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Architectural Digest, May 1975

As seen in

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N11766 Indefinite  15’1” × 25’7”


N11762 Efflorescence  10’ × 12’

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Inspired by pop art movement

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N11729 Daliesque  8’7” × 10’2”

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The origin of Alexander McQueen’s iconic silk skullprint scarf.

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Alcaraz Carpet. Late 19th century. 6’5” × 11’3”

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The geometric patterns found in Kirman (Kerman) rugs are based on Islamic art

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BB2665 Persian Kirman  14’10” × 22’3”

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Prevalent in fine rugs from Tabriz.

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BB6599 Tabriz  11’ × 17’

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“Mother and child” our interpretation of Miro, he often worked with a limited palette, yet the colors he used were bold and expensive.

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N11784 Mother and Child  10’3” × 14’2”

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The Khorassan Razavi Tombs (Meshad)

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BB6588 Antique Persian Khorassan  15’10” × 24’9”

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The roaring twenties

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BB6583 French Art Deco. Circa: 1920.  9’2” × 11’10”

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Designed by Brett Beldock , inspired by the Amazon Jungle

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N10714 Rain  12’6” × 15’6”

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Hand knotted graded in the finest silk on a wool background. The grading acts like shading to create a 3 dimensional treat for the eye.

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N11693 Dreamy  12’ × 18’

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Motif inspired by Persian antique hat

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N11619 Kula  9’8” × 16’

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The artistry of the mosques in Isfahan were a source of inspiration

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BB6497 Late 17 th Century Persian Isfahan  10’7” × 15’

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In 1909 the process was known as „tied-dyed” for a set of ancient resist – dyeing techniques

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N10848 Mandala  10’9” × 16’7”

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Village women wove themes significant for their lives into their rugs and food being paramount

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BB4185 19th Century Crab Carpet  14’4” × 19’2”

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Sultan’s embroidered slipper from the ottoman empire

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BB6522 Turkish Sivas  3’8” × 5’7”

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On the hills of Queen Victoria’s great exhibition in the Crystal Palace an affair that exposes the treasures of the orient

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BB5055 French Deco  10’8” × 14’

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Most cities in Morocco had unique style or design characteristics that distinguished their carpets. The designs were substantially inspired by their lifestyle.

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BB6218 Moroccan. Circa: 1960.  5’ × 11’4”

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Inspired by snake skin nature’s influence

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N11373 Snakey  10’2” × 13’10”

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Over a 1,000 oversized rugs in stock.

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BB4190 Indian Rug. Circa: 1900.  13’4” × 22’9”

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It isn’t about one rug. It’s about casualness… playfulness and beauty.

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N11663 Endless  12’ × 16’

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The first weavings of Tabriz rugs made in the city of Tabriz was before 1880-1920. Rug making influenced by following the European aesthetics and color sensibility at it’s height.

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BB6862 Persian Tabriz  11’2” × 17’8”

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Inspired by Carlsbad Caverns, New Mexico 7th largest cave in the world

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N11659 Surfaces  13’ × 17’

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What is it about bees and hexagons?

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N11026 Hive designed by Kim Alexandriuk  10’8” × 14’8”

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Amritsar located in the North West of India was at the center of Indian rug weaving during the reign of the Maharaja Ranjit Singh

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BB3675 Antique Amritsar. Circa: 1880.  11’5” × 16’10”

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The rug idea stemmed from our interest in the Art Deco period, mostly inspired by the work of American designer Marion Dorn. The triangle motif was something Dorn explored in different ways throughout her career, so we started by developing a field of triangles. To make a twist on the design we decided to have the triangles themselves be expressed as a fuller pile, with the remaining field of the rug being flat, this pile difference can also be found in other examples of art deco rugs. This created an interesting texture and perhaps a less obvious way of reinterpreting Dorn’s ‘triangles’. Andre Mellone

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N11742 Dorn’s Triangles  11’0” × 19’3”

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..

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Marta Maas-Fjetterstrom After being endorsed by such titans of modernism and proponents of modern design as Le Corbusier, Ray Eames and Frank Lloyd Wright, Swedish rugs quickly became a highly desirable commodity. Swedish Country Interiors by Edie van Breems The traditional geometric and abstract designs and the long pile of Rya rugs were considered especially desirable due to their perceived aesthetic complement to the hardwood, metal, and sparseness favored by modern designers. As homeowners began to transition toward a preference for modern aesthetics, it became difficult for Sweden.. to keep .. up with the demand for high-quality Ryas and other rugs. The design studio founded by Marta Maas-Fjetterstrom in 1919 – and later headed by Barbro Nilsson after Mass-Fjetterstrom’s death in 1941 – became an important center for Swedish rug design, and remains so today. ° °

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BB6858 Finish Pile Rug by Greta Skogster. Circa: 1940.  8’0” × 11’8”

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Hand woven, pure hand spun yarn and hand dying technics is why the rug has unique shapes and rich texture variation. “Stripes for ever�


N11786 Blue & White   10’1” × 15’

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Thou wast that all to me, love, For which my soul did pine— A green isle in the sea, love, A fountain and a shrine, All wreathed with fairy fruits and flowers, And all the flowers were mine. *Painting of the Enchanted Garden, 1924 by S. Shelton, Poe Museum Collection

Inspired by Maurice Dufrene Carpet with a sprig motif

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N11681 Sprig   14’1” × 18’4”

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Antique Chinese Rank badge from Quig (1644-1912) Dynasty on show at the Palais (MusĂŠe Guimet, Paris)

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BB6837 Chinese Dragon.   Circa: 1920.   16’3” × 16’6”

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Text inspired from 18th century Kashmir textiles.

“It takes a village to weave a rug”

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BB6850 Indian.   Circa: 1920.   14’ × 22’3”

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“Village Party” Hand knotted pile rug woven in West Anatolia, Turkey. New production made with yarn obtained from pre 1960’s flat weaves of Anatolia.

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N19999   Village     8’ × 10’

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The Bauhaus movement was revolutionary in allowing the combination of many aesthetics

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N11010 The Bauhaus   8’ × 12’

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Moved by the screen saver

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N11769 “Motion”   12’2” × 15’6”

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Retailed by Liberty’s London as the “Glenmure”, which was described in their 1903 catalogue a “treatment of teazel and leaves”

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BB6584 Arts & Crafts Voysey Rug   9’10” × 14’3”

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The accolades started with Doris Leslie Blau in 1965.  There is a continued tradition of beauty, of value, of respect and above all, of consideration for those whose trust has been placed in Doris Leslie Blau over all these years.   Continuing today with Nader Bolour at the helm.

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As seen in

Architectural Digest, 1973

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As seen in

Architectural Digest, 1978

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As seen in

Architectural Digest, 1994

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As seen in

Architectural Digest, 1997

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As seen in

Architectural Digest, 1999

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As seen in

Architectural Digest, 2000

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As seen in

New York Times, 2008

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Cover of Architectural Digest, January 2015, by Michael Smith

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The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams...

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© Doris Leslie Blau, Inc. All Rights Reserved. MAGRAF s.c., Bydgoszcz Printed by Colonel S.A., Kraków


MAIN SHOWROOM 306 E. 61 st Street, 7 th Floor, New York, NY 10065 Washington Design Center 1099 14 th Street NW, Suite 325, Washington, DC 20005 Tel. 212-586-5511 Email: nader@dorisleslieblau.com www.dorisleslieblau.com

Doris Leslie Blau MEMORIES  
Doris Leslie Blau MEMORIES