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The Frog Footman, the Duchess, Mad Hatter and the early version of Alice.

as one Alice might wear. I feel this rendering of Alice was later substituted by the Little Nell (the Dickens character) doll. This was done, perhaps, to simplify manufacturing and to cut down on production costs. This more often found Alice has the usual Chase cloth body and stitch jointed limbs. Her lightly textured hair is bright blond, center parted, ending with two braids down her back. Her clothes are fashioned after the character illustrated in the “Alice in Wonderland” book. According to information passed down from the Chase family, Martha used existing dolls heads to create her own molds. This was a secret she never revealed during her lifetime. It was discovered only after the business was closed and dolls’ heads, that had been copied, were found hidden away in her attic. Keeping this in mind, except for Alice, the other character heads in the set could not have been copied from already existing dolls’ heads. It seems doubtful that there were dolls made in those so intricately executed images. I wonder how Martha Chase developed them. Did she find another artist with more capabilities to develop and sculpt them? The creation of Alice and her cohorts leaves no doubt that Martha Chase surpassed her other masterful accomplishments.

The twins – Tweedle Dee and Tweedle Dum.

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Profile for Antique Doll Collector Magazine

September 2010  

Special Chase Dolls • All Bisques • Meet the Bumsteads • Dolls’ Houses from the Old Salem Toy Museum • UFDC Salesroom • Antique Blue Ribbon...

September 2010  

Special Chase Dolls • All Bisques • Meet the Bumsteads • Dolls’ Houses from the Old Salem Toy Museum • UFDC Salesroom • Antique Blue Ribbon...