need legal assistance, how they can be served more cost-effectively, and how lawyers can contribute to greater social change. 28


We hope to create exponentially greater impact. We have impacted the lives of thousands of people and, by supporting social movements, our work with activists creates the potential for large-scale and/or systematic change that impact thousands more. We hope to keep changing how legal aid organizations operate. Our model offers new strategies for legal aid organizations to address their funding gaps, increase access to justice, and improve their impact by working with and within communities. We hope to continue influencing—and eventually, changing—how current and new legal organizations operate. In the next 5 years, we hope to become a national organization and a national leader in community lawyering. We plan to expand our model to new communities in the Midwest, and to create, coordinate, train, and support a network of organizations across the country using the model. 29


OUR SUPPORTERS

Alphawood Foundation Chicago Abdon Mendez Hai Ho Maya Shurley Amazon Smile Foundation Alex Boni-Saenz Hannah Jurowicz Melissa Broudo Anne & Andrew Abel Charitable Fund Ami Gandhi Harold Mancusi- Ugaro Michael Santamauro Centro de Trabajadores Unidos Andy Toh James McMillan Michael Haroz Chicago Community Trust Angela Littwin James McDonough Michele Wan Crossroads Fund Ann Chen Alice & Janice Huynh Mike Jarecki DePaul University Anne Holmelund Jed Dulanas Monica Llorente Echoing Green Anthony Nelson Jenna Miara Nancy Lanham Enlace Chicago Tony Borich Jennifer Alvarado Nhung Phan Google One Bao Ho Jennifer Payne Olga Tellez Harvard Law School Public Service Brandon Christensen Jesus Santacruz Olga Pribyl Venture Fund Brij Patnaik Jody Adler Paul Rietema Hughes Socol Piers Resnick Dym Carol Mancusi Joshua Abel Rachel Rosenthal Illinois Immigrant Funders Charlie Wysong Juan Zayas Rafi Mottahedeh Collaborative Chirag Badlani Justin Snider Richard Pouzar Jenner & Block Christina Jackson Kalman Resnick Roger MacDougall Julian Grace Foundation Christopher Wilmes Kate Schwartz Ryan Kappes Kirkland & Ellis LLP Foundation Cynthia Wilson Kathryn Muse Samantha Kyrkostas Lawyer's Trust Fund of Illinois David Abbott Kathy Schneyer Samuel Heppell Lehman-Stamm Family Fund Deanna Chang Kevin Zickterman Serafina Ha Mano a Mano Debbie Nguyen Lam Ho Sharlyn Grace National Association for Law Dennis Myers Larry Wood Shaun Van Horn Placement Diana Lin LaRue Robinson Sheila Emerson Northbridge Technology Alliance Dr. & Mrs. Harold Laura Bishop Stephanie Marzouk Organized Communities Against Mancusi-Ungaro Jr Laura Lopez Steve Kim Deportation Edward Lai Leah Bendik Steven Art Polk Bros Foundation Elizabeth Mazur Lilian Jiminez Susan Butler Plum PwC Charitable Foundation Ellen Craig Linda McMaster Suzie Granja Sex Workers Outreach Project Erin McGinley Liz Tracy Telbina Santiago Skadden Foundation Eudocia Trevino Luis Ramirez Theofano Vamvlas Springfield Tracy Fund Frances Heppell Lulu Martinez Theresa Nguyen State Street Bank Frank Censullo Manuel Lara Thomas Lipsmeyer Smokeball Gail Gillispie Mara Block Timothy Borich Werman Salas Andy Lipsmeyer Margaret Brown Todd Pierce-Ryan Glenda Lipsmeyer Marianna Chapleau Tony Miner Grace Kim Marina Aronchik Wendy Goldberg Greg Wyckoff Mark Hansen William Keach Gregoire Magadini Mary Henin Wing-Sze Choi H. Peter Steeves Mary Claire Schmit

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BOARD OF DIRECTORS

STAFF


Community Activism Law Alliance 405 W Superior St 7th Floor #506 Chicago, IL 60654-8561

Phone: 312-999-0056 Email: cala@calachicago.org www.calachicago.org

CALA

Lawyering Beyond Boundaries...

CALA 2 Years of Community Impact  

Success Stories of Community Impact

CALA 2 Years of Community Impact  

Success Stories of Community Impact

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