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OUT & ABOUT LONG ISLAND

An Anton Media Group Special June 15 - 21, 2016

Outside

FUN• INSIDE: Farmers’ markets

Hiking Community gardening

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LONG ISLAND OUT & ABOUT • JUNE 15 - 21, 2016

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LONG ISLAND OUT & ABOUT • JUNE 15 - 21, 2016

If you’re looking to ditch the grocery store produce you’ve been buying, try checking out a farmers market where you can pick up fresh produce and other products from local farmers. Scattered across Long Island are farmers markets and farm stands that provide the local communities with fresh food. At one of these markets, you can find fresh produce, dairy, breads and even meat, along with a number of other products. “The highlight of the market is the fresh fruits and vegetables,” said Ethel Terry, director of multiple markets around Long Island. “Everyone sells out, and it gets very busy with long lines.” Not only are you supporting local businesses when shopping at these markets, but also you are buying healthy products. Not only do the markets sell food, but also some of them have events, such as cooking lessons and recipe handouts. “I’ve been running these markets for 24 years now, and people always come out; they love it,” said Terry. Here are some of the local markets:

Anna House Farm Stand

2150 Hempstead Tpke., Elmont (inside Belmont Park, gate 6) Tuesdays, June 28 to Sept. 27 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. www.childcarenassau.org • 516-358-9250

Garden City Farmers Market

101 County Seat Dr., Mineola, parking lot behind the Supreme Court building Tuesdays, through Nov. 22 from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. www.longislandgrowersmarket.com 631-323-3653

Roslyn Farmers Market

Christopher Morley Park Wednesdays, through Nov. 23 from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. www.longislandgrowersmarket.com 631-323-3653

& FUN

ALL OVER?

Queens Farm Farmstand

173-50 Little Neck Pkwy., Floral Park Wednesdays through Sundays through Nov. 6. Wed-Fri from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and on weekends from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. www.queensfarm.org • 718-347-3276

East Meadow Farmers Market

832 Merrick Ave. at Cornell Cooperative Extension Fridays from 3 to 6 p.m. and on Saturdays from 9 to noon through Oct. 8. www.ccenassau.org • 516-297-1894

Seaford Farmers Market

Railroad Street in the railroad station parking lot Saturdays, through Nov. 18 from 7 a.m. to noon www.longislandgrowersmarket.com 631-323-3653

Port Washington Organic Farmers Market

Town Dock, Main Street Saturdays, through Oct. 29 from 8 a.m. to noon www.localharvest.org • 516-883-0887

Sea Cliff Farmers Market

253 Glen Ave., Sea Cliff, corner of Roslyn Avenue in courtyard of St. Luke’s Church. Saturdays through October from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. www.localharvest.org

It’s Sheldon in his tux... because every day’s a party at

New Hyde Park Farmers Market

Municipal parking lot, near Village Hall 1441 Jericho Tpke. Saturdays through Nov. 19 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. www.longislandfarmersmarkets.com 631-944-2661

Spinney Hill Farmers Market

Community Dr., Great Neck, in the parking lot at LIJ Sundays from July 10 to Oct. 30, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. www.ligreenmarket.org • 516-543-6033 Stop by your local farmers market and enjoy some delicious, fresh produce.

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BY ANTON MEDIA STAFF

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LONG ISLAND OUT & ABOUT • JUNE 15 - 21, 2016

Long Island Takes A Hike As Long Islanders gleefully embrace the warm weather summer has to offer, outdoor activities become the norm around some of Nassau County’s scenic hot spots. Whether you enjoy an afternoon stroll taking in a breathtaking view of the Long Island Sound or making your way through the former estate of King Zog at Muttontown Preserve, an adventurous summer awaits.

Sands Point Preserve

127 Middle Neck Rd., Sands Point. www.sandspointpreserveconservancy. org • 516-571-7901 In a village where the likes of the Vanderbilts and of course, the Sands, called home—lies the former estate of American renaissance man Harry F. Guggenheim. Virtually untouched, this 216-acre public park and historical site provides visitors with an inside look to the bucolic lifestyle of the Guggenheims. Wrapped around the still standing Castle Gould and Hempstead House—along with two other remaining mansions (Falaise and Mille Fleur) are six hiking trails that weave through countless natural and landscaped areas. Upon entering the estate, its immediate beauty solidifies the Sands Point

Preserve as one of summer’s must visit spots.

Muttontown Preserve

25A west of Jericho-Oyster Bay Road, East Norwich. www.nassaucountyny. gov/2839/Muttontown-Preserve 516-571-8500 Located 30 minutes from the tip of Sands Point is yet another eye-catching escape. Muttontown Preserve, comprised of 550-acres of fields, woodlands, ponds and estate grounds, is the perfect place to hike and explore the ruins of the formerly standing 60-room granite mansion, once property of King Zog I of Albania. Although the king himself never actually set foot inside the mansion, its demolishment in 1959 has attracted many to visit its remains with hopes of possibly uncovering one of his abandoned treasures.

Stillwell Woods Park

South Woods Road, Syosset. www.nassaucountyny.gov/2908/ Stillwell-Woods-Preserve Visitors to the northeastern section of Oyster Bay will find a tree-filled nature preserve located on 270 acres of land. One of Nassau County’s few “tri-trails,” this woodland offers various trails for hiking, biking and even horseback riding. Whether you’re a biking

Garvies Point Preserve

(Photo courtesy of Garvies Point Museum)

connoisseur or just the casual rider, the mountain bike trail is every cyclist’s dream–providing an intimate atmosphere surrounded by wildlife while simultaneously giving you a workout for the ages.

Harry Tappen Beach & Marina

Shore Road, Glenwood Landing www. oysterbaytown.com 516-674-7100 Tucked away in the cliffs of this North Shore village is the breathtaking view of the Hempstead Harbor from Tappen Beach. This marina marks the perfect spot to run, walk or even bike along the water. Take a minute to glance out at the glistening water as the sun begins to set, or even walk down to the shore and explore what the underwater world has to offer. This public beach also houses a children’s playground, community pool and accessible grilling spots for the impromptu family picnic.

Garvies Point Preserve

50 Barry Dr., Glen Cove. www. garviespointmuseum.com 516-571-8010 A center for Long Island geology research as well as a valued resource for Long Island’s study on Native American archeology, visitors are in for quite an experience when hiking the grounds of the Garvies Point Preserve. Consisting of 62 acres of forests, meadows and waterways, this preserve is home to more than 60 different species of trees as well as a variety of wildflowers and animals. As you navigate your way through the forest trails you’ll be greeted by high cliffs overlooking the Long Island Sound. Although exploring this protected wilderness would be ideal any time of day, aim to go around the 3 to 4 p.m. in autumn in order to catch the vibrant purples and pinks painted across the sky as the sun sets.

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BY ANTHONY SOLIS

asolis@antonmediagroup.com


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LONG ISLAND OUT & ABOUT • JUNE 15 - 21, 2016

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LONG ISLAND OUT & ABOUT • JUNE 15 - 21, 2016

Baldwin Community Garden

environmental benefits of locally grown food. The goal is to promote all that home-grown produce has to offer including better food quality, a reduction in the price of fruits and vegetables, and a decreased carbon footprint and amount of fossil fuels emitted associated with the transportation of food products. The garden is open to all Long Beach residents whether they choose to just visit or volunteer. With a similar mission to grow food for local consumption, the Trinity Lutheran Church Community Garden located in Hicksville was founded in 2011 with the purpose of providing food to individuals and families in the surrounding neighborhoods who are struggling to meet their basic needs. The 33 raised beds are accompanied by a small fruit tree orchard to produce a variety of fruits and vegetables. Garden participation is not limited to members of the church congregation. Residents of Hicksville as well as the surrounding communities are all encouraged to visit the possibility of a sculpture garden, with 16 more beds under construction. and engage in activities. a meditative maze and a farmer’s In an effort to reconnect people One of the oldest community market that can distribute locally grown with nature following the devastating gardens on Long Island is in Lynbrook, produce to nearby shelters and food effects of Hurricane Sandy, the Cornell the Tony Lenzo Lynbrook Community pantries. Cooperative Extension Community Gardens, founded in 1994. The space, Freeport’s Seed to Table Community Garden at East Meadow Farms leases once just underutilized land, was Garden holds similar values, but focus- plots to schools, families, individuals, transformed by one of its es its attention on the neighborhood’s and community groups. After founders, Tony Lenzo, youth. The garden, which contains Hurricane Sandy, many who would visit the gardens to perform daily maintenance and teach other residents about weeding and planting. Today, it contains a total of 40 plots where residents can apply for a plot of land to grow their own produce. Recently a garden in Westbury, the “Yes We Can” Community Garden, made certain adjustments that allows Residents attend a community residents with disabilities and senior citizens to enjoy the space as well. On garden build and planting May 23, five new garden beds were workshop at the “Yes We Can” unveiled to the public, two of which are Community Garden. Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) people lost their personal gar- compliant and wheelchair accessible. dens, so this allows them the The garden hosts a range of crops, opportunity to start fresh while particularly cold-tolerant crops, such as also connecting with residents romaine, cilantro, napa cabbage, baby in similar circumstances. Plots bok choy, broccoli and beets. are offered to Nassau County These community gardens only residents through a lottery scratch the surface of those that can be Seed to Table Community Garden system each year. Any excess found across Long Island. In Nassau eight compost beds and two compost produce from the week is donated to County alone, there are gardens located bins, attempts to utilize the space as an the Interfaith Nutrition Network (INN) in Hicksville, Westbury, East Meadow, outdoor science and nutrition laborato- in Hempstead, a non-profit organizaGreat Neck, New Hyde Park, Rockville ry to teach students both practical busi- tion that addresses the issues of hunger Centre and South Hempstead. If your ness and agricultural skills. Many of and homelessness on Long Island. neighborhood doesn’t already have these students come from low-to-modLong Beach’s first community garone, there are steps that can be taken erate income households, and have den, the Magnolia Center Community to establish a new community garden. the ability to bring produce home or Garden, was founded in 2013 in For information regarding the proper sell the rest to a farmer’s market. The hopes of educating the surrounding procedure, visit longislandcommunigarden is currently expanding its efforts community about the health and tygardens.org.

Wake Up And Smell The Vegetables BY NICOLE LOCKWOOD specialsections@antonmediagroup.com

Imagine a place where community members of all ages with a common appreciation of nature can come together to tend to their own plots of land and watch their plants grow together. For residents of Nassau County, this is more than just wishful thinking, it’s a reality. Community gardens are sprouting up across Long Island, bringing a sense of unity to certain neighborhoods. Though similar in aesthetic, each garden possesses its own unique purpose and goals for the future. A community garden is “a single piece of land gardened collectively by a group of people,” yet it offers much more than the definition implies. Participation in these local gardens is on the rise, bringing people of all ages, genders, ethnicities and backgrounds within a neighborhood together. According to the Long Island Community Gardens website, “Not only do gardens increase access to fresh food and nature, they also beautify neighborhoods, raise property value, and reduce neighborhood crime.” “The purpose of this community garden is to encourage neighbors to interact while appreciating the flora and fauna as well as learning about healthier diet alternatives,” reads the mission statement of the Baldwin Community Garden, founded in 2014. Though it has been in operation for just two years, garden participants have certain things they intend to achieve in the near future including the creation of an interactive children’s garden, bike racks and a solar powered kiosk where people can find information regarding upcoming local events and workshops. Residents are also speculating upon


29 LONG ISLAND OUT & ABOUT • JUNE 15 - 21, 2016

Long Island’s Largest Bingo Night In Eisenhower Park On June 18 New South Shore Blueway Trail Opens

In conjunction with National Trails Day on June 4, local officials announced the opening of the South Shore Blueway Trail at Bay Park in East Rockaway. The South Shore Blueway is made up of 22 launches and landings providing safe, easily reached water access for non-motorized boaters to explore the western bays of the South Shore Estuary Reserve and experience its beauty visiting its numerous parks, historic sites, natural areas and attractions. Visitors can discover the unique characteristics and abundant wildlife. “More than 1,000 residents collaborated in the planning process to develop this beautiful South Shore Blueway Trail stretching across the entire south shore of Nassau County,” said Nassau County Executive Ed Mangano. “The trail offers residents and visitors a new and exciting recreational opportunity to explore our waterways while also promoting a healthy lifestyle.” The project was approved as

part of the 2006 Nassau County Environmental Bond Act Program. “Hempstead Town is proud to partner with the South Shore Blueway along our bays and waterways, further enhancing environmental preservation and conservation in our community,” said Town of Hempstead Supervisor Anthony Santino. “As a member of the Blueway Advisory Committee, our municipality is excited to welcome this innovative water trail for non-motorized boats like kayaks to the area.” In 2008, the Village of Freeport joined with Nassau County and obtained matching funds from a Local Waterfront Revitalization Program (LWRP) Grant from the New York State Department of State under Title 11 of the Environmental Protection Fund. Visit www.southshoreblueway. com to learn more about South Shore Blueway, including maps and how to participate in Long Island paddle sports.

Nassau County and Connoisseur Media Long Island will host Long Island’s Largest Bingo Game on Saturday, June 18, from 4 to 7 p.m. at Lakeside Theater in Eisenhower Park. Attendees can play 10 games for a chance to win over $30,000 in prizes, including a: • two-year lease on a 2015 Honda CR-Z EX CVT, courtesy of Huntington Honda • $10,500 deluxe spa package from AJ Spas • Stone fire pit from Astro Masonry • Photo package from Camera Concierge • Trip to Sandals • Diamond ring from Coin Gallery of Oyster Bay • Carpeting/flooring from Empire Today • Ping pong table, accessories and installation from Grimaldi’s • Golf getaway in Killington, VT “Eisenhower Park is the place to be this summer,” said Nassau County Executive Ed Mangano. “Grab a

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blanket, picnic basket and come enjoy the largest Bingo Game on Long Island.” This is event is free, but printed invitations are required in order to ensure a seat. Invitations can be obtained at Nassau County parks, from Connoisseur Media radio stations or at www.BingoLI.com for a complete list. Lakeside Theatre gates open at 3 p.m. and games will be hosted from 4 to 7 p.m. The Harry Chapin Lakeside Theatre is located near parking fields 6 and 6A in Eisenhower Park. Special accommodations are available for disabled patrons, including reserved parking, easily accessible restrooms and a reserved seating.

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LONG ISLAND OUT & ABOUT • JUNE 15 - 21, 2016

Museum Continues To Wow Curious Science Minds high school, including home-schooled students, through the on-campus and off-campus programming.

Camps & Programming

BY CHRISTY HINKO

in 1963, the SMLI was conceived by a group of women from Sands Point, Great Neck and Port Washington who knew the importance of forming a science learning center for young minds. In the first three years, the group held supplemental science classes wherever they could find a temporary space, in storefronts and eventually, in a Glen Cove estate. The museum had even operated on the Sands Point Preserve for a while, but has been at Leeds Pond Preserve since the early 1970s. The museum sees more than 10,000 children each year, nursery through

specialsections@antonmediagroup.com

Tucked quaintly into the woods at Leeds Pond Preserve, the Science Museum of Long Island (SMLI) has been fostering wonder and excitement for science for more than five decades. SMLI stimulates and nurtures youngsters’ natural interest in exploring and experimenting in the fields of life, earth and physical science through fun, hands-on learning. Founded in 1962 and chartered by the New York State Board of Regents

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County Executive

Recently, we had a chance to chat with SMLI’s chief administrator Cara Sheridan O’Donnell, who shared some of the newest and most popular programming at the museum, including Slime, Goo and Ooze, Volcanos, Forensics, Physics of Toys, Animals, STARLAB and STEM club. “New this year for fourth-grade and up is the STEM club, which focuses on videogame development, CAD software and 3-D printing,” says O’Donnell. “The club also explores robotics and robot building.” Another trend across the nation are Minecraft clubs. SMLI recognized the importance of this computer game and how it related to science learning—O’Donnell admits it’s been growing exponentially. “Minecraft teaches survival skills,

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) campgrounds in the Adirondack and Catskill Parks are officially open for the summer camping season. “From hiking to fishing, New York’s campgrounds offer some of the best outdoor recreational opportunities in the world,” Governor Andrew Cuomo said. “I encourage residents and visitors alike to plan a trip to one of these campgrounds and experience these beautiful sites for themselves.” DEC operates 52 campgrounds and six day-use areas in the Adirondack and Catskill Forest Preserves. The summer camping season runs through Labor Day, with some facilities remaining open during fall foliage and hunting season. “Each year millions of people visit DEC facilities to enjoy the spectacular landscapes, lush forests, and variety of fish and wildlife species that reside in the constitutionally protected “forever

team building, thinking outside the box and problem-solving,” says O’Donnell. “The kids have to decide whether it is more efficient to join forces or work individually and of course the game aspect makes it fun, which is our whole mission, is to make science fun.” With the popularity of this program, SMLI will soon host a new overnight Minecraft marathon for the game enthusiasts. As spring emerges, SMLI has already started its Maple Sugaring program, where kids can discover the world of making maple syrup by tapping and collecting sap from sugar maples on the preserve. “Kids are going to love this program. They learn things like how much sap is needed to make table syrup and about the grades of maple syrup,” says O’Donnell. The programming workshops are typically scheduled for children during school vacations and on weekdays.

State Campgrounds Open For Season wild” campgrounds,” said Acting DEC Commissioner Basil Seggos. “Campers can also enjoy the many events, historical sites, and restaurants of nearby towns and villages.” Sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis and range from $18-$28 a night. For more information on DECoperated campgrounds, including a list of campgrounds and their schedules, visit DEC’s website at www.dec.ny.gov and go to the Camping link under the Outdoors Recreation section, or call DEC’s Bureau of Recreation at 518-4572500. To make reservations at any of these camping facilities, visit www. newyorkstateparks.reserveamerica. com or call ReserveAmerica at 800-456-2267.


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“We are one of the least expensive camps around still because we don’t want to turn anyone away, especially kids who love science,” says O’Donnell. SMLI also offers their science expeditions, Earth PULSE (People Understanding and Learning Science through Exploration), which have included expeditions to Easter Island, Argentina, the Amazon rain forest, Egypt, Costa Rica, the Badlands of South Dakota and most recently a trip of 20 people to Cuba. The expeditions bring together scientific experts like Jim Fowler, Sylvia Earle, Thor Hyerdahl, John Loret and James Watson, with those who have a desire to learn and explore the world of science. SMLI is extremely Boy and Girl Scout-friendly, with dozens of Scouts visiting the preserve and museum each year to learn more about science and to earn specific Scouting badges and awards. Presently, five Boy Scouts are

working on their Eagle Scout projects, either to benefit the preserve or the museum. One local Boy Scout recently completed his Eagle Scout project, which resulted in the renovation of one of the museum rooms—this will eventually become an anthropology lab. In addition to the cooperatives with Scouts, SMLI also benefits from regular college internships programs, most recently by college students from Adelphi University, Hofstra University, Molloy College and SUNY Geneseo.

Community Support And The Property The museum relies heavily on donations which are used to defray expenses associated with the care of the live animals, to purchase new computer software and materials for the 3-D printers and computer labs. Donations also subsidize the cost associated with bringing supplemental science lessons to children in a local long-term care facility and also for the ground maintenance and the grounds and structures on the 36-acre Leeds Pond Preserve. “We need the community to appreciate that we are here; we need more community support,” says O’Donnell. “Service and monetary donations are necessary so we can have things like new shingles, repairs to the building, etc.” Although Nassau County owns the

36-acre Leeds Pond Preserve, SMLI is a separate corporation, a nonprofit organization and is responsible, not only for the staffing, programming and interior of the building, but also the exterior of the building and supplemental property maintenance. “You see a historical place like the Inisfada (Mansion) torn down to build to build McMansions and it’s upsetting,” says O’Donnell. “Although this is a preserve and it’s unlikely that would happen here, the building needs to be maintained. We need people to appreciate the fact that we are here and to donate.” The county-owned property is a natural treasure with short trails that are great for walkers, joggers, bird watchers and fishermen. There are five trails and several access points on the property. And although SMLI is not your typical museum where you can just drop in and stroll around for the in-house exhibits, there’s plenty to do on the preserve. The preserve offers many opportunities to explore a variety of ecosystems including a forest, a salt marsh, a brackish pond, a freshwater stream and a beachfront estuary. In addition to O’Donnell, Daniel Steiger, Owen Correnti and Caitlin Orellana make up the museum’s four full-time staff. There are also several

per diem teachers in addition to all of the interns and volunteers that rotate through each year. SMLI’s Board of Trustees includes: Sean C. Martens, president; Eugene Petracca, Jr., vice president; Linda Green, secretary; Marilyn Stefans, treasurer; Maria Brown, Marilyn Chapoteau, Steve Farenga, EdD, Carlo Manganillo, Corinne Michels, PhD, Harold Michels, PhD, Daniel Ness, PhD, Tom O’Malley and Margie Suga. The Science Museum of Long Island, located at 1526 Plandome Rd. is open on weekdays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and weekends based on scheduled events. The preserve property is open from dawn to dusk. Visitor parking is free. Call 516-627-9400 or check out SMLI’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/sciencemuseumli or visit their website (www.smli.org) to learn more about the programming and events happening throughout the year.

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Wear A Helmet While Biking North Hempstead would like to remind residents, especially those under 14 years of age, to always wear a helmet while riding a bicycle. By law, all bicyclists under the age of 14 are required to wear approved bicycle helmets when bicycling or riding as passengers on bicycles in New York State. The maximum penalty for an offense is a $50 fine. “If you have a child learning to ride a bike, the best thing you can do to encourage helmet usage is to wear one yourself,” said Supervisor Judi Bosworth. “Studies show that kids are more likely to wear helmets when riding a bike with older people who are also wearing helmets.” There is no greater way to reduce fatalities related to bicycle accidents than by wearing a helmet. According to a study on helmet use published in Injury Prevention,

wearing a helmet protects riders, reducing the risk of serious brain injuries by up to 88 percent. “We have a very active population here in the town and many of our residents enjoy bike riding,” said Councilwoman Anna Kaplan. “However, recently I couldn’t help but notice the startling number of cyclists, especially children, who were not wearing helmets. After mentioning my observations to the supervisor and the town board, we decided to do something about it and launch a new public safety campaign.” Bicycle injuries are more common than you may think. Each year, about 54 New York State residents are killed in bicycle crashes and about 2,000 New York State residents are hospitalized due to bicycle-related injuries. Next to motor vehicle injuries, bicycles injure more children than any other consumer product, according to the National SAFE KIDS Campaign. “The statistics on bicycle helmets could not be clearer,” said Councilwoman Kaplan. “They save lives and prevent head injuries. It’s important to always practice safe riding.”

Free Fishing Days The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation will sponsor free fishing days on Saturday, June 25, and Sunday, June 26. During these days, anyone can fish the fresh or marine waters of New York and no license is required. It the perfect opportunity to introduce someone to the sport of fishing. Visit www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/89821.html to learn more. Nov. 11 has also been designated as a free fishing day.

PLANTING FIELDS FOUNDATION’S

NATURE SUNDAYS

FOR CHILDREN

SUNDAYS, 12:00 NOON JULY 3RD – AUGUST 28TH NO PROGRAM ON JULY 17TH

All Nature Sundays events are FREE admission with $8.00 parking fee. Rain or shine. REGISTRATION REQUIRED.

To register please call Antigone Zaharakis at (516) 922-8668 or email: education@plantingfields.org

JULY 3RD

Learn all about the life cycle of plants with one of our experienced outdoor educators who will lead you on a multisensory adventure exploring colors, textures, smells, tastes and sounds. Listen as The Cat in the Hat explains how seeds grow. Later, plant your very own mini sensory garden. For children 4 years and older.

LI AARDVARKS JULY 10TH

Join us for a foot stomping, jingle shaking, drum drumming hullabaloo that both kids and parents enjoy. This interactive musical experience combines songs, dance and rhythm and is geared towards toddlers and children 4 months to 4 years old. Singing, dancing, musical storytelling, instrumental jam sessions and more! Stay and make your own musical instruments.

RADIANT RAINFOREST

DREAM TALE PUPPETS

Visit our Main Greenhouse where our environmental educator will take you on an exciting tour and point out some neat plants like the banana plant and the chocolate tree. Children will also learn about the animals of the rainforest and the layers of the rainforest that those animals live in. Afterwards, stay for a rainforest craft. For children 6 years and older.

Join us for two charming puppet shows, Three Little Pigs and Little Red Riding Hood. Each show is approximately 25 minutes long and offers a quick intermission between shows. Bring a snack to enjoy while you wait for the second show! Best suited for children 3 years and up.

JULY 24TH

JULY 31ST

MORE FUN TO COME IN AUGUST

TREMENDOUS TREES – August 7th (Children 6+ years) Be a tree detective–explore & indentify REVOLUTION YOGA – August 14th (Children 5-10 years) Fun children’s yoga class with games BEAUTIFUL BUTTERFLIES – August 21st (Children 4+ years) Scientific exploration with educator f ABRAKADOODLE – August 28th (Children 6+ years) Kids on Canvas: explore the world of art

PLANTING FIELDS ARBORETUM STATE HISTORIC PARK 1395 PLANTING FIELDS RD., OYSTER BAY, NY 11771

WWW.PLANTINGFIELDS.ORG

PLANTING FIELDS FOUNDATION

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LONG ISLAND OUT & ABOUT • JUNE 15 - 21, 2016

r e m m u S ncert Co

FREE ADMISSION

June 22nd Captain Jack Billy Joel Tribute

FREESION IS M D A

Concert Starts at 7:30 pm at Memorial Field, New Hyde Park Lincoln Ave. (between Albert & Williams Streets) just west of New Hyde Park Road. For your comfort, bring your own lawn chairs. Rain Location (Same Date)

Marcus Christ Hall 1420 Jericho Tpke., New Hyde Park

ADMFREE IS S I ON

Sponsored as a Community Service by

(718) 335-1300

We Treat You Like Family

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LI Out & About 06-15-16  

LI Out & About is a special advertising supplement of Anton Media Group. In this edition, we focus on Outside Fun, Farmer's Markets, Hiking...

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