Issuu on Google+

CAMPS & SCHOOLS - ANTON COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS - OCTOBER 26, 2012

1C

C AMPS & S CHOOLS

Making Halloween A Treat Instead Of A Trick Advice from early childhood professionals on helping children who are frightened by the holiday By Ronald Scaglia rscaglia@antonnews.com or most children, Halloween is one of the most eagerly anticipated days of the year. After all, it’s a chance to dress up in a costume, participate in the fun activities that are held in schools, go trick-or-treating with friends, and bring home candy to enjoy. However, there is another side to Halloween, the spooky side. While adults may enjoy scary costumes and bloodcurdling tricks, for children, especially younger kids, some Halloween activities can be terrifying. “Walking around at night with scary costumes, the younger you are the less you are able to differentiate real from fiction,” says Dr. Robert Dicker, associate director of child and adolescent psychiatry at Zucker Hillside Hospital, part of the North Shore-LIJ Health System. “For a 2- or 3year-old, it can be really frightening.” Marcy Safyer, MSW and director of the Institute for Planning at Adelphi University, concurs that while Halloween can be fun for many children, others will find it very scary. She adds that some of the fear may not be related to scary costumes but is simply a result of the responsible advice that children are given to be cautious of strangers. “To go up and knock on the doors of strangers is counter to what we tell them the rest of the year,” Safyer comments. So what should parents do if terrifying costumes and decorations frighten their children? According to Dicker, Safyer, and Katie Henry, a pre-K teacher at Portledge School, parents should be understanding of their children’s fears and be supportive. “Respect children and their fears,” Henry advises. “It’s a protection mechanism.” All three experts concur that children should not be forced into excessive trick-or-treating. For some children, a visit to three or four friendly houses may be enough for children to get some enjoyment from the holiday without being pushed excessively. “Parents should pick up cues from their child,” advises Dicker. “If they’re in tears, getting candy is not worth it.” Safyer adds that it is okay for parents to accompany their

F

Although, many children enjoy Halloween, some kids, especially younger children, might be frightened by the spooky theme of the holiday.

children to the doors to trick-or-treat, if they are afraid to go on their own and they even may carry their children if necessary. She further says that homes, decorated so they appear scary, should be skipped. “It’s really fine if you have a child who indicates that some things frighten them, to give them some room,” Safyer explained. “Some kids find it scary and if they do it’s probably just what they’re going through developmentally. If they find it scary one year, it doesn’t mean they’ll find it scary the next year.” In addition, Henry advises that there are other Halloween activities that might be a better solution for some children. Examples of such include pumpkin carving parties, or Halloween parties without costumes. Another suggestion she offers is trick-or-treating in a very friendly environment. She commented that Portledge School offers trick-or-treating in one of its buildings. Dicker also advises parents to monitor the television shows and movies that their children may watch on Halloween and the days leading up to it. He cautions that there is some very frightening and gory programming that is aired in October that children can be exposed to. He says that some adults, who are otherwise responsible about shielding children from such images, may not be so diligent when it comes to holiday-themed specials. “It’s really basic common sense principles when all is said and done, but sometimes, on the holiday, it’s forgotten,” says Dicker. The choice of costume can also contribute to the anxiety that some children will feel about the holiday. Safyer advises that parents choose a whimsical costume, such as a princess, instead of scarier outfits. Henry adds that parents may let their children have input into the choice, and that a costume such as a superhero may allow children to feel empowered. However, although parents need to be mindful that Halloween may be frightening for some, it can still be quite fun for many. “I love Halloween and I love Almond Joy,” Dicker said with a chuckle.


2C

CAMPS & SCHOOLS - ANTON COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS - OCTOBER 26, 2012

C AMPS & S CHOOLS

Westbury Friends School students enjoy a visit from Buster the Bus.

Buster The Bus Visits Friends n Tuesday, Oct. 16th, Buster the Bus came to Westbury Friends School to “speak” with students in nursery through second grade. The topic, of course, was

O

bus safety. Buster is an animated remote controlled vehicle and a wonderful messenger for all on the important safety information young children need to know.

Supplies Delivered To Westbury Students re-K and kindergarten students at Dryden Street School in Westbury are well-equipped for success thanks to The Early Years Institute and Astoria Tools for School Drive. Recently, staff members of The Early Years Institute hand-delivered 33 backpacks to each classroom, complete with the right tools to help make school days easier and ensure every child is ready for success. Each backpack was filled with supplies and ma-

P

terials that would help improve the students’ fine motor skills (pencils, crayons, glue sticks, glue, etc.) Recent research shows that the development of fine motor skills early in life sets the foundation for later success in literacy, math and reading skills as children move from preschool into elementary school. The pack also included teacher-specific supplies such as pens, notebooks and other items to help make their day.

Temple B’nai Torah Welcomes New Students emple B’nai Torah of Wantagh welcomed 33 new students to the Susanne E. Heiman Religious School with a special ceremony. Rabbi Marci Bellows, Cantor Steven Sher and Rabbi Deanna Pasternak, director of education gave the students a special blessing

T

and each student received a certificate and a Torah. The Susanna E. Heimann Religious School provides an enriching education from kindergarten through 12th grade including a program for students with special needs, a full Bar/Bat Mitzvah program as well as art, music and dance electives.

The new students at Temple B’nai Torah of Wantagh are welcomed at the ceremony.


CAMPS & SCHOOLS - ANTON COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS - OCTOBER 26, 2012

3C


4C

CAMPS & SCHOOLS - ANTON COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS - OCTOBER 26, 2012

C AMPS & S CHOOLS Sacred Heart Students Receive Awards In National Merit Competition hree Sacred Heart Academy students, Grace M. Agolia, Katelyn Glassman, and Rebecca A. Ruescher, have been named as Semifinalists in the 2013 National Merit Scholarship competition. In addition, Christine S. Paul has been named as a Semifinalist in the Black American National Achievement Scholarship competition. Additionally, Sacred Heart has eight 2013 Na-

T

tional Merit Scholarship Commended Students, Meghan Dodson, Mary E. Duffy, Emma M. Hegermiller, Clare E. Martin, Emma R. Smith, Christina A. Uria, Rosalie C. Caracciolo and Patricia Z. Dominguez. National Merit Scholarship Commended Students placed among the top 5 percent of the approximately 1.5 million high school juniors who entered the competition.

Three Sacred Heart students who were named Semifinalists in the 2013 National Merit Scholarship are congratulated by administrators. Pictured (l-r) Sister Joanne Ross, CSJ, president of Sacred Heart Academy, Rebecca A. Ruescher, Grace M. Agolia, and Principal Sister Joanne Forker, CSJ.

Sacred Heart’s commended students. From (l to r) are Sister Jeanne M. Ross, CSJ – president, Meghan Dodson, Emma Smith, Clare Martin, Rosalie Caracciolo, Mary Duffy, Patricia Dominguez, Emma Hegermiller, Sister Joanne Forker, CSJ – Principal. (Not shown: Christina Uria)

Christine S. Paul, Semifinalist in the Black American Achievement Scholarship competition is congratulated by Sister Ross and Sister Forker.


CAMPS & SCHOOLS - ANTON COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS - OCTOBER 26, 2012

5C


6C

CAMPS & SCHOOLS - ANTON COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS - OCTOBER 26, 2012

C AMPS & S CHOOLS Holocaust Memorial and Tolerance Center Of Nassau County Names Upstander Of The Month he Holocaust Memorial and Tolerance Center of Nassau County recognized a McGann-Mercy North High School student who has used his leadership position to encourage other students to treat everyone with dignity and respect. Kevin Butterfield has been a student leader in a number of areas, but regardless of the context, Kevin’s actions perfectly embody his school’s motto — “Live Mercy” — according to his guidance counselor, Mr. Lombardi. Kevin’s leadership includes always challenging bigoted comments, recognizing the value of all cultures, peaceful resolution to conflict, and an attitude of inclusion. He encourages others to join him in his efforts to create a welcoming school through the Ambassador Club and the East End Youth Leadership Conference. His commitment is perhaps exemplified by his long-term friendship with a young man from a different religious background. Together they wrote a poem, which has received a poetry award. “We are proud to recognize Kevin and wish him continued success during his senior year,” says Dr. Sarah Cushman, Director of Youth Education at the center. Each month the center accepts nominations from teachers, civic leaders, family and friends of a Long Island youth that has implemented the center’s mission by

T Cradle Of Aviation Opens New Planetarium The Cradle of Aviation recently opened the JetBlue Sky Theater Planetarium. Scott Carpenter (right) a member of the original Mercury astronauts attended the ceremony, as did New York State Senator Kemp Hannon (left).

Local Teachers Attend Google Academy Two area teachers were recently selected to attend the annual Google Teacher Academy in New York City. Lisa Parisi, a teacher at Denton Avenue Elementary School in the Herricks School District, and Lawrence Reiff, a teacher at Roslyn High School, were chosen for the two-day intensive program that recognizes educators who are doing innovative and exciting things in their classrooms with technolo-

gy, and gives these teachers the opportunity to learn directly about the latest technology from Google product managers and previous graduates of the program. The selection process was extremely competitive as only 10 percent of applicants were accepted. Those selected were chosen based on their commitment and creativity when it comes to incorporating technology in the classroom.

The Holocaust Memorial and Tolerance Center of Nassau County named Kevin Butterfield, “Upstander of the Month.”

advocating respect for all people. The student’s action as an Upstander could be one of intervention or prevention. To nominate a student for “Upstander of the Month” or learn more, email Dr. Cushman at sarahcushman@holocaust-nassau.org or call 516-571-8040 ext. 106.


CAMPS & SCHOOLS - ANTON COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS - OCTOBER 26, 2012

C AMPS & S CHOOLS

Pictured (l-r) are Anthony Beckner, Kimberly Nicolas, Theresa Caffray, Caroline Brown, and Alexander Martinez. These five Holy Trinity seniors have been named as Commended Students.

Five Holy Trinity Seniors Named Commended Scholars ive seniors from Holy Trinity Diocesan High School in Hicksville have been named as Commended Students in the 2013 National Merit Scholarship Program. Anthony Beckner, Kimberly Nicolas, Theresa Caffray, Caroline Brown, and Alexander Mar-

F

tinez are among the approximately 34,000 throughout the nation, who are being recognized for their academic promise. These students placed among the top 5 percent of the more than 1.5 million students who enetered the 2013 competition.

7C


8C

CAMPS & SCHOOLS - ANTON COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS - OCTOBER 26, 2012

C AMPS & S CHOOLS

We all scream for ice cream, especially Portedge students who created their own flavors.

Portledge Middle School Creates New Ice Cream Flavors he 5th Annual Portledge Middle School Founders Day Ice Cream Contest was recently held at Portledge School. Students worked in advisor groups, concocting a delicious creation using mix-ins. Gooseberry Grove supplied all ice cream and toppings for this very fun and tasty activity. Math teacher Mrs. Sillat calculated that there were 126 possible combinations. First place honors were awarded to Mrs. Cope’s eighth-grade advisor group (Sander Davis – Oyster Bay; Shaina Farahmand – Glen Cove; Julia Ritholz – Port Washington; Sean Williams – Oyster Bay; David Yardeni – Brookville; and Betty Zhu – Locust Valley) for their What’s Not to Like? ice cream made with chocolate crunch,

T

Oreo cookies and caramel. Second place was awarded to Miss Renwick’s sixth-grade advisor group (Cole Balacek - Manhasset; Spencer Boris – Old Westbury; Nicole Guarino – Sands Point; Tae Han Kim – Glen Cove; Juliet Love – Huntington Station; Angelina Magin - Bayville; and Meg Weissman – Mill Neck) for their “Blue Blizzard” ice cream with marshmallow sauce, white chocolate drops, Oreos and blue coloring. The winning ice cream flavors were scooped out to hungry crowds at Portledge Founders Day. The What’s Not to Like variety will be sold at Gooseberry Grove through October (or as long as supplies last) under the Portledge Pride 2012 name.

Fifth Graders Become Head Of School This year, each fifth-grade student at Westbury Friends School will have the chance to be head of school for a day. On Oct. 15, Sydney Walker had the opportunity. From 8 a.m. through 3 p.m., she followed a full schedule of appointments and daily activities that encompass this position. Her sense of purpose, her appreciation for the opportunity given to her, her genuine excitement with the experience brought joy to all who interacted with her throughout the day, including the school secretary, the director of admissions, and the business manager. The faculty and students were duly impressed by the way in which she handled each situation.

Fifth-grader Sydney Walker assumed the role of head of school at Westbury Friends School.

Portledge Open Houses Nov. 4 And 8 ortledge School will be hosting two open houses this fall. On Sunday, Nov. 4, from 11:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m., an information session and tour will be held for grades six through 12. Students will share their experiences during an interactive panel discussion and tours of the 60acre campus and buildings will follow. A recent alumnus and a parent will speak and faculty and division heads will be available to answer questions throughout. On Thursday, Nov. 8, an open classroom and information session will be held

P

from 9:30 until 11 a.m. All are invited to visit toddler through fifth-grade classes in progress, meet teachers and students, tour the facility and campus, and learn more about Portledge’s programs. Refreshments will be served. Pre-registration is suggested but not required. To register or for more information or directions, call Michael Coope at (516) 7503202 or Leigh Farrell at (516) 750-3203 or visit www.portledge.org. Portledge School is located at 355 Duck Pond Road in Locust Valley.


9C

CAMPS & SCHOOLS - ANTON COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS - OCTOBER 26, 2012

C AMPS & S CHOOLS

Students and faculty at Holy Trinity Diocesan High School, which just received reaccreditation from the Middle States Commission of Secondary Schools.

Holy Trinity Granted Reaccreditation By Middle States Commission fter a year long self-study that occurred during the 2011-12 school year, Holy Trinity Diocesan High School has been granted reaccreditation by the Middle States Commission of Secondary Schools. The team that visited and assessed the school concluded that Holy Trinity was “healthy, energetic and stable.” The visiting team noted many strengths during their site visit. First is the “profound sense of community.” Additionally, the report stated that “the students note

A

how much they believe Holy Trinity has provided a foundation for them to achieve great success in the future and how they will be connected to the school well beyond their graduation.” The second point concerns the teachers, staff and administrators that “support this culture of community through their very evident dedication to one another, the school and mostly importantly to the students.” “Faith is palpable at Holy Trinity” finds the team. “Students are eager and encour-

aged to deepen their relationship with God through the fine work of the Campus Ministry Office, the guidance of the religion department, the retreat experiences, peer ministry and the opportunity to participate in liturgies.” When looking at the education provided at Holy Trinity, the team speaks of it as “vibrant.” It is stated, “There is a vast array of course offerings, graduation requirements that exceed the state expectations, a resource room program, which

provides the opportunity for a Catholic education to students with learning differences, a thriving arts program, a highly competitive athletics program and many club opportunities. Often a telling sign of the health of an institution is identified by how many students are still in the building an hour after the last bell rang. It was very evident to the visiting team that the vast majority of students were certainly engaged with some activity well after the last bell.”


10C

CAMPS & SCHOOLS - ANTON COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS - OCTOBER 26, 2012


Camp and School: October 26, 2012