Page 1


Inside This Issue 6

ABC’S of Breast Cancer

8

Preventing Breast Cancer

9

Fight Breast Cancer with G-BOMBS

Information on the types of Breast Cancer and their symptoms Steps to help reduce the risks of developing Breast Cancer Foods to prevent Breast Cancer

after Breast Cancer 12 Life Yvonne Gayle’s Survivor Story and Answers 13 Question The answers to the most commonly asked questions Fight to Survive 17 The The road to recovery Gets Breast Cancer? 20 Who Know your Genes.

23 New Treatments in Cancer 25 Breast Word Search

Breast Cancer

Testing 27 Self How to do a Breast Self Exam Cancer Screening 28 Breast How to test for Breast Cancer Breast Cancer 30 Surviving Reconstructive Surgery

32 Mammograms How soon is too soon Cancer Myths 33 Breast Is it True or False much do you know 35 How Cross Word Puzzle


Antonette Mason _________________ About the Author Antonette Mason is a final year student at the University of Technology, Jamaica (UTech), pursuing a Bachelor in Communication Arts and Technology, focusing on Public Relations. From as early as age four, Antonette has had a love for writing. In fact she has over the years been using this tool to not only express herself but also to motivate and inspire others. As a media student her first writing assignment was to uncover the truth about Freemason’s. It was this assignment that further inspired Antonette to become a writer and to create this women’s health magazine that will not only inform but also motivate and inspire women. Antonette Mason is aware of the impact her writing has and will have on her readers and as such, she has the drive to continue writing. Antonette has high hopes for her writing, she is clear of what she wants to achieve. Though becoming a Public Relations Officer, Mason aspires to one-day start her own magazine company. She also believes that her magazine will offer a different attitude towards the issues to be discussed, and as a result will attract both young and mature women.


Editor’s Letter The issue you are holding/viewing is the first for J’Can Health. It’s a remarkable achievement, which has set the status quo as Editor in Chief

ANTONETTE MASON Assistant Editor Saccheen Laing

it relates to creating a women’s health magazine in Jamaica. What this accomplishment indicates is, once you have set your mind to something it can be done. It was over a year ago that we decided to

CONTRIBUTORS

create this magazine, however many setbacks occurred which would have pushed us

FEATURES Dr. Fuhrman : Fight Breast Cancer with G-BOMBS Dr. Angela Scott: Who gets Breast Cancer? Know your Genes

further away from this dream. Through determination though, we have reached the mark and have succeeded. With this issue, J’Can Health is helping to educate women about Breast Cancer. We’re offering techniques on how to be a healthier you, in order

Photographer: Darien Robertson Graphic Designer : Adrian Wray

to reduce your risk of developing this disease- and more. The best part of this explosion of information is that if you have already contracted this disease, this magazine offers a sense of hope and if not it informs

MODELS Kerrol Parke, Ashley Henry Janiece Forbes, Sherene Jervis Saccheen Laing, Stephanie Duhaney Nemeica Campbell, Gavin Patterson

you of how to keep risk factors low as well as discussing the experiences of others. Overall this magazine is a community where readers come together to learn and strengthen themselves. There is so much to learn and be inspired by in this issue and we have a feeling you’ll be referring to it over and over.

Printed by: Xpress Litho Limited


Dr. Angella Scott describes Breast Cancer as a malignant tumor found in the breast or areas that drain the breast; such as under the armpit. There are various types of Breast Cancers, all of which may affect different parts of the breast or areas surrounding the breasts. Some of such Breast Cancers include : 1. Adenocarcinoma: This is a general type of cancer that starts in the glandular tissues anywhere in the body. Nearly all breast cancers start in the glandular tissue of the breast. The two main types of breast adenocarcinomas are ductal carcinomas and lobular carcinomas. The term in situ as it relates to breast cancer, refers to cancer remains confined to ducts or lobules and have not invaded surrounding fatty tissues nor spread to other organs in the body. 2. Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS): Ductal carcinoma in situ, is the most common type of noninvasive breast cancer. DCIS is cancer cells located inside the milk ducts but have not spread through the walls of the ducts into the fatty tissue of the breast. DCIS generally has no symptoms, however a lump may be present. The development of this disease is an indication that there is a strong possibility of developing an invasive breast cancer later on. 3. Infiltrating (or invasive) ductal carcinoma (IDC): This is the most common form of breast cancer. This cancer begins in a milk passage (breast ducts) but has broken through the wall of the duct and invaded the fatty tissue of the breast. Overtime this cancer may spread to other parts of the body through the bloodstream. At first there may be no symptoms but overtime the following may be noted: • swelling of all or part of the breast • skin irritation • breast pain • nipple pain or the nipple turning inward • redness, scaliness, or thickening of the nipple or breast skin • nipple discharge other than breast milk • lump in the underarm area

J’Can Health Magazine is Copyright © 2014. All Rights Reserved. Originally Written by Antonette Mason May 2014 6


4. Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC): This is the second most common form of breast cancer. ILC starts in the milk-producing glands. Similar to IDC, this cancer has broken through the wall of the lobule and begun to invade the tissues of the breast and has the potential to spread (metastasize) throughout the body. This cancer can affect female of any age. Symptoms may include: • Thickness or hardness of the breast • Swelling of all or parts of the breast • Skin irritation • Breast pain • Nipple pain or the nipple turning inward • Redness,scaliness, or thickening of the nipple or breast skin • Nipple discharge 5. Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC): This rare type of invasive breast cancer, appears red and feels warm on the breast skin as if it was infected and inflamed. The skin may also develop ridges and small bumps that resemble hives. IBC is more common among women who are overweight or obese. IBC tends to be more aggressive; it grows and spreads more quickly than the more common types of breast cancer. 6. Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS): LCIS is not seen as true cancer but instead as an indication that the affected person stands a greater chance of developing an invasive cancer in the future. LCIS begins in lobules (milk-producing glands), and does not break through its walls. This is viewed as a rare condition, and the cause unknown. LCIS does not cause symptoms and usually does not show up on a mammogram. It tends to be diagnosed as a result of a biopsy performed on the breast for some other reason. 7. Paget's disease of the nipple: This is a rare type of breast cancer which starts in the breast ducts and spreads to the skin of the nipple and then to the areola (dark circle around the nipple). This type of cancer often times affect women over the years of fifty (50). Some symptoms may include: The skin of the nipple and areola appearing crusted, scaly, and red, with areas of bleeding or oozing. The woman may also notice burning or itching. 8. Phyllodes tumor: This is a very rare type of breast tumor, which is formed on the outside of the ducts rather than the inside (breast duct) as seen in other cancers. Phyllodes tumor is formed from the stroma (connective tissue) of the breast. These tumors are usually benign (inactive) but on rare occasions may be malignant (having the potential to metastasize). Phyllodes tumors can occur at any age, but they tend to develop when a woman is in her 40s. Symptoms include lumps in the breast.

J’Can Health Magazine is Copyright © 2014. All Rights Reserved. Originally Written by Antonette Mason 7 May 2014


Breast Cancer Prevention : How to reduce your risk

Breast cancer prevention can be attributed to healthy habits such as restraining from alcohol, smoking and staying physically active. Do you know what you can do to prevent yourself from getting Breast Cancer? By : Antonette Mason

Many women are anxious about breast cancer, as they know how dangerous it can be. Many wander “Can this disease be prevented? And if so what are the necessary steps I need to take in order to reduce my risks”?

Limit your alcohol intake The greater the quantity of alcohol you consume, the higher your risk of developing breast cancer. High consumption of alcohol is believed to be linked to breast cancer; as it increases the level of hormones, such as oestrogen, testosterone and insulin in the body.Oestrogen contributes the most to breast cancer ;therefore no more than one glass of wine or beer is recommended in a given day.

Manage your weight

Well there is no definite way to prevent this disease, however, there are steps all women can and should take in order to reduce their risk.

Being overweight or obese increases the risk of breast cancer in women. Body fat converts adrenal hormones to oestrogen and with more oestrogen in the body there is a greater risk of developing breast cancer.

One’s lifestyle can increase or decrease their risk of breast cancer. It is never too late for a lifestyle change. The following steps can be taken to reduce your risk:

Be active Exercise as much as possible (at least three times a week), this will in turn reduce the chances of developing Breast Cancer by decreasing your hormonal levels. Don't smoke Research has indicated that there is a greater risk of getting breast cancer, when women smoke.

Avoid exposure to radiation It has been noted that constant exposure to radiation may increase Breast Cancer risk. Therefore mammograms are recommended only once a year.

Breast-feed Breast-feeding may play a role in breast cancer prevention. The longer you breast-feed, the greater the protection. Women are therefore adviced to try and breastfeed for atleast one year if possible.

Avoid/Limit hormone therapy Hormone therapy, though beneficial for menopausal women, increases their risk of breast cancer. Therefore individuals should ask their physician for alternative drugs, limit their use or use for the shortest time period necessary.

These are a few steps that can be taken in order to reduce one’s risk of developing Breast Cancer. Though there are no definite ways of knowing what causes this disease, a healthy lifestyle will surely help in withstanding this ailment.

J’Can Health Health Magazine Magazine is is Copyright Copyright © © 2014. 2014. All All Rights Rights Reserved. Reserved. J’Can Originally Written Written by by Antonette Antonette Mason Mason Originally May 2014 8


Fi ht Breast Cancer

with

G-BOMBS

by : Joel Fuhrman, M.D Women need to be aware that they are not powerless against breast cancer. Mammograms for ‘early detection’ are not the only defense and do not even offer significant benefits. The scientific evidence shows that women do have the power to protect themselves against breast cancer with powerful preventive lifestyle measures. Staying slim and active, focusing on healthful natural foods, and avoiding the disease-causing foods of the Standard American diet are strategies women can use to win the war on breast cancer. Most importantly, we must unleash the immune system’s special forces: G-BOMBS! G-BOMBS (Greens, Beans, Onions, Mushrooms, Berries and Seeds) are the foods with the most powerful immune-boosting and anti-cancer effects. These foods help to prevent the cancerous transformation of normal cells, and keep the body armed and ready to attack any pre-cancerous or cancerous cells that may arise. G – Greens Green vegetables (the cruciferous family in particular) contain compounds with anti-cancer compounds and substances that protect blood vessels; they also promote healthy vision and reduce diabetes risk. Cruciferous vegetable phytochemicals inhibit a wide range of cancer-promoting cellular processes, including angiogenesis; the angiogenesis inhibitors found in cruciferous vegetables prevent new blood vessel growth, which is needed for tumor growth and fat tissue growth. Eating cruciferous vegetables regularly is associated with decreased risk of breast cancer and has even been shown to increase survival in women after being diagnosed with breast cancer.

B - Beans Beans are unique foods because of their very high levels of fiber and resistant starch; carbohydrates that are not broken down by digestive enzymes. The fiber and resistant starch in beans reduce total the number of calories absorbed from beans, reduce cholesterol levels, and are converted by healthy gut bacteria into many substances that protect against colon cancer. Eating fiber-rich beans regularly dramatically lowers colon cancer risk, and a recent analysis of 10 scientific studies has shown that the higher your fiber intake, the lower your risk of breast cancer. O – Onions Onions, leeks, garlic, shallots, chives, and scallions not only lend great flavor to meals, they have beneficial effects on the cardiovascular and immune systems, as well as anti-diabetic and anti-cancer effects. These vegetables are known for their characteristic (and eye-irritating) organosulfur compounds, which slow tumor growth and kill cancer cells – eating onions and garlic frequently is associated with reduced risk of digestive cancers. These vegetables also also contain high concentrations of anti-inflammatory flavonoid antioxidants that contribute to their anti-cancer properties. M - Mushrooms In one recent Chinese study, women who ate at least 10 grams of fresh mushrooms each day (which equates to about one button mushroom per day) had a 64% decreased risk of breast cancer,all types of mushrooms all have anti-cancer properties. Plus, mushrooms are unique in that they contain aromatase inhibitors – compounds that can block the production of estrogen. Aromatase inhibitors are thought to be largely responsible for the preventive effects of mushrooms against breast cancer. Even the most commonly eaten mushrooms (white, cremini, and Portobello) have high anti-aromatase activity. Mushrooms also contain powerful angiogenesis inhibitors. Keep in mind that mushrooms should only be eaten cooked: several raw culinary mushrooms contain a potentially carcinogenic substance called agaritine, and cooking mushrooms significantly reduces their agaritine content.

J’Can Health Magazine is Copyright © 2014. All Rights Reserved. Originally Written by Antonette Mason 9 May 2014


Dr. Fuhrman’s Nutritarian Food Plate

1/2 Raw and 1/2 Cooked 30-60% of calories

ory -fa rm ed

cts,

Beans

ra atu )n

or

wild

anim

s gs, fi al products, poultr y, eg

pot ato

10%

rai sed

ite

than

ll y

10-40% of calories e.g. chia, hemp, sesame, flax, pumpkin, sunflower, walnuts, pine nuts, pistachios, almonds, cashew

Fruits

10-40% of calories e.g. berries, cherries, grapes, pomegranates, pineapples, oranges, melons, kiwi, peaches, bananas, plums, pears

wh

L e ss

Seeds/Nuts

nd

Whole Grains

20% or fewer of calories e.g. oats, black rice, brown rice, quinoa, whole wheat

i ,o ir y a h,d

l, a

Limit: (

10-40% of calories e.g. kidney, cannellini, pinto, black, chickpeas, lentils, split peas, black-eyed peas, soybeans

lly red meat. especia

e.g. collard/mustard/turnip greens,kale,swiss chard spinach,brussels sprouts, bok choy, cabbage, broccoli, asparagus, squash, carrots, peppers onions, garlic, tomatoes, zucchini, mushrooms,lettuce

u rod

c he ese , sw ee ts

Vegetables

fact

lp

Avoi d:

e, white flour, a hite ric nd

a im an

,

sed ces o pr

d s, w foo

Nutritian Checklist Enjoy, everyday: a large salad, include some raw onion on top.

at least a 1/2 cup of beans in a soup, stew, on top of a salad or in another dish. at least 3 fresh fruits, especially berries, cherries, plums and oranges.

at least 1 ounce of raw nuts and seeds, focus on high omega-3 nuts and seeds (walnut, flax etc).

1 double-size serving of steamed greens, utilize mushrooms and onions in your dishes.

J’Can Health Magazine is Copyright © 2014. All Rights Reserved. Originally Written by Antonette Mason May 2014 10


LIFE after Breast Cancer The strength I never knew I had Yvonne Gayle’s Story

As an active teacher, dedicated mother and grandmother as well as a faithful member of the Diamond Acres Seventh Day Adventist Church; not once did it ever occur to Mrs. Gayle that she would develop Breast Cancer. Yvonne Gayle was fifty four (54) when she received her life threatening diagnosis of breast cancer. “When the doctor confirmed that it was cancer, I was so scared, I honestly thought I was going to die” she stated. Yvonne Gayle’s shocking discovery came in December 2009, as she did her daily chores. “As I was cleaning, I moved a chair and my hand hit my right breast and it felt painful, upon feeling the area I realized that there was a lump and it was hurting”. Though Gayle found the lump in December, she did not acknowledge it until January 2010. December she explains was not a good time to reveal her discovery, as it was during the time that the family was celebrating the lives of her sister and mother who both died during the winter season two years back. “My sister died December 26 and my mother January 1st, and the family was barely recovering from that pain and I didn’t want to cause any more pain” states Gayle. She added “I knew however that I had to deal with it soon, so as soon as January came, I visited the doctor and explained my findings; he told me that if it hurts it’s more than likely not cancer or it has reached very far”. Gayle was then urged to do a mammogram, after which it was confirmed that she had developed cancer of the breast. She remembers that receiving the diagnosis was not easy, but she knew she had to find the strength and courage to just get through it. It was not long after, that she decided to do a biopsy at the University Hospital of the West Indies. “The lump was so deep that I had to do the biopsy twice” she stated. For Gayle, mastectomy was the best option for the affected right breast. However, after surgery it took more than physical healing, as Gayle had to heal mentally and come to the realization that she was now a woman with one breast. She describes living without a breast as being a real challenge and she often times refrained from being around people. She states “I hated looking in the mirror; I hated the fact that I only had one breast, but at the end of the day I knew I made the right decision. If they even took both breast I would be alright, because I just didn’t want the cancer to return”. She laments on her journey, “Cancer is a very lonely battle because though you have friends and family, it’s just your fight. You never want to be a burden or cause pain and sadness to those around you”. She advices other women stricken with the disease “Be happy, because you can’t change it, but you can change your mentally, live everyday like it’s your last. Also you have to make the best decision for you, just as I did, I knew reconstructive surgery was not for me, because I was scared of the cancer reoccurring. Another important thing is, you have to trust your physician, to guide you on your path of healing”. J’Can Health Magazine is Copyright © 2014. All Rights Reserved. Originally Written by Antonette Mason 12 May 2014


She notes however that sometimes it’s extremely difficult to follow the instructions from the doctor such as keeping up with appointments, seeking help from nutritionists, and getting the medication, as it is very costly. “ Breast cancer is a very costly disease, every step you take it’s going to cost you”. Mrs. Gayle knows all too well how stressful breast cancer can be both on the affected and their families. “You know breast cancer changes the life of the victim but it affects the family even more” states Gayle. This she believes is true as when down while sick, the financial strain is then on the families. Having a daughter and a granddaughter causes a lot of anxiety for Gayle as she often times worry about them developing breast cancer. “I urge them ever so often to get tested regularly”. She indicates that is easier to take preventative steps to reduce the chances of acquiring this disease or atleast catching it early, rather than to develop it and try to get better. “This disease is very stressful, it is a lonely disease and a costly one”. MOVING FORWARD Despite developing hypertension, Gayle has been able to move forward and continue doing what she loves, after surgery. She admits however that there is still a little fear of its return and with every swelling and slight pain felt she begins to wander. Despite the negative that stemmed from this disease, Gayle believes it has given her a greater outlook on life “ When you have such a disease the first think that comes to mind is death; and you begin to reflect on your life and you realize that most of the things you fussed about were very irrelevant. In fact I was reminded to always trust God and be very grateful for everyday”.

BE INFORMED

1

Where can you get tested for Breast Cancer? Answer: There are various places in Jamaica to get tested such as any X-Ray Facility and also at the Jamaica Cancer Society.

2 3 4

How often should a mammogram be done? Answer: Once a year. Mammograms expose the breast to radiology which can highten the possibility of getting Breast cancer, so it is recommended that this test be done once a year, unless there is a urgent need for another. Is there a specific age at which a mammogram should be done? Answer: No, there is no limit, however if there is no urgent need to do a mammogram, screenings should start at age 40. Is the mammogram the only method of being tested? Answer: No. This test can also be done with the use of ultrasounds, MRI and recently with the use of the Gamma Specific Breast Imaging, which is a more sensitive kind of mammogram.

J’Can Health Magazine is Copyright © 2014. All Rights Reserved. Originally Written by Antonette Mason May 2014 13


10 CONT’D

5 6 7 8

9

How important is self testing? Answer: Self testing is very important, as it is most time the individual that first identifies these tumors within their breast. This is so as they know their breast more than the doctors, and so are able to tell the differences they may have observed even if the tests didn’t identify anything. How often should self testing be done and at what time of the month? Answer: Self testing should be done at least once every month. This should be done some days after the period has started and the breast is less tender. Are all lumps cancerous? Answer: No, the majority of lumps felt in the breast are not cancerous, such as Cyst and or other hard tumors. There are some lumps however that show an increase risk of becoming cancerous. What is Chemotherapy? Answer: Chemotherapy is medication that can be given either through the veins or orally, that targets cells that are rapidly dividing. It interrupts their ability to divide and grow into large tumors. Is there a possibility that the tumor may re occur? Answer: Yes there is, as not all individuals respond to the various types of treatment.

11

Can wearing a bra all the time highten the risk of getting breast cancer? Answer: No, you cannot get breast cancer from this. What you wear and do not affect your risk for breast cancer. Does breast density affect breast cancer?

Answer: Breast density refers to the proportion of the different tissues that make up a woman’s breasts and how they show up on a mammogram. Having dense breast is often times related to higher risk of having breast cancer. •High breast density means there is a greater amount of breast and connective tissue compared to fat. •Low breast density means there is a greater amount of fat compared to breast and connective tissue. When breast density is high, mammograms are harder to interpret than when breast density is low.

12

What does stress have to do with breast cancer? Answer: Long-term stress may result in breast cancer as it can increase blood flow to tumors and triggering hormones that encourage tumor growth. Chronic stress may also increase the growth and spread of "triple negative" which is the deadliest form of breast cancer, for which there is no proven treatment.

13

Can exercise really help you cut your risk of breast cancer?

Answer: Yes. In fact exercising three or more hours per week could reduce your risk by 20 to 30 percent.

14

What environmental factors can affect your risk of breast cancer?

Answer: Some toxins you're exposed to have been linked to breast cancer. These chemicals when ingested can block the body’s hormones such as estrogen. Estrogen is needed in the body however high levels may result in cancer growth.

J’Can Health Magazine is Copyright © 2014. All Rights Reserved. Originally Written by Antonette Mason 14 May 2014


ISLAND GRILL


Men are also active participants in the fight against Breast Cancer. Various movements have been formed to encourage more men to take a stand against this disease. Men’s support is needed to not only help women as they battle this disease, but also to motivate them to keep abreast of their health status. Breast Cancer is a very serious disease and it is an important issue for everyone. Men, encourage the women in your life to get their annual mammograms and to enquire about their breast health.

Early Detection is key!


The Fight to

They also remind me each day that they would be there through the thick and thin, and that this disease didn’t change who i was as a person. All my family and friends offer huge support. I could not have done it without them”.

Survive The road to recovery. Patrice Dawkins Diagnosed: Age 35 Currently battling Breast cancer Now: Age 36

“I was only thirty five years of age, when I was diagnosed with Breast Cancer. One Tuesday morning, after driving my children to school, my hand bounced against my breast and it was really painful. Upon feeling the area I realized that there was a mass. I immediately called my family doctor in a panic”. “ My doctor referred me for a mammogram and it was confirmed that I had stage one Breast Cancer. That news was a total blow to me, never in a million years, did I expect that to happen to me. I am currently going through my chemotherapy treatment; and it is a real struggle. You have no strength when doing chemotherapy and besides that, the side effects are really bad from nausea to loosing my apetitite and my hair. Loosing my hair, I must say is the worst of all; I am still not used to seeing myself hairless, though my husband and children try to convince me that I’m still beautiful, deep inside I am a little insecure. "I'm fighting this disease with everything in me; I refuse to give in. I Know God is by my side and I will just continue to trust that he will take me through”.

Advice to new patients/ Unaffected ladies: "Take one day at a time. You have to be and think positive no matter what. You have to dig deep for your inner courage and strength, because finding out you have the ‘Big C’ can really hit the wind out of you. Also live everyday like it’s your last”. “For unaffected women, you need to follow the steps to potencially decreasing your risks. Get your regular mammograms as well because early detection is key; it really is”. How I've changed: "I've completely changed my life, I change how I eat; I stay away from meat totally. I also change my exercise routine, now I exercise more, I have changed the way I look at others; no longer do I judge people, because I don’t know their situation. I have also changed the kind of friends I kept; I don’t affiliate myself with negative persons, especially now. Doing this has made me a better person”. What I'm proud of: "How positive I am, though I’m going through the most difficult time in my life. I’m also proud that I have found my inner peace with the situation; but that doesn’t stop me from fighting this to the end". What I wish everyone knew: "Breast Cancer isnt a death sentence, you can still live and enjoy your life; however, prevention is way better than cure”.

Inspirations: "God and my family. When you are going through this fight, there is no one else you can call on but God, he alone knows the pain you feel deep down. He has been my confidant through it all. My family is also a huge inspiration; they encourage me to get up each day and fight and to be grateful for the opportunity to be alive.

J’Can Health Magazine is Copyright © 2014. All Rights Reserved. Originally Written by Antonette Mason May 2014 17


Celebrating lives through poetry for survivors Celebrate and Fight by: Shawnette Wignal

It’s your celebration time Everything has turned out fine Though the meds had you down and frail You kept pressing...you didn’t fail We now celebrate with you Your determination carried you through This disease has called many home But they’re still with us we’re not alone Let’s fight back...this war is far from done There’s still hope, cancer you better run The search for a cure is looking great There will soon be an increase in the survival rate The world can’t wait to be cancer free. My Wish

by: Serita Campbell

Wouldn’t you just love a world without cancer? Just imagine how happy and free we all would be No more suffering or pain Or just waiting for your time to die Imagine women just enjoying life Living free without any worry, Enjoying life and family and friends And not wandering when will be the end I may seem like a dreamer, But trust me I am not Just another woman, who sees the fight The struggle, the pain, the loss Of families and friends I’m sure I’m not the only one Who wishes this world was cancer free So we could all just live in peace Worry free.

Emotional Scars of Survivors by: Monique Brock

The battle we’ve fought Is not an easy one Not all are equipped to overcome it It takes a lot of strength, courage and drive To go through such a test and still have the courage to fight Our battle was never a secret No, not for a minute, did we try to keep it Our story and trials documented in clinics, hospitals and even the ER War wounds we never discarded Though sometimes we’d have them covered We have no problem embracing them Showing the world our strength and power Though we have fought and conquered it all There are still some emotional scars Though we know we have passed the test We now have to come to terms That we have no breasts We are still learning acceptance Of things beyond our control This is now who we are Every limp taken, every scar Shows a piece of victory We have fought our best fight And have come out of this cancer war On the winning side.

J’Can Health Magazine is Copyright © 2014. All Rights Reserved. Originally Written by Antonette Mason 18 May 2014


Big or Small Save Them ALL

Together we fight Breast Cancer


Who gets Breast Cancer? Be aware of the genes? By: Dr. Angela Scott, Clinical Haematologist/Oncologist

Too often I see women who have close family members that have been diagnosed with breast cancer and yet they ignore their own symptoms. The reasons they give are varied “Oh she was overweight, I am not, She drank alcohol and I don’t drink, She lived on junk food, I’m a vegetarian”. While lifestyle issues are important in the development of cancer there are other factors to consider. I had a patient say to me “I’m the healthiest sick person you’ll meet” she eats right, exercises regularly and has appropriate body weight for her height, yet she too had cancer.

daughter) or second degree (grandmother, aunt) relatives with breast cancer, ovarian cancer ; both if there is a first degree family member with breast cancer below the age of 50; a first degree male relative with breast cancer or a first degree relative with cancer in both breasts. These genes are also seen with higher frequency in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. What is the value of finding out if you have the gene? It allows close monitoring which increases the chances of making the diagnosis early, particularly at stage 0. This significantly improves ones chance of a cure. It also guides treatment strategies, but probably most important is the fact that some prevention strategies can also be utilized once the risk is known. The test is simple; it can be carried out on a blood sample. Unfortunately it is quite costly and has to be processed overseas. However, more and more women are benefiting from this improved assessment of risk. It is therefore important that both lifestyle and genetic risk factors be considered as we strive to reduce breast cancer.

Over the last decade we have become increasingly aware that genes also have a role to play in the development of breast cancer. So far a number of gene mutations have been discovered that are associated with an increased risk of getting cancer. The two main ones for Breast cancer are the Breast Cancer Gene I (BRCA I) and the Breast Cancer Gene II (BRCA II). Having either of these gene mutations significantly increases the risk of developing breast cancer. These genes are also associated with the development of other cancers particularly ovarian, pancreatic and prostate cancers. The chance of an individual carrying the BRCA I or BRCA II genes increases if: There are many first degree(mother, sister, J’Can Health Magazine is Copyright © 2014. All Rights Reserved. Originally Written by Antonette Mason 20 May 2014


New Treatments in Breast Cancer By : Antonette Mason There is a plethora of research being conducted worldwide on the causes, prevention and treatment of breast cancer in today’s society. It is as a result of these studies, that there has been a breakthrough in many drugs that can potentially help women in recovering from this disease. Though many of these drugs have not yet been approved to be on the market, there are many that are currently being tested on women and have had a positive outcome, in increasing their survival rate. Below are the top four drugs/treatments that were recently discovered to have benefited the lives of women. Smart Drug The smart drug otherwise known as T-DM1, is one of the recent drugs that have been used to treat breast cancer in women. This drug is a combination of Herceptin and Chemotherapy, and is said to significantly increase the survival rate of women with breast cancer. It is also said to have fewer side effects that alternative drugs. Abraxane Abraxane is another new and effective drug used in treating breast cancer patients. This drug may be identified as a new chemotherapy drug for breast cancer; however it isn’t entirely a new drug but in fact a new way of delivering an existing drug. Traditional drugs such as Taxol, cannot be dissolved in water, therefore they are placed in solvents to be delivered to patientsce. It is those solvents that cause severe side effects in patients such as nausea and allergic reactions. With Abraxane, however, the side effects associated with the solvent are absent; this is so as this drug binds with albumin which is a naturally occuring protein that can be dissolved in water. This then eliminates the dissolving of this medication in solvents. Targeted Therapy Targeted therapy is a group of drugs that specifically target the changes in cells that cause cancer. One of such drug is Everolimus which is said to help hormone therapy drugs work better. This drug has been approved to be mixed/combined with other drugs for more results. In one study, letrozole plus everolimus worked better than letrozole alone in shrinking breast tumors before surgery. It also helped in treating advanced hormone receptor-positive breast cancer when added to tamoxifen. Bisphosphates Bisphosphates are sets of drugs, useful in treating breast cancer; by strengthening and reducing the possibility of bone fracture in affected women. Examples of these drugs include Alendronate, Ibandronate, Risedronate and Zoledronic acid. These drugs have significantly improved breast cancer survival rate in postmenopausal women. Types of Bisphosphates available in Jamaica include Ibandronate and Zoledronic acid. Studies into Zoledronic acid have shown that this drug has enhanced the effectiveness of traditional drugs such as chemotherapy. Though these drugs were originally designed for the treatment of osteoporosis, they have had a significant effect on postmenopausal women with breast cancer.

J’Can Health Magazine is Copyright © 2014. All Rights Reserved. Originally Written by Antonette Mason May 2014 23


Many drugs being used now are significantly impacting survival, though they might not be extremely new. However, it is important to note that not all treatments work for all, therefore careful consideration has to be taken when selecting the best treatment for you.

Drugs available in Jamaica that treat Breast Cancer can be put in the following categories. Hormonal Tamoxifen Letrazole(femara) Anastrazole(Arimidex) Aromacin Zoladex Chemotherapy 5 Fluoro Uracil Methotrexate Adriamycin Cyclophosphamide Taxol Docetaxel Carboplatin Gemcitabine Capecitabine Navelbine Etoposide Targeted therapy Herceptin Tykerb Bisphosphonates Zolendronic Acid Ibandronate

J’Can Health Magazine is Copyright Š 2014. All Rights Reserved. Originally Written by Antonette Mason 24 May 2014


Breast Cancer: Are You Aware Q B D E S T K B T C H T K G F O F T S L S T X F F X B D A C

S U M A M M O G R A M E E G Q P A C U M E I T J N H P Q Q I

B F E R T M V L X V X P A V Z S J Q R G D I Z X Q L T X L B

Z J D L I O T V B T N V P L H M U C V P O Z S E S X K I R R

J K R Y R X R O B N E R F K T O C E I B N I L P S V C E A V

W X U D I M C I G E E T V T S H V P V U H P F X W Z A X S F

U S H E P M Z Y N M D A B W G K O T O G P T W J H S K N W G

L W N T S E W O G T M K S S I S X F R I M T A D T T I I W E

BENIGN BIOPSY BREAST CHEMOTHERAPY COURAGE CURE DETERMINATION DIAGNOSIS DUCT EARLY DETECTION ESTROGEN EXAM EXERCISE

F H P E E C I N R A Y S S M I I S E N H Y U I X U P C O T U

A E B C G T V X H E S Q B T D T O N H G L A X M Y T J W C V

P J R T A O T J N R G T I O R U B M T R G W O T V M M I C P

K N W I T Y R R O T K V N E M P I V C N A R D B M M H C D G

K K D O X K U T N K E G N Q G O Q Z O J H M B G Y A R V M I

L A I N E O C A S T R G E E P A B S S P H V T L R Y P O U B

R T N P J A C Y H E T C X D T I I D E R N C Y T Q V F W T K

N M O N F X L I S H T V W F E S X D K U D Q T K J W F A I N

H H A K Z S N Y S P O I B M L T E N Q G N L E J P S V Z Q U

Z X S L D K N X U C H E M O T H E R A P Y I R C X M L P I G

E I D Y I W O R B F R I E N D S K R D P I W S V O S B H I I

R G Y N M G F O H P L O B U L E H Y M U R R U T F U W F B M

G N G C K O N L K V B H A V C L V I F I D N G K A H R D H V

N U E A N L T A U I K Q G T E U U U L E N B G A M O O A A O

FAITH FAMILY

FRIENDS GENES HEALTH HOPE JOURNEY KNOWLEDGE LOBULE LOVE LYMPH NODES MALIGNANT MAMMOGRAM

P G L H O J Q C N B T J I B X C R D Y W K A R J I W T T G T

U Z I X W Z L K E T Q X U B A O P E X O E B T T L G A R L E

Q T P N L J H F Y T M Q R W M I P S B S S D F I Y W R O O P

K B H K E C R V I H S E S I C R E X E H T I G O O O K P M P

B G J Y D B T D U C T A Z X U Q B L A I X E Q Z R N P P K H

B S H I G I V F M U A W M I S F O F J F Z V S C G A J U Q J

J O X V E O F T O L D Z F Q Q H A X J B Q O S X H M C S F J

A C J Y T S I G O L O C N O O N L U L S B L G N F S E N E G

MASTECTOMY NIPPLE ONCOLOGIST POSITIVE THINKING RADIATION RISK FACTORS SPIRIT STRENGTH SUPPORT SURVIVOR TREATMENT TUMOR

J’Can Health Magazine is Copyright © 2014. All Rights Reserved. Originally Written by Antonette Mason May 2014 25


Self Testing Breast self exam is a check-up women do on their own to look for changes in the breast tissue. It is recommended that women of all ages perform breast self-exams at least once a month. “ This exam is very important as often times it’s the individual who first notices the change in their breast” states Dr. Angela Scott. The best time to do this exam is three to five days after your period starts. The breasts are not as tender at this time in your monthly cycle.

The Steps of a breast self-exam:

Step 2: Lie flat on your back. To examine left breast, place pillow under left shoulder, raise left arm overhead. 1. With the right hand use the pads of your fingers to apply pressure around your right breast. Start with gentle pressure then increase, this will allow you to examine the various levels of breast tissue. 2.Use small circular motions covering the entire breast area and armpit. Repeat procedure on the right breast. If a lump is found in one breast, check the other, if the lump is also found at the same place in the other breast, it may be normal. However you can check a doctor for certainty.

Step3: Raise one arm. Step1: Look at your breast in the mirror; keep shoulders straight and arms at your hips. Look for the following: • Changes in the skin texture, such as dimpling, puckering and indentations. • A change in the position of the nipples (retraction, discharge, rash). • Swelling or Soreness • Change in size or contour of breasts. Check again by pressing shoulders and elbows forward to flex chest muscles. Look again for any changes as noted above.

1. Put left hand behind head. 2. With finger pads of three middle fingers, check for changes by moving right hand over entire area of the left breast. 3. Switch sides and use left hand to check right breast.

J’Can Health Magazine is Copyright © 2014. All Rights Reserved. Originally Written by Antonette Mason May 2014 27


Breast Cancer

Screening

New ways to get tested for Breast Cancer. By: Antonette Mason Breast Cancer is the leading form of cancer in women, and with the motility rate continuously rising, women are urged to get tested regularly. Though many know the urgency of testing they refrain from doing so based on previous experience or the experience of others as it relates to pain and discomfort. This article will therefore show three new ways of screening for breast cancer,that may be less tedious that the traditinal mammogram. Digital Tomosynthesis Digital tomosynthesis is different from a standard mammogram. The Digital tomosynthesis creates 3-dimensional pictures of the breast using X-rays and the mammogram creates flat images. With a normal Mammogram, the breasts are pulled away from the body and are compressed between two glass plates, in order to take the picture of the top and bottom tissues in the breasts. The Digital Tomosynthesis aims to overcome this issue, by taking multiple X-ray pictures of each breast from many angles. The breast is positioned the same as in a conventional mammogram, but only a little pressure is applied just enough to keep the breast in a stable position during the procedure. The X-ray tube moves in an arc around the breast while 11 images are taken during a 7-second examination. The information is then sent to a computer, where it is assembled to produce clear, highly focused 3-dimensional images throughout the breast. This new breast imaging technique is not only more comfortable but it makes cancers cells more visible especially in dense breast tissues. Dense Breasts, refers to breasts with less fatty tissues than normal. Molecular Breast Imaging According to Dr. Scott, Molecular breasting imaging (MBI) is a method for detecting breast cancer. The technique she stated is also known as, scintimammography, or breast specific gamma imaging. This test uses radioactive tracers that highlight areas of cancer inside the breast. This tracer is injected through the vein in the arm into the body. The Breast cancer cells will then absorb the radioactive substance much more than normal cells will. A special camera called a Nuclear Medicine Scanner then scans the breast, looking for any areas where the radioactive substance is concentrated. MBI is especially useful for women with dense breast tissues; tumors can be hard to locate on a normal mammogram. This is so as normal fatty tissues are dark looking; dense tissues on the other hand appears white, like the tumors; therefore it is much harder to identify the cancerous cells. A MBI can therefore be used to identify these cells. If however your risks of developing breast cancer are average and you do not have dense breasts, the mammography is the ideal screening tool for you. This is so as many doctors believe that, for most women, mammography is better than MBI at detecting breast tumors when they are small and generally easier to treat.

28 May 2014

J’Can Health Magazine is Copyright Š 2014. All Rights Reserved. Originally Written by Antonette Mason


Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) This is a diagnostic procedure that uses both large magnet, radio waves, and a computer to create detailed images of organs and structures within the body. For this procedure the women normally lies face down, with her breasts positioned through openings in the table. In order to make abnormalities more visible, a contrast is needed. The patient is therefore injected with gadolinium contrast-related contraindications, into a vein in the arm before or during the procedure. The contrast make it possible to evaluate anatomy and outline abnormality more easily. An MRI is especially useful as it can locate small breast lesions. It can also help detect breast cancer in women with breast implants and in younger women who tend to have dense breast tissue. Disadvantages of MRI: 1. Not always able to distinguish the difference between cancerous abnormalities, which may lead to unnecessary breast biopsies. This is often referred to as a "false positive" test result. 2. Unable to identify calcifications or tiny calcium deposits that can indicate breast cancer. 3. MRIs are costly. 4. May be very uncomfortable. Reasons for the procedure Even though not a very new technology, MRI use in breast cancer and especially in detection for women being screened after breast reconstruction is still relatively new. This procedure is also important for further evaluation of abnormalities detected by mammography. Below are some advantages of taking a breast MRI. It is helpful in: • Discovering early forms of breast cancer, which have not been detected by other tests. This is especially important for high risk women and women with dense breast tissue. • Examining women with implants or scar tissues that might produce an inaccurate result from a mammogram • Detecting small abnormalities not seen with mammography or ultrasound. • Evaluating the size of the breast cancer lesions, as well as highlighting the possibility that more than one area of the breast may be involved. • Determining whether or not a mastectomy is necessary. • Noticing changes in the unaffected breast that has not been diagnosed with breast cancer. • Evaluating inverted nipple.

J’Can Health Magazine is Copyright © 2014. All Rights Reserved. Originally Written by Antonette Mason

May 2014 29


Surviving Breast Cancer : Reconstructive Surgery Patricia Edwards Story Patricia Edwards was diagnosed with breast cancer in March 2011. She decided that Mastectomy and Breast reconstructive surgery was the best decision for her. This is her story. “One morning in March 2011, as I woke I stretched lazily, and my right hand fell on my chest and the area felt strange, something was different; so I made an appointment to see the doctor the very next day” states Gayle. Upon visiting the doctor Edwards was urged to do both a mammogram and an ultrasound; the result identified that there was something on her chest. “ The test came back that something was there, but no one knew what it was, so I did a biopsy soon after and it was confirmed that I had cancer in my left breast”. The diagnosis was a shock to everyone especially to Edwards, as not only was there no form of breast cancer in her family but the mammogram came back without a clear indication of what exactly was on her chest; only to be confirmed as Breast Cancer. Though in awe of the diagnosis, Edwards kept strong and positive at all times; “I didn’t cry or breakdown, I just conditioned my mind to get through it, and I knew I had strong family support. I also knew that it is what you think that shapes you, so I refused to think negative”. This positive approach led to an easy and smooth transition for her and her family, as though they knew she was ill, they knew she would be better very soon. “My husband and my son was right there all the time; my husband made it his duty to tell me how beautiful I was very often and both my husband and my son reminded me, that cancer doesn’t affect who I am; and that gave me the strength to fight on. Upon consulting her physicians and hearing the various treatment options that could be taken, Edwards chose to do a Mastectomy. “I wanted to just get rid of the breast, my husband didn’t mind my decision as he only wanted me to do what made me happy. My sister however who worked in the hospital for many years urged my husband and I to get reconstructive surgery. This she said would help me heal emotionally and mentally”

After hearing the council from her sister, Edwards decided to go through with the mastectomy and the reconstructive surgery. “They would remove everything from the breast, all the tissues and cells, leaving just the unaffected skin as a sack. Muscles from under my left arm would then be taken out and implant it into the sack, to create my new breast.” “After now doing the surgery I can honestly say I made the best decision”. Edwards explains that getting out of surgery and seeing the results has made her happy with her decision. She also stated that being able to see a breast every morning has made the healing process a lot faster. “ Though I know that I have lost a breast seeing that the area isn’t empty, has caused me to look past that time in my life, I am happy my sister convinced me to take this approach to healing”. Scarring “I came out of the surgery with a perfect left breast; my surgeon did an excellent job” Edwards said smiling. She further explained that the only difference between her new and old breasts is the difference in firmness; the reconstructed being the firmest. She went further to add that often times, she forgets that she even did the surgery, as there is hardly any scar. “If you saw me topless and you didn’t know I had the surgery, you would have had no idea, because the scar is hardly visible on my breast. A scar can be seen however under my arm where they took the muscle from, but if you saw that scar, you would think it was just a cut, rather than that I had reconstruction done”. Secondary Treatment Also a part of her treatment was Chemotherapy. Though the cancer was stage 2 and had not spread, it was discovered that it was an aggressive type .Oncologist therefore believed this treatment would be beneficial as it would be a precautionary step in preventing the return of this disease. It was this treatment that changed the appearance of Edwards, as she lost all her hair. But not once did she think negatively about herself, as she knew it was a process of healing; and having a supportive and loving family also made it easier. “Doctors also recommended radiation but I refused to do it because I believed it was unnecessary; based on various test results that proved I was healthier post surgery than I was before my diagnosis”.

J’Can Health Magazine is Copyright © 2014. All Rights Reserved. Originally Written by Antonette Mason 30 May 2014


Life after Surgery

“Since doing my surgery I’ve had a second chance at life. Things I took for granted I no longer do; I appreciate the little things in life, a lot more”. Edwards now takes life one step at a time and tries not to let things beyond her control get to her. She has now realized the importance of taking time for herself, to just sit and relax and realize and be grateful for where she is and what she has.

It has now been two years since her diagnosis and lifestyle change, and Edwards is doing better than ever before. She therefore urges individuals with this disease to not think of it as a death sentence. “You have to be positive and think positive, while taking the necessary treatment options. You have to also listen to the council of those around you and then make the right decision for you, not forgetting the council of your physician of course”.

“Before I tried to make everything be as perfect as possible, but now I have a list of things I need to do in a day and I try my best to complete those tasks, however if anything gets left it just does, no longer do I stress myself worrying and arguing over things I can’t change”. Cancer and her Relationship Edwards and her husband were together for over twenty five years, when she received her diagnosis. Though it was a challenging time in their lives they never allowed the situation to come between them or bring them down as a couple; instead they were each other’s rock. This situation she says was a reminder that she can lean on her husband no matter what storm may blow, their way. “I could never have gone through this had it not been for my husband, it’s nice to know that at the end of the day, you always have someone in your corner” she states on the brink of tears. With her husband by her side at every step of the way, they grew closer together; which built their intimacy level in the end. Our sexual lives haven’t changed; the new breast doesn’t really affect anything. What I have come to realize however, is that I don’t really like when the breast is touched. We have therefore come to an agreement that the right breast is his and the left breast mine. He can have his way with the right and I’ll let him be but I’m a bit more protective of the left one. I sometimes however place his hands on the left breast and let it stay there. So in other words I like to be in charge of what happens with the left breast. But as it relates to our intimacy the surgery hasn’t affected it. The key step taken by Edwards in her recovery was that she chose to be strong and to take the necessary steps to be healthy again. This change led to a total three sixty in every area of her life “ With breast cancer you have to change a lot of things you do; you have to do a lifestyle change, and I did just that. I changed my diet, the way I worked the persons I associated with but most importantly I changed the way I thought, no longer was I going to associate with person who were always negative, or who I thought brought me down, I wanted people to uplift me and encourage me to be and do my best”.

Mrs. Edwards and her husband.

J’Can Health Magazine is Copyright © 2014. All Rights Reserved. Originally Written by Antonette Mason May 2014 31


Mammogram: How soon is too soon

Though they are different ways of screening for Breast Cancer, women often time turn to the more traditional method “Mammograms”. But are women fully aware of how important it is to get regular tests and that there is a time to do so? Women should start getting regular mammograms once they reach the age of 50. However many believe that this age may be too late as many may develop this disease long before they have reached this age. st

According to the World’s Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC)," 1.7 million women were diagnosed with breast cancer in 2012, an increase of 20 per cent since 2008. The mortality rate also rose 14 per cent over that time period with 522,000 deaths in 2012". The increase in breast cancer incidents can be attributed to the lifestyle shifts of western regions; as well as the fact that the advanced treatments to combat this disease have not yet reachied women in this region.

So does that mean women should start scheduling mammograms ASAP? While many may suggest doing these mammograms every two years starting at age 50, many doctors would disagree. Dr. Angella Scott recommends women get annual screenings starting at age 40. This she believes is the ideal age, as at this time the breast is less dense. There is no ideal age to do a mammogram, however it is recommended that women start at age 40. This is so as it is much easier to detect cancerous cells during this time. Many women however choose to wait until the age of 50; which is not necessarily recommended as it is possible that they could miss out on early detection that could save their life. It should be noted however that screening at a young age also has risks. Therefore it is not recommended to do mammograms younger than the recommended age (40 years), unless there is a great need for one. Advice to the wise: Know your risk factors and talk to your doctor about when to schedule regular mammograms. And most importantly, don’t let conflicting recommendations lead you to put off screenings altogether.

J’Can Health Magazine is Copyright © 2014. All Rights Reserved. Originally Written by Antonette Mason 32 May 2014


Breast Cancer Quiz: Myth or FAct Many individuals are anxious about breast cancer, as they know how dangerous it is. How much do you know about the risk of developing or surviving breast cancer? Take this quiz to test to see if you can pick the myths out of the facts about breast cancer risk factors.

1. A diagnosis of breast cancer is rarely a death sentence. (a)Myth (b) Fact 2. Having your annual mammogram causes breast cancer. (a)Myth (b) Fact 3. Breast-feeding heightens the possibility of developing breast cancer. (a)Myth (b) Fact 4. If there is no history of breast cancer in my family I won't ever get it. (a)Myth

(b) False

9. There is nothing a woman with average risk can do to reduce her risk of developing breast cancer. (a)Myth (b) Fact 10. A breast injury can develop into breast cancer. (a)Myth (b) Fact 11. Maintaining a vegetarian or vegan diet reduces the risk of breast cancer. (a)Myth

(b) Fact

12. The best time to do a breast self-exam is 2-3 days after your period. (a)Myth (b) Fact 13. The most significant risk factors for breast cancer are being female and aging. (a)Myth (b) Fact 14. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) increases your risk of breast cancer. (a)Myth (b) Fact 15. Most people think they have a higher risk of breast cancer than they actually do. (a)Myth (b) Fact

5. The age at which developing breast cancer is highest is between 80-90. (b) Fact

15. B

6. Radiation from mammograms actually causes breast cancer. (a)Myth (b) Fact

14. B

(a)Myth

13.B 11. A 10.A 9.A 8.A 7.A 6.A 5.B 4.A 3.A

8. If you have a family history of breast cancer, there is nothing you can do to protect yourself from this disease. (a)Myth (b) Fact

12.B

7. Getting breast implants for augmentation or reconstruction raises your risk for breast cancer. (a)Myth (b) Fact

2.A 1.B Answers

J’Can Health Magazine is Copyright Š 2014. All Rights Reserved. Originally Written by Antonette Mason May 2014 33


Ways Breast Cancer May Present itself

A persistent lump or thickening in the breast or armpit area

Changes in the colour or skin of the breast, areola or nipple (e.g. dimpling, puckering or scaling)

A newly retracted/inverted (pulled in) nipple

Blood or discharge from the nipple

Change in the size or shape of the breast

J’Can Health Magazine is Copyright Š 2014. All Rights Reserved. Originally Written by Antonette Mason 34 May 2014


Cross Word Puzzle 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

Across

Down

2.A diet high in _______ is good in reducing breast cancer risk.

1.The process of checking your own body for lumps

5.Most common Breast X-Ray 6.Circular area around the nipple 8.The Removal of the breast 9.This hormone contributes the most to Breast Cancer 11.Name of the breast specialist

3.Worn to support the breast 4.Activity that keeps the body healthy 7.Mass of Benign or Malignant cells 10.Female Hormone 12.Tube leading to the nipple

13.Lymph_______? 14.Where breast milk is produced 15.Non Cancerous lumps

SEE ANSWERS ON PAGE 37

J’Can Health Magazine is Copyright ©All 2014. All Rights Reserved. J’Can Health Magazine is Copyright © 2014. Rights Reserved. Originally by Antonette Originally WrittenWritten by Antonette MasonMason May 2014 35


Answers B G R A M 1

5

M A M M O 6

8

A R

M A

S

E

O L

T

E

E A S

2

F

I

3

B R

R

E R C

T U

C T O M Y O 9 O E S T R O G E 11 O N C O L O G I S F 12 13 D N 14 L O B U L E C X 15 T A B E M

E X

A 7

4

I S E

E N S T

10

R O D G E N I

E

S

G

N

Across 2.A diet high in _______ is good in reducing breast cancer risk

Down 1.The process of checking your own body for lumps

5.Most common Breast X-Ray

3.Worn to support the breast

6.Circular area around the nipple

4.Activity that keeps the body healthy

8.The Removal of the breast

7.Mass of Benign or Malignant cells

9.This hormone contributes the most to Breast Cancer

10.Female Hormone

11.Name of the breast specialist

12.Tube leading to the nipple

13.Lymph_______? 14.Where breast milk is produced 15.Non Cancerous lumps J’Can Health Magazine is Copyright Š 2014. All Rights Reserved. Originally Written by Antonette Mason

May 2014 37


J'Can Health  

J’Can Health is a Jamaican based women’s health magazine, which aims at highlighting and educating young Jamaican women of the various disea...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you