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This Week Only: Double The Puzzles

VOL. 137, NO. 46

WWW.ROSLYN-NEWS.COM

JULY 2 - 8, 2014

$1.00

Stamm Leading Youth Engagement Concern Over Trucking Operations

By AARON CHERIS

ROSLYN@ANTONNEWS.COM

When walking in the front entrance of Temple Sinai of Roslyn, there are many things to see, from the latest Bar and Bat Mitzvah students’ photos on an electronic message board to old Jewish artifacts, like ancient writings on display. However, downstairs from the main level, one of Temple Sinai’s most successful employees has her office. For the past eight years, Alison Stamm has called that office her own. As Temple Sinai’s Director of Youth Engagement, Stamm’s job is to keep all the temple youths, from fourth grade through college, engaged in Jewish life. Her goal has always been the same.

see STAMM on page 9

BY JOE SCOTCHIE

JSCOTCHIE@ANTONNEWS.COM

a potentially deadly infection of the heart. “I have a 30-year-old daughter myself, so this case had a big impact on me,” said Edward Lundy, M.D., Ph.D., a cardiothoracic surgeon who kept a vigil by the teacher’s bedside to make sure she survived the harrowing ordeal. “To see someone so young, vibrant, and healthy endure something

South Bay Industries has been in Roslyn Heights for three months. Local residents have expressed worries over noise, pollution and safety, but officials with the Copiague-based company claim that they are aware of such concerns and are studiously trying to keep life normal. The Roslyn News recently received a letter from a local resident, who said that South Bay “has been sending its massive trucks down the length of Donald Street” in the early morning hours and “ending somewhere in the early evening hours but occasionally sending trucks as early as 4 a.m., and as late as 10 p.m., Monday through Saturday.” The letter also listed noise, pollution and safety concerns. “The overspray from power washing the trucks and the diesel exhaust makes the town park next to the truck depot unusable much of the time,” the letter stated. “When the trucks travel from the bottom of the hill on Donald Street to Roslyn Road, the noise and vibration is enough to awaken sleeping residents in the early morning hours.”

see HEART on page 10

see TRUCKING on page 10

Left to right: Lizzie George, Sammi Goldstein with Alison Stamm and the “Go Sorty Go” softball game poster. Rabbi Michael White is in the background.

Happy Reunion For Heart Patient BY THE ROSLYN NEWS STAFF ROSLYN@ANTONNEWS.COM The St. Francis Heart Center has come through again. Recently, Massapequa resident Enzamaria Grimaudo visited the Roslyn-based hospital to thank the medical team that saved her life with intense heart surgery. At St. Francis, Grimaudo recalled her near-death experience. She said

she would never forget the last words she said before turning blue and going into cardiac arrest. “Please don’t let me die,” she begged while hugging a nurse, who replied, “Don’t worry, we won’t.” Doctors and nurses at St. Francis kept that promise, working for four hours to get the 30-year-old Elmont school teacher’s heart pumping again and miraculously saving her from the effects of viral myocarditis,

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110 WALT WHITMAN ROAD, HUNTINGTON STATION, NY, 11746. 631.549.7401 | © 2014 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE. ALL MATERIAL PRESENTED HEREIN IS INTENDED FOR INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY. WHILE, THIS INFORMATION IS BELIEVED TO BE CORRECT, IT IS REPRESENTED SUBJECT TO ERRORS, OMISSIONS, CHANGES OR WITHDRAWAL WITHOUT NOTICE. ALL PROPERTY INFORMATION, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO SQUARE FOOTAGE, ROOM COUNT, NUMBER OF BEDROOMS AND THE SCHOOL DISTRICT IN PROPERTY LISTINGS ARE DEEMED RELIABLE, BUT SHOULD BE VERIFIED BY YOUR OWN ATTORNEY, ARCHITECT OR ZONING EXPERT. PHOTOS SHOWN MAY HAVE BEEN MANIPULATED.  EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.

MAGNIFICENT CENTER HALL COLONIAL | MANHASSET | $1,729,000 Distinctive Colonial on a dead-end street, majestic foyer and formal rooms, 2 fireplaces, gourmet kitchen, 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths and a lovely yard. Close to all. Web# 2653406. Connie Liappas, LAB c: 516.319.3274

BEAUTIFUL EXPANDED RANCH | GREAT NECK | $1,348,000 Situated on flat lot in the Village of University Garden. Living room/fireplace, dinning room and kitchen/breakfast area. Master suite/main, basement/playroom and storage. Web# 2654897. Jennifer Lo, LAB d: 516.498.2127 | c: 516.376.9212

SPACIOUS SPLANCH | MANHASSET HILLS | $799,000 Spacious 4-bedroom 2.5-bath Splanch on quarter-of-an-acre in Manhasset Hills. Eat-in kitchen adjacent to den with brick fireplace which leads to private yard. 2-car attached garage. Web# 2671074. Mona Kremin, LAB d: 516.498.2122 | c: 516.780.2333

PRIME PW ESTATES LOCATION | PORT WASHINGTON | $769,000 Four bedrooms and 2 full baths, includes master with private bath. Gracious Colonial retains its original detail, in a prime location close to both town and train. Web# 2683937. Maggie Keats, LAB c: 516.449.7598 | Peter Crifo, LSA c: 516.669.7596

MOREWOOD OAKS | PORT WASHINGTON | $739,000 Wonderful Split Level, 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths. Family room, office (option for 4th bedroom). Upgraded roof, siding and windows. Lovely property with lush, mature landscaping. Web# 2683593. Maggie Keats, LAB c: 516.449.7598

BEST VALUE AROUND | EAST HILLS | $649,000 4-bedroom, 2-bath with access to East Hills Park, including pool, tennis, camp, community center and private security. Completely updated. Magnificent oversized property. Web# 2673786. Irene (Renee) Rallis, LAB c: 516.241.9848

PRIME ALBERTSON LOCATION | $579,000 Beautiful Cape with a huge den, fireplace, 3 bedrooms and 2 baths. Easy commute to New York City, a dream home in a dream location. Web# 2681520. Inbal August, LAB d: 516.629.2219 | c: 917.957.8111

IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY RENTAL | ROSLYN HEIGHTS | $6,000/MONTH Gorgeous Contemporary with walls of glass, great open flow for entertainment, 19-foot ceiling, 5 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, marble floor, eat-in kitchen with granite countertops, alarm and surround sound. Web# 2648893. Farrah Mosleh, LSA c: 516.805.5591

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Making Long Island A World-Class Art Capital Art Southampton to feature works by masters and contemporaries alike BY JOE SCOTCHIE

JSCOTCHIE@ANTONNEWS.COM

World-class art is coming to Art Southampton this summer, thanks to the energetic work of Roslyn native Nick Korniloff. From Thursday, July 24 to Monday, July 28, Art Southampton will solidify its standing as the premier international contemporary and modern art fair of the Hamptons, showcasing primary and important secondary works of art. For Korniloff, the exhibit represents a homecoming of sorts. A graduate of Herricks High School, Korniloff settled in Florida after graduating from Florida International University. In Roslyn, Korniloff was first inspired by his mother and sister, both of whom,

he said, were talented artists. Growing up in the New York City area, he was exposed to world-class art from visiting all of the cultural amenities New York has to offer, including its many fine-art museums. In Florida, Korniloff first became interested in promoting artworks, those both classics and those that are part of emerging trends. He recalled an Art Miami fair in the early 1990s that was the “most beautiful show I ever saw. It opened my eyes to a new world.” And so, in 1994, Korniloff began his career in special event production and art fair management when he helped produce and promote the first contemporary art fairs in Miami. As

see ART on page 11

Nick Korniloff, right and Pamela Cohen

Clark Botanic Garden Summer Concert Series arrangements of classical music. The seasoned group showcased their one-of-a-kind arrangements with their performance of “Mozart Meets Jazz,” with the New York’s Nova Philharmonic. Folk Night in the Garden takes place on Tuesday, July 22, with David Sear performing in concert followed by Gathering Time. Sear has been an active member of the American Folk Music scene since the 1940s, and has taught courses in folk music at Hofstra University. Gathering Time is a folk-rock trio with beautiful harmonies and up-tempo songs that will have the whole family dancing. On Tuesday, July 29, audience

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Enjoying a summer day at Clark Botanic Garden.

In July and August, the Town of North Hempstead will host the 2014 Summer Concert Series at Clark Botanic Garden in Albertson. All concerts take place on Tuesday evenings at 7 p.m. “With summer upon us, the Town of North Hempstead invites residents from all over the town to join us for our series of free summer concerts throughout the season from July 6 to Aug. 24. These relaxing and fun summer concerts are a wonderful way to spend time with your family and friends in the community,” said Supervisor Judi Bosworth. On Tuesday, July 15, the first concert will feature the Paul Joseph Quartet. The quartet is known for their unique and innovative jazz


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THE ROSLYN NEWS - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

| AT THE BRYANT LIBRARY Finding Your Narrative Voice A Prose Workshop Tuesdays, July 8, 15, 22, 29, 5 p.m. Registration required. Sign up by clicking on first session of program on the Calendar of Events. This writing workshop will explore how to create an original narrative

voice in fiction and non-fiction. A strong emphasis will be placed on constructing credible and engaging characters. Example readings by David Sedaris, Chuck Palahniuk, Neil Gaiman, Vivian Gornick and others will be used to examine craft. Students will have the opportunity to bring work to class to be discussed in a professional

and encouraging environment. Melissa Rubin has a Master of Fine Arts in creative writing. Though her concentration was in non-fiction, she loves experimenting with fiction and poetry. Her work is published in Font literary magazine and Everyone’s An Author, the newly released rhetoric and composition textbook.

Healthcare Panel Sponsored by Hadassah ACHOT Wednesday, July 16, 7 p.m. This panel of healthcare professionals will focus on feeling healthy and looking great at any age. There will be a dermatologist, internist and psychiatrist. Questions are encouraged.

The five most popular titles of books being read by the Bryant Library patrons include: Summer House with Swimming Pool by Herman Koch, All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr, The Vacationers by Emma Staub, The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin and All Fall Down by Jennifer Weiner. Among recent other books of interest, the library recommends: Fridays at Enrico’s by Don Carpenter, The Adjacent by Christopher Priest, The Auschwitz Escape by Joel C. Rosenberg, 50 Children by Steven Pressman and Lovers at the Chameleon Club by Francine Prose.

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Postmaster:Send Sendaddress address changes Anton Community Newspapers, P.O.P.O. Box 1578, Mineola, N.Y. 11501. Postmaster: changes toto Long Island Community Newspapers, Box 1578, Mineola, N.Y. 11501. Entered Entered as as periodicals periodicals postage postage paid paid at at the the Post Post Office Office at at Mineola, Mineola, N.Y. N.Y. and and additional additional mailing mailing offices offices under under the the Act Act of Fridays by Anton Community Newspapers, 132 East Second St., Mineola, N.Y. ofCongress. Congress.Published Published weekly on by Long Island Community Newspapers, 132 East Second St., Mineola, N.Y. 11501 11501 Box 1578). Phone: 516-747-8282. per is copy is 75 cents.subscription Annual subscription is $23 in Nassau. (P.O. (P.O. Box 1578). Phone: 516-747-8282. Price Price per copy $1.00. Annual rate is $26rate in Nassau County.


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| CHAMBER OF COMMERCE NEWS BY THE ROSLYN NEWS STAFF ROSLYN@ANTONNEWS.COM On the heels of the successful Multi-Chamber Networking Event, the Roslyn Chamber of Commerce is reminding members of another event, The Image of Success Networking Series, held on Tuesday, July 8, from 6 to 8 p.m. at Mio Posto, 600 West Old Country Rd., Hicksville. The event features cocktails, hors d’oeuvres, “fabulous” people to connect with, and two spotlight presentations for fresh business ideas. Stephen Linker, the first speaker, is a New York forensic accountant with more than 30 years of experience. He will present “Embezzlement: You Never Thought It Could Happen to You.” The second speaker will be Thomas J. Santucci, founder and president of Gateway Investments, LLC, Garden City. He will present “How to Organize Your Financial Life.” Standard admission is $18 online at http://bit.ly/1knmwcU <http://bit.

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THE ROSLYN NEWS - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

ly/1knmwcU> or $30 at the door. For only $39 online, or $55 at the door, a VIP ticket gets participants over $100+ worth of goodies plus a ticket to premium raffle prizes, which include $150 to spend on food and beverage in Bourbon Street restaurant and two private ballroom dance lessons from Long Island Wedding Dance for a single or couple. In addition, Chamber of Commerce member and East Hills resident Barbara Kaplan is issuing a call for vendors for the Baby Boomer/Senior Expo to be held on Sunday, Sept. 28 at the Melville Marriott. Such expos, Kaplan said, are a great way for Roslyn area businesses to get the word out about all the fine products they have to offer. Reserve your table or speaker spot now at the 5th annual Over 50 Fair, an event geared towards adults age 50+ taking place on Sept. 28 from 10-4:30 at the Marriott. Kaplan said that 20 vendors and nine speakers have already signed up. Visit www.Over50Fair.com or 516621-1446 for more information.

Action Fund Endorses Haber East Hills resident Adam Haber, who is running on the Democratic Party line in the New York State Senate’s Seventh District race, has been endorsed by Make The Road Action Fund. “I take special pride in this endorsement because the issues that are important to Make the Road Action Fund are important to so many working people in Nassau County,” said Haber. The candidate stressed that raising the minimum wage is among the most important legislative matters for New York State’s Latino community and working-class people in general. "I look forward to working with Make The Road Action Fund as a State Senator to ensure hardworking New Yorkers earn enough to make ends meet.” “Our members are proud to stand with Adam Haber in his run for State Senate because he stands with working-class New Yorkers and Latino residents on the legislative proposals that matter most to us: increasing the minimum wage with indexation and local wage

Adam Haber increase authorization, fighting for equal educational opportunity for immigrant students, cracking down on wage theft, creating community schools, and ending discrimination against LGBTQ New Yorkers,” said Javier H. Valdés, co-executive director of Make the Road Action Fund.

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The Roslyn Rotary Club honored Roslyn High School senior Hana Kim as its May Student of the Month at a luncheon on June 19. Hana’s community service has included working at the Nassau Community Art Museum; volunteering at Sun Harbor Manor playing Bingo with patients and helping to serve drinks and snacks; playing games and setting up parties for disabled adults through volunteers for the Education of Developmentally Disabled Adults (VEDDA); teaching Cambodian children English using Skype through Teaching and Sharing Skills to Enrich Lives (TASSEL); and helping to organize a fundraiser for Lily of Valley. Pictured, left to right: are Rotary Co-President Cathy Mealing, Hana’s mother Mrs. Hyun Kim, Hana Kim, and Rotary Co-President Deborah Zenir.

Roslyn Board Meeting July 7 The Roslyn Public Schools Board of Education will hold its annual reorganization meeting on Monday, July 7 p.m. at 8 p.m. in Roslyn High School. Agendas and minutes for Board of Education meetings are available at www.roslynschools.org; click on “Board of Education.”

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| HEALTH & WELLNESS BRIEFS Genetic Testing Before And During Pregnancy

Monday, July 7 Those interested in learning about genetic testing before and during pregnancy can attend an educational seminar at Manhasset’s North Shore University Hospital from 6 to 7 p.m. in conference room three of the hospital’s tower. Women will learn about the tests performed for chromosomal abnormalities such as Down syndrome and sex chromosome abnormalities. There will be a discussion about carrier screening. The session will be

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moderated by certified genetic counselor Kimberly Kessler, MS, CGC. To register, call Mary Sellers, medical secretary, at 516-562-2684.

Gynecological Cancer Support Monday, July 7 The Winthrop Wellness Pavilion, 1300 Franklin Ave., Garden City, Suite ML-5, hosts a free support group for women with gynecological cancer from 5 to 6:30 p.m. The group is being conducted by Mary Rzeszut, LMSW, from Winthrop’s Institute for Cancer Care. For reservations, call 516-663-3867.

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STAMM from page 1 “I want to help raise up competent and confident Jews,” Stamm said. “I am trying to instill the value of Tikkun Olam into these teenagers so that they recognize that they need, as a Jew, to leave the world a better place than they found it.” Growing up in Montreal, Stamm was a member of the only reform Jewish congregation in the city. During the summers, she worked at Camp Eisner in Massachusetts, where she met the man that she later married. After earning her Bachelor of Education from McGill University, Stamm moved to the United States, hoping to teach in the New York public school system. After she couldn’t find a job teaching, she ended up at Temple Sinai. This was a revelation for Stamm. “I realized I could work in a synagogue doing the same kind of Jewish work I did in summer camp year round,” she said Eight years later, Stamm hasn’t looked back. Since starting at Temple Sinai, Stamm has revitalized the youth programs. “We went from programs with a handful of kids to programs with 120 kids,” Rabbi Michael White, beginning his eighteenth year at Temple Sinai, said happily. Typically, Hebrew high school was held at the temple once a week and teens came in on the same day, and it wasn’t perfect for everyone. Since many students are constantly busy during the week, the program had to change. “Now we have programming every night of the week so teens can pick a Jewish experience that speaks to their interest and fits to their schedule,” Stamm said. Tikkun Olam, Hebrew for “repairing the world,” is one of Stamm’s core values, and she is making sure the teens of Temple Sinai do the same. In February 2012, some of Temple Sinai’s teens went to Israel with the

BOTANIC from page 3 members will be treated to the Five Towns College Concert Pops with Dean Karahalis. This professional concert band and orchestra features an ensemble of musicians, many of whom perform on Broadway and with the Metropolitan Opera. Following their performance will be a screening of the Academy-Award winning film Million Dollar Baby, featuring Clint Eastwood and Hillary Swank. Finally, on Tuesday, Aug. 5, Plaza Productions presents the

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temple. “We still maintain that it’s a service trip and we go to Israel and see it through the social justice lens,” Stamm said. While the trip to the Jewish homeland is one of the happier moments for any Jew, it won’t be the only one, especially with Stamm leading. With any program that involves traveling with teens, safety is the main concern for everyone. Rabbi White himself has two children, each of whom took part in the youth programs at Temple Sinai. He said that Stamm puts that as one of her top priorities, not just that teens are physically safe, but have a safe place to express who they really are. “Under Ali’s leadership, [the youth} have a wonderful experience and will be safe,” he said. “She’s the kind of person, as a parent, that you want your kids connected to.” Rabbi White isn’t the only person who knows people should connect to Stamm. In April, Stamm traveled to Sweden, as she was selected to participate in the elite Paradigm

Program through Paideia, The European Institute for Jewish Studies in Sweden. Stamm was one of about 20 youth experts to go to Stockholm for the program. “We were tasked with thinking about and discussing Jewish life in Europe post Holocaust and post communism,” she said. While there, Stamm met other Jewish leaders from Croatia, Russia and Israel, among others. “We’ve reached new heights at Temple Sinai that were nationally and internationally recognized as being premier youth engagement models.” Ultimately, the finished products of Stamm’s work are the young people she surrounds herself with every day. “I can see the fruits of my labor a lot more easily than a public school teacher can,” Stamm said. The fruits of Stamm’s labor are eager to praise her back. Andrew Levitt, a member of The Wheatley School class of 2014, was the President of Temple Sinai’s youth group this past year. He can only compliment Stamm. “She has made it so that people

from all over Long Island have been coming to us because of the great programs she had,” Levitt said. “She is the greatest thing to ever come out of Canada.” He added that he attended some temple programs just so he wouldn’t let Stamm down. This idea resonates with others as well. Nikki Schreiber graduated from The Wheatley School in 2012. Like Levitt, Schreiber took Stamm’s advice when it came to attending some programs. “She brings such a good spirit to the temple and makes you happy to be there,” Schreiber said of Stamm. Schreiber echoed what Stamm has wanted all along. “Ali makes me want to be a better person.” Schreiber’s opinion is shared among friends. Ari Zarin also graduated from The Wheatley School in 2012, and was an active member in Temple Sinai’s youth programs throughout his life. After calling Stamm, “The most fantastic person ever,” Zarin said, “Ali is the kind of person where you can go and talk to her and she will listen for hours and help you get through whatever it is.” Zarin went on the February 2012 trip to Israel, and says that his favorite memory with the temple. “She kept me coming back, she is a great person who always wants to keep people happy,” he said. Even the clergy can only praise Stamm. “Ali is the finest director of youth engagement in the world,” Rabbi White said proudly. But while praise from others is nice, Stamm takes pride in something else. “What’s important is that young people realize that there are young adults who care so deeply about Judaism that they are willing to commit their life to it,” Stamm said. “You don’t have to be a Rabbi and you don’t have to be a cantor. If you can become a youth professional and make a difference in at least one person’s life, then you hit the jackpot.” It’s safe to say, Stamm has hit that jackpot.

classic musical Beauty and the Beast. Plaza Productions is one of Long Island’s best-known touring theatre companies. “With summer upon us, the Town of North Hempstead invites residents from all over the town to join us for our series of free summer concerts. These relaxing and fun summer concerts are a wonderful way to spend time with your family and friends in the community,” said Bosworth. Clark Botanic Garden is a 12-acre living museum and educational facility at 193 I.U. Willets Rd., Albertson.

Call 311 and visit www.northhempsteadny.gov for more information and the full schedule of summer

events and festivals. — Submitted by the Town of North Hempstead

Alison Stamm, center, with teens Perri Schreiber, left and Allie Schreiber, right at a food bank in Memphis, Tenn., this past February

Artists Wanted The Roslyn News wants to publish the artwork of community residents of all ages—young, not so young and in between. Whether you work in oil on canvas or finger-paints on construction paper, we want to see your work. Take a photo of your creation (with a camera, not a cell phone), and email it to Editor Joe Scotchie at jscotchie@antonnews.com


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TRUCKING from page 1 Finally, the letter noted that the depot is located near a residential neighborhood. “The entire neighborhood is residential including many families with school-aged children,” it noted. “School buses stop up and down that two-block stretch of Donald Street, picking up and discharging public school students including preschoolers from the two local day care centers throughout the day. Having enormous construction vehicles moving in and out of this residential neighborhood on a street which can only accommodate a single lane of traffic at anytime is an accident waiting to happen.” Robert Ewing, president of South Bay Industries, addressed those concerns. He noted that all South Bay trucks leave the yard in the early morning, many of them going east into the five boroughs for their delivery jobs. In the meantime, the lot in Roslyn

is generally empty all day. The trucks return to the Donald Street destination in between 2:30 and 3:30 p.m. There is no excess noise in the yard, Ewing said, except for an occasional power-washing job on the trucks. Ewing said the trucks have been in Roslyn for only three months. “[The routine] is new to people,” he said. People are not used to it.” In an effort to hold down the noise, Ewing added that the company makes sure that the trucks do not have their back-up alarms on when they are in the lot. “There is no noise at the yard,” he said. “[Our trucks] are not working in the [Roslyn] area at all.” Concerning safety issues, Ewing said that he understands resident concerns. “[Our trucks] are gone by the time the school buses are there,” he said. Ewing added that his drivers all “observe school rules.” “All my drivers come down that hill at a crawl,” he said.

Donald Street

Enzamaria Grimaudo, second from left, bottom row with her niece of her lap and a flower boutique, relishing the moment with the staff at St. Francis Hospital.

HEART from page 1 like this and completely recover is truly amazing.” Grimaudo was walking her three-year-old niece to a park in Massapequa when she realized something was very wrong. “It felt like something was sitting on my chest,” she said. “I started losing my breath and feeling like I was about to pass out, so I grabbed my niece and started running to my brother’s house.” Grimaudo collapsed at his front door and was rushed by ambulance to St. Joseph Hospital, where doctors determined she needed more specialized cardiac care. She was taken to St. Francis Hospital where Lundy and interventional cardiologists Theofanis Tsiamtsiouris, M.D., and Antonio Madrid, M.D., stepped in to perform the operation. The cardiologists inserted a tiny pump called Impella through a catheter to keep Grimaudo’s heart beating,

but it was clear she was going to need more help. So Lundy surgically implanted an ECMO (Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenator) cardiac assist device that took over the function of Grimaudo’s heart and lungs. A week later her heart began to function on its own again and she avoided the possibility of having to undergo a heart transplant. “It was as if she was struck by lightning and was dead, but now she is back to being normal and healthy again,” said Lundy. Doctors still don’t know how the young teacher contracted the rare virus. Meanwhile, Grimaudo, who teaches first and second graders with disabilities, looks forward to going back to school this fall. “It really and truly is a miracle. I still don’t believe I survived,” said Grimaudo who had no previous history of heart problems. “When I woke up, I wanted to go to work the very next day.” — Submitted by St. Francis Hospital

East Hills Students In Math Olympiad Students from East Hills Elementary School were among the nearly 150,000 participants worldwide in this year’s Math Olympiad program. They participated in a series of five monthly contests of five problems each, from November to March, and weekly practice sessions under the supervision and coaching of Suzanne Falcone. She taught the children to solve unusual and difficult problems and to think creatively. All 32 students responded well and all were recognized with certificates for their participation. A trophy and

gold pin was awarded to Aaron Kann in fifth grade, with a score of 23 out of 25 points. Fourth grader, Luca Guillon received a gold pin for a score of 22 out of 25. Gold pins are awarded to those in the 98th percentile (top 2 percent) of all participants. The silver pin is awarded to those in the 90th to 97th percentiles. Daniel Rosman and Alida Pahlevan both received silver pins. Fourteen students received patches for scoring in the top 50 percent of all participants. — Submitted by the Roslyn School District

Math Olympiad students


www.roslyn-news.com

THE ROSLYN NEWS - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

ART from page 3 the Facility Manager for Spectator Management Group (SMG) and the Miami Beach Convention Center he managed the operational and promotional initiatives of the original Art Miami and Art of the Americas' Fair. Finally, in 2008, Korniloff took the helm at Art Miami LLC and quickly revitalized the now 23-year-old Art Miami fair, one that now attracts over 50,000 attendees annually during its run in the first week of December. Korniloff travels the world, entering negotiations with international exhibitors, asking them to participate in both the Miami and Southampton shows. “We promote and market the space,” he said of the art fairs. “[Our displays] contain modern and contemporary art, very blue chip.” The Southampton fair includes artwork from the postwar era to more modern art, along with classical art and extending to emerging artists involved with excellent work from today’s world of art. The works themselves range from paintings to sculptures. “The fair is reflective [of movements in art]; it has full air conditioning, carpeted, with great food, quality art and [is a combination of] current movements of contemporary art with more established artists,” he said. As a result, Art Southampton has become the premier international contemporary and modern art fair of the Hamptons. Art Southampton 2014 will feature a carefully selected group of 70 international art galleries with a strong focus on investment-quality works from the 20th and 21st centuries. The country’s preeminent school of figurative painting, drawing and sculpture, presents an exhibition curated by renowned artist John Alexander. A portion of sales will go directly to scholarships for Academy students. Art Southampton 2014 will feature works by such contemporaries

as Zachary Brown, Megan Ewert, Elizabeth Glaessner, Angela Gram, Nicolas Holiber, Yunsung Jang, Christian Johnson, Will Kurtz, Bryan LeBoeuf, Michael Meadors, Alyssa Monks, John O'Reilly, Guno Park, Nicolas V. Sanchez, Holly Ann Scoggins, Stephen Shaheen, Aliene de Souza Howell, Maria Teicher, Phillip Thomas, Melanie Vote, Annie Wildey and Lucy Winton. From the world of classical art, the lineup is as impressive as any exhibit of its kind: The artists to be shown include the most sought after talents of the 20th and 21st centuries: Warhol, Picasso, Freud, Bourgeois, Avery, Kline, Wesselman, Lichtenstein, Sherman, Basquiat, Bochner, Chamberlain, Frankenthaler, Kusama, Motherwell, Rauschenberg, Rivers, Stella, Botero, Soto, Baechler, Calder, Moore, Avedon, Close, Dali, Fischl, Nevelson, Miro, Johns, Indiana, Dubuffet, Dine, Ramos, Richter, Rosenquist, Sultan, Wyeth, Matta, Goldberg, Hoffman, Vicente, Kahn, Vaselitz, Haring, Koons, Giacometti, Francis, Mapplethorpe, Lewitt, Bleckner, Mazzucco, Clergue, Man Ray, De Kooning, Banksy, Katz, Ernst, Ruscha, Leger, Matisse, Koons, Nicholson, Baldessari, Lam, Muniz, Chagall and more. On Thursday, July 24, there will be a VIP Platinum Preview. From 6 to 7:30 p.m., there will be champagne & hors d’oeuvres with the VIP preview following from 7:30 to 10 p.m. That event is sponsored by GRAFF Diamonds, Maserati North America, Ruinart Champagne, Saunders & Associates and Luxe Interiors + Design and benefiting the Parrish Art Museum. In all, Art Southampton looks to be another milestone in Korniloff’s career in the art world, one that has made him a foremost expert in that field, earning him numerous appearances in the media, including such publications as The Art Newspaper, ArtDaily.org, Art & Auction, Art Info, The Antiques Trade Gazette and The Miami Herald.

11

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• ARTS • ENTERTAINMENT • LIFESTYLES •

he Roslyn weekend

July 2 - 8, 2014

On the inside

D’Addario Exhibit In Southampton

Roslyn

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

BY JOE SCOTCHIE

• Page 4A •

JSCOTCHIE@ANTONNEWS.COM

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Christine D’Addario in front of the Chrysalis Gallery

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ANTON WEEKLY - ANTON COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS - APRIL 5, 2013

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• Pages 10A - 13A •

94319

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From now until July 17, Roslyn native Christine D’Addario will be exhibiting her artwork, “From The East End of Long Island” at the Chrysalis Gallery in Southampton. A reception was held on July 4. Other featured artists in the exhibit include Theresa Giannuzzi, David Tyndall and Howard Rose. The exhibit is a collection of fine oil paintings celebrating summer life. D’Addario is an award-winning artist and a graduate of Roslyn High School and The College of Saint Rose. After graduating in 2001, D’Addario 19A was named as one of the Top 50 Graphic Designers in the country and has worked in the field of art ever Daycare / Nursery since. Her Schools portfolio features original logos,Babysitter posterAvailable art and book cover Experienced College Graduate. Able to drive design for the well-known publisher, and great with kids! References upon request. St. Martin’s Press. Her advertising has Please call Hilary at 516-382-4846 been published in all major music Employment magazines throughout the world. Her custom packaging designs and a multitude of catalogs can be found at any music store and/or online vendor of music accessories. D’Addario is also a member of the D’Addario “Guitar Strings” family, which has received favorable publicity in the Long Island media. For 10 years she served as art director for COUNTRY CLUB HIRING music accessories the family-owned business D’Addario & Company, Inc.


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THE WEEKEND - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

EXHIBIT from page 1A In addition, D’Addario has created graphics for famed guitarist Joe Satriani,and the media materials for the D’Addario Foundation Concert Series at Weil Hall, Carnegie Hall. D’Addario told The Roslyn News that the birth of her twin girls inspired a transition into her “true passion” of creating fine art. She describes her coastal scenes as “[conveying] the alluring character of Long Island’s East End.” From living and growing up on Long Island, D’Addario said that she has a deep appreciation for the beach-going season. Her works, she added, are inspired by the William

Merrit Chase, Edward Henry Potthast, John Singer Sargent and Joaquín Sorolla. Other influences are more contemporary artists Peggi Kroll Roberts, Simon Parkes, Fairfield Porter, Marcia Burtt and her mentor Howard Rose. D’Addario is a member of the Salmagundi Art Club in New York City where she partakes in exhibits, workshops, and serves as an alternate juror. Her work has been featured in the International Contemporary Artists Volume VII and American Art Collector Magazine. The Chrysalis Gallery is at 2 Main St. in Southampton. The phone number is 631-287-1883.

“Dancing In The Wind”

Assembly Votes On Hydrofracking Ban Assemblyman Charles Lavine (D-Glen Cove), who represents the Roslyn area in Albany, recently voted with colleagues in the Assembly last week to suspend the Department of Environmental Conservation’s issuance of new natural gas drilling permits for horizontal drilling and high-volume hydraulic fracturing (known as hydrofracking) in New York until 2017. “The potential health risks associated with hydrofracking remind us that we need to proceed cautiously, without putting our families at risk, until we know for sure what consequences might exist,” said Lavine. “The Assembly’s legislation gives us time to make an informed decision regarding hydrofracking and the possible beneficial or detrimental

“Wispy Sky Low”

effects it could have on us and the environment.” Hydrofracking is a method of extracting natural gas from underground rock formations through the injection of a chemical cocktail and highly pressurized water. Lavine said studies are currently underway that examine the longterm impact of hydrofracking on the environment and public health. Some of the studies should be complete within the next three years. While hydrofracking has the potential to yield enormous amounts of natural gas, the risks associated with it are still to be determined. “More time is needed to assist us in deciding what is best for our local communities,” Lavine said.

| NEWS BRIEF

Go to The Roslyn News Facebook page and click “Like” Full Sweepstakes details on our Facebook page Also visit www.roslyn-news.com

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Technology Summer Workshops If that iPad or tablet is gathering dust, bring it to one of two workshops offered by EAC Network’s SeniorNet program and the Town of North Hempstead Services for the Aging. Summer workshops for senior citizens who want to learn how to use new technology begin on Wednesday, July 16 at the Town of North Hempstead Services for the Aging, 470 Old Westbury Rd., Roslyn

Heights. Bring an iPad or tablet to classes that are run by SeniorNet volunteers. “Make The Most Out Of Your iPad” starts on July 16 and runs for three sessions. The second class, “Using A Tablet Or iPad To Search The Internet And Finding Apps To Make The Most Out Of Summer Travel” begins on Thursday, July 17 for two sessions. There will be small fees for materials. Call 516-539-0150 ext. 130 or visit for more information.


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THE WEEKEND - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

Great Summer Events In Nassau County Parks NASSAU COUNTY EXECUTIVE

EDWARD MANGANO

I am so very proud of our parks system and all we have to offer in our great county. This summer, we have an action-packed lineup. With a combination of quality entertainment and fun activities for the whole family, we look forward to seeing you out and about. Alongside my continued dedication to creating tourism, the incredible support we have received from local business sponsors has made bringing top-notch events to our residents at no additional cost, a great reality. Here’s a look at some upcoming happenings. Pack your lawn chair and mark your calendar, because we have some good old-fashioned entertainment in store. The month of July is going to be full. Beginning with a musical performance by Swingtime Big Band on Wednesday, July 2, we are kicking off quite a busy time. The following day, again stop by the Harry Chapin Lakeside Theatre in Eisenhower Park to enjoy Mike DelGuidice and the Billy Joel Band. Both acts will hit the stage at 7 p.m. If it’s up to us, this Fourth of July is going to be one you are sure to

remember. Starting at 10 a.m., the 1864 Independence Day Celebration will be flowing with music, dancing, trade demonstrations, speeches, a parade and so much more to enjoy. We hope to see you all at Old Bethpage Village Restoration for the fun. If Friday’s festivities aren’t enough, grab the family and head to Lakeside Theatre on Saturday, July 5, for Neil Berg’s much-anticipated “100 Years of Broadway.” Like most of our musical performances, this must-see production is free of charge and will start at 7 p.m. The International Music Nights Concert Series is a great Nassau County tradition, with nearly two-dozen nights dedicated to music and culture that honor a range of ethnic groups. Be sure to stop by and enjoy the park, music and culture all summer long. Help us to continue

the celebration of each and every one of our Nassau County residents with Punjabi American Night on Sunday, July 6, German American Night on Monday, July 7 and Armenian American Night on Sunday, July 13, all beginning at 7 p.m. at Lakeside. Our busy calendar continues to unfold with a number of incredible music shows. On Tuesday, July 8, see Jersey 4—a Tribute to Frankie Valli— and on Friday, July 11, check out Oldies Night with Jay Siegel’s Tokens. Both concerts will begin at 7 p.m. at Lakeside Theatre. On Wednesday, July 9, South Bound will be entertaining audiences at Eisenhower Park’s Parking Field 6A beginning at noon, before Five Towns College Pops hit the stage at Muttontown Preserve’s Chelsea Mansion at 7 p.m. The Long Island International Film

Expo (LIFE) will be taking place from Wednesday, July 9 through Thursday, July 17. Please contact Bellmore movies at 516-783-3199 or the Nassau County Film Office at 516-571-3168 for more information. In the meantime, to help you get in the spirit, grab some popcorn and get comfy at Lakeside Theatre, on Thursday, July 10, for a showing of Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2. The film is set to start at dusk. Also, remember to clear your schedule the second weekend in July because the Cole Brothers Circus is coming to town. Shows will take place at Parking Field 6A of Eisenhower Park on Friday, July 11 at 5 and 8 p.m., as well as 2, 5 and 8 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. Please visit www.nassaucountyny. gov/summer for more information on any of our summer events.

The Cole Brothers Circus comes to Eisenhower Park on Friday, July 11, through Sunday, July 13.

Friendship Bench A East Hills All of East Hills School gathered in the gymnasium on June 13 for the unveiling of the school’s new Friendship Bench. Special Education Teacher Victoria Schnittger, who is retiring at the end of the school year and wanted to leave something special to the school that has been her home in Roslyn for more than 30 years, presented the bench. After meeting weekly with her fourth grade Friendship Club children, they decided to create a bench that would be a “Safe Zone” for all children at recess. It was designed in Roslyn blue to make it inviting and noticeable from anywhere on the playground. Friendship Club was specifically designed to teach children social rules, ways to modify their emotional

reactions, and to help students plan social behaviors including communication and play. There is a friendship club in each grade led by different staff members. Peer mentors and other members of the Friendship Club gave a presentation for the whole school on Friday that included role modeling and songs to dedicate the new bench. The bench was dedicated with the following saying: A Friendship Bench ... • It’s a place where anyone is welcome • It’s a safe place to rest • It’s a place to share a laugh on a tough day • It’s a place for high-fives to celebrate a success • It’s a place for high-fives when

The Friendship Bench you’re feeling down • It’s a bully-free zone, a place to stand tall • It’s a place to share a kindness • It’s a place for compassion, where you can be a ‘bucket filler’ • It’s a place to find a new friend

• It’s a place to meet an old friend • It’s a place to talk to someone, about anything • It’s a place to listen • It’s a place to feel included — Submitted by the Roslyn School District


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THE WEEKEND - JULY 2 - 8, 2014 PP UBLISHER UBLISHER Angela Susan Anton

Founded 1877 Grace S. Anton, Publisher Emeritus Publication Office: 132 East Second St., Mineola, NY 11501 Phone: (516) 747-8282 Fax: (516) 742-5867 www.antonnews.com KARL V. ANTON, JR., PUBLISHER, ANTON COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS, 1984-2000 2014 Long Long Island Island Community Community Newspapers, Newspapers, Inc. Inc. © 2013

EDITOR IN CSHIEF EDITOR ADVERTISING ALES EDITOR IN CHIEF John Owens Joe Scotchie Lee Reynolds, Angela Susan Anton John Owens Wendy Kates, Valerie Link, ADVERTISING SALES CLASSIFIED MANAGER COO PPRESIDENT EDITOR RESIDENT&& COO Mari Jeryl Sletteland MariGaudet, Gaudet, Valerie Link, IrisScotchie Picone Michael Castonguay Joe Michael Castonguay Michele Caro, Jeryl Sletteland C DD IRECTOR LASSIFIED MANAGER CREATIVE HIEF PAGE ESIGNER EVP ALES OO PERATIONS EVPOF OFSS ALES&& PERATIONS DCIRECTOR OF PRODUCTION IrisSchiavone Picone Tommy TommyVon Von Voigt Voigt Frank FrankA.A.Virga Virga Lisa EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT For circulation email: @antonnews.com subscribe@antonnews.com addresses: first initial of first name followedinquiries, by last name Shari Email Egnasko Email addresses: First initial of first name, followed by last name, @antonnews.com

| EDITORIAL Summer Starts When The Sky Is Lit While June 21 is considered the official start of summer, the real fun doesn’t kick off until bottle rockets, firecrackers, roman candles, sparklers and jumping jacks are lighting the night sky on July 4th, honoring the adoption of the Declaration of Independence 238 years ago. Rarely does it rain on July 4th (I’m having a hard time remembering when it did), which makes

the night that much more sweet. You can step out your door and find a fireworks celebration almost anywhere in Nassau County. Sitting in a lawn chair at The Park At East Hills for the concert series and fireworks show to begin marks a new tradition of lounging around, forgetting about the work week ahead. From kid smiles to adult gazes, Independence Day pushes family’s towards the heart of summer, one pop and sizzle at a time.

| LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Dorian Gray Runs For Office “A picture does [not] say a thousand words” unless you are looking at Dorian Gray. The politicians have started early this year due to the primary season. Noted advertising guru Marshall McLuhan once wrote that “the medium is the message.” That being the case, what is the medium deployed by our politicians and what is the message? Currently blighting our environment are political signs, illegally posted on both public and private lands.

These signs tell us the name of the candidate, the office they are seeking and their political party — but that is all. The point is that candidates pray that signs will increase their name recognition causing voters to cast their ballots for them irrespective of their otherwise lackluster records. Delusions of grandeur coupled with obscene campaign contributions build these candidates into truly minor, local celebrities where brainwashed voters are hoodwinked into electing them on the basis of party loyalty, pretty faces, road signs

Calling All Columnists Do you know some aspect of life in Roslyn really well, and do you like to write? The Roslyn News is seeking columnists to write about the people and events in our community. Do you know fascinating residents, and would you like to tell their stories? Are local sports your interest? Local food? Town history? The arts? The senior scene? Politics in the villages? What’s going on at the various houses of worship? Your column can be short—a few hundred words—and could appear weekly, monthly or whatever works. Send Editor Joe Scotchie a note explaining what you would like to write about and why you are qualified. jscotchie@antonnews.com

and false, negative advertising. But what do these insulting road signs which obliterate the landscape, distracting us from traffic conditions, really tell us about these arrogant candidates? As in the case of most political advertising, they tell us nothing. Road signs and campaign stickers are the cheapest form of advertising but not needed by candidates with legitimate name recognition and those with big money available for paid television advertising. So what does this mean for voters trying to navigate safely through this mine field of junk advertising? It means that you have to be more than informed. You must be a psychologist as well to determine why candidates seek public office and whether they have the qualifications, knowledge, insight and courage to solve the problems which we face. We should need them more than they need us. Slogans do not suffice. Most candidates secure nominations and even elections for all the wrong reasons. They have flown below the radar throughout their careers avoiding controversy and have joined the local church and Kiwanis Club. They want a title, paid vacations, pensions and medical insurance. Their mediocrity then becomes our mediocrity. Road signs are a symbol telling us that candidates expect that they can get by with a smile and a handshake. In the past

that is all they needed. Thomas Liotti

A Real Court Jester Is Kimba Woods a Judge — or a joke? Queen Kimba recently gave a convicted 60-year-old thief 39 years to pay back the $300,567 in disability pension benefits that he virtually stole by faking a Long Island Rail Road disability. It’s bad enough that she’s only asking him to pay back $700 a month; but this is on top of her recent sentencing of another LIRR fraudster to pay back the $300,000 he stole at a mere $25 a month — meaning that it would theoretically take him 982(!) years (even though, according to the Bible, Methusaleh himself only made it to 969-years-old). This “sentence” would be funny if it wasn’t so sad for society and the rule of law. I’d like to point out to Judge Woods (whom I’d like to sentence for judicial malpractice in my own Court of Common Sense) that the dictionary defines a “judge” as “someone capable of making rational and wise decisions.” These recent decisions of hers could make even the famous iron statue of Lady Justice cry tears of shame underneath her blindfold. Richard Siegelman

Letters to the editor are welcomed by the The Roslyn News. We reserve the right to edit in the interest of space and clarity. All letters must include an address and daytime telephone number for verification. All material contributed to Anton Community Newspapers in any form becomes the property of the newspapers to use, modify and distribute as the newspaper staff or assigns see fit.


SALUTE TO VETERANS AN ANTON COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT • JULY 2  8, 2014

My Grandfather’s Last Thoughts Editor’s note: Michael Pevsner of Massapequa Park recently earned first place in Anton Community Newspapers and Cockpit USA’s essay contest about military heroes. Pevsner submitted the following essay about his grandfather, Private First Class Harold Hibler, who served in WWII, in the Army’s 101st Infantry. Hibler was a survivor of the Battle of the Bulge and received a Purple Heart for his actions. Hibler was discharged in 1945. He passed away on Aug. 23, 2008. My grandfather’s last thoughts could have been...of shrieking bullets overhead and seeing his young comrades so alive one moment, covered in blood the next during the Battle of the Bulge. It could have been leaving school at so early an age, taking any job to earn what wages he could to support his family during the Great Depression. It could have been of his private war with heart disease, finally succumbing after a valiant struggle. I hope, however, that my grandfather’s last thoughts were of the family he created and the loving legacy he left us all. Harold Hibler, PFC, was a man of integrity, hard work, and thrift. A decorated war hero who survived the Battle of the Bulge, went on to work his entire life, and still found time for his family. A man whose biggest desire in the world was to see his children and grandchildren receive the education that he did not have the chance to get, and to see them benefit from his lifetime of dedicated work. One who is remembered as a role model, a man whom I am proud to call my grandfather. One of my grandfather’s core values was hard work. As a child of the Depression, and a man who constantly worked from the age of 18, until he was 83, at jobs ranging from selling papers in the streets of Brooklyn, to owning a gas station supply shop in Queens. He held a serious work ethic in the highest regard, and that was not lost on me. He encouraged me to challenge myself and not waste a moment, goals I am reaching now by maintaining grades in four AP classes, working two jobs, and devoting countless hours of my time to my school’s Key Club; organizing events, collecting money for UNICEF, ringing the Salvation Army bell in December and running my

school’s Key Club website. All of these things gave my grandfather pride in me, and continue to give me pride in myself. My grandfather took me to work with him in Queens all of the time; more recently, he congratulated me on my first official job, at Massapequa News. Shortly after that, he called me from the hospital, while he had his own matters to deal with, to congratulate me on getting yet another job, at CVS. The last material object I showed my grandfather was my first pay stub from CVS. Never have I seen anyone smile as brightly. Another virtue my grandfather bestowed upon me was that of prudence. Again, as he was a child of the Depression-era, waste was not tolerable in his house. He firmly believed that one man’s refuse was another’s treasure, and on my own scavenger hunts through his basement, I have found vintage designer clothes, license plates, car parts, tools and even a portable record player, most of which he saved from the misfortune of spending eternity in a landfill. He was more resourceful than a Hollywood spy, and I inherited that sense. I have always followed after him in being careful not to throw away something that can be useful a second time, especially if that something can bring back memories or be resold as a collectible. One of my hobbies is collecting sneakers; my grandfather always wanted to see me sell a pair of rare sneakers for more than what I paid. Looking now at the values of some sneakers that I have accumulated, if I had the heart to part with a pair, I could do just that, turn my sneaker collection into an investment. Beyond that, among my most treasured possessions are random little journals and notebooks that my grandfather got as souvenirs from stores, business contacts, and promotions, each signed “love always”, that now house both memories of him and my written words spanning from the moment I was able to write, to present day. My grandfather was, and still is, a role model. The things I hold closest to my heart are the wealth of memories I have of him and the lessons and characteristics he passed on to me.

Michael Pevsner at American Airpower Museum

119039


THE WEEKEND / SALUTE TO VETERANS - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

Museum Of American Armor On The Fourth Of July The Museum of American Armor at Old Bethpage Village Restoration will roll out of its new $5 million home and present selected vehicles for operational display on Friday, July 4. Armor experiences will be offered to a number of D-Day veterans and new members of the museum while living historians provide visitors with a glimpse of what their

grandfathers experienced some 70 years ago while FDR is heard over vintage loudspeakers. The Museum of American Armor, at 1303 Round Swamp Road, in Old Bethpage, will be open on the Fourth between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Its collection includes World War II tanks, artillery, armored cars and weapons that broke the back of the Axis powers during World War II.

Purple Heart County 119016

6A

Nassau County Executive Ed Mangano was recently joined by Bob Chiappone, Commander Chapter 417 of Military Order of the Purple Heart; Connie Steers, Past Department Commander of Military Order of the Purple Heart; members of the Nassau County Veterans Service Agency; and local Purple Heart veterans as he officially designated Nassau County a Purple Heart County.


THE WEEKEND / SALUTE TO VETERANS - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

7A

| VETERANS WALL OF HONOR

Richard “Moon Man” Mooney, USMC, Operation DeSoto, Vietnam, circa 1967. Mooney is commander of V.F.W. Post 6910 in Floral Park Centre.

118816

Bryant Piontkowski, USN, Petty Officer Third Class, taken in Kaneohe Bay Marine Corps Air Station in Hawaii, circa 1968.

Jerry Lee, Sergeant of Westbury.

119056


THE WEEKEND / SALUTE TO VETERANS - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

GRAND OPENING

| VETERANS | WALL OF HONOR At left: Rinaldo “Len” Aloisio, Army, Corporal, Fort Bliss, Texas, circa November 1951.

At right: Jim Ansel, Army, served in Vietnam with 2/9 Artillery, 3rd Brigade of the 25th Infantry Division. Photo at Camp Enari the Brigade HQ, circa 1966.

Matthew J. Giametta, USMC, Lance Corporal, pictured with his sisters Lisa and Aprill. At left: Thomas C Costa, Air Force Reserves, Captain, Chaplain, served 1982-88, of Levittown, currently pastor at Our Lady of Mercy Church in Hicksville.

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119006

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John Fackre, Army, Specialist 4th Class, of Williston Park served in the Army Adjutant General Corps. He served in accounting, data processing, and as an illustrator. Photo circa 1967, Cam Rahn Bay, South Vietnam.


THE WEEKEND - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

9A

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10A

THE WEEKEND - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

HOROSCOPE By Holiday Mathis

WORD FIND Try r your luck ry

ARIES (March 21-April 19). There’s so much going on this week that you may feel as though maintaining your possessions just takes too much of your time. Do it anyway. Neat and clean environs reinforce the mindset that you’ve got your act together. Your responsible attitude makes you attractive and successful.

Solution: 9 Letters

© 2014 Australian Word Games Dist. by Creators Syndicate Inc.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20). Your fantasy life is strong, and you could spend a good deal of energy building castles in the air. You can’t live in them, but some of the ideas are practical enough to apply once you touch back down to Earth. A healthy balance means allowing yourself to dream but commanding yourself to take practical steps, as well. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). This week shows you in an ambitious mood, and you’ll require much of yourself. Of course, it’s difficult to make big things happen if you are distracted by every enticement along the way. Because you’re after the larger experiences of life, you feel the need to bring your lower appetites into control. CANCER (June 22-July 22). This week you have something that really needs to be accomplished and a message to match the task. There will be no such thing as over-communicating it. To keep yourself and everyone around you on purpose, repeat yourself often. Find new ways to say it. With constant communication, you will get there.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Empowering talk leads to exciting developments in a relationship. Things really are getting better. Practice describing your experience, feelings and needs. Avoid claiming that another person is “driving you crazy” or “making you mad.” The more responsibility you can take for your own state the better off you’ll be. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). The mightiest warrior knows that battling isn’t the only way to victory. Some of the best victories are handed over. Negotiation would be better in this week’s case, but if you must go to the mat, offer your opponent nothing to resist, and there won’t be much of a fight. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). You’ll gladly deliver good news. As for the bad news, you might leave it for someone else to tell — or not — hoping that by ignoring it, depriving it of your breath and attention, it will somehow disappear. Sometimes this method works! At least if you focus yourself on the positive there will be far less room for the negative. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). You’ll have a knack for speaking in the vernacular most appropriate to your company this week, and you’ll be around many types. There is a Malayan proverb that goes, “Trumpet in a herd of elephants; crow in the company of cocks; bleat in a flock of goats.” You’ll do it all! CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). The way you feel about a loved one is similar to the way you feel about music. You know there is meaning there, but the meaning is beyond words. Go ahead and try putting it into words anyway. Your loved one will benefit from knowing that your affections run deep. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). You’re on the fast track. Creativity is flowing, and your social network is growing. Pretty soon you won’t be able to tell the difference between your business relationships and your social relationships. Pool resources with family, colleagues and friends. You’ll get there faster getting there together. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). You may feel somewhat depleted at the start of the week, but don’t worry. The well of joy inside you hasn’t dried up; it’s just that you can’t reach it with a broken rope. New tools are needed. Where will you find them? Almost anywhere you look. Your intention to be happy will lead to many fortuitous discoveries.

THIS WEEK’S BIRTHDAYS Before you make any radical changes, ask yourself, “Is this something I can do for the rest of my life?” Permanent changes will be life enhancing, while committing to something short term will be more effort than it’s worth. An August business endeavor is a win as long as you don’t break your own investment rules. October brings a fortuitous meeting, and romance will sweep into your life. January endeavors require heart, faith and sweat, but they will be some of your best times this year. COPYRIGHT 2014 CREATORS.COM

aces ante baccarat backgammon banker bet bingo blackj k ack kj bridge canasta cards casino chess counter crib Crown dealing

dice dominoes euchre face five hundred full house gain gin rummy heart jack jackpot keno kismet land low ludo Mastermind

money Monopoly pawn poker pot prize scrabble seeking shake skip Sky City Star tokens Wrest Point Y Yahtzee

Solution: Ta T ke a punt

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). You are devoted and true, and yet there is something inside you that is weary from doing the right thing. Being good doesn’t always feel good. You’ll start to wonder whether there’s such a thing as being too good. The malaise you feel is a sign that you need a break. Demand less of yourself this week.

CONTRACT BRIDGE By Steve Becker


11A

THE WEEKEND - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

Weekly Sudoku Puzzle Enter digits from 1 to 9 into the blank spaces. Every row must contain one of each digit. So must every column, as must every 3x3 square.

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A D·O ZEN TO

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12A

THE WEEKEND - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

Weekly Sudoku Puzzle Enter digits from 1 to 9 into the blank spaces. Every row must contain one of each digit. So must every column, as must every 3x3 square.

2 8 3 9 7

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5 1

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C IROSSW~ORD/ By Frank A . Longo

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13A

THE WEEKEND - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

“TICKED OFF” Vic

WORD FIND Dinner at the pub Solution: 9 Letters

© 2014 Australian Word Games Dist. by Creators Syndicate Inc.

JULY 18 • 8PM

bar beer biscuits bottle bourbon brandy burger cashews celebration cellar chardonnay cheese dinner disco

fish ‘n’ chips friends garden garlic bread ice lager lamb laugh lime lounge middy new pad thai parmigiana

It's an evening of laugh-out-loud funny with YouTube sensation ("Bread and Milk") Vic DiBitetto. You know him from his appearances Fridays on WPLJ's The Todd Show. Hosted by Monk

peanuts pool prawns publican roast of the day rum salad saloon schooner shiraz snacks steak vegetarian whisky

Solution: Cheap eats

CONTRACT BRIDGE By Steve Becker rwnewyork.com

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14A

THE WEEKEND - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

It Doesn’t Have To Be An Unhappy Ending

Arnold Standard represents you before the NYS Workers' Compensation Board and/or US and NYS Department of Labor, to settle penalties which have been imposed --- for a fraction of the original amounts. Our work also includes performing a review of the circumstances prior to lodging the correct appeal. We achieve closure at the local level WITHOUT referral for FICA correction. Our initial consultation with you is conducted without any charge. New York State is going back up to SIX YEARS & assessing major penalties for the above subjects. This happens when you have classified people as Independent Contractors & individuals have been treated as self-employed, or there has been a lapse in coverage. Frequently, there are minimum wage and/or overtime considerations because of time and attendance record keeping errors. We manage the entire process from field audit through the appeal phase with the Department. Our record in this area is excellent, and there is no upfront cost, because we are only paid after we save you money. Email ra@arnoldstandard for a free copy of our presentation at a recent seminar before the NYS Society of CPAs.

117186

A fellow in his late 50s, a successful salesman in the medical-equipment field, stopped by my office recently to discuss addiction. He has been reading my columns on the topic, and wanted to share some thoughts. He is an alcoholic who has been sober for several decades, and now works with others trying to beat addictions, most commonly, heroin. “The story is always the same,” he said, nodding his head knowingly. “Always the same.” By that, he means how people become addicts to substances ranging from alcohol to opiates and what they do to deny it, hide it and ultimately get in deeper and deeper. Listen to the stories of addicts, he said, and whether it’s a Hollywood star who gulps Grey Goose from a water bottle or a suburban kid copping oxycontin out of medicine cabinets, the trajectory of the tragedy is always the same. Then, there comes a point where some addicts get clean and many don’t. Here, all of the stories aren’t the same. Sometimes, with luck, the parents can step in, and after trying everything, try yet something else. And it works. Add in support from people like my sober salesman, and the story doesn’t have to end in tears. Here’s one such story from a local mom: As a parent of a heroin addict, I have been following with great interest your series on addiction. The disease of addiction is very insidious. It starts out slowly and then takes over every facet of the addict’s life and the family’s life as well. Our family went through many years of pain and suffering. I don’t think that words can describe the helplessness that one feels as they watch a loved one self-destruct. As a family unit we went to all of the family components of every rehab that my child was involved in—the words can be helpful, but if the actions of the addict don’t change, you still have that feeling of helplessness. Unfortunately, our society looks at addiction as if it should be controlled by the addict—as if they can willingly just turn off that switch that makes them use and become healed. People you think of as friends don’t give you the same comfort they would were your child suffering from cancer, diabetes or any other disease. “You, the addict, should fix it yourself.” Our insurance companies think that patients should be cured after

FROM EDITOR

THE

JOHN OWENS three or four days of detox. They won’t pay for extended care, and unless the family has thousands and thousands of dollars to pay for their loved one’s care, with no guarantee of a cure, you are on your own. There is a twofold problem with most of the rehab facilities in the New York: They all seem primarily concerned about the financial aspect of the case, and most of the programs are rather punitive in nature. After a particularly bad run, I took my son to a facility in North Palm Beach, Fla. Their whole approach to the addict is so different from anything I have seen in New York. They are genuinely concerned with the addict’s recovery. The clients live in an apartment and are responsible for taking care of cooking, cleaning and such. In addition to therapy sessions, they go to outside Narcotics Anonymous and Alcoholics Anonymous meetings, and are encouraged to get a sponsor. They have an opportunity to meet many sober people. They also do extracurricular activities, such as going to the gym, movies and bowling. They get to see and live a sober life. This can only be accomplished with the client’s willingness to do step work and participate in these groups. After 90 days there, my son came home a changed person. He is actively involved in AA, this includes working the steps. He has made many new sober friends. He is now clean almost eight months. I applaud your efforts to bring attention to this terrible disease. I want to let people know that there can be a light at the end of the tunnel. Thank you. This is a story worth sharing. Any other readers who have a story to share, please email it to me. Your insights and experiences are important. And your anonymity is assured. John Owens is editor in chief of Anton Community Newspapers. Email: jowens@antonnews.com


THE WEEKEND - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

Leaf Blower Flap Isn’t Just About Noise For over 40 years, gas-powered leaf blowers have been a focal point for irritation and frustration over neighborhood noise. The issue is percolating up all over the country again, and now it’s also about swallowing doody. Gas-powered leaf blowers aren’t the only gardening and landscaping apparatus that use loud two-stroke engines (it takes two piston movements to complete one cycle of combustion), but it’s pretty easy to understand what lawn mowers and chainsaws do and why they are used. The purpose, efficiency and effectiveness as a gardening tool of using powerful blowers on a typical 50by-100-foot property is more mysterious. Even the phrase “leaf blowers” is a misnomer. They don’t blow just leaves. They blow everything that’s on and in and around your lawn into the air, where it lingers for hours until it settles onto the neighbor’s car and their kids’ faces. Mold, pollen, seeds, little rocks, dead bugs, live ticks, it’s all launched at high speed. The polite word for it is “fugitive dust,” but on the street we call it “rodent feces,” and worse. In two-stroke engines, fuel is mixed with oil for lubrication, and about 30 percent of the mixture goes unburned and gets spewed out. That smell in the air after the gardener leaves is a mix of

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At left: Now hear this: More than grass clippings go airborne.

VIEWPOINT

MICHAEL A. MILLER carbon monoxide, nitrous oxides and various carcinogenic hydrocarbons. In late 2011, a study by Edmunds. com, the auto information site, found that the hydrocarbon emissions from half an hour of yard work with a two-stroke Echo leaf blower generated about the same carbon monoxide and non-methane hydrocarbon emissions as driving the 3,900 miles from Texas to Alaska in a 6,200-pound Ford Raptor. We know a lot more now than we did 10 and 20 years ago about allergies, asthma and the dangers of extended exposure to very fine particulate matter, which can penetrate deep into lungs, enter the bloodstream and harm the heart and other organs. This isn’t a joke. The noise is a problem, especially for people with limited mobility who

can’t easily escape, or for the mother who finally got an infant to sleep. Leaf blower noise seems particularly jarring, especially throttling up, and seems to carry unusually longer distances and penetrate walls and closed windows. But while most people perceive gas-powered blowers to be much louder than other machinery, it doesn’t always measure out in as convincingly, creating doubt about action and enforcement. Even louder than a 115-decibel blower is the sound of a little kid coughing. Some landscapers in my neighborhood have been buying even louder, larger and more inappropriate machinery. I frequently see workers sent out with no hearing protection,

taught to gun up the throttle to maximum, always. Perhaps some business owners are trying to make a point. One East End landscaper told the East Hampton Star that banning or regulating blowers was “the stupidest idea…If they don’t like the noise and people making a living…people should leave town and go somewhere where they don’t have leaves or people to bother.” The Washington State Capitol in Olympia sits in a 290-acre park, from which work crews clear 80 tons (180 dump truck loads) of leaves annually. It’s a big space. Nassau County has 14 incorporated villages that are smaller than 290 acres. Earlier this year, in response to legislators fed-up with gas blower noise and smells, testing determined that using electric tools or rakes would require seven extra workers. In this century, information travels faster than sound, and a lot of old claims about imposing hardships on businesses aren’t going to hold up. Opposing reasonable standards and precautions will grow support for a total ban. Mike Miller has worked in state and local government. Email: mmiller column.gmail.com

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THE WEEKEND - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

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THE WEEKEND - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

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THE WEEKEND - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

SLIRR Commuters Have Ways To Survive Strike EYE ON

THE ISLAND

MIKE BARRY Recognizing a strike which impacted commuters effective Sunday, July 20, would inflict insufficient mayhem, the Long Island Rail Road’s (LIRR) union leaders want their prospective work stoppage pushed back to September. This comes as no surprise. But I was astonished to see the four U.S. House Members who represent Nassau County — Rep. Peter King (R-Seaford), Rep. Steve Israel (D-Huntington), Rep. Carolyn McCarthy (D-Mineola) and Rep. Gregory Meeks (D-St. Albans) — agreed with the LIRR’s union leaders while invoking an absurd cover story: the fate of Long Island’s summer tourism industry. “We encourage the MTA [Metropolitan Transportation Authority, the LIRR’s parent] to accept a proposal from the involved employee labor unions to extend the current ‘cooling

off’ period for an additional 60 days,” stated a June 19 letter to MTA chairman and CEO Thomas Prendergast, which was signed by the aforementioned U.S. House Members, and six others, from downstate New York. The correspondence is posted at www.smartunionlirr.com, and goes on to say “we are concerned about the

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effect that any potential work stoppage [in July 2014] could have on Long Island tourism, as the LIRR is a vital means of transportation to the East End and other destinations during the peak tourism season in the summer months.” True enough. Yet if you asked typical LIRR daily commuters whether they could more easily withstand a July LIRR strike, as compared to one in September, I daresay 90-plus percent of commuters would want a LIRR strike to occur in July. It is an easier time of year to take vacation, their children are on summer break, and the roadways are less clogged because neither school buses nor teachers are making the trips they take between September and June. To its credit, the LIRR’s Commuter Council, an entity created by the state legislature, began distributing pamphlets to LIRR riders at Penn Station in late June, offering guidance on how to prepare for a July strike. Meanwhile, the LIRR’s unions have the downstate Congressional delegation and two separate Obama administration-appointed panels backing them, even though the recommendations of those presidential nominees were non-binding, whereas the MTA’s labor negotiators are fending for themselves at the moment. The MTA has remained too silent throughout these proceedings, and could learn something from The Metropolitan Opera, which is currently in the midst of contract negotiations with 15 of the 16 unions representing employees that work at the Met. In a full-page New York Times advertisement (June 20), the Met’s executive committee explained how work rules forged in a different era are today financially unsustainable, and draining the institution’s resources. One example the Met

LIRR brass at a recent event promoting summer travel. If a strike comes, would it be better now, or in September? cited in its ad: the orchestra receives 16 weeks (yes, 16) of annual paid vacation. I’m sure comparable, unjustifiable expenditures are set into motion by the LIRR’s work rules. The MTA should take a full-page advertisement in a major daily newspaper and explain clearly some of the LIRR’s antiquated work rules to the public. LIRR commuters do, however, have weapons in 2014 that were not at their disposal in 1994, the last time the LIRR’s unions walked off the job. The first are the dramatic technological advances that have been made in the workplace. Given a laptop and an iPhone, most people can conduct business almost anywhere and, while they may miss face-to-face contact with colleagues and customers, a LIRR strike in 2014 is a major inconvenience as opposed to an event that can cripple the economy. The last 20 years have also brought widespread business continuity improvements made in the wake of 9-11, and Superstorm Sandy, times when New York City offices were either closed or inaccessible for extended periods of time. Should a LIRR strike occur, and continue for weeks, or even months, you’ll see city-based businesses rent space in either Nassau or Suffolk to accommodate their Long Island employees. Indeed, rather than shutting down the Island, a prolonged LIRR strike could boost to its commercial real estate market. Mike Barry, vice president of media relations for an insurance industry trade group, has worked in government and journalism. Email: MFBarry@optonline.net


THE WEEKEND - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

Nassau’s Invisible Immigrant Community Most Long Islanders don’t think about Belmont Park beyond the annual Belmont Stakes. But look closely, and you will see that year in year out, the track is a very active and important economic force. Belmont Park has been part of the Long Island community since 1905. The grounds reside partially within Floral Park and Elmont, overlapping slightly into Queens. It typically holds nine or 10 races each day, Wednesday through Sunday. It’s a major part of the economy not just for those towns, but also for Long Island as a whole. Its economic contribution rests largely on the shoulders of an invisible group of men and women — nearly all of whom are immigrants. In racing parlance they are known as “backstretch” employees. These people perform essential jobs related to the care of the horses, including grooming, feeding and exercising. At Belmont Park, there are approximately 2,000 backstretch workers, most of whom live on the park grounds, according to Paul Ruchames, executive director for Backstretch Employee Service Team (BEST) of New York, a non-profit that provides health care and other services to the workers. “The horse racing world, which generates hundreds of millions of dollars, would not exist or it would be very tiny in New York without these workers,” said Ruchames. Despite their critical role in Long Island’s economy, there is little integration between the backstretch workers and the local community. Part of the reason is that the vast majority of workers live in dormitories on the grounds. Some have children who go to the local schools. Some take second jobs at the car wash or deli nearby. Most, according to Ruchames, “keep a low profile.” Life on the backstretch starts at 4 a.m. and ends around 11 a.m. Nearly all of the jobs these workers perform are physically demanding. “One is called a hot walker, who walks the horse before and after exercise,” said Ruchames. “Then there is an exercise rider.” There’s also the groom, who Ruchames said is the secret behind each horse. It is the groom who has the best gauge of the horse’s health and condition. “The groom bandages and takes care of the horse,” he said. “The groom knows the psychology of the horse. He knows his eating habits and sleeping habits.” All of these jobs require the men and women to be outside and exposed

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LONG ISLAND WINS

MARYANN SLUTSKY to the elements for hours at a time. And there’s always the risk of being kicked or thrown by animals weighing well over a thousand pounds. “There’s a lot of shoveling,” said Ruchames, “and restraining the horse takes a lot of strength.” The immigrants performing these jobs accept these risks. Most come from rural villages in Mexico, Honduras and Guatemala — many from the same village or neighborhood. A good portion has had exposure to, if not hands-on experience, working with farm animals. For some, it’s a family tradition. Despite the hard labor, one thing is clear to Ruchames: The backstretch workers have a tremendous work ethic and truly love what they do. “They come to have relationships with the horses,” he said. Think of the bond people have with their pet, he said, “Now imagine that it’s your job, eight hours a day, working with your pet. Your pet runs a race — and wins!” Love or not, these are the proverbial jobs Americans simply won’t do. Ruchames said when trainers advertise openings, they get few, if any, responses from American-born workers. In the past, backstretch workers were African-Americans. Now, the role falls mainly to immigrants. Today’s backstretch workers are hired by the horse trainers, and brought to the U.S. on H2-B visas, like farmworkers. BEST was established in 1989 by people who had these working conditions in mind. “It was originally started just to handle drug and alcohol problems,” said Ruchames. “About seven years ago, it expanded the mission to include health care.” Largely funded by New York Racing Association (NYRA) and the New York Thoroughbred Horseman’s Association, BEST helps subsidize the workers’ health care costs, as well as provides alcohol and substance abuse counseling, psychological counseling and prescription medical assistance. It also established an on-site medical facility that offers primary care, chiropractic services, acupuncture and other treatments.

Dr. Fred Cogan, primary physician at the BEST Backstretch Clinic, said that he sees ailments related to the grueling outdoor work, and notices similarities with those in law enforcement, where long-term exposure to the elements is common. Cogan tries to ensure basic preventative care, such as routine blood tests and annual physicals, as well as immunizations. Planned Parenthood comes by once a month to offer their services. The benefit of the program goes beyond the backstretch. Over a five-year period, Ruchames said, “We saved the local community over $2 million in health care costs by what we are doing here. People who are going to our medical facility are not going to the emergency room.” Backstretch workers also receive childcare through the Belmont Child Care Association, popularly known as Anna House in honor of Anna Cordero, the late wife of Hall-of-Fame jockey Angel Cordero. Anna House is open from 5 a.m. to 1 p.m. to accommodate the workers’ schedule.

Top: Paul Ruchames, executive director for Backstretch Employee Service Team (BEST) of New York Bottom: A mural vividly portrays track — and backstretch — life. There’s also an on-site chaplaincy run by a separate non-profit called the Racetrack Chaplaincy of America N.Y. But non-profit organizations can do only so much. The passing of comprehensive immigration reform would be a game-changer for backstretch workers. For example, they would be able to reap the benefits of taxes they pay. The workers pay into Social Security, but rarely see the benefit because many ultimately move back to their country. We’re ready to wager that immigration reform would bring a better future for these workers — and for Long Island. Maryann Sinclair Slutsky is the executive director of Long Island Wins, a communications organization promoting commonsense immigration policy solutions that work for all Long Islanders. Email: mslutsky@longislandwins.com


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THE WEEKEND - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

Key To Long Island’s Future: Think Transit

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119015

One concept that addresses many of Long Island’s economic and social needs is “transit-oriented development.” It should become a prominent focal point in this election season, as Long Islanders discuss our future ambitions. Transit-oriented development (TOD) refers to any development — housing, office, retail or any combination of them — located adjacent to transit stations (for us, the Long Island Rail Road). What’s especially impressive is the number of priority needs it addresses on Long Island. From an economic standpoint, we need to grow job opportunities, and TOD provides settings for office and retail jobs, as well as housing. We need to increase our population, in order to expand our economy and reduce the individual tax burden, and TOD enables higher-density growth without impacting less commercial areas. We need to provide more varieties of housing — smaller units and more rental options that appeal to young people as well as those looking to down-size from larger homes — and TOD can accommodate those varieties as well. From an environmental standpoint, we need to preserve our open space and the suburban lifestyle for which Long Island is renowned; we need to reduce our reliance on cars, and we need to be more creative in how we address our parking needs, so that we eliminate the growing blight of cars spreading out from transit stations in all directions. Transit-oriented development can accomplish all of that and more. For a look at innovative approaches to parking, for instance, see the Long Island Index’s ParkingPlus Design Challenge. From the standpoint of increasing innovation, we need to better link our centers of innovation — our universities, research centers and business incubators — and the people who work at them. We need to provide enhanced downtowns offering the mix of housing, entertainment, workspace and transit access that young people seek. We need to provide more options for reverse-commuting so that the talent and businesses we want to attract will move to Long Island rather than to Westchester County, southern Connecticut or northern

OPINION

NANCY RAUCH DOUZINAS New Jersey — nearby locations where reverse-commuting is so much easier and economic growth is far surpassing Long Island’s. Again, transit-oriented development can support all of that. The good news for Long Island is that crucial resources needed to expand TOD are already in place. First, we have the Long Island Rail Road and its 124 stations. Local communities will have to decide for themselves whether they want transit-oriented development and on what terms, but many larger communities do — for any number of the reasons cited above. Second, we have the space. There are more than 4,000 acres of surface parking lots in and around Long Island’s downtowns, and that space can be far more creatively imagined and effectively used. Think what a difference it would make if that space was contributing to Long Island’s economy in innovative ways while offering even more parking. That’s the reality of what’s possible, as the ParkingPlus Design Challenge reveals. Third, we have the access that transit provides to all parts of Greater New York City, the business capital of the world, and we need to put that access to greater use for Long Island. Election season is upon us and will be escalating as we approach November. Long Islanders should ask candidates for office what they will do to enhance transit-oriented development. It’s time for those candidates to hear that we are tired of watching the jobs that we need go to those other nearby locations. We need transit-oriented development and the economic growth that goes with it. It’s time for Long Island to get more TOD. Nancy Rauch Douzinas is president of the Garden City-based Rauch Foundation. Website: www.long islandindex.org


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THE WEEKEND - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

Summer Of ‘69 Celebration BY ANTON NEWS STAFF

EDITORIAL@ANTONNEWS.COM

are required. For reservations, call 516-572-4066. The hours are Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. An Apollo 11 45th anniversary

FRIENDS ACADEMY CLASS OF 2014 COLLEGE MATRICULATIONS

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Strong Minds. Kind Hearts.

Congratulations Class of 2014!

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SIMISOLA AKINOLA JAMISEN BEECHLER ERNST ADRIENNE BIELAWSKI DAVID BINLER MARGARET BRENNAN EMMA BROWN MARY BURNS CAROLYN CAHILL KABIR CHABRA NICHOLAS CHAPMAN CAM CONSTANTS GABRIELLE CRON PATRICK CROWLEY IAN D’SILVA RYAN DOBRIN RACHEL DVOSKIN ANDREW FEINSTEIN DYLAN FOLEY

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dinner and Q&A with astronauts for Lunar Module workers. No autoFred Haise, Buzz Aldrin and Walter graphs are allowed. For details, contact Cunningham takes place at 6 p.m. Carol Nelson at 516-572-4026. To make Admission is $100 per person and $50 reservations, call 516-572-4066.

119067

The Cradle of Aviation Museum, Charles Lindbergh Blvd., Garden City, is turning back time and celebrating the Summer of 1969 on Friday, July 11 and Saturday, July 12 On July 20, 1969 Apollo Astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin became the first human beings in history to walk on the moon. On Friday astronauts Walter Cunningham (Apollo 7) and Fred Haise (Apollo 13) will give a lecture about the first moon exploration from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $20. To purchase tickets, visit www.cradleofaviation.org and click on the events link. On Saturday the Summer of ‘69 Exhibit opens, and it will run through September. The exhibit features over 50 photographs of the Apollo missions, 35 Woodstock photographs and artifacts, Mets memorabilia and more. The exhibit is free with museum admission. A Lunar Module worker reunion takes place from noon to 4 p.m. The reunion is open to all of those who worked on the Apollo program. Admission is free, but reservations


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THE WEEKEND - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

red truck eState SaLe! Art

La Nort nd h Al Sh li ore an ce

Antiques Objects

Trees Exhibit At LIU Post BY ANTON NEWS STAFF

Benefiting the north Shore Land aLLiance to Save our Land & Water!

EDITORIAL@ANTONNEWS.COM

The art exhibit Trees brings the outdoors inside at LIU Post’s Steinberg Museum of Art at Hillwood, 720 Northern Blvd., Brookville, from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. through Friday, July 11. Featuring watercolors, hanging sculptures and paintings on canvas, the exhibit contains 30 works by local artists.

JuLy 12 & 13 - 10am to 4pm the green VaLe SchooL 250 VaLentineS Lane, oLd BrookViLLe, nY $5 per perSon entrY fee to Be heLd at

Artist John Day contributed a sculpture created from more than 500 branches collected from Leeds Pond Preserve in Plandome Manor and the LIU Post forest. Elizabeth Kolligs, inspired by the changing season of Shu Swamp on the North Shore of Long Island in Mill Neck, contributed large paintings focused on changing seasons. The exhibit is free and open to all. For details, call 516-299-4073 or visit www.liu.edu/museum.

Journey in Stone & Wood BY ANTON NEWS STAFF

EDITORIAL@ANTONNEWS.COM

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119013

oxford reStoration, joanna Badami appraiSaLS Ltd., poSt wineS

The art exhibit Journey in Stone & Wood opens at the Art League of Long Island’s Jeanie Tengelsen Gallery, 107 East Deer Park Road, Dix Hills, on Sunday, July 20. Working in marble, limestone, alabaster and wood, 12 sculptors studying with Thom Janusz will exhibit work done in his Stone and Wood Carving programs. Participants in the exhibit include Rose Burke, Temi Cain, Alex Fuchs, Riva Gelman, Angela Goldman, John Lemmerman, Michael McDyer, Paul Moreno, Bruce Rosenzweig, Bette Rubin, Dorothy Schwartz and Jan Shulman. An artist’s reception takes place from 3 to 5 p.m. on opening night. The gallery is open free of charge Monday through Thursday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., Friday 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and

Art by Thom Janusz weekends from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The phone number is 631-462-5400. For details, visit www.artleagueli.org.


23A

THE WEEKEND - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

| SPECIAL EVENTS Summer Splash

and 11:30 a.m. and evening sessions begin at 7 and 8:30 p.m. Beginners should bring one skein of light-colored yarn in a worsted weight and a pair of size 8 knitting needles. Students who are already knitters should bring their patterns, needles and yarn. Advance and in-person registration must be accompanied by a check for $80 payable to the Cold Spring Harbor Library. To register, call 631-692-6820.

Thursday, July 3 Children can enjoy summer craft stations, scavenger hunts and exploration tables at the Cold Spring Harbor Whaling Museum, 301 Main St., from 2 to 5 p.m. The activity is free with museum admission (members, free). The phone number is 631-367-3418.

Green Teens Thursday, July 3 The Long Island Children’s Museum, 11 Davis Ave., Garden City, hosts science and nature related activities with students from the Green Teens program from 2 to 4 p.m. The program engages students from neighboring high schools to develop and teach interactive nature and environmental education programs. The activity is free with museum admission.

Firework Cruise Friday, July 4 And Saturday, July 5 Freeport Water Taxi at Richmond St. hosts a firework cruise from 9 to 11 p.m.

Mood Indigo

Attendees will enjoy free tastings from wineries, distilleries and breweries. Admission is $30 per person. For details, call 516-521-7744. The website is www.freeportwatertaxi.com.

Blood Drive Tuesday, July 8 The Athletes for Life Blood Drive takes place at Long Island Blood

Thursday, July 10 Mood Indigo plays at Great Neck’s Bow Squire Cinemas, 115 Middle Neck Road, at 7:30 p.m. The film is about Colin, a bachelor, whose hobbies include developing a “pianocktail” (a cocktail-making Services, 905 Walt Whitman Road, piano) and devouring worldly dishes Melville, from 2:30 to 8:30 p.m. prepared by his trusty chef. When For details, call 516-655-2299. he learns that his best friend has a new American girlfriend, his lifestlye changes. Knitting Classes Tickets are $15 (students, $10); Wednesdays, July 9, 16, 23, and 30 They cost $20 at the door. To buy Beginners and intermediate knitters tickets, call 516-829-2570 or visit can learn how to improve their www.goldcoastfilmfestival.org/ techniques with experts at the Cold furman#mood. Spring Harbor Library, 95 Harbor Road. Morning sessions begin at 10 see EVENTS on page 24A

IS BACK

T W O G R E AT E V E NTS. O N E D E L I C I O U S W E E K E N D. Ten evenings of the best in new independent films from the U.S. and around the world. Enjoy film premieres, Q&As with filmmakers and receptions.

FILM PASSES $85 SINGLE TICKETS on sale July 7 $10 adults $8 seniors $5 students

July 11th & 12th

SAYRE PARK 156 Snake Hollow Road. Bridgehampton, NY

Don’t Miss out - Get your tickets now

www.danstasteofsummer.com #DansTos Must be 21+ to attend

Presenting Sponsors

For more information call 631.227.0188

Platinum Sponsors

Gold Sponsors

Beyond Luxury

www.stonybrookfilmfestival.com • (631) 632-ARTS [2787]

HamptonAmbassador.com

Silver Sponsors

STALLER CENTER FOR THE ARTS / STONY BROOK UNIVERSITY 100 Nicolls Road, Stony Brook, NY 118772

Bronze Sponsors


24A

THE WEEKEND - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

Midsummer Night Dance Thursday, July 10 Learn how to dance in the Celebration Tent at the Vanderbilt Museum, 180 Little Neck Road, Centerport, from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Lessons will be held from 6:30 to 7 p.m. Dances will feature ballroom and others. Admission is $30 at door and $25 in advance. Sessions will also be held on Thursdays, Aug. 7, 21 and 28 and Sept. 4. Dance classes for the whole season cost $160 ($20 per dance). Tickets can be purchased at www.bit. ly/1qaLmoq.

Wings and Beer Saturday, July 12 The Summer Wings and Beer Festival takes place from 2 to 7:30 p.m. at Cannon’s Blackthorn, 49 North Village Ave., Rockville Centre. Patrons will receive a total of 16 wings and 42 ounces of craft beer divided between eight Long Island restaurants and four local breweries. Tickets are $35. They can be purchased in advance at www. bestwingsli.com. • NASSAU COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART Closed for show change on Monday, July 7 through Friday, July 18

Garden Party Through Sunday, July 6 Garden Party, an art exhibit inspired by flowers, is on display at the Nassau County Museum of Art, 1 Museum Dr., Roslyn. Artists include Louis Comfort Tiffany, Marc Chagall, Larry Rivers, James Rosenquist, Maurice Prendergast, David Hockney, Janet Fish, Jane Freilicher, Robert Mapplethorpe and Georgia O’Keeffe. The exhibit is free with museum admission. Call 516-484-9338, ext. 12 to inquire about group tours.

AftermondernisM Through Sunday, July 6 The exhibit AftermondernisM is on display at the Nassau County Museum of Art. The exhibit, which focuses on the work of Michael Bevilacqua, James Busby and Ridley Howard, broadens the concept of fractured asymmetry. This exhibition illustrates the broad range of styles spanning non-objective abstraction through sharp focused realism.

Outdoor Life

It explores man’s relationship to the countryside through the art pieces “Large Winter Scene,” “Clear Weather in the Valley,” “Luncheon of the Boating Party,” “La Grande Jatte” and “Max Schmitt in a Single Scull.”

Nassau County Museum Gardens Ongoing View the flowers and the greenery at the Nassau County Museum of Art. The museum’s large garden contains quiet nooks, a beautiful view and horticulture. The grounds are free and open to all.

Sculpture Park Ongoing Visit the Nassau County Museum of Art and view more than 40 sculptures, many of them monumental in size, by artists including Fernando Botero, George Rickey and Mark DiSuvero are set up to interact with nature on the museum’s property. The grounds are free and open to all.

Walking Trails

Through Sunday, July 6 The film Outdoor Life plays at the Nassau County Museum at 11 a.m., noon, 1 and 3 p.m.

Ongoing Walk the trails of the Nassau County Museum of Art. The museum’s 145 acres include many marked nature trails through the woods, perfect for family hikes or independent exploration. The grounds are free and open to all.

Family Sundays Ongoing Each Sunday, the Nassau County Museum of Art offers a 1 p.m., docent-led family walk-through of the exhibition and supervised art activities for the whole family beginning at 1:30 p.m. Special family guides of the main exhibition are available in the galleries. Family Sundays at the Museum are free with museum admission, reservations are not needed. • ONGOING EVENTS

Equine Art Show

115655

EVENTS from page 23A

Through Wednesday, July 30 Equine Extravaganza & Other Things, an art exhibit inspired by horses and farm life, showcases at the Cold Spring Harbor Library and Environmental Center, 95 Harbor Road. The exhibit will include equine-inspired watercolor, acrylic paintings and a sampling of artist Diana Berthold’s traditional, non-traditional, pictorial, and ribbon quilts.

The art is presented for viewing, but it is also available to buy. To view Berthold’s art, visit www. distinctivedesignsbydiana. The phone number is 631-692-6820.

Rhythm & Repetition Through August 10 The exhibit Rhythm & Repetition in 20th Century Art is on display at the Heckscher Museum of Art, 2 Prime Ave., Huntington. The exhibit focuses on artists who use repeated shapes as a method to organize their compositions. Drawn entirely from the museum’s permanent collection, the exhibition features work by Berenice Abbott, Richard Anuskiewicz, Oscar Bluemner, Arthur Dove, Childe Hassam, Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Richenburg, Emilio Sanchez and Friedrich Stowasser (Friedensreich Hundertwasser), among others. Museum hours are Wednesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the weekend. The phone number is 631-351-3250.

Don Resnick: Essence of Place Through August 15 The art exhibit Don Resnick: Essence of Place is on display at Hofstra University Museum’s Emily Lowe Gallery. Curated by Karen T. Albert, the Museum’s associate director of exhibitions and collections, the exhibit features the essential and eloquent beauty of the land, sea and sky on Long Island and the Resnick family enclave in Maine. An interactive touch-screen kiosk in the gallery will provide supplemental material on the artist’s process as well as his artistic training. The phone number is 516-463-5672. The museum website is www.hofstra. edu/museum. For a map and directions, visit www.hofstra.edu/map.

Shakespeare Festival Through Sunday, August 24 The Arena Players Repertory Theater group will present their 26th annual Shakespeare Festival at the Vanderbilt Museum, 180 Little Neck Road, Centerport. Performances are given on Wednesdays and Fridays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 7 p.m. Actors in full Elizabethan costume perform on the Vanderbilt Courtyard stage against the backdrop of the historic mansion and Bell Tower. Tickets are $15. For reservations, call 516-293-0674. Performances are cancelled on Friday, July 4 and Sunday, July 27.

see EVENTS on page 25A


25A

THE WEEKEND - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

Tai Chi Classes

EVENTS from page 24A

Melanesian Works Through August 28 Hofstra University’s museum showcases artwork created by communities of the South Pacific. The art is located in the Joan and Donald E. Axinn Library, Ninth Floor, South Campus. For directions and a map, visit www.hofstra.edu/ campusmap/.

Wednesdays and Sundays Take a tai chi class at the Old Westbury Gardens, 71 Old Westbury Rd., at 10:30 a.m. Tai chi, a unique form of moving meditation, calms the mind, relaxes the body, and strengthens the spirit. Professional instructor Linda Cafiero designs classes with all experience levels in mind. Classes are $15 per session (members, $5). The phone number is 516-333-0048.

Alice’s Wonderland

Yoga at the Gardens

Through August 31 Journey down the rabbit hole at the Long Island Children’s Museum, 11 Davis Ave, Garden City. The exhibit inspires curiosity, encourages exploration and helps make the unknown more familiar. Children will enjoy activities such as experimenting at a mad tea party and a game of croquet.

Thursdays and Saturdays Relax at the Old Westbury Gardens, 71 Old Westbury Road, by taking a

yoga class at 11:15 a.m. Lorili Henry, professional kripalu instructor will lead students through a dynamic, yet gentle flow of postures and conscious breathing in a beautiful and relaxing setting. Classes are $15 per session (members, $5). The phone number is 516-333-0048.

Vanderbilt Observatory Fridays The Vanderbilt Museum’s planetarium, 180 Little Neck Road, Centerport, hosts night-sky viewings from 9 to 10 p.m. (weather permitting). Observation is free to visitors with a planetarium show ticket. Admission is $3 for those without a show ticket.

Sculpture Art Exploration Ongoing Adults and children can explore the outdoor sculpture collection at Hofstra University with activity-filled animal, shapes or people-themed exploration backpacks. Activity materials and backpacks are located in the Emily Lowe Gallery. Participants return the backpacks, but they can bring their completed art projects home. The activity is free. Hofstra University is at 1000 Fulton Ave., Hempstead. For directions and a map, visit www.hofstra.edu/ campusmap/.

Fabulous Interiors Through September 30 Explore interior designs and artworks by Elsie de Wolfe and Charles Duveen, 1915-45, at the Planting Fields Arboretum Historic State Park, 1395 Planting Fields Road, Oyster Bay. Wolfe designed the Planting Fields’ vibrantly colored Tea House, and Duveen designed Tudor-inspired interiors for the country house, Coe Hall. The exhibit in Coe Hall is open from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. daily. The entrance fee is $4 for non-members. The Tea House is open from 12:30 to 2 p.m. Entrance is free with park admission.

TUESDAY, JULY 15 WEDNESDAY, JULY 16 THURSDAY, JULY 17 FRIDAY, JULY 18

TO TO TO TO

6PM 6PM 7PM 6PM

ENJOY SIGNIFICANT SAVINGS & SPECIAL OFFERS AT THESE PARTICIPATING STORES

Tuesdays and Thursdays Every Tuesday and Thursday, the Long Island Children’s Museum hosts a story time and arts session at 11:30 a.m. to noon. Bring your child to listen to both new and classic stories.

25 PARK

THE NINES

BANANA REPUBLIC

PAPER SOURCE

BEN’S KOSHER RESTAURANT

RED MANGO

BROOKS BROTHERS FLEECE

REPLICAS

DANIEL GALE | SOTHEBY’S

SCOOP NYC

INTERNATIONAL REALTY

Community Connections

SNEAKEROLOGY

FUNKY MONKEY TOYS & BOOKS

©2014 CASTAGNA REALTY CO., INC.

AT MADDY’s 390

TUTTI BAMBINI

MADDY’S 390

TWO WORLDS DANCE & FITNESS

MANSOURI

VINCE CAMUTO

ME.N.U

WHEATLEY NAILS & BEAUTY

Anton Junior Page.indd 1

GLEN COVE ROAD AT NORTHERN BOULEVARD 888.627.2250

WHEATLEYPLAZA.COM

118913

Story and Art

Wednesdays and Fridays Every day, people in the community are helping to make our lives easier. Join the Long Island Children’s Museum, 11 Davis Ave., Garden City, every Wednesday and Friday from 10:30 to 11 a.m., and explore the lives and daily routines of a different community helper. Children ages 3 to 5 will build on their vocabulary as they are introduced to job-specific words through songs and activities. Each class will include a hands-on, themed activity. Admission is $3 with museum admission ($2 for members).

10AM 10AM 10AM 10AM

6/20/14 4:55 PM


26A

THE WEEKEND - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

• Service Directory • Employment

2014 SUPER SUMMER EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES AT THE PARK AT EAST HILLS!

118541

LIFEGUARDS REQUIREMENTS: • At least 16 years of age • Lifeguards must be Nassau County Certified • Available to work through Labor Day weekend

Route Sales in Boroughs & Long Island

THE VILLAGE OF EAST HILLS IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

DONATE YOUR CAR

Metro New York

Call: (631) 317-2014

With 15 yrs. Experience is available to care for Sick or Elderly. Days, Nights, Weekends. Own car. Excellent References. 516-353-1626.

Candidates must possess strong communication skills, have successful outside sales experience and enjoy participating in a collaborative work environment. Guaranteed draw, benefits & paid vacation.

Drivers License, Excellent References. 631-449-1176. 118997

Employment ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

Responsibilities: Financial Reporting, Special Projects,Budgets & Forecasts, Reconciliations, Capital Projects and Debt Management. Requirements: 5+ Years of Accounting experience (Municipal Accounting experience a plus) Strong Excel skills, strong knowledge of all aspects of Accounting and reporting, Strong written and verbal skills and ability to handle multiple projects simultaneously. Applicants should send a letter of interest and résumé (in confidence) to careers@ northhempsteadny.gov

FREE CLASSES IF YOU QUALIFY Call 718-263-0750 Solar Tech BA, QA, SAP, A+, Video Production, Medical Assistant PCT (C.N.A./EKG/Phleb) ... etc.

118374

AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Financial aid for qualified students - Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-296-7093.

118291

118310

Port Washington based General Contractor is seeking Administrative Assistant to perform administrative duties as well as support activities for Project Managers. Duties may include fielding telephone calls, word processing and creating spreadsheets. Extensive skills required with MS Word, Excel and Outlook, as well as Internet research abilities and strong communication skills. Prior experience in construction related office a plus. Email résumé to gkcindustriesinc@gmail.com

The Town of North Hempstead is seeking Experienced CPAs

CAREER-DRIVEN! Route Sales Openings Metro NY Area.

119038

Sales & Delivery. Energetic & Friendly. Must be at least 21 with acceptable MVR & HS/GED. To apply contact Betty Bartos at betty.bartos@flocorp.com 207.783.9161 ext 339

THE ANTON CLASSIFIEDS CAN HELP YOU

Reach The People You Need To Rent Or Buy Your Home, Sell Your Car, Or Babysit Your Children. Call Us Today 516-403-5182 or Email to CLASSIFIEDS@ANTONNEWS.COM

ACCESS INSTITUTE

Local printer seeks College Student to sell advertising for Every Door Direct Mailing in the Glen Cove area. Must be motivated self-starter with great people skills. 516-676-7718 mmpgc@aol.com

118862

F/T, P/T. Live in/out. 20 years experience.

CPAs - Part Time

NANNY & HOUSEKEEPER JOBS Immediate Employment • Long Island & New York City Full Time/Part Time/Live-in/Live-out Jobs Available Experience required. NO FEE. High $$$

Nassau (516) 802-3780 Suffolk (631) 486-4594 119033

IRISH NURSE’S AIDE AVAILABLE

Chimney King, Ent. Inc.

Send résumé: fvirga@antonnews.com

118896

Call Marie 516-469-8410

Home Services

118450

CERTIFIED CAREGIVER AVAILABLE FT/PT Live In/Out, experienced with excellent references.

Want A Career Operating Heavy Equipment? Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. “Hands On Training” & Certifications Offered. National Average 18-22 Hourly! Lifetime Job Placement. Assistance. VA Benefits Eligible! 1-866-362-6497

TM

516-766-1666 • 631-225-2600

Fully Licensed and Insured *H0708010000 41048-H

“FOR THE GENTLE TOUCH” GENTIL 1 Piece or Entire Household G N I In-House Moving MOV ES All Types of Pianos SERVIC

(516) 741-0454

2196 JERICHO TPKE., GARDEN CITY PARK DOT# T10136 • USDOT# 737521 www.gentilmove.com Email: pgentil@gentilmove.com

HOUSE CLEANING Experienced, References. Own car, bilingual English/Spanish 646-542-9203

One Stop For All Your Home Improvement Needs

Basement, Bathroom & Kitchen Remodeling, Carpentry, Crown Molding, Closets, Doors, Sheetrock, Painting, Dry Wall, Repairs, Spackling & Wall Paper Removal & Installation Decks- Power Washed, Stained, Repaired & Built GEM-BASEMENT DOCTOR

516-623-9822 www.Gem-Home.com Smith Brothers Handyman Services General Clean-ups, Landscaping, Painting, Organizing Call (516) 944-6875

PARTTIME MAIL CLERK Westbury Location

Monday thru Friday – 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. HELP WANTED PARTS DEPARTMENT 20 hours per week Full Time, Benefits. Precision Clover MillWork, Associates MailInc room experience preferred. 75 Harbor Road, P.W., is looking Distribute and pick-up interoffice mail. Post any mail or 337person Merrick Suite 3UPS packages. Knowledge of for an organized to packRoad,outgoing copy machines a plus. Occasional heavy lifting. & ship parts. Some heavy lifting. Retirees welcome Lynbrook NY 11563 Operate fork lift. Call Annette Contact Human Resources Department at: chunt@mssny.org or Carol @ 516-883-2002. 516-568-1800 FAX 516-872-1398

Client:

• Chimneys Rebuilt, Repaired & Relined • Stainless Steel Liners Installed

Lic./Ins. H-3803000000

‘The Nanny, Baby Nurse and Housekeeper Professionals’

80-02 Kew Gardens, Queens, NY 11415 www.accessqueens.com LIRR Accessible

Chimney Cleaning & Masonry Service Done By Firefighters That Care

absolute best care

118768

AIDE COMPANION

118743

Companions / Elder Care

119071

WheelsForWishes.org

Call: (631) 317-2014

118975

Suffolk County

*Free Vehicle/Boat Pickup ANYWHERE *We Accept All Vehicles Running or Not *100% Tax Deductible

Dutton@mainestaff.com call Dutton at 1-888-786-0791

Nassau County Newspaper Group with paid circulation plus NYC and aggressive newsstand presence seeks results-driven local & major accounts salespeople to join our team. We offer one of the finest portfolios of special sections and niche products in the market.

118704

x % Ta 100 tible uc d e D

118478

ADVERTISING SALES

Wheels For Wishes benefiting

117313

Auto / Motorcycle / Marine

118602

118977

To apply, contact The Park at East Hills at 516-484-9800, email us at gcox@villageofeasthills.org, or simply visit Village Hall on a business day from 9am-4:30pm. We are located at 209 Harbor Hill Road, East Hills, NY 11576. Ask for Gerica Cox to get an application.

Career Opportunity - position entails delivery of bakery products by box truck, no special license - early morning start, excellent customer service skills - this may be your chance to be associated with one of the regions finest, Lepage, distributors of Wonder Bread, Barowsky Organic, and Natures Own - deliver, display and sell company product lines on your assigned sales route - Lepage is looking for self-motivated individuals to operate routes in Nassau County, Long Island, Brooklyn, Queens, Bronx and Elmsford, NY which may lead to the purchase of your own route. Forward résumé to

118511

Online Only 2-Day Auction, Furniture Liquidation including Rugs, Tables, Household Items, Furniture & More. Jamestown, NC Guilford Co. 7/11 at 8am to 7/18 & 7/21 at 1pm. Iron Horse Auction Co., Inc. 800-997-2248. NCAL3936. www.ironhorseauction.com

The Park Director is currently interviewing candidates for:

118855

Suffolk Cty - License #41959-H Nassau Cty - #H18G7160000

1. Are you looking for an exciting summer job with competitive pay and upbeat work environment? 2. Would you like to spend the summer at the finest park facilities with the largest municipal leisure pool on Long Island? 3. Do you like the outdoors? Then our positions are a perfect fit for you!

118724

118636

118290

HAS YOUR BUILDING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLD-BARN. www.woodfordbros.com

Receptionist

Immediate Opening - Long Island Alzheimer’s Foundation seeks organized and detail oriented individual for front desk. Duties include: answering multi-line switchboard, greeting visitors, data entry and correspondence, ordering supplies, and general office duties. Knowledge of Microsoft Office required. Knowledge of DonorPerfect and QuickBooks a plus. Hours Mon.-Fri 8:45am-4:45pm. Cover letter and résumé to: fjenny@liaf.org

118940

Auctions

Buy or sell at AARauctions.com. Contents of homes,businesses, vehicles and real estate. Bid NOW! AARauctions.com Lights, Camera, Auction. No longer the best kept secret.

Sweeney Painting of Garden City

Interior • Exterior Carpentry • Renovations Licensed / Insured

516-884-4016

118946

Announcements


27A

THE WEEKEND - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

LACROSSE LESSONS

118893

Manhasset: Office Spaces for Rent: 277, 297, 318, 363, 639 sq. ft. Near LIRR, Parking Available. Call 516-627-0906

OFFICE TO SHARE

118411 118973

MASSAPEQUA PARK SOUTHGATE Lovely Townhouse, 3 Br, 2.5 BA, Gar, Club Hs, NR Shop Ctr., Schools $565,000/owner 516-795-1172

North Hills Townhouse Condo in Acorn Ponds 2 BR, 2.5 Bth, Corner, New EIK, Asking $719K 516-551-2888 No Brokers Pls 118694

Sebastian, Florida - Affordable custom factory constructed homes $45,900+, Friendly Community, No Real Estate or State Income Taxes, Minutes to Atlantic Ocean. 771-581-0080, www.beach-cove.com. Limited seasonal rentals.

Ready to buy a home? We are ready to help. The State of NY Mortgage Agency offers up to $15,000 down payment assistance. www.sonyma.org. 1-800-382-HOME (4663).

119070

Masters, MBA, NYS Certified Teacher, 30 yrs Exp.

Mrs Augenthaler @ 516-767-1150 Cell 516-641-3925

Swim Coaching

“Swim With Ease” Beginners, Competitive & Masters. Certified Water Safety Instructor. Experienced Swim Coach* 516-526-1085 swimmingcoach@optonline.net *You must have access to own pool

TUTOR 4 YOUR CHILD

NYS Certified Experienced Teacher Kindergarten - 5th Grade • Reading and Math

Wilson Reading (Fundations) Certified

Lisa Mintz 516-972-7847 TuTor4yourchild@optonline.net

CALL: 516.809.9538 usatutoringny.com

Vacation & Travel Section OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND. Best selection of affordable rentals. Full / partial weeks. Call for FREE brochure. Open daily, Holiday Real Estate. 1-800-638-2102. Online reservations: www.holidayoc.com

PRIME VACATION OPPORTUNITY. $150/NIGHT. PRIVATE, Spectacular Lakefront setting MID-COAST MAINE. 1 BR, Sleeps 4. Swim, Boat, Fish, Hike or Just Relax. highfields@tidwater.net; 207-785-2851; toll-free 844-785-2851 119008

118854

MATH TUTOR

Elementary thru 12th Grade • Math Regents Excellent Results & Affordable

Pre-K - College Test Prep And All Subjects

Equal Housing Opportunity Federal, New York State and local laws prohibit discrimination because of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, disability, familial status, age, marital status, sexual orientation or disability in connection with the rental, sale or financing of real estate. Nassau also prohibits source of income discrimination. Anton Community Newspapers does not knowingly accept advertising in violation of these laws. When you suspect housing discrimination, call Long Island Housing Services’ Discrimination Complaint Line at 800-660-6920. (Long Island Housing Services is the Fair Housing Agency of Nasasau and Suffolk Counties.)

Attention All School PTAs, Sports Organizations, Social Clubs and Civic Associations!

Look ing

er s i a r for a new fund

?

Real Estate on Cape Cod

118899

118970

Approx. 400 sf facing front, all windowed. Indoor parking for 1 car; surface parking available. Rent and fees split 50/50 Call 516-466-9660 during business hours.

LOVELY MEADOW AND FOREST. 5.4 acres, $49,900. Was $199,900. Bank ordered sale. Beautiful Bethel NY. Near Woodstock site. 85 miles from Manhattan. Assorted hardwoods, approved building site, underground utilities, across from lake, walk to Performing Arts Center, financing. 877-836-1820

118941

118514

Great Neck Prime Office Space Fully windowed, 170 sq. ft. office within a prime professional office building suite--111 Great Neck Road. Use of secretary on limited basis. Ample parking. 5 min walk to LIRR station. Contact Mark at 516-883-0303

516-487-8424

118632

Real Estate for Rent

Feels Like A House, 3 Bedrooms, Newly Renovated! Low Maintenances, Walk All MUST SEE!!

119010

119007

Also Stamps & Paper Money, Entire Collections, Estates. Travel to Your Home. Call Marc in NYC 1-800-959-3419.

2 PARKING SPACES available $200 ea. Close to Train. Call: 5167673353

Delaware’s Resort Living without Resort Pricing! Low Taxes! Gated Community, Close to Beaches, Amazing Amenities, Olympic Pool. New Homes from $80’s Brochures available. 1-866-629-0770 or www.coolbranch.com

FOR SALE GREAT NECK CO-OP BY OWNER,

CASH for Coins! Buying ALL Gold & Silver.

PORT WASHINGTON:

CAPE COD WATERFRONT PROPERTIES Available Throughout the Region. Good Pricing and Financing!!. Act Now! Call David Schwamb at Robert Paul Properties 508-274-5697 118974

119009

117205

118972

ABSOLUTE FARM LIQUIDATION JULY 12TH & 13TH! 3-61 acre Parcels 50% Market Price! Less Than 3 hours from NYC. 1/2 Hour from Albany! Jaw dropping views, spring fed ponds, gorgeous trout stream, rolling fields, deep woods! EZ terms! Call: 888-905-8847! Newyorklandandlakes.com

Colgate’s Club Lacrosse Captain 2- year Manhasset Varsity Player Call 516-286-9308 Email: brbarry@colgate.edu Reasonable Rates

118945

Real Estate for Sale

Merchandise for Sale

516-365-1153 valentino6th@gmail.com

117748

Rent includes Internet, telephone, voicemail, utilities and cleaning. From $500 to $1,200 per month. 516-609-5010 for details

Free Estimates Call Today 516-314-9400

Special Needs Children Physically Challenged Adults HOME VISITS AVAILABLE

118313

ROSLYN VILLAGE EXECUTIVE OFFICES AVAILABLE

ART SCHOOL Traditional Drawing & Painting ART THERAPY FOR ALL AGES 116455

119051

Professional Working Male Looking for a room or studio w/pvt. ent. & bath. 516-305-3153

118430

Start Making Your List... Repair. Replace. Install. Hang. Remove. Clean. You name it!

Tutoring

118625

Real Estate for Rent

117987

Home Services

PORT WASHINGTON BAXTER ESTATES

Port Washington

516-676-0431

119073

Renovated 2 bedroom/2 bath apt. L/R w/fireplace, deck. Avail. Immed. $1950 Owner/Broker

Cape Cod Horse Property — $1,150,000 — Private understated Colonial Saltbox with luxury finishes and thoughtful detail is being offered on a 3.3 acre lot. Waterfront Cape Cod Home — $1,295,000 — Close to town and beach. Dutch Colonial home though remodeled maintains its antique charm.

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THE WEEKEND - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

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29A

THE WEEKEND - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

| COMMUNITY CALENDAR Friday, July 4 Independence Day Parade And Festival From 10 a.m. to noon, the Village of East Hills will host their annual Fourth of July Parade and Festival. The event takes place at the Village Theatre Lawn. The theatre is at 209 Harbor Hill Rd. For more information, call 621-5600.

Monday, July 7 Bryant Library Events At 9:45 a.m., the library will host a Giggles and Wiggles event in the Children’s Room. Registration required. At 11 a.m., the library will host a Little Sprouts event, also in the Children’s Room. Registration required. At noon, the library will host a Retired Executives and Professionals (REAP) brown bag lunch event in the Helen Glannon Room. At 1 p.m., the library will host a REAP program, also in the Helen Glannon Room. The library is at 2 Paper Mill Rd. Call 621-2240. Shelter Rock Library Events At 10:15 a.m., the Shelter Rock Library will host a Toddler Storytime. At 11 a.m., it will host a Senior Rap Group. At 1:30 p.m., it will host a Preschool Storytime. The library is at 165 Searingtown Rd., Albertson. For information, call 248-7363.

Tuesday, July 8 Bryant Library Events At 9:45 a.m., the library will host a Giggles and Wiggles event in the Children’s Room. Registration is required. At 10 a.m., the library will host a Yoga class in the Helen Glannon Room. Registration is required. At 11 a.m., the library will host a Little Sprouts program, also in the Children’s Room. Registration is required. At 4 p.m. and 6:30 p.m., the library will host Science of Toys events in the Helen Glannon Room. Registration is required. The library is at 2 Paper Mill Rd. Call 621-2240.

Tuesday, July 8; July 15; July 22; July 29 Summer Adult Education Temple Sinai of Roslyn will host a Summer Adult Education at 11

At 7 p.m., it will host a Belgian Waffle Ice Cream Sundae event for adult singles. Measure, mix and make your own waffle from scratch, then bake it on a waffle maker. Add ice cream and toppings and enjoy this delicious treat. The library is at 165 Searingtown Rd., Albertson. For information, call 248-7363.

Shelter Rock Library Book Discussion

As listed below, the Shelter Rock Library will hold a Young Adults Book Discussion on Wednesday, July 9 at 7 p.m. The group will discuss The Dark Days Of Hamburger Halpin by Josh Berk. When Will Halpin transfers from his all-deaf school into a mainstream Pennsylvania high school, he faces bullying. Still he manages to solve a mystery surrounding the death of a popular football player in his class with the help of an odd-squad of fellow outcasts. Will’s interest in others and sense of humor keeps the story from getting too dark. The library is at 165 Searingtown Rd. Call 248-7363. a.m. on all of the above dates. The class will concentrate on The Story of the Judges. The book of Shoftim called “Judges” in English describes the stories and exploits of Israel’s first leaders in the new land of Canaan. The infamous Judges such as Deborah, Gideon and Samson were part military leader, lone warrior and prophet. The book describes the challenges of political rule and reminds us of the fine line between ethics and power. Join Rabbi Gordon on Tuesday mornings this July as participants look to this ancient book of the Bible to understand God’s role in history and to grapple with what it means to be an ideal leader. All are welcome. Contact Temple Sinai of Roslyn, 425 Roslyn Rd., 516-621-6800 or visit: www.mysinai.org. Shelter Rock Library Events At 10:15 a.m., the Shelter Rock Library will host a Toddler Storytime. At 7 p.m., it will host a Books Buddies program. Registration required. The library is at 165 Searingtown Rd., Albertson. For information, call 248-7363.

Wednesday, July 9 Bryant Library Events At 2 p.m. and 4 p.m., the Bryant Library will host a Little Scientists program in the Children’s Room. Also at 2 p.m., it will show a film, The Grand Budapest in the Helen Glannon Room. At 4 p.m., the library will host a Young Adults Craft Program in the

Friday, July 11 Preschool Storytime At 10: 15 a.m., the Shelter Rock Library will host a Preschool Storytime. Designed for children ages 3-5, this is a program of stories, simple songs, fingerplays and rhymes with other preschoolers. Children must be three by July 1, 2014.

Monday, July 28

Helen Glannon Room. At 7 p.m., the library will host a Pajamarama Night in the Children’s Room. Registration is required. The library is at 2 Paper Mill Rd. Call 621-2240. Shelter Rock Library Events At 5 p.m., the library will host a Book Chat for grades 3 and 4. The book under discussion is Stink And The Freaky Frog Freakout by Meagan McDonald. Swim class changes when Stink has a close encounter with a freaky mutant frog. Now his “froggy senses” are tingling. At 7 p.m., the library will host a Young Adult book discussion. The book under discussion is The Dark Days Of Hamburger Halpin by Josh Berk. The library is at 165 Searingtown Rd., Albertson. For information, call 248-7363.

Thursday, July 10 Bryant Library Events At 10 a.m., the library will host a Yoga class in the Helen Glannon Room. Registration is required. At 4 p.m. and 6 p.m., the library will host Science of Toys events also in the Helen Glannon Room. Registration is required. Shelter Rock Library Events At 10:15 a.m., the library will host a Toddler Storytime. Designed for toddlers 2-3 with a parent or caregiver as a program of stories, simple songs, fingerplays and rhymes with other toddlers and their parents. Children must be two by July 1, 2014.

St. Francis Golf Outing At 1:30 p.m., Brave Hearts of St. Francis Hospital will hold an annual golf outing at Oyster Bay Golf Course. Cost is $160 per person and includes golf and dinner at The Inn at Fox Hollow in Jericho. Call 516-562-6785 for more information.

Bridge Games Newplicate (supervised duplicate) Bridge is held at the Shelter Rock Jewish Center, 272 Shelter Rock Rd., Roslyn, every Monday from 9:30 a.m. to noon for bridge students, new players and social bridge players welcome. Short lesson, and earn points in a fun, friendly atmosphere. For reservations call 917-658-5991. Open Duplicate Bridge Game at 7 p.m. every Wednesday. Refreshments served. Call 917-658-5991 for reservations. Daytime Bridge - A new ACBL sanctioned daytime bridge game will be held on Thursday afternoons at 12:30 p.m. at Shelter Rock Jewish Center, 272 Shelter Rock Rd., Roslyn. For info and reservations call 917-658-5991.

Monthly Events VFW Post #5253 meets every second and fourth Wednesday of the month (only on the second Wednesday in the summer, November and December) at 8 p.m. at 155 Searingtown Rd., Albertson. For more information call 833-7536. Well Spouse Association for well spouses or partners of the chronically disabled. When one is sick, two need help. Is your spouse ill? Are you feeling the stress of being a caregiver?

see CALENDAR on page 30A


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Temporary Injunction At Christopher Morley BY THE ROSLYN NEWS STAFF ROSLYN@ANTONNEWS.COM After going to Nassau Supreme Court on an emergency basis Tuesday, three plaintiffs from the Roslyn area obtained a Temporary Restraining Order to protect the 33-acre recreational forest at Christopher Morley Park from any work on behalf of the air stripper for the Roslyn Water District. The order to preserve the status quo in the forest was granted after an emergency hearing due to the imminent expiration of a Statute of Limitations on one decision the plaintiffs were challenging, from February. In June, the New York State Senate and Assembly passed legislation approving the air stripper, one that stipulated that the air stripper can be removed once it is no longer needed. For several months, local officials have stressed that it is needed to remove toxic Freon and Volatile Organic Compound (VOCs) from a water well in the Roslyn Water District. The order is due to remain in effect until a court hearing, which was set for early July. Results of that hearing will appear in future issues of The Roslyn News. The three agencies challenged are Nassau County, which owns and runs Christopher Morley Park, the Town of North Hempstead, and the Roslyn Water District. The water district is a

CALENDAR from page 29A Do you feel lonely, angry, sad, guilty, frustrated, desperate? Have your friends deserted you? Would you like to share emotional problems and coping skills with others who walk in your shoes? If your answer is yes, join a group of people in similar situations. Share feelings, experiences and helpful ideas. Regular meetings are held on the second Wednesday of each month from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. at the St. Charles Rehab Center, 201 I.U. Willets Rd. (corner of Searingtown Rd.), Albertson. Call Betsey BudneFinnel 482-6574 or Rose Packard 829-8740 or e-mail: rosebirdlady@ aol.com.

Ongoing Programs Exercise Classes Free silver sneakers exercise classes for all levels: balance, agility, strengthening, endurance and osteoporosis for eligible seniors.

Biologist Eric Morgan, a professor at SUNY Farmingdale, makes notes in the Christopher Morley Park forest. Special Improvement District of the Town, which appropriates money for its capital budget, such as the air-stripper project. East Hills resident Richard Brummel and two Roslyn Estates residents who live close to the Christopher Morley Park challenged various official actions as being in violation of numerous provisions of New York State environmental protection law. The Sierra Club LI Group and the Green Party of Nassau County

have also opposed the use of the Christopher Morley Park for the air-stripper. The Water District claims the facility is perfectly safe for neighbors, pointing to dozens of such facilities in residential neighborhoods across Long Island, and had planned to locate it on its own property before a chorus of opponents pushed them to try to locate it in the Park. Brummel in particular has argued that no air-strippers are safe because they pollute the atmosphere with

Monday through Saturday. Roslyn and Garden City locations. Call for more details, including seeing if you are eligible and class times at 516-745-8050.

Canasta Players Wanted Mature women looking for canasta players to play canasta Wednesdays or Fridays at the Links of Roslyn. Call 365-6048.

Boy Scouts Open to all boys 11-18 years old. Meets at sponsor: Temple Beth Sholom, 401 Roslyn Rd., Tuesdays from 7:30 to 9 p.m. Contact Steven Cahn 621-3890.

Van Nostrand Starkins House Museum Located at 221 Main St., Roslyn. Open every Saturday and Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. Admission is $4 adults; $2 children and seniors. Beverly McDermott, museum educator, gives guided tours every half hour. The museum is filled with two rooms of 18th century antique furniture and one room filled with 18th century samplers and archaeological artifacts. The Children’s Hands on Education program is not to be missed. It is filled with 18th century reproductions of children’s clothing, toys and artifacts for children to handle and enjoy.

Cub Scouts Open to all boys 6-10 years old. Meets at sponsor: Temple Beth Sholom, 401 Roslyn Rd., Tuesdays from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Contact Dan Sharon 428-3633. Bridge Players Wanted The residents of East Hills Park are looking for bridge players who are East Hills residents only who would like to join the group. It takes place on Wednesdays beginning at 7 p.m. in the East Hills Lounge. Call 621-8782.

Board Meetings Village of Roslyn Zoning Board of

chemicals such as Freon, even if the toxic gases don’t threaten the direct neighbors. Local politicians all hailed the passage of the state legislation. “I’m quite pleased to hear that Senator [Jack] Martins was able to lead the efforts in the State Senate to pass this important legislation. The vast majority of residents of Roslyn Estates came out expressing their concerns with the air stripper being placed in our village and wanted to see it moved into the Park,” said Village of Roslyn Estates Mayor Jeffrey Schwartzberg. “Our representatives in the state, the county, the town, our village and the Roslyn Water District all came together to make this happen. Although it is not finalized, this is a major step closer and I truly believe that if we all continue to work together we can make this happen.” In early June, rallies were held at Christopher Morley Park, two of which featured speakers from the Sierra Club LI Group and the Green Party of Nassau County, as well as Bruce Piel from Parks and Recreation Council of Nassau (PARCNassau). A petition with about 300 signatures of Park users opposing the project was gathered in the Park over three weekends. A petition with 150 signatures was submitted to the County Legislature before they approved the alienation Home Rule Message on June 2. The voice vote was unanimous.

Appeals meets on the first Monday of every month at 8 p.m. at Village Hall, 1200 Old Northern Blvd., Roslyn. Village of Flower Hill Board meets on the first Monday of every month at 8 p.m. at the Village Hall, One Bonnie Heights Rd., Flower Hill. Village of Roslyn Estates Board of Trustees will hold its public meetings on the second Monday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at Village Hall, 25 The Tulips. Village of Roslyn Harbor Board of Trustees usually meets on the second Monday of every month at 7 p.m. at the Village Hall, 500 Motts Cove Rd. South, Roslyn Harbor. Village of Roslyn Board of Trustees meets on the third Tuesday of every month at 8 p.m. at Village Hall, 1200 Old Northern Blvd., Roslyn. Village of Roslyn Historic District Board meets on the third Wednesday of every month at 8 p.m. at Village Hall, 1200 Old Northern Blvd., Roslyn.


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THE WEEKEND - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

Roslyn Moving-Up Ceremonies

Principal Gina Faust proudly distributes certificates to fifth graders at her first moving up ceremony at Harbor Hill School while Assistant Principal Mary Wood looks on.

East Hills School principal Melissa Krieger offers congratulations to moving up fifth graders.

The Harbor Hill School Moving-Up Ceremony for the fifth grade class also took place on June 23 at Roslyn High School.

This past week, students at schools in the Roslyn District celebrated Moving Up Ceremonies. Pictured here are East Hills School fifth graders in their Moving-Up Ceremony on June 23 at Roslyn High School.

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THE WEEKEND - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

Roslyn High School Graduation A photo gallery of the graduation of Roslyn High Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Class of 2014 is now available at www.roslyn-news.com

(Photos by Geoffrey Walter)


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14

www.roslyn-news.com

THE ROSLYN NEWS - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

Roslyn Middle School Graduation

Family and friends joined students, teachers and administrators at Hofstra University for Roslyn Middle School graduation ceremonies. Here, students wait anxiously in their seats for the ceremony to begin.

The scoreboard announces the big day

Students file out of the gymnasium

Friends strike a celebratory pose

Roslyn School District Superintendent Dr. Dan Brenner hands out a diploma

Students file onto the stage underneath a huge screen (Photos by Aaron Cheris) (More photos next page)


www.roslyn-news.com

THE ROSLYN NEWS - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

A retiring band teacher, Steven Malinofsky, takes a bow

Dan Brenner addresses the students and their parents

The Middle School choir entertains the audience

Superintendent of Business Joseph Dragone adds humor to the ceremony

More happy graduates

Rebecca Golden, left and her father, Seth with her graduation certificate. (Photos by Aaron Cheris)

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THE ROSLYN NEWS - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

Summer Film Series In Albertson Million Dollar Baby screening July 29 On Tuesday, July 29 at 8:45 p.m., the film, Million Dollar Baby will be screened at Clark Botanic Garden in Albertson. The film features Clint Eastwood and Hillary Swank, and won four Academy Awards, including Best Picture. The showing is part of the Town of North Hempstead’s free Summer Film Series. “With summer upon us, the Town of North Hempstead invites residents from all over the town to join us for our free summer movie series. These movie experiences are a great way to enjoy a beautiful summer night with the family,” said Supervisor Judi Bosworth. Other movies include: Matilda, to be shown on Sunday, July 13 at 7:30 p.m. at Clinton G. Martin Park in New Hyde Park; The Rookie, to be shown on Friday, Aug.15 at 8 p.m. at Martin Reid Park in New Cassel and Frozen, to be shown on Saturday, Aug. 23 at 7:45 p.m. at North Hempstead Beach Park. This film will be set up as an

A crowd gathers at a recent movie night in North Hempstead. old-fashioned drive-in movie. Sit in your car or bring a lawn chair to watch the film.

Call 311 and visit www.northhempsteadny.gov for more information and the full schedule of summer events

and festival. — Submitted by the Town of North Hempstead

Roslyn Rescue Parade Town of North Hempstead Supervisor Judi Bosworth, Town Clerk Wayne Wink, and Councilman and East Hills resident Peter Zuckerman attended the fifth Battalion Fire/ EMS Parade hosted by Roslyn Rescue Hook and Ladder Co. #1 on June 21. The parade ventured throughout Roslyn and ended at the Roslyn train station where festivities were held featuring an awards ceremony, food and beverages, and a raffle drawing.

Left to right: Judi Bosworth and Ex-President of Roslyn Rescue H&L Company Captain Jon Sendach.

Left to right: Wayne Wink, Judi Bosworth, Jon Sendach and Peter Zuckerman.

Left to right: Peter Zuckerman, Wayne Wink, Judi Bosworth and Jon Sendach.


YOUR TRUSTED SOURCE FOR LOCAL NEWS AND COMMUNITY EVENTS - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

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Summer School For Gardeners

• July 15 Grow More With Less: Creating a Sustainable Landscape With limited natural resources and other challenges, it is important to find long-term ways to sustain our landscapes. This lecture provides ways to create a more sustainable environment by looking at habitat management, managing invasive species, recycling, composting and proper plant selection. July 15 at 6 p.m. $98

Hofstra University’s School of Continuing Education offers several one-evening summer seminars on topics horticultural, all taught by Vincent Simeone, Director of Planting Fields Arboretum State Historic Park in Oyster Bay, New York. Since 2005, Simeone has published four books, including Great Flowering Landscape Shrubs, Great Landscape Evergreens and The Wonders of the Winter Landscape. The prolific lecturer gives an average of 50 horticultural presentations a year, and has appeared on garden shows including Martha Stewart Living and HGTV. In 2010, the Long Island Nursery and Landscape Association named him its Man of the Year. For more information on Hofstra’s summer gardening or other

• July 22 The Four Season Garden: Trees and Shrubs with Year-Round Interest While spring is the most popular season to many gardeners, creating the four-season garden has become a popular trend. Using plants that provide ornamental flowers, foliage, fruit, fall color and bark interest can really spice up a garden. Using these plants in effective plant combinations can further enhance the natural beauty of the garden. This topic will explore woody plants that possess two or more seasons of interest and how to use them effectively in the landscape. Other considerations will include attracting wildlife into the landscape. July 22 at 6 p.m. $65

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THE 2 -2014 8, 2014 THE ROSLYN ROSLYN NEWS NEWS -- JULY JULY 4.

LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICE Notice of formation of Interior Electronics Consultants LLC. Articles of organization filed with the Secretary of state of New York, SSNY, on 4/04/2014. Office located in Nassau County. SSNY has been designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail copy of any process served against IEC LLC 74 Sullivan Road, Farmingdale NY 11735. Purpose: any lawful purpose. 7-11-4; 6-27-20-13-6-20146T-#117537-ROS LEGAL NOTICE SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF NASSAU DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT SERIES INABS 2006-E LEHMAN, V. NAHID ESMAGHBAKSHI, et al. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated 08/11/2009 and entered in the Office of the Clerk of the County of NASSAU, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT SERIES INABS 2006-E LEHMAN is the Plaintiff and NAHID ESMAGHBAKSHI, ET AL. are the Defendant(s). I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the NASSAU SUPREME COURT, CALENDAR CONTROL PART (CCP) COURTROOM, 100 SUPREME COURT DRIVE, MINEOLA, NEW YORK, 11501, on 7/15/14 AT 11:30AM, premises known as 226 WARNER AVE, ROSLYN HEIGHTS, NY 11577: Section: 7 Block: 33 Lot: 105, 106 ALL THAT CERTAIN PLOT, PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND, SITUATE, LYING AND BEING AT ROSLYN HEIGHTS IN THE TOWN OF HEMPSTEAD, AND THE COUNTY OF NASSAU AND THE STATE OF NEW YORK. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index # 07-10171. EDGAR J. ROYCE, ESQ. Referee. RAS Boriskin, LLC 900 Merchants Concourse Westbury, New York 11590, Attorneys for Plaintiff 7-4; 6-27-20-13-20144T-#117718-ROS

LEGAL NOTICES

Lawful Activity. 7-18-11-4; 6-27-20-13-20146T-#118053-ROS LEGAL NOTICE SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF NASSAU INDYMAC FEDERAL BANK, F.S.B., V. RYAN LUCIERE, et al. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated JULY 9, 2014 and entered in the Office of the Clerk of the County of NASSAU, wherein INDYMAC FEDERAL BANK, F.S.B. is the Plaintiff and RYAN LUCIERE, ET AL. are the Defendant(s). I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the NASSAU COUNTY SUPREME COURT, CALENDAR CONTROL PART (CCP) COURTROOM, 100 SUPREME DRIVE MINEOLA, NY 11501, on 7/22/14 AT 11:30AM, premises known as 93 ROSLYN ROAD, MINEOLA, NY 11501: Section 9 Block 424 Lots 25 and 26; ALL THAT CERTAIN PLOT, PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND, WITH THE BUILDINGS AND IMPROVEMENTS THEREON ERECTED, SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN THE INCORPORATED VILLAGE OF MINEOLA, COUNTY OF NASSAU AND STATE OF NEW YORK. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index # 14735/08. MARY ELLEN DIVONE, ESQ. - Referee. RAS Boriskin, LLC 900 Merchants Concourse Westbury, New York 11590, Attorneys for Plaintiff 7-11-4; 6-27-20-20144T-#118199-ROS

LEGAL NOTICE INCORPORATED VILLAGE OF ROSLYN PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the Board of Trustees of the Incorporated Village of Roslyn will hold a Public Meeting at 8:00 P.M. on Tuesday, July 15, 2014 at Village Hall located at 1200 Old Northern Boulevard, Roslyn, NY or at some other location to be hereafter designated by the Mayor, for the following application: #1407 Prince of Realms LLC 24 Skillman Street, Roslyn, NY Sec 20, Block A, Lot 106 Applicant proposes to remove a one-story rear addition and construct a two-story rear addition and LEGAL NOTICE an open front porch addiNotice of Formation of Spetion to an existing office cialty Connections LLC, Arts. building. Requires special of Org. filed with Secy of use permit and site plan apState of New York (SSNY) proval. on 5/23/2014. Office location: #1408 Nassau County. SSNY desigLumber Earth Realty LLC nated as agent of LLC upon 17-21 Lumber Road, whom process against it may Roslyn, NY be served. SSNY shall mail a Sec 6, Block 53, copy of process to: c/o SpeLot(s) 1042, 1045 cialty Connections LLC, 22 Applicant seeking appeal Village Rd., Roslyn Heights, of Historic District Board NY 11577. Purpose: Any decision dated June 18,

2014. By Order of the Board of Trustees Inc. Village of Roslyn Anita Frangella, Village Clerk/Treasurer 7-4-2014-1T-#119061-ROS LEGAL NOTICE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT the Village of East Hills Board of Trustees’ meeting scheduled for August 20, 2014 has been rescheduled for August 12, 2014. The meeting will be held at 8:00 PM at Village Hall, 209 Harbor Hill Road, East Hills NY. BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES INC. VILLAGE OF EAST HILLS Donna Gooch, Village Clerk 7-4-2014-1T-#118999-ROS LEGAL NOTICE PUBLIC HEARING VILLAGE OF FLOWER HILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE, that the Incorporated Village of Flower Hill will hold a public hearing on Monday, July 7, 2014 at One Bonnie Heights Road, Manhasset, New York at the Village Hall at 8:00 p.m.: Application of Michael Cohen, for Arhaus, 15-25 Port Washington Blvd., Roslyn, NY 11576 also known as Section 6, Block B5, Lots 456, 457 on the Nassau County Land and Tax Map for a proposed alteration and change of use of said property from automotive repair to retail furniture use with an outdoor sales showroom. Applicant seeks a change of use special exception permit from the Board of Trustees under §240-15(A) of the Code of the Village of Flower Hill which requires that all commercial applications be subject to site plan review by the Board of Trustees; §85-7 which requires that a change in occupancy be approved by the Board of Trustees; and §240-15(B)((1)(k) prohibiting an outdoor display of merchandise. This meeting is open to the public. Persons who may suffer from a disability which would prevent them from participating in said hearing should notify Ronnie Shatzkamer, Village Clerk, at (516) 627-5000 in sufficient time to permit such arrangements to be made to enable such persons to participate in said hearing. By Order of the Board of Trustees Ronnie Shatzkamer, Village Administrator Flower Hill, New York Dated: July 2, 2014 7-4-014-1T-#118949-ROS LEGAL NOTICE East West United Development Group LLC Articles of Org. Filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) on November 20, 2013. Office in Nassau Co. SSNY Desig, Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail

LEGAL NOTICES copy of process to 76 Parkway Drive, Roslyn, NY 11577. Purpose: any lawful purpose or activity. 8-8-1; 7-25-18-11-4-20146T-#118834-ROS LEGAL NOTICE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT the Village of East Hills Board of Trustees’ meeting scheduled for July 16, 2014 has been rescheduled for July 15, 2014. The meeting will be held at 8:00 PM at Village Hall, 209 Harbor Hill Road, East Hills NY. BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES INC. VILLAGE OF EAST HILLS Donna Gooch, Village Clerk 7-4-2014-1T-#118800-ROS LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Town of North Hempstead Board of Zoning Appeals Pursuant to the provisions of the Code of the Town of North Hempstead, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Zoning Appeals of said Town will meet at the Yes We Can Center, 141 Garden Street, (The Banquet Room), Westbury, New York, on Wednesday, July 16, 2014, to consider any matters that may properly be heard by said Board, and will hold a public hearing on said date to consider applications and appeals. The following cases will be called at said public hearing starting at 10:00 a.m. APPEAL #19783 - David Sani (Owner)/ Ramin Benlevi, R.A. (Applicant), variances 70-29.B, 70-30.C, and 70-31.A to maintain an enclosed porch with insufficient aggregate side yards and within required front and side yard setbacks and to construct an addition exceeding the permitted floor area; S/side 19 Pond Park Rd., 636.10’ W/of Bayview Ave., Great Neck, Sec. 2, Blk. 367, Lot 15, R-A District. APPEAL #19784 - Susan Mindick (Owner)/Heather Sanderson (Applicant), variance 70-52 to maintain a concrete patio within a required rear yard setback; S/side 9 Hawthorne Ln., 391.26’ W/ of Bayview Ave., Great Neck, Sec. 2, Blk. 373, Lot 2, R-A District. APPEAL #19785 - Midori Owaki & Tom E. Weiss (Owner)/Gregory Meindl (Applicant), variance 70-52.6 and 70-103.A to construct a new dwelling exceeding the permitted eave height with insufficient off-street parking; N/side 45 Marino Ave., 960.64’ W/of Port Washington Blvd., Port Washington, Sec. 5, Blk. J, Lot 2, R-C District. APPEAL #19786 - Dena Prybutok, variances 70-29.C and 70-100.2.A(2) to maintain fencing beyond the front building line and construct additions exceeding the permitted floor area; S/E/cor. 30 Richards Rd. and North Plandome Rd., Port Washington,

LEGAL NOTICES

Sec. 5, Blk. 71, Lot 80, R-A District. APPEAL #19787 - Smruti Patel, variance 70-100.2.A to install fencing exceeding the permitted height; S/side 85 Nassau Dr., 455.20’ W/of Deepdale Pkwy., Albertson, Sec. 7, Blk. 93, Lot 90, R-B District. APPEAL #19788 - Shefali Goyal, variance 70100.2.A(2) to erect fencing beyond the front building line; S/side 35 Sunset Rd. S., 468.34 W/of I.U. Willets Rd., Albertson, Sec. 7, Blk. 268, Lot 25, R-B District. APPEAL #19789 - Benjamin S. Ruggiero, variance 70100.1.B to maintain a deck and garage within a required rear yard setback; W/side 144 McKee St., 240’ N/of Bryant Ave., Floral Park Centre, Sec. 8, Blk. 80, Lot 17, R-C District. APPEAL #19790 -John Stallone, variances 70-50.C, 70100.2.A, and 70-100.2.H to maintain a portico within a required front yard, an A/C unit within a required side yard, and fencing exceeding the permitted height; E/side 82 Stephan Marc Ln., 503’ W/ of Lakeville Rd., New Hyde Park, Sec. 8, Blk. K-7, Lot 33, R-C District. APPEAL #18693.A - Rita Flaherty, conditional use 70-45 & variance 70-231 to maintain alterations to a single-family dwelling for use as a Mother/Daughter residence exceeding the permitted gross floor area; W/side #1031 N. 2nd St., 360’ N/of White Ave., New Hyde Park, Sec. 8, Blk. 2, Lots 21, R-C District. APPEAL #19791 - Susan Dastolfo, variance 70-100.2.H to maintain an A/C unit within a required side yard setback; W/side 23 Grattan St., 270’ N/of Hillside Ave., New Hyde Park, Sec. 9, Blk. 114, Lot 127, R-C District. APPEAL #19792 - Jose Rodriguez, variance 70-100.2.A & 70-100.2.A(2) to maintain fencing exceeding the permitted height and beyond the front building line; S/E/ cor. 98 Longfellow Ave. & Lowell St., Westbury, Sec. 10, Blk. 36, Lot 5295, R-C District. APPEAL #19793 - Giro Iadevaia, variance 70-100.2.A to maintain fencing exceeding the permitted height; S/side 156 Manchester St., 147.74’ E/of Cherry Ln., Westbury, Sec. 10, Blk. 276, Lot 3, R-B District.

APPEAL #19794 - Kathleen Walsh, variance 70100.2.A(4) to maintain fencing exceeding the permitted height; E/side 107 Roosevelt Ct., 282.93’ N/of Old Country Rd., Carle Place, Sec. 10, Blk. 288 Lot 9, R-C District. APPEAL #19795.A – DKA Properties, variances 70-125, 70-103.A, 70-103.B, 70103.F, 70-103.O, 70-229.A, 70-135, and 70-231 to maintain an addition to an auto body shop (not a permitted use) with insufficient offstreet parking, parking stall dimensions, number of loading zones, access to a street, and access aisle width, fencing exceeding the permitted height, and non-compliance with pervious decision #12879; W/side 363 Great Neck Rd., 478.99’ S/of Water Mill Ln., Great Neck, Sec. 2, Blk. 42, Lot 319, B-A District. APPEAL #19795.B - DKA Properties, variances 70-125, 70-103.A, 70-103.B, 70103.F, 70-103.O, 70-103.M, and 70-208.F, to construct additions to an auto body shop (not a permitted use) in a non-conforming structure, with insufficient off-street parking, insufficient stall dimensions, loading area, and parking in a required front yard setback; E/side #362 Great Neck Rd., 319.39’ N/ of Broadway, Great Neck, Sec. 2, Blk. 43, Lots 41, B-A District. APPEAL #19688 - 45 Glen Cove Scott, LLC (Owner)/ Laffey Fine Homes International (Applicant), variance 70-196.J(1)(f) to install a wall sign exceeding the permitted height above grade; N/W/ cor. 45 Glen Cove Rd. and Wellington Rd., Greenvale, Sec. 20, Blk. N, Lot 604, B-B District. APPEAL #19781 - C&P Real Estate Holdings, variances 70-103.A & 70-103.B for interior alterations to convert a warehouse to office space with insufficient off-street parking and insufficient parking stall size; W/side #99 Seaview Blvd., 597.69’ W/of Osprey Ct., Port Washington, Sec. 6, Blk. 89, Lot 54, MPIP District. All interested persons should appear and will be given an opportunity to be heard at such meeting and/or hearing. DAVID MAMMINA, R.A., Chairman; Board of Zoning Appeals 7-4-2014-1T-#119002-ROS

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www.roslyn-news.com

THE ROSLYN NEWS - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

Wink Named To Board of Trustees Roslyn resident and North Hempstead Town Clerk Wayne Wink has joined the board of trustees of Family & Children’s Association. In addition to his current role, Wink has served three terms as County Legislator for the 11th district; five years as a Town Councilman; a Legislative Aide and Chief of Staff to the late Barbara Johnson; and Deputy Counsel to the County Legislature’s Democrats from 1997-1999. “We’re delighted to have Wayne Wink as our newest trustee and believe his expertise will complement our efforts to provide help and hope to Long Island’s most vulnerable children, seniors and families,” said Dr. Jeffrey Reynolds, president/CEO of the Mineola-based organization.

Wayne Wink

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| NEWS BRIEFS Free Fall Prevention & Balance Testing

Metro Physical & Aquatic Therapy provides free silver sneakers exercise classes on Fridays at the Atria in Roslyn Harbor. The classes are free and fully sponsored by the non-profit organization: Healthways. Classes will be held on all levels: balance, agility, strengthening, endurance, and osteoporosis for eligible seniors. Atria in Roslyn Harbor is at 100 Landing Rd. Call 516-626-6900.

Are you at Risk of Falling? Metro Physical & Aquatic Therapy also provides free fall prevention screenings for seniors on Long Island, including their branch in Roslyn. This program is in place to provide all seniors the opportunity to test their balance and see if they are at risk of falling. For more information, call 516-745-8050.

| RELIGIOUS SERVICES The Roslyn Synagogue (Orthodox)

257 Garden St. Roslyn Heights, NY 11577 The Roslyn Synagogue is a warm, welcoming, family friendly Orthodox synagogue led by Rabbi Robert D. Block. Shabbat morning services at 9 a.m. Additionally, prayer services are held daily in the morning and late afternoon/ evening. Please see The Roslyn Synagogue website at www.roslynsynagogue.org for specific times. Moreover, classes are offered throughout the year, including Rabbi Block’s weekly Tuesday night Talmud class and Wednesday night Torah class. Classes are open to all, and are appropriate for all backgrounds and levels of knowledge.

Shelter Rock Jewish Center (Conservative) 272 Shelter Rock Rd. Roslyn, NY 11576 741-4305 Rabbi Martin S. Cohen Rabbi Emeritus Myron M. Fenster

ROSLYN HEIGHTS DELI 82 MINEOLA AVE ROSLYN HEIGHTS NY 11577 (516) 625-1420 ROSLYN SHELL INC 220 MINEOLA AVENUE ROSLYN HEIGHTS NY 11577 (516) 621-1211 WILLIS MOBIL 225 WILLIS AVE ROSLYN HEIGHTS NY 11577

Free Obituaries

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MOBIL 449 GLEN COVE RD ROSLYN HEIGHTS NY 11577 (516) 621-7821

Services: Monday - Thursday 6:45 a.m., 8 p.m. Friday 6:45 a.m., 6:30 p.m. Saturday: Main Services 9 a.m.; Junior Congregation 10:30 a.m.; Gan Services 11 a.m. (preschool to age 6) Saturday evening - call the temple office Sunday 9 a.m., 8 p.m.

Rabbi Michael A. White Rabbi Andrew Gordon Cantor Sergei Schwartz Summer Services beginning June 27 through August 29 at 6:30 pm in the garden weather permitting. Saturday Morning Minyan/Torah Study in the Library at 9:00 am.

Temple Beth Sholom Conservative (Egalitarian)

333 Searingtown Rd. Manhasset, NY 11030 621-8049 Rabbi Todd Chizner Cantor Abbe Sher Services: Friday Evenings 8 p.m. Saturday Mornings 10:30 a.m. Children’s and Junior services available on select Friday nights. Contact the temple. Religious School for children of grades Kindergarten through High School 621-8212

401 Roslyn Rd. Roslyn Heights, NY 11577 621-2288 Rabbi Alan B. Lucas Rabbi Jennifer Schlosberg Cantor Ofer Barnoy Services: Monday through Friday 6:45 a.m. Sunday through Thursday 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Sunday and holidays 9 a.m. Saturday evening-call the temple office

Temple Sinai (Reform)

425 Roslyn Road Roslyn Heights, NY 11577 621-6800

Temple Judea of Manhasset (Reform)

Seasonal changes MUST be submitted NO LATER than June and August (for change to appear in July and September). There will be NO exceptions made.

The Roslyn News celebrates the lives of all those who impact the community. We publish obituaries of residents and former residents at no charge to the families. Email text of no more than 500 words to Joe Scotchie at jscotchie@antonnews.com. Include a photo if you wish, as a hi-resolution jpg, emailed separately. Or, to send the old-fashioned way, mail to The Roslyn News, 132 E. Second St., Mineola, NY 11501.

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Box 1578) ☐ 1 ☐… …wk) yr(38¢ Address Send to: 132 East Street $20 (38¢ wk) Address (P.O. Box 1578) ☐3… … 1 yr yr ☐ 3 yrs (P.O. 1578) Address $20 wk) (P.O. BoxSecond 1578)Newspapers (P.O. Box 1578) to:Box Anton Community $20 (38¢ $48 (31¢ wk) $20 (38¢ wk) $20 (38¢ wk) (P.O. Box 1578) (P.O. Box 1578) $23 $20 (44¢ (38¢ wk) $48 (31¢ wk Address Send $48 (31¢ wk) $20 (38¢ wk) (P.O. Box 1578) Mineola, N.Y. 11501 $20 (38¢ wk) (P.O. Box 1578) $20 (38¢ wk) The Glen Cove Mineola, N.Y. 11501 $48 (31¢ wk) City City (P.O. Box 1578) Mineola, N.Y. 11501 Mineola, N.Y. 11501 Mineola, N.Y. 11501 $20 (38¢ wk) City wk 132 East Second Street (P.O. Box 1578) Mineola, N.Y. 11501 Mineola, N.Y. 11501 Mineola, N.Y. 11501 City ☐ … 2 yrs☐ … Mineola, N.Y. 11501 2… yrs2 yrs Mineola, N.Y. 11501 ☐ Zip Phone Please add $20 per year for Zip Phone ☐ … 2 yrs Mineola, NY 11501 Please add $20 per year for Zip Phone Please add $20 per for $35 (34¢ wk) Please add $20 per year for Zip Please Phone Seniors: add $20 per year for $35 (34¢ wk) Please add $20 per year for Please add $20 per year foryear Seniors: Please add $20 per year for delivery out of Nassau County Seniors: Seniors: $35 (34¢ wk) $35 (34¢ wk delivery out of Nassau County Seniors: Seniors: (62 and older) delivery out of Nassau County delivery out of Nassau County Seniors: Seniors: (62 and older) Please add $20 per year for Please add $20 per year for delivery outside of Nassau County delivery out of Nassau County delivery out of Nassau County I want to subscribe to the (62 and older) (62 and older) delivery out of Nassau County Please add $20 per yearStreet for (62 delivery out of Nassau County (62 and older) and older) Send to: 132 East Second (62 and older) ☐ … 1 yr Send to: 132 East Second Street Seniors: (62 and older) ☐ … 1 yr ☐ Check here if renewal Send to: 132 East Second Street Street ☐ … 1☐yr…Seniors: ☐☐Check here ifif renewal yrs delivery out of Nassau Check here renewal Send to: 132 East Second ☐ … yrs (P.O. Box 1578)County ☐333and … 1 yr delivery out of Nassau County ☐ … yrs $20 (38¢ wk) ☐ … 3 yrs Check One: (62 older) Method of payment (P.O. Box 1578) ☐ … 3 yrs Check One: (P.O. Box 1578) $20 (38¢ wk) (62 and older) Method of payment ☐… 3 yrs $20 wk) Check One: (62 and older ☐ … 3(38¢ yrs $39 (25¢ wk) Method of payment Name ☐ … 3 yrs $39 (25¢ wk) Method of payment Mineola, N.Y. 11501 (P.O. Box 1578) $39 (25¢ wk) $39 (25¢ wk) $20 (38¢ wk Name Method ofN.Y. payment Name $39 (25¢ wk) Mineola, 11501 Mineola, N.Y. 11501 ☐ … 3 yrs $39 (25¢ wk) Method Method of payment payment $39 (25¢ wk) ☐ … 3 yrs ☐ … 3 yrs Address ☐ … 3 yrs $46 $39 (29¢ (25¢ wk) ☐ … 2 yrs Mineola, N.Y. 11501 Address ☐ … 3 yrs ☐ Am Ex ☐ M.C. ☐ Visa ☐ $48☐(31¢ (31¢ wk) Address ☐… … 22 yrs yrs ☐ Am Ex ☐ M.C. ☐ … 2 yrs Please add $20 per for $55 Method of payment $48 wk) ☐ Am Ex ☐ M.C. ☐ Visa Visa ☐ Am Ex ☐ M.C. ☐ Visa 35 ☐ … 2wk) yrs $54 ☐(35¢ … 2 yrs ☐ Am Ex ☐ M.C. ☐ Visa Please add $20 per year foryear City Method of payment $28 (27¢ wk) ☐ Am Ex ☐ M.C. ☐ Visa Seniors: $39 (25¢ Please add $20 per year for City $28 (27¢ wk) ☐ … 2 yrs ☐ Discover Card ☐ Check Enclosed $39 (25¢ wk) City $28 (27¢ wk) wk) $28 (27¢ wk) ☐ Am Ex ☐ M.C. ☐ Visa delivery out of Nassau County Seniors: ☐ … 2 yrs ☐ Discover Card ☐ Check Enclosed ☐ … 2 yrs $28 (27¢ wk) ☐ Am Ex ☐ofM.C. ☐ Visa ☐ Please Discover Card ☐Enclosed Check Enclosed ☐ Discover Card ☐ Check Seniors: (62 and older) wk $28 (27¢ wk) delivery out of Nassau County ☐ … 22 yrs Zip Phone ☐ Discover Card ☐ Check Enclosed add $20 per year for ☐ … yrs ☐delivery Discover Card ☐ Check Enclosed out Nassau County (62 and older) Zip Phone $28 (27¢ wk) Zip Card ☐ Phone ☐ … 1 yr $35 (34¢ wk) (62 and older) $34 $28 (33¢ (27¢ wk) ☐ Discover Check Enclosed ☐ … yr $35 (34¢ 40…wk) Seniors: ☐ Check here ifM.C. renewal ☐… … 1yrs yr2 ☐ Discover Card ☐ Check Enclosed 1 yr $41☐ (39¢ wk) ☐ Ex ☐ ☐ Visa Card ☐ … 2 yrs yrs 31… ☐ … 11☐ yr delivery Nassau County ☐ ☐##Am Am Exout ☐of M.C. ☐ Visa $42 ☐ … yr(62 $16 (31¢ wk) Card # Card # Card ☐ … 3 yrs Check One: and older $16 (31¢ wk) Method of payment Card Send to: 132 East Second Street $16 (31¢ wk) $16 (31¢ wk) Card # # Method ☐ … 1 yr $28 (27¢ wk) ☐ … 1 yr Send to:to:132 East Second Street 3 yrs $39 (25¢ wk) of payment $16 (31¢ wk) Exp. date ☐ … 1 yr $28 (27¢ wk) Send 132 East Second Street $16 (31¢ wk) ☐ … 1 yr ☐ Discover Card ☐ Check Enclosed Name wk ☐ … 1 yr Exp. date date $39 (25¢ wk) Exp. ☐Exp. Discover Card ☐ Check Enclosed Card # Box 1578) Method of(P.O. payment / (P.O. $20 (38¢ wk) Security Code Exp. date Card # date ☐ … 3 yrs (P.O. Box 1578) Exp. date $20 (38¢ wk) $26 $16 (31¢ wk) 50 wk) Box 1578) $39 (25¢ wk) $23 (44¢ wk) $19 $16 (37¢ (31¢ Address ☐ ☐ … 3 yrs ☐ … 2… yrs1 yr Mineola, 11501 Am ExN.Y. ☐of M.C. ☐ Visa $48☐(31¢ Mineola, N.Y. 11501 Exp. date date … wk) 2 yrs ☐ Mineola, N.Y. 11501 ☐ Am ExMethod ☐ M.C. ☐payment Visa ☐… 1 yr Exp. 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THE ROSLYN NEWS - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

| REAL ESTATE: SOLD

Properties From The Fabulous Fifties

BY JOE SCOTCHIE

JSCOTCHIE@ANTONNEWS.COM

The decade of the 1950s is when modern Long Island was born. That includes the Roslyn area, as mansions were demolished to make way for residential housing and such amenities as pool and tennis clubs. Most of the homes featured this week were constructed in that decade and are still going strong today. The house on 3 Orchard Ct. is a residential townhouse with three bedrooms and two bathrooms, six total rooms and a full basement. The house on 110 Oak Drive is a handsome structure with five bedrooms and four full bathrooms. It has a finished basement, an attic and a formal dining area. The house on 34 Pool Drive has four bedroom and two full bathrooms. It has a basement and attic, plus an office space. The co-op on 19 Edwards St. has two bedrooms and one full bathroom. Its five total rooms also include a formal dining room and an efficiency kitchen.

19 Edwards St. Sold For $219,000 This building was constructed in 1950. The maintenance is $980.

3 Orchard Ct. Sold For $360,000 This house was built in 1983. The lot size is 2,296 sq. ft. Total property taxes are $2,503.

34 Pool Drive Sold For $900,000 This house was built in 1953. The lot size is 160x57. Total property taxes are $9,291.

110 Oak Drive Sold For $1,330,000. This house was built in 1959. The lot size is 110x153. Total property taxes are $28,593.

Homes shown here represent closed sales, sold by a variety of agencies and selected for their interest to readers by The Roslyn News editor. Except where noted, data and photos are provided courtesy of Multiple Listing Services of Long Island, Inc.

A TRUE LEADER IN LUXURY REAL ESTATE SINCE 1911…

the #4 company in the nation by sales volume. In a new category of top firms by average sales price, Douglas Elliman achieved the 4th highest ranking in the nation, ahead of any other company in the New York region.*

Roslyn Office | 516.621.3555 1528 Old Northern Blvd (Harbour View Shopping Center next to Kotobuki)

TOP REAL ESTATE FIRMS IN THE NATION by AVERAGE SALES PRICE

1. Washington Fine Properties, LLC (Washington, DC) 2. Alain Pinel Realtors (Saratoga, CA) 3. Pacific Union International (San Francisco, CA) 4. DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE (New York) 5. Shorewood Realtors, Inc. (Manhattan Beach, CA)

ASKELLIMAN.COM *REAL TRENDS 500 SURVEY, MAY 2013 | 110 WALT WHITMAN ROAD, HUNTINGTON STATION, NY, 11746. 631.549.7401 | © 2014 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE.  EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.

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For the 6th consecutive year, Douglas Elliman has ranked


22

THE ROSLYN NEWS - JULY 2 - 8, 2014

ROSLYN SPORTS ★

www.roslyn-news.com

Boot Camp Comes To Roslyn Classes available at Gerry Pond Park BY THE ROSLYN NEWS STAFF ROSLYN@ANTONNEWS.COM

Local residents participating Boot Camp and Personal Training classes

Summer is here and the time is right for…. boot camp. This camp isn’t for delinquents. Instead, it is a program offered by the Town of North Hempstead to keep residents fit and healthy during the hot summer months. Town officials said that Gerry Pond Park would be one of the two venues where the camp is being held. In short, the camp features personal training classes held in conjunction with Ultimate Performance and Fitness. The other venue is Michael J. Tully Park in New Hyde Park. “The boot camp and personal training classes allow residents to take advantage of our beautiful parks and facilities while remaining fit and healthy,” said Supervisor

Judi Bosworth. “We hope that our residents enjoy our classes, parks and facilities this summer.” The boot camp classes will feature a total body workout including calisthenics, battling ropes, TRX suspension training and agility drills. Participants are asked to bring a towel and water. Class sessions are already underway at Gerry Pond Park and on Saturday and Sunday from 9 to 10 a.m. Single classes are available at a cost of $25 for residents and $30 for non-residents. Classes can also be purchased in bulk at a discounted rate, 10 classes for residents at the cost of $200 and $240 for non-residents. Gerry Pong Park is located on Roslyn Road in downtown Roslyn. For more information, call 311 or 516-869-6311.

YMCA Encourages Pool Safety BY THE ROSLYN NEWS STAFF ROSLYN@ANTONNEWS.COM The YMCA of Long Island is encouraging Long Island parents and children to take the national “Pool Safely Pledge,” to be safe in and around the water this summer. A campaign of the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), and now in its fifth year, “Pool Safely” (www. poolsafely.gov) is a comprehensive pool safety program which includes safety tips and checklists for parents, along with a commitment by parents, caregivers and children to follow recommended safety guidelines designed to prevent residential drowning and entrapment incidents. “With summer just around the corner, ‘Pool Safely’ is a perfect opportunity to reinforce basic water safety practices for parents, and to instill in children at an early age the importance of following these rules,” said YMCA of LI President Anne

Brigis. “As a national partner with the U.S. CPSC on this campaign, we encourage all of our members—and all Long Islanders with pools on their property—to take the pledge.” The ‘Pool Safely’ Pledge (http:// www.poolsafely.gov/pledge/) asks adults to commit to five water safety steps in and around their pools: • Designate a water watcher every single time children in their care are in or near the water; • Make sure children in their care know how to swim; • Learn CPR; • Remove or secure ladders in on ground pools when the pool is not in use; • Ensure that all pools have a proper fence with a self-closing and self-latching gate, and safe drain covers. Children can also sign an online pledge, in which they agree to never swim alone, and to ask their parent for swim lessons. The YMCA of Long Island provides over 22,000 swim lessons annually

for all ages, starting as young as six months, noted Brigis. “Swimming lessons provide children with important, potentially lifesaving skills, to keep them safe in pools, on boats, or at the beaches, and they also offer tremendous benefit by

providing regular athletic activity and provide a sense of achievement and confidence,” Brigis added. To learn more about swim instruction programs, contact the YMCA of Long Island at 516-674-8091.


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danielgale.com

OPEN HOUSE

Sunday, July 6, 12:00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1:30pm By Appointment Only

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Real Estate Salesperson Gold Circle of Excellence Roslyn Office 1400 Old Northern Blvd., Roslyn, NY 516.484.1800 ext. 225, c.516.330.3131 ronitberman@danielgale.com

Judith Lenchewski, CBR, CLHMS Associate Real Estate Broker Gold Circle of Excellence Roslyn Office 1400 Old Northern Blvd., Roslyn, NY 516.484.1800 ext.224, c.516.445.7887 judithlenchewski@danielgale.com

Each office is independently owned and operated. We are pledged to provide equal opportunity for housing to any prospective customer or client, without regard to race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.

117408

Ronit Berman, CBR

The Roslyn News - 07/04/14  
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