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Antigua & Barbuda

The Beach is Just the Beginning

Tourism Newsletter

Aug/Sep 2011

Culture Issue

Carnival Compendium: 10 Reasons to Rock and Prance

A&B Culturepedia:

10 Things ‘Dem Say:

50 Year Round Cultural Experiences and Best Places to Stay

Agro Antigua:

Who in the World is Jack?

Costume Couture:

The Black Pineapple – Feeling Haute! Haute! Haute! National Fruit and Hospitality Symbol Cover: Highlights from Antigua’s 54th Carnival Celebrations


For all of us we come from Africa

Is for our Nation proud for so

Is for Tomorrow’s children, ah say they wise and free

Is for Initiative, to bring about the reality

Is for Government and with that we are all content

Is for Unity, I think we agree

Is for all Antiguans so come lemme se you hand, black, beautiful and proud. From the Calypso song “Antigua” by King Short Shirt A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


BUZZ PIRATIONS

BUZZ PIRATIONS: Inspiration for today’s valued A&B Specialists As the soil, however rich it maybe, cannot be productive without cultivation, so the mind without culture can never produce good fruit. Seneca, Roman philosopher

A nation’s culture resides in the hearts and soul of its people. Mahatma Ghandi

A people without knowledge of their past history origins and culture, is like a tree without roots. Marcus Garvey

I think music in itself is healing. It's an explosive expression of humanity. It's something we are all touched by. No matter what culture we're from, everyone loves music. Billy Joel

A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


BUZZEDITORS TravelPad

Many of us have difficulty expressing what “culture” actually means. One analogy that I found interesting is that “culture is like dropping an Alka Seltzer into a glass of water. You don’t see it, but somehow it does something.” Regardless how you define culture, or whether you would opt for an ENO* instead (Caribbean brand of antacids), there is consensus that culture is a phenomenon with many layers that is shaped by the widening of the minds and spirit of local residents.

I recently brainstormed with my team about some of the distinctive elements of A & B’s culture and despite some generational differences, some of the commonalities on our short list were: music, dance, storytelling, language, revelry, rivalry, cuisine, family, community, religion, hospitality and the game of cricket. In conjuring up images that depict our culture, we referenced colorful carnival costumes and floats, the public market on a Saturday morning, polite villagers giving directions to sightseeing tourists and roadside vendors selling heaps of mangoes and pineapples. Legendary calypsonian, King Short Shirt, described Carnival as the “greatest vehicle of expression,” and the festival unites the entire country in celebration of a common heritage. Every year the festival brings over 12,000 people to the shores of A & B and over $5 million into A & B’s economy. Barbuda also has its own brand of Carnival in May, called Caribana. After more than 50 years, this festival has its own unique appeal, highlighting many aspects of Barbudan culture. As in many cultures, music is a compelling force and calypso and steel pan are synonymous with the destination’s cultural identity. The infectious beats and poignant lyrics of calypso, address a range of issues -- from commentary about the state of the economy, moral responsibility for HIV/AIDS prevention, to anecdotes about a visitor or even an alien who discovers his or her rhythmic soul, or finds love during the Carnival excitement. The music arouses “party animal instincts” and elicits Carnival expressions such as “party can’t done,” “bacchanal,” “get on bad” and “jump and wave.” Virtually every hotel, guest house or villa in A & B offers onsite or nearby cultural attractions for all to enjoy. Concierges are savvy in recommending an escort to accompany you or your clients to ensure that you make the ‘”cultural connection.” Even after Carnival, a number of year round activities allow visitors to sample the rich culture, unmatched hospitality and pride among the locals. In this issue, we take you on an “educultural” journey to off- the-beaten path attractions, tours, and dining spots to discover the unique elements of A & B culture. We will integrate excerpts from popular calypso and folktales, infuse the local dialect, and elicit commentary from artisans and local icons, transporting you into the cultural soul of A & B. Regardless of the language that visitors speak, there are virtually no barriers in gaining access to Antigua and Barbuda’s range of cultural attractions. Let the vibe be your guide in this intriguing melting pot and discover so many reasons to keep coming back. Sincerely,

A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011

Derede Samuel-Whitlock, Director of Tourism, USA Antigua and Barbuda

A&B will join in celebrating World Tourism Day 2011 on Sept. 27th. Theme: “Tourism Linking Cultures”


BUZZ Worthy Events 2011

August August 1 – Carnival Monday (public holiday) August 2 – Carnival Tuesday (public holiday) August 13-14 – MangoFest – Christian Valley

September 25 – Annual Frankie Nunes Memorial One-Day Fishing Tournament

November November 1 – Independence Day November 11 – First Annual Antigua Film Festival (11/11/11) November 12-13 – JHR Caribbean Annual Regatta hosted by the Jolly Harbour Yacht Club November – Antigua and Barbuda International Literary Festival

December

A&B

September

December 4-10 – 50th Annual Antigua Charter Yacht Show December 9 – Heroes Day December 25 – Christmas Day in the Dockyard December 26 – Boxing Day December 31 – Nelson’s Pursuit Race organized by the Antigua Yacht Club

A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


10

Bert Williams

Antiguan born actor and first African American to make his debut on a Broadway stage in 1910.

Viv Richards

Captain of the West Indies Cricket team and record breaking batsman. Vivi is the name, cricket is the game!

Jamaica Kincaid

Award winning Antiguan novelist and gardening writer!

June Ambrose

Music and style are personified in one of the mavericks of celebrity styling, Tourism Ambassador June Ambrose. She has created the looks for music stars like Mary J. Blige, Mariah Carey, P. Diddy and Jay-Z. The ingenious Ambrose coined the idea of putting then-new artist Missy Elliot in a blown up garbage bag in the video for "The Rain (Supa Dupa Fly),” just one of the many looks that will forever be etched into music video history.

Roland Prince

Legendary guitarist and a part of the Jazz Machine, a revolving door of jazz musicians started by legendary drummer Elvin Jones. The well known side man for Miles Davis and Nicholas Payton in many underground clubs in NYC in the early ‘70’s, Prince often battled performers like George Benson in displaying his musical talents.

Burning Flames

Antigua’s musical pioneers and one of the first soca bands to be signed by Bob Marley’s label island Records in the 1980’s. Their song “Sweet Little Island Girl” was featured in the film Weekend at Bernie’s A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011

Sir Hugh Bailey

Antigua & Barbuda’s godfather of the yachting industry. Among his winnings are Best Antigua Boat, Best Caribbean Boat, and Best Boat over 20 years old, First in Class, and First Overall in Fleet. With 53 years' experience in professional sailing his team represented Antigua & Barbuda, in the United States, for the first time in 1976 at the bicentennial.


A&B Cultural Icons with International Appeal

BUZZ A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


10 Celebrities Who’ve Experienced A&B Culture Actress Angie Harmon

visited Jumby Bay with husband Jason Sehorn for a photo shoot with In Style Magazine. The Law and Order actress danced barefoot on the shores to the pulsating rhythms of CC Cochrane, legendary steel pan player acclaimed for his unique style of playing with not two, but four pan sticks.

Actor Malik Yoba, known

for his role in New York Undercover and who recently returned to the small screen in the Syfy drama series Alphas, co-hosted the Jaycees Caribbean Queen Show, as part of Antigua’s 50th Anniversary of Carnival.

Newscaster Julie Chang of FOX, donned

a colorful feathered headdress as she covered aspects of the destination’s culture at the South Street Seaport in NYC, as part of Caribbean Week. Following his 2004 bid for US President, Senator John Kerry vacationed in Antigua to get some well needed R & R. As part of his recovery, he worshipped with the locals in a traditional Sunday service at the historic Lebanon Moravian Church in Sea View Farm Village. A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


Tony Harris, former CNN day time anchor, participated in A & B Carnival on his maiden voyage to the island. At Shirley Heights Look Out, Harris was so captivated by the rhythms that house steelband, Halycon Steel Orchestra, let him ‘join the band’ in playing a plastic cow bell.

Newlyweds, Dahntay Jones of the Indiana Pacers and Valeisha Butterfield, daughter of a

US congressman, enjoyed a Daymoon in Barbuda and learned to play the national game of warri, coining the phrase “Couples that Play Warri, Don’t Have to Worry.”

Actress Angela Bassett, visited Dennis Bar and Restaurant at Fryes to enjoy an authentic local brunch that included the national dish of fungee and pepperpot. She also sampled local “bush tea” made from lemon grass and learned about local folk tales from her host Dennis.

Racheal Ray went on a culinary adventure to many dining shacks in search of the local fare with great value for her show 40 Dollars A Day. She had an opportunity to sample ginger beer, a favorite local beverage, for the first time.

Kathy Sledge of the group Sister Sledge stopped by the Vanessa Williams,

actor in the television drama Soul Food, planted a tree at Body Pond as part of a local reforestation project. The actress got down and dirty in her water boots, nurturing her tree with healthy helpings of the rich soil.

Cobbs Cross Primary School near English Harbor to meet the students. They all sang a rendition of the 70s hit song We are Family.

BUZZ A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


The Carnival Compendium 10 Reasons to “Rock and Prance”…

Carnival is an annual celebration of heritage and culture in many countries throughout the world. Antigua’s Carnival is a spectacle of ‘‘mas, music and revelry, which is a celebration of the local culture, rich history showcased in a blend of modern rhythms and African traditions that capture the energy of the locals. Antigua’s Carnival, dubbed the “Caribbean’s Most Colorful Summer Festival,” was designed as a “crop over” celebration or midyear break from the sugarcane fields, the commemoration of the emancipation of slavery and an attraction to induce visitors the island. Antigua’s Carnival officially began in 1957, but a successful carnival celebration in 1953, organized to commemorate the coronation of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, inspired the need for an annual festival in this former British colony. Carnival originated among Italian Catholics who held a wild costume party just before the start of Lent. The festival was called ‘carnevale’ which ‘ means “to put away meat.” Popular festivals in Brazil, Trinidad and Tobago and New Orleans culminate on “Fat Tuesday.” Carnival was a form of self expression for African slaves to demonstrate their rich cultural traditions and power as individuals. Freed slaves paraded in circles, dressed in costumes and masks in an ancient ritual believed to bring good fortune, heal problems, and ”chill out” angry relatives who had died and passed into the next world.

A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


BUZZ Carnival Compendium

A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


BUZZ Carnival Compendium

10 Reasons to “Rock and Prance”… Carnival attire draws from African traditions combining natural objects (bones, grasses, beads, shells, fabric) to create a piece of sculpture, mask, or costume. Each object represents a central theme or spiritual force. Feathers are common in many of today’s Carnival costumes. In many African cultures feathers symbolized the ability to rise above problems, illness and heartbreaks by being transported to another world to be reborn and to grow spiritually. Calypso can be traced back to West African kaiso, a rhythmic language used for covert communications to outwit and mock the slave masters. African dance traditions helped to transform carnival celebrations with the inclusion of many African steps and hand movements, large puppets, stick fighters, and mocko jumbies -- colorfully costumed stilt dancers. Jumbie refers to ghost-like spirits of West African belief. Steelband music stemmed from a ban on drumming among freed slaves in the 1880’s. Rioting resulted, and the slaves ultimately readapted their drums to create new forms and mediums of music, including the tamboo bamboo, a rhythmic ensemble of bamboo joints beaten together and pounded on the ground. Biscuit tins and dustbins were later crafted into instruments, becoming the first “pans.” BUZZ

A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


As an avid ‘mas player, with several consecutive wins in the Gown” category I wanted to expand my creativity alvin S has been blazing trails in fashion design in A & B for more than 25 years. His exquisite evening gowns and costumes have graced many stages -- Antigua ’s Carnival Queen Contest and various pageants around the world. Currently enrolled in an advanced Fashion Design degree program in NYC, this nouveau designer, trainer, stylist and makeup artist has his eyes set on NY’s Fashion Avenue . Yet Calvin’s Carnival Majesty remains intact back home in Antigua . This year he integrates haute couture with revelry and launched Beautiful People, a Carnival troupe comprising several hundred bedazzled ‘mas players, portraying the theme “What Happens in Vegas stays in Vegas.” Calvin S takes a bow and shares highlights of his illustrious career in fashion with Joyce Henry, Marketing Officer in the Ministry of Tourism and part of the Buzz Team. BUZZ: How long have you been involved in fashion design? Tell us about your involvement in local pageants and the many hats, or should I say “headpieces”, that you wear during Antigua ’s Carnival as a designer, stylist, makeup artist and much more. CALVIN S: I have always had an “eye for fashion” having grown up in a family of local “fashionistas.” My mother loved beautiful clothing and she dressed her only child in the latest designs. I learned to sew by hand, but never followed through with my dreams until I was in my early twenties. I began to sew for a few clients in the late ‘80s and in 1991 a contestant approached me to make her gown for the Carnival Queen Contest. The gown was a crowd pleaser, because it represented something fresh and different and helped raise the standard for the evening gown segment of the Show. I won the best evening gown that year and since then I have set a record for the “most wins” in gown design in the Miss Antigua Pageant. BUZZ Who are some of your favorite designers and who are some of the “famous” people that you have dressed? CALVIN S: My early inspiration came from local designers in Antigua like Heike Peterson Hudes and Pat Fredricks and there are many international designers whose work I also admire. I love Valentino, Alexander Mc Queen, Halston and vintage Versace. I had the pleasure of designing a gown for ABC anchor woman Robin Roberts for her 50th birthday celebrations last winter. I also designed the formal ceremonial attire for A & B’s first female Governor General, Dame Louise Lake-Tack. I am particularly proud of this accomplishment since it will be the attire worn by future female governors and will eventually make it into our national museum in years to come. BUZZ What prompted your foray into costume design and building? How would you characterize your costume designs?

A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011

Calv A&B Desi Cost


BUZZ Carnival Compendium

“Best Evening

vin S lvin S B Fashion igner/ tume Builder

Right: A&B Tourism Officer, Shermain Jeremy wearing a Calvin S. Gown in the Ms. Universe Pageant 2005 representing Antigua and Barbuda

A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


“For a costume display, I always look at someone who has flare and appreciation for intricate work and detail and three names comes to mind: Cher , Diana Ross and Beyonce”

Robin Roberts in a Calvin S. Design Governor General, Dame Louise Lake Tack in Calvin S designed formal dress uniform A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


BUZZ Carnival Compendium

CALVIN S: As an avid ‘mas player, with several consecutive wins in the “Best Evening Gown “category I wanted to expand my creativity and I was approached by a few contestants to design and build their costumes for the Carnival Queen Show. At first I was hesitant since I had only done carnival costumes for myself for carnival. But I had designed and built costumes for delegates who represented Antigua and Barbuda at both the Miss World and Miss Universe pageants so I had some confidence in my abilities. Again, I had great success and I got more involved with some of the legendary builders in A & B to enhance my own creativity and design. BUZZ To what extent is costume design similar to mainstream fashion design? CALVIN S: There are some similarities like color co-ordination and silhouette, however, there are also big differences. What works in mainstream fashion does not necessarily translate into costume design. There is the temptation to go overboard with costumes, but the trick for me is with my knowledge in both types of designs, I often marry and balance both elements to create something fresh and new. BUZZ What are the biggest challenges that you face as a costume designer in A & B? CALVIN S: The availability of the necessary materials needed for construction and most times you have to either travel to the US mainland, Trinidad or Puerto Rico to obtain these materials, thus increasing the cost of production. Costumes these days have been reduced to a basic beaded bra and bottom with less creativity than in years gone by. As an artist I like the fact that I can create more than just some feathers on a headpiece. You have to carefully marry the preferred party type attire with creativity and color to produce a costume that depicts the spectacle and splendor of Carnival. BUZZ What sets your costumes apart from other local designers and builders? CALVIN S: The fact that I have a background in fashion design and having been to FIT and being exposed not only to mainstream fashion but also to theatrical costumes, I utilize many “tricks of the trade,” making my designs more unique. Whereas other designers utilize more traditional costume making techniques, there is always an element of “haute couture” in my work. BUZZ If you could recruit anyone, from anywhere in the world and outfit them with a Carnival costume who would that be? CALVIN S: For a costume display, I always look at someone who has flare and appreciation for intricate work and detail and three names come to mind: Cher , Diana Ross and Beyonce. But if I had to do it for one person, I would say Oprah. Her business acumen and huge following would ensure that millions of people around the world would get to see and enjoy my work. Everything Oprah touches turns to gold and her stamp of approval would be the ultimate endorsement for me. BUZZ Why is ‘mas so important to A & B’s carnival? Continued…

A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


BUZZ Carnival Compendium

Carnival is our biggest festival and it brings many visitors to our shores bearing in mind that our main income earner is Tourism. It also helps to brand A & B as a vibrant, cultural, entertainment center. This makes ‘mas and Carnival critical to our cultural identity. People come to our shores expecting to sample our culture, music and cuisine and during Carnival those expressions are most visible through our mas, steel pan and the whole pageantry of Carnival. BUZZ What would you say to a visitor who is considering playing ‘mas in Antigua ’s Carnival? CALVIN S: It is an experience of a lifetime like no other. Make sure you have your sun block, dancing shoes and you will be energized because it a celebration for everyone. There will be lots of dancing in the streets, great food and drinks and an abundance of creativity and warm hospitality that A & B nationals are known for. BUZZ

A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


Who Let the Underdog Out?

BUZZ Back

A&B’s Cultural Icon and Diplomat By Tourism Officer, Shermain Jeremy His melody and message imbue a sense of national pride among Antiguans and Barbudans. I can remember my first memories of Ambassador Rupert “Baba” Blaize while watching a re-run of the Calypso Monarch Competition in 1984. This internationally accomplished performer, known for singing classics and American chart topping songs returned to A & B’s calypso circuit as the underdog. His song “Antigua is home, is home to me, land of sun and sea and total beauty” stuck in my head, and not only did he place second In the Calypso Contest, he emerged as a cultural icon after a riveting performance. “Antigua is Home,” tugged at the heart strings of the audience and almost 30 years later has become A & B’s cultural anthem. I was ecstatic when asked to conduct this interview because of my curiosity about the man behind this powerful song and enduring message.

Ambassador Rupert “Baba” Blaize Ambassador At Large for Antigua & Barbuda (Investment & Special Cultural Promotions)

SJ: Tell me about your work as a performer and Ambassador for your country. When did you discover your passion for music? RB: I started writing lyrics and composing songs at the tender age of 15.Thanks to local DJs Ephraim John and Mickey Matthews, one of my compositions "Oh Antigua" became a hit. I recorded my first album "Move up Antigua" in my late teens. SJ: Who were some of your early musical influences both locally and/or internationally? RB: Caribbean performers Short Shirt, Lord Canary, King Obstinate and the Mighty Sparrow got my early attention as talented performers. However, my style was influenced by the

See the Ambassador in Action Here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tG7eklyobfI

A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


BUZZ Back

Who Let the Underdog Out? Continued melodious voices of Nat King Cole and Harry Belafonte. SJ: Have you worked with any interesting artists or performers in the past? Is there anyone you’d still like to work with in the future? RB: I have performed with Jimmy Cliff, Bob Marley, Paul Anka and Rueben Blades. It would be a great thrill to share the stage with Mr. Harry Belafonte himself. SJ: “Antigua is Home” is undoubtedly an epic song. What inspired the concept and who did you work with in creating this memorable piece? RB: "Antigua is Home" was inspired and created by Doctor Prince Ramsey. I worked with him to complete the lyrics and melody. Frankie MacIntosh, a prolific music arranger from St. Vincent, brought the song to life. It is indeed one of the most memorable music pieces that I have had the pleasure to perform. I was inspired to write this song because I did not feel that there was a single tune out there at the time that really captured the beauty, history and culture of A & B. SJ: As A & B’s cultural Ambassador how do you utilize your title in promoting A & B? RB: The designation of Cultural Ambassador is a great honor to bestow on any citizen. I am honored to use my voice to help promote A & B, in collaboration with the US Tourism Office. There is little doubt that my status as Ambassador has enhanced my public profile and broadened my platform as an entertainer. I leverage my “enhanced persona” humbly, to keep the spotlight shining on A & B. SJ: With so many western influences on our society what elements of our culture do you think might have been lost? How can A & B maintain A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011

“It’s the cultural connection that draws them [visitors] to A&B… and will keep them coming back.” its unique cultural identity? RB: Our customs can’t be insulated from the dominant culture of the United States but certain aspects of our rich culture are A.W.O.L and should be preserved in a more sustainable way. Our unique language and ways of preparing food should be passed on to the next generation as emblems of our heritage. SJ: Why is calypso as an art form important to our culture? RB: Calypso is germane to the upkeep of our language, history and customs. I view calypso as the corner stone of our indigenous culture and calypsoninans as the guardians of our fragile progressing democracy. “Don’t stop the Carnival" is an admonition, not merely a shout of merriment. If we ever stop the music, it would be a blackout and we might as well go home. Calypso is Culture!! SJ: How can we achieve greater cultural integration in our tourism product? How do music and culture contribute to tourism promotions? RB: Cultural integration is a worldwide movement --"We are all one family" Tourists are in search of sea, sun and fun, but it's the cultural connection that draws them to A & B in the first instance and will keep them coming back. Excite our visitors with cultural calisthenics and help them create life long memories of A & B. SJ: Tell us something about yourself that most people may not know. RB: As an Ambassador and performer, my life is pretty much an open book. However, I bet most people would be surprised to know that I am also a CPA and avid runner.


10 THINGS ‘DEM SAY… 1. Who in the world is Jack? No one really

No one knows or questions who ‘dem (they) are, or on whose authority ‘dem make so many pronouncements that characterize A & B’s rich culture. But it is not uncommon to hear locals refer to ‘dem as a reference point for wisdom, guidance or knowledge.

knows but his name is used for emphasis whether to admonish, encourage or express dismay. Often heard in expressions such as, “Yes Jack”, “Lard Jack”, “Stop Jack!

2. Goodnight means welcome and not a goodbye

3. “Tall” is not necessarily a measure of height but an emphatic “No.”

4. When buying the fish “cavali,” pay attention

to whether it attracts flies or place a silver coin in the mouth of the fresh catch. legend has it, no flies or the coin turns green, pass on this delicacy.

5. You drunk? It is not your alcohol level that is in question, but rather your credibility.

6. Do not be alarmed if served a fish with the head still on it. As far as the locals are concerned, the “fish head” is one of the most nutritious parts of the catch.

7. Jelly has many meanings all over the

world. In A&B don’t expect jam for your toast, it also refers to the nutritious “food” inside a coconut.

Jack?

8. When asking for directions do not expect to Jelly?

hear “left of this” or turn right. You just might need a compass to follow the directions like “east of the school” or “the west road.”

9. Beware of green apple trees along the beach. This supple fruit is the deadly manchineel which blisters the skin.

10. Kenip (ginep) is a seasonal fruit that

resembles grapes on the outside and lychee on the inside. The large seed is slippery and can cause choking if swallowed. When bitten, the juices could stain your clothing. Not to worry, the stain disappears once the fruit out of season. BUZZ

A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


BUZZ Carnival Compendium

Carnival Celebrations in Antigua ntigua’s Carnival unites residents and visitors in celebrating the country’s legacy as a trailblazer in the fight for emancipation from slavery and the island was the first in the Caribbean to fully adopt the emancipation decree in its entirety in 1838. There is speculation that once the word spread about the freedom celebrations in Antigua that it provided impetus for slaves in the United States to step up their efforts in their own struggle for freedom. But although islanders celebrated freedom from slavery for many years, the first official Carnival was not planned until 1957.The festival takes place annually in Carnival City at the Antigua Recreation Grounds, with several parades throughout the city. During this 11-day festival, social, political and economic differences are jettisoned to celebrate the rich culture and heritage! Even the Prime Minister, Hon. Baldwin Spencer, dons a mask and costume and joins the locals in a massive street dance throughout St. John’s. Many visitors from around the world come to Antigua to enjoy the live music, street dances, intricate costumes, and enjoy parades and pageants. Carnival also means great parties and in recent times, many pre-Carnival fetes are staged in the countdown to the official start of the festival. J’ouvert is an organized fully disorganized fete and for many locals and visitors it is the icing on the cake of the Carnival celebrations. You just never know what to expect. Politicians, lawyers, domestic workers, businessmen, nurses and cleaners can be seen hugging drinking and dancing in the streets together. Each year the “usual suspects”, a variety of characters who dress up in the weirdest costumes provide the entertainment as the lead personalities in stirring up humor for revelers and onlookers. The party really begins when these characters show up. There are five main elements of A & B culture that can be experienced during Carnival: 1. Music and Dance – A range of performances, talent showcases and free style acts 2. Artistry – The creativity, imagination, skills and local techniques are on display 3. Language – The local dialect offers provide unique interpretations and folklore in addressing many social, political and economic issues. 4. Cuisine – Food is at the center of every A & B celebration, particularly Carnival. There are opportunities to sample the local fare at every corner of the destination. 5. Heritage – The ancestry, legacy, traditions and customs, are interwoven in many activities as part of the entertainment and celebration A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


BUZZ Carnival Compendium

A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


Carnival Celebrations in Antigua Music and Dance: ‘Mas and Revelry frican rhythms and dance resonate throughout A & B culture. Although calypso is the most dominant musical genre, the influence of soca and reggae cannot be missed. Fused with the distinctive Caribbean beats, an untrained ear can also decipher spiritual rhythms from hymns, jazz and blues. Meringue and salsa are often integrated into musical arrangements, reflecting the influence of immigrants from other Caribbean countries. Calypsonians play a prominent role in A & B’s cultural fabric and they are respected as social commentators, although some see them as mere “news carriers,” whose message is communicated through satire and sarcasm. For example, this year’s Calypso King De Bear, won the title with a tune entitled “Melee For Sale” that is laden with lyrical references to the latest local gossip. His performance at the Calypso King Contest had significant crowd appeal. There are two main types of Calypso. The traditional informative calypso is synonymous with legendary performers and former Calypso Kings, Short Shirt, Swallow and Obstinate whose repertoire of work is recognized worldwide. In more recent times, the more “jumpy” calypso is often influenced by salsa, blues or reggae and beats. This type of music is synonymous with performers such as the Burning Flames, Claudette Peters and Tian Wynter. A Salute to The Steel pan The origins of the steel band are well documented as having roots in Trinidad and Tobago, but the longest surviving steel band hails from Antigua, the legendary Hell's Gate Steel Band, formed in 1947. Their performance of the Hallelujah Chorus from Handel's "Messiah" won the 1964 Antigua Steel band competition, earning the band an all expenses paid trip to the New York World's Fair. One of the most modern musical instruments, the steel pan evolved during the early 20th century. Made from used oil Drums, they are cut off on one end and then shaped, pounded, and tuned. Comprising up to one hundred pan players who practice their tunes for months on end, steel bands vie for the Panorama Championship and participate in the Road March competition as part of the street jump up. Steel band music is an entertainment staple in hotels, restaurants and other hot sports. A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


BUZZ Carnival Compendium

Carnival Celebrations in Antigua Music and Dance: ‘Mas and Revelry uring the late 1940s, the steel band movement in Antigua was strongly opposed by local aristocrats who claimed that the steel bands attracted “vagabonds and derelicts.” A petition was sent to then Gov. Lord Baldwin to outlaw steel bands in the colony. Were it not for Gov. Baldwin, who was a steel band enthusiast, the art form may have long been extinct in Antigua. Over the decades, Hell's Gate Steel Orchestra has performed for the royal and famous. Occasions include a performance for Her Royal Highness, the late Princess Margaret at the Antigua’s Government House. On March 2, 1960, Hell's Gate Steel Orchestra played abroad the yacht Christina for Sir Winston Churchill. In 1977, the band performed in the presence of Queen Elizabeth II and, Prince Phillip, the Duke of Edinburgh.

A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


BUZZ Carnival Compendium

Carnival Celebrations in Antigua Artistry: Costume Design and other Art Forms Costume Design major spectacle of Carnival is the throngs of colorful costumed ‘mas players in the street parades. During the two day processions, thousands of locals don colorful costumes that depict the richness of the island’s culture. Many community organizations develop a troupe comprising hundreds of ‘mas players, to express interpretations of the culture. In the months leading up to Carnival, scores of local artisans can be seen welding; sewing; gluing; applying feathers, sequins, foil papers, glitter and lots of creativity, energy, and patience. The first step is to come up with an overall theme or concept and develop costume illustrations for each section of dancers. Costumes are then sewn, decorated, and fitted to each individual dancer. All this creative activity takes place in “mas camps,” where teamwork and organization are crucial to creating an award-winning production. Larger costumes require greater skills in their design and construction and frames are created by bending wire into shapes, which are then covered with paper mâché, foam, and other materials. Physics play an important role in portability as the costume must be able to move and dance across stages and streets, and not fall apart! Many different forms of decorations and materials (natural and man-made) are used to transform the costume into a dream of the mind’s eye.

A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


BUZZ Carnival Compendium

Carnival Celebrations in Antigua Artistry: Costume Design and other Art Forms Pottery ea View Farm is a village located in the center of the island well known for its pottery. Endowed with some of the richest clay soil in the island, many of the early settlers in this village were potters. The art of pottery goes back about 200 years and this is still the best place to get coal pots, garden pots and other customized items. The soil in this part of the island is unique with high levels of clay sediments that make it are ideal for pottery making. Few indigenous potters remain to carry on this traditional style of pottery, a rare cultural art form in A & B. Elvie’s Pottery is the oldest pottery still in operation in Antigua today where traditional handmade pottery can still be found. Hyacinth Hillhouse, Elvie’s daughter carries on the family and village tradition in the same backyard where she grew up. Hyacinth’s lighthearted spirit coupled with the quick pace and ease with which she moulds these pots will amaze even the most seasoned potters. The pots are fired in the kiln and it takes two weeks for the pots to be completed. So visitors who take a class at Elvie’s pottery may not be guaranteed that they can take their handiwork with them. However, there is always a surplus of pots in the backyard to choose from, so they will not leave empty handed. For those in search of local Caribbean art, this backyard gallery is one of the best places to see a local artisan at work. Clay pots -- called coal pots and yabbas are used for cooking and jar pots are used to keep water cool. Some of the decorative designs are sold to hotels and to upscale homeowners. There are also a variety of unique souvenirs to choose from. Budding potters should make an appointment to join the class. Monday – Saturday 7am – 6pm. Telephone 268 463-1888. You have to go Farm for that! – to get something custom made!

A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


BUZZ Carnival Compendium

Carnival Celebrations in Antigua Language: Dialect and Intellect Joy Lawrence

English is the main language in A & B and the island enjoys one of the highest literacy rates in the Caribbean. Several dialects are spoken around the island and residents speak quickly with an accent, sometimes making it difficult for visitors to understand. Immigrants from other islands have brought other languages that have influenced the local dialect and many Spanish, French-Patois and Creole terms have been infused into the local lingo and music. A & B dialect comprises many words of West African origin, based on the different tribes that were brought to the island. Many of the proverbs that are used by Antigua's people are derivatives of African sayings. It is not uncommon to find locals communicating and joking with each other, using customized vocabularies, speaking in puns, alliteration and antonyms, in a rhythmic language that only they “overstand.� This practice came about as slaves held on to their native languages and created a whole new language that allowed them to communicate to outwit their slave masters. Fortunately most Antiguans and Barbudans speak and write English exceptionally well and when communicating with visitors, most locals immediately revert to standard communications in English, stand erect

A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


wearing with the brightest smile and projecting the warmest hospitality. Literary Works Featuring the Local Language Joy Lawrence is one of Antigua and Barbuda’s most prolific poets and activists in the literary arts. She is also a dramatist, historian and folklorist of significant renown. In her book The Way We Talk and Other Antiguan Folkways, Ms. Lawrence set out to document Antigua and Barbuda’s culture and history, even linking our unique linguistic idioms to Ewe, Twi and Fante – languages spoken in Ghana, Togo and Benin. Her determination to preserve our culture and history continues in her new book, Bethesda and Christian Hill our History & Culture. Born and raised up in the tiny agricultural village of Bethesda, she first showcased her talents in 1995 with a public performance of her poem, An Interview with Hurricane Luis. Trained as an educator, Ms. Lawrence taught at the elementary and secondary school levels. She then went on to the Antigua State College, where she was a senior lecturer and founder of the ASC/UNESCO annual poetry contest. Ms. Lawrence was awarded the 2004 UNESCO Honor Award by the organization’s literary arts committee, for her contribution to literary arts in Antigua and Barbuda. “Ms. Lawrence has written a comprehensive and readable account of the villages of Bethesda and Christian Hill. Anyone interested in local history will find this informative book compelling reading. She has put on record our local history so that the young people of our nation will gain insight into their past.” Sir James B. Carlisle, Governor General of Antigua and Barbuda 1995 - 2007


BUZZ Carnival Compendium

Cuisine: Exotic Food and Drink Food and drink are at the core of A & B’s culture. Every festival, party, graduation, birth, wedding or holiday celebration must have food! Local food. A& B cuisine today is a result of interactions between indigenous Indians and Europeans during the early years of exploration in the Caribbean region, Europeans and Africans during years of colonization and through interactions between immigrants from neighbouring islands in more recent times. The first known inhabitants of the Caribbean region were Indians and from them European settlers gained knowledge of local fruits and vegetables. The national dish of Antigua and Barbuda is fungee (similar to polenta) and pepperpot that is made of leaves from a dasheen plant mixed with spinach, okra, local herbs and often various meats or seafood. Stewed oxtail, beef, goat and chicken are all popular. Side dishes include rice and peas, yams, fried plantains, dasheen, sweet potato, cassava, beans and lentils. Fish and lobster are extremely popular, especially in Barbuda which is known for the spiny lobster. Many residents eat fish for breakfast, lunch and/or dinner! The best cooks of local cuisine are often the older women in the community. Asking for a recipe is often pointless as they do not cook with recipes but rather with memory and taste; they add a little of this and a little that and create masterpieces. Let’s RUMble! A & B is known for its smooth blend of rums. Distilled on island, the most popular brands are Cavalier and English Harbor Rum were originally manufactured using local A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


molasses from the sugar plantation. However, sugar production was discontinued in the early ‘70s. There are a number of popular health and fruit drinks. Seamoss is a popular drink made of seaweed that is boiled until it dissolves and then mixed with milk and spices. Mauby is made by boiling the bark of the tree with spices including cinnamon and is a local favorite. Other favorites include; passion fruit, sorrel, soursop and natural coconut water. Bush tea, made from brewing lemon grass and other local herbs is used widely for its soothing qualities and medicinal properties. Urlings Sea Food Fiesta This event held in the tiny village of Urlings is staged about six times throughout the year and has grown considerably since the first fiesta kicked off in the summer of 2004. Locals from all corners of the island venture to Urlings to sample the fresh catch, enjoy local side dishes such as Johnny cakes and wood baked bread and enjoy local music and other types of entertainment. One of the main goals of this event was to capitalize on the bounty of the seas that is synonymous with the southern side of the island. The Urlings Fisheries is a hub of activity as local fishermen bring in their daily catch of snapper, sword fish, crab, conch and lobster. In addition to supplying many hotels and restaurants with a steady supply of fresh sea food, the fishermen from the south ensure that they have surplus catch during long weekends and major holidays like Easter, Labor or Carnival. The Sea Food Fiesta is coordinated by the Ministry of Agriculture and is designed to generate more economic activity and foster sustainability with the Fisheries sector.


BUZZ Carnival Compendium

Carnival Celebrations in Antigua

Heritage: TLC – Traditions, Legacy and Customs

The people of modern-day Antigua were born from an ancestry of slavery. More precisely, the people who presently inhabit Antigua are from a lineage of black slaves who were chosen and bred by their British masters for desirable characteristics. As a result, many of the people living on Antigua and Barbuda share the same family names, and are of very tall and strong stature. In a census taken on the island in recent years, approximately 96 percent of Antigua's population declared to be of African descent. The African influence on the island's culture is seen in many aspects of everyday life on Antigua, including its music, folklore, religion and generational transfer of knowledge and language.

Antigua's historic windmills are remnants of the island's one-time role as a major sugar producer

A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011

Antigua Emancipation Day

Antigua's colonial past began with the British settlement of the island in 1623


Celebrating ‘Ole Time Christmas Christmas in A & B takes on a distinctly tropical hue and with a unique fusion of food, music and dance. As the local liquor begins to flow, the aura is as easy going as a pour of Johnny Walker or Guinness Stout. The simmering scents of cloves, ginger, pimento and other spices permeate from literally every home signaling the start of the Christmas feast. The concept of the ‘Ole time Christmas is being revived in many communities. The merriment creates an upbeat vibe that brings villagers together for a cultural celebration. Authentic island fare of stew pork, goat water and yard fowl are preferred, in lieu of the usual ham and turkey. Local butchers are extremely busy in the days leading up to Christmas to ensure ample supplies of local cuts. The pork is seasoned overnight and slow cooked outdoors on a coal pot. The menu also includes seasoned rice which is rice cooked with pigeon peas, butter beans or red beans and corned meats, steamed vegetables, and a slice of sweet potato or potato salad. For a more authentic menu, fungee, the national dish (similar to polenta), is served with the stewed pork and fried National Dish Fungee and Pepper Pot dumplings or Johnny cakes are served instead of bread. Goat water is a special treat and the meat is cooked until tender and served as a spicy stew or side dish. This main course is particularly copious and the goal is to ensure that everyone gets a “bellyful.” Dessert follows with black rum cake, bambula (cassava bread), sorrel, ginger beer, rum punch and locally made fruit tarts and turnovers and slow churned ice cream. Carolers with flambeaus bring seasonal cheer to kick off after dinner entertainment and a number of masqueraders including highlanders and the famed “John Bull” dressed in a suit of banana leaves, dance to steel and iron band music. For more formal gatherings, the Royal Police Force Band, an orchestra comprising more than 30 police officers, provides the entertainment. BUZZ

A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


A & B Culturepedia 50 Ways to Experience A&B Culture Year Round local band featuring legendary cricket players and musicians Richie Richardson and Curtley Ambrose.

Jouvert – this street dance is the icing on the cake for thousands of revelers.

Music and Dance

1

Visit the Pan Lab in Belmont to learn about the art of making the instruments and get lessons in playing the pan

2

Check out Jam Corner every Thursday night, starting in June and leading up to Carnival. See live stage performances and enjoy local music food and drink. Warning crowds are thick, so you may need an escort.

3 4

Enjoy one of the annual pre-Carnival Fetes, the prelude to Carnival, starting with the Caribbean Snowstorm or white fete, on the 4th July weekend. Other Fetes that follow: Blue Jeans, Colors and Red Eye. Head to King’s Casino at Heritage Quay for a Friday night of gaming with the locals. Enjoy music from Spirited, a

A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011

5

Visit Shirley Heights Look Out on Sundays for the longest running BBQ party since 1981. Enjoy steelband music until sunset and the after party continues with a local reggae or calypso band until midnight.

6

Check out Antigua Rhythms a cultural and performing arts center, featuring of Art Shows, Dance, Theater, Comedy, Poetry and Live Music

7

So You Think you can Dance! Join a Zumba Class and learn to do Caribbean dances such as the dollar ‘whine.’

8

Stop by King Progress’ Music Store in the Departure Lounge at the Airport. This former Calypso King will help you top up your repertoire of island tunes and melodies.

9

On Friday nights visit OJ’s, see live performances by Roland Prince, legendary jazz musician who performed with the likes of George Benson in many underground clubs in NYC in the early ‘70s.


15

Contact Mark Brown, a contemporary Antiguan Figure Painter whose work usually reflects states of the human condition. His primary medium is Oils on Canvas. www.markbrownart.com

16

Stop by Island Woman Boutique at Redcliffe Quay for a selection of locally designed attire and the best pick of handmade leather sandals.

17

Visit Harmony Hall to enjoy exotic dining a variety of art exhibits in their gallery throughout the season featuring local artists such as Gilly Gobinet and Jan Farara.

18

Check out Art Café, Barbuda, featuring artist Claire Frank for vibrant silk paintings of fish, lizards, turtles and other tropical scenes are inspired by the colors and light of the Caribbean. She sells through many Antiguan galleries but lives on the island of Barbuda. www.barbudaful.com

19

Marvel at glass art designs by Katherine Hutchinson, featuring traditional, whimsical, showy and stately pieces. Commissions are welcome. katnitram@msn.com

Artistry

10

Take a Pottery class at Elvie’s Pottery in Sea View Farm or Sarah Fuller in Coolidge. The Pottery Shop at Redcliffe Quay, carries a wide range of Fuller’s work. Commissions welcome.

11

Visit Dynamics, Myst or Revelers ‘Mas Camp’ in May – July to learn more about costume design and construction.

12

Visit the local Craft market and order custom made garments, leather goods and other accessories.

13

Visit local art galleries in English Harbor and along Fig Tree Drive to discover local talent and to support the works of emerging artists.

14

Take an underwater photography tour to discover the treasures of the underworld.

A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


A & B Culturepedia 50 Ways to Experience A&B Culture Year Round

Language

20

Grab a copy of The Way We Talk and Other Antiguan Folkways, by local author Joy Lawrence at the Best of Books Store.

21

Engage locals and find out “Who is Jack” that everyone refers to. Also learn fun phrases like “mek out” and “tall” in A&B’s dialect.

22

Worship with the locals in a village church. Expect a blessing as you immerse yourself in local “prayer and praise.”

23

Tune in to local radio or television to enjoy talk programs, local ads and jingles filled with local folklore and unique linguistics.

A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011

24

Board a bus to a local beach and enjoy interactions with locals as they go about their daily activities.

25

Support a local charity or volunteer at a local school for the mentally or physically challenged – Amazing Grace, Sunshine Home for Girls or Boys Training School

26

Visit the Parliament and see the local legislature in session. (Business casual attire required)

27

Hang with the fellas on the block in Urlings or Old Road Village. Enjoy a local game of warri or dominoes.

28

Visit a local beach at dawn and join an “age appropriate” exercise group. Get the latest work out techniques, pain remedies and “old wife’s tales” to address any ailments. .

29

In Barbuda, attend a horse racing event on Sundays. Chuckle at the local horses’ names, enjoy the commentary, rivalry and interaction as locals support their favorite stallions.

30

Board the ferry to Barbuda and interact with locals who commute between islands. Antiguans and Barbudans unspoken rivalry eventually comes out when residents get really relaxed on the water.


35

Dine at the Hospitality Training Institute. Sample local entrees and be waited on by apprentices, the next generation of hospitality workers.

36

Stop for freshly churned ice cream along many of the sightseeing routes throughout the island.

37

Visit the Pineapple Farm at Cades Bay to pick and peel your own sweet Antigua black pineapples.

38

Stop for hot bun and cheese at a local bakery, direct from the oven to your mouth. Get there at sunrise since supplies go quickly.

39

Attend a local food fair. Many villages and parish churches host fundraisers on Easter Monday, Boxing Day or Whit Monday

40

A quick stop at either location of the Epicurean Supermarket, on Friar’s Hill Road or Jolly Harbor, to sample local delicacies.

Cuisine

31 32 33 34

Check out the Urlings Seafood Fest for fresh catch prepared by the best road chefs in the south. Stop at Harriett’s food shack near Crosbies on Saturdays for mouth watering delicacies such as souse, conch water, or seasoned rice. Tune into to ABS Television for Gwen Tonge’s legendary show, Cooking Magic now in syndication or purchase her cook book. Visit the Public market to sample freshly picked varieties of mango, pineapple and other seasonal fruits and vegetables.

A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


A & B Culturepedia 50 Ways to Experience A&B Culture Year Round

Heritage

41

Visit Betty’s Hope for a reenactment of life on the plantation, from the use of farm equipment to cooking techniques and demonstrations.

42

Tour the grounds of the St. John’s Cathedral (building closed temporarily for repairs) and marvel at the architecture of this historic building. Read the large tombstones and peek into the past of the lifestyles of the local aristocracy.

43

Check out a weekend match of cricket or football (soccer) at the Antigua Recreation Grounds—food, music, entertainment galore!

44

Take a nature walk to Rendezvous Bay to see rare species of birds, turtles and other rare creatures in their natural habitat.

A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011

45

Visit the local museum to see several displays including vintage photography, archeological exhibits and sculptures.

46

Attend one of the monthly lecture series at the Museum to learn more about the treasure trove of relics that dot the island’ landscape.

47

Visit Martello Tower a 17th century fort, one of the oldest models of this type of architecture.

48

Take a windmill tour and learn how skilled “wind masters’ calculated and determined the wind currents.

49

Venture to Diamonds Estate an old plantation, now a full scale farm. Produce including carrots, lettuce, papaya, yams and sweet potatoes are grown — many find their way onto the menus of the finest local hotels.

50

Stroll through Fort James and be transported back in time with cannons and relics of wars won or lost, and a shot of rum at Russell’s Sea Food Restaurant and Bar.

BUZZ


BUZZ Worthy Features

Caribana Helps to Unite the World No culture can live it attempts to be exclusive.

-Mahatma Gandhi

Scotiabank Toronto Caribbean

Carnival, formerly known as Caribana, is a festival of Caribbean culture and traditions held each summer in the city of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Annually, the festival draws hundreds of thousands of tourists from around the globe to Toronto's lakeshore. This Caribbean Carnival event, that has been billed as North America's largest street festival, frequented by over 1.3 million visitors each year for the festival's final parade. Following a trademark law dispute between the original operators of the festival, who still owned the Caribana name, and the current organizers, the festival was renamed Scotiabank Caribbean Carnival Toronto in May 2011. The entire event, which is one of the first Caribbean Carnivals along with those in New York City, Notting Hill and Boston to be held outside of the Caribbean region, brings in over one million people to the shores of Toronto and over $400 million into Ontario's economy, annually. While Caribana runs for two weeks, the culmination of the Caribana event is the final weekend which is punctuated by the street Parade of Bands. This weekend traditionally coincides with the Ontario statutory holiday Civic Holiday. A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


BUZZ Worthy Features

Caribana Helps to Unite the World Continued This Canadian crafted celebration coincides with Antigua's Carnival and culminates with a massive street parade on the first Monday in August. Caribana has been an emblem of the successful transport of Caribbean culture to the Diaspora and helps to unite people from all over the world, with a rich display of costumes and floats that depict Caribbean themes with vivid pageantry and splendor. . This annual event encompasses the many facets of Caribbean culture -food, music, dance, visual arts, cuisine, history and politics are irreverently represented. Although Carnival is celebrated worldwide, Caribana is quintessentially Caribbean. Because the concept of Carnival is so universal many are able to discover what we all have in common, and to celebrate what makes us different as people. The power and creativity that underlies the music and art forms often unite families, communities and countries and help to transform lives. BUZZ

A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


BUZZ Worthy Events 2011

August 12-14 – Fortune Cooking Food Festival Harbour-Front Centre, Toronto August 17, 22, 23 – Transat Holidays Product Launch – Toronto, Montreall (Laval and South Shore)

September September 2-5 – Hot and Spicy Food Festival

Contact Erica Henry-Jackman

Canada

August

Sales and Marketing Manager Antigua and Barbuda Tourism Office Consulate General of Antigua and Barbuda 60 St.Clair Avenue East, Suite 601 Toronto, Ontario, M4T 1N5 Telephone: 416-961-3085 Fax:416-961-7218

A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


BUZZ Worthy Features

Agro Antigua!

Antigua and Barbuda closed it main sugar operations in the early 1970’s ending a legacy of more than 300 years of sugar production. Tourism became the main industry and for the past 35 years, the twin island nation has developed a thriving tourism business featuring the unique endowment of its 365.white sandy beaches and friendly people. The agricultural culture never left many communities particularly on the Southern side of the island rich in volcanic soil and bounteous seas.

The Antigua Black Pineapple is the National Fruit and sits atop the country’s coat of arms and the distinctive motif says "Welcome!" to the almost one million visitors who visit A & B each year.

The Antigua Black Pineapple. National Fruit and Symbol of Hospitality Rare Fruit - The WHAT?? Columbus “discovered” the pineapple in the neighboring island of Guadeloupe during his second voyage to the New World. in 1493. In Antigua, Columbus’ next stop, crew members shared samples of this prized fruit with the natives. The exotic fruit was called the piña, due to its resemblance to a pinecone, and was used by the sailors as a source of Vitamin C to stave off scurvy on long voyages. The Antigua Black.

National Pineapple Day Celebrated on 3rd Friday in May Visitors receive samples of this sweet fruit upon arrival at the various ports of entry. Workshops demonstrate farming techniques, entrees and traditional methods of preparation and cooking, by products and medicinal properties of the Antigua black pineapple A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


In recent times with the challenges of the economy, there has been resurgence in backyard farming and fishing. While the Tourism industry accounts for more than 70% of the nation’s GDP, agriculture now accounts for more than 27%, representing a significant increase over previous years. This Ministry of Tourism and Ministry of Agriculture have embarked on a number of joint initiatives like the Mango Fest to highlight the destination’s rich agro culture and foster stronger linkages between these two important sectors.

Symbol of Hospitality Due to its exotic qualities and rareness, the pineapple became a symbol of hospitality and it was considered a great feat for a host to procure a ripe pineapple for guests. Seafaring captains used to impale fresh pineapples --souvenirs of their lengthy travels to tropical ports-- atop the porch railings of their homes when they returned. Pineapples used in colorful centerpieces, symbolized the utmost welcome and hospitality. Cades Bay Pineapple Farm

Vitamin and Seas Despite its name, the Antigua Black is not actually black. It is fully ripened and delicious when is dark green on the outside. The Black Pineapple, indigenous to Antigua and Barbuda was brought from West Africa in the early 1800s. This species thrives on the Southern side of the island where the volcanic soil profile rich in sulphur, yields a unique taste and the sweetest variety of the fruit to be found. Superior to that of other countries, its sweetness comes from the type of soil, and the amount of rainfall which allows the sugar content to be much higher. Today A & B produces more than 300 tons of pineapple each year. A new program was recently introduced to increase pineapple production per acreage to address increased demand for the black pineapple from Norway and other parts of Europe. The pineapple grown is consumed locally and is not sufficient to meet local demand.

Bartender in the 2011 Mango Pineapple competition

Believe it or Not!

One cup of Pineapple contains 82 calories, 22 g of carbohydrates, 2 g of fiber, 1 g of protein, no appreciable fat or cholesterol, 131 % of recommended daily intake of Vitamin C, and only 2 mg of Sodium BUZZ


BUZZGuide

BUZZA&B Entertainment Guide In selecting accommodations in A&B many visitors try to strike that balance between having access to great beaches as well as great entertainment. If your ideal vacation includes partying in different nightclubs, you might want to do some extra research since Antigua is known more for its tropical beauty than for its club scene. Nevertheless once you have found the right place to stay, you will have many entertainment options (on site or off site) to choose from during your evening hours in Antigua and Barbuda. Hotels on the following lists are worth considering if you want your vacation nights to include more than star gazing or moonlit strolls along the shore. Of course, a vacation consists of more than just drinking and dancing the night away. You’ll want to select a hotel that offers you the right mix of amenities, and one that offers the right balance between quality and price. Clicking any of these hotel names will take you to a detailed page where you can see everything from the number of rooms in the hotel and a list Or visit www.antiguabarbuda.org or www.antiguahotels.org for more information about Accommodations in Antigua and Barbuda... A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


Hotels With On Site Nightlife Hotels listed below show number of bars and the number of drinking venues per guests, whether live entertainment is offered and the frequency. Live entertainment comprises steel band and calypso performances, folk music and string bands, fire eating, drumming, karaoke, salsa and meringue. The availability of live entertainment and the typical frequency of live entertainment at each hotel are also listed. Please note that less frequent entertainment during the off season. Consider calling or emailing the hotel directly to obtain the entertainment schedule.

Hotel

Location

Number of Bars

Rooms per Bar

Live Entertainment

Jolly Harbour Beach Resort, Marina and Golf Club

St. John's

5

13.3

Every Day (7 days a week)

Sandals Grande Antigua

St. Johns

6

15.4

Every Day (7 days a week)

Rex Resorts Halcyon Cove

St. John's

3

48.2

Every Day (7 days a week)

St. James' Club

Mamora Bay

4

62.8

5 to 6 days a week

Grand Pineapple Beach Resort

St. John's

3

60.0

Every Day (7 days a week)

Jumby Bay

St. John's

4

35.0

Every Day (7 days a week)

Blue Waters Hotel

St. John's

2

43.8

5 to 6 days a week

Hawksbill Beach Resort

St. John's

2

66.6

5 to 6 days a week

Galley Bay

St. John’s

1

98.0

Every Day (7 days a week)

Carlisle Bay

Old Road

4

20.5

Every Day (7 Days A Week)

Curtain Bluff

Old Road

1

72.0

Every Day (7 Days A Week)

The Verandah Resort and Spa

St. John’s

3

66.6

Every Day (7 Days A Week)

Blue Waters Hotel

St. John's

3

54.0

5 to 6 days a week

The Sugar Ridge Resort

Near Jolly Harbor

2

25.0

Every Day (7 Days A Week) A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


BUZZGuide

Antigua Hotels With Nearby Entertainment

BUZZA&B Entertainment Guide No. of Bars/Hotspots Within: 10 Min. 20 Min. Walk Drive

Hotel

Location

Cocos

Near Jolly Harbor

4

11

Jolly Harbour Beach Resort, Marina and Golf Club

Jolly Harbor

4

12

Jolly Beach Resort

Near Jolly Harbor

4

12

Cocobay Resort

Near Jolly Harbor

5

13

Antigua Village

St. John's

6

12

Sandals Grande Antigua

St. Johns

6

12

Rex Resorts Halcyon Cove

St. John's

6

12

Royal Antiguan

St. John's

2

13

The Inn at English Harbor

English Harbor

4

8

Hawksbill Beach Resort

St. John's

2

13

The Admiral's Inn

English Harbor

6

15

Hermitage

Near Jolly Harbor

5

15

Coconut Beach Club

St. John

2

14

Antigua Yacht Club Marina

English Harbor

5

15

Copper and Lumber Store

English Harbor

5

15

Trade Winds Hotel

St. John's

6

15

A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011

For some vacationers if their hotel doesn’t offer live entertainment, or the band shuts down early, a nearby hotel or hot spot may offer the perfect solution when some more excitement is needed. Hotels in the following table are ranked by the number of other hotels offering entertainment nearby. The hotels were primarily ranked based upon a 10 minute walk and secondarily based on a 20 minute drive. For example, offers 4 options for entertainment within walking distance, and 11 that are within a short driving distance. Antigua Hotels Located Near Nightclubs and Bars If you are weary of the bar scene at your hotel, or you’re ready for a livelier bar scene, you will have plenty of options if you’re staying close to other hotels. Since bars are located at nearly every hotel in Antigua, the hotels in this next table are ranked by the number of hotel bars and nightclubs nearby. Once again, the rankings consider first a 10 minute walk and second a 20 minute drive. BUZZ


BUZZ Worthy Events 2011

September

USA

September 23-24– Antigua and Barbuda Falling for Vermont A Weekend Culinary Experience at the Annual Wine Harvest Sponsored by A & B Tourism, Matterhorn Inn and Vermont Wines Wine Fall Harvest Dinner featuring Hell's Kitchen runner up, Chef Kevin Cottle and Antigua’s Chef Murphy For more information www.MatterhornInnVt.com Or call (802)-464-4676

November November 11 – Antigua and Barbuda’s First Film Festival November 17 – Paradise Without a Layover AA non-stop Service from New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK) and V. C. Bird International Airport in Antigua (ANU), four times a week Schedule for the new service (all times shown are local) From

To

Flight #

Departs

Arrives

Frequency

New York (JFK)

Antigua (ANU)

673* (nonstop)

8:35 a.m.

1:40 p.m.

Mon, Thurs, Fri, Sat

Antigua (ANU)

New York (JFK)

678* (nonstop)

3:05 p.m.

7:00 p.m.

Mon, Thurs, Fri, Sat

*Effective Nov 17, 2011 A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011


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Feedback from BUZZ readers

The BUZZ maintains a cutting edge, up-todate knowledge base, and is great source of reference when trying to secure a booking. The positive response from our clients on their return say it best. Nick Minucci President/Travel Consultant Minucci Travel Inc. 9 Meadow Ridge Lane New Milford CT 06776 860 350-8852, Fax 860 355-4990, Out of town 800 646-8224 E Mail: nick@minuccitravel.com www.minuccitravel.com

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Great job on your newsletter. I love the way it’s laid out and as owner and manager of my agency I do think its a very compelling selling point to have. Wanda Kruszewski Wanda's Travel 248 Route 100 P.O.Box 1763 West Dover, VT 05356 A&B BUZZ – Aug/Sep, 2011

As a result our sales staff are more equipped each month with fresh ideas and a much clearer understanding of the destination. Having the BUZZ as a yardstick and gauging it against what Antigua and Barbuda has to offer on a monthly basis, has allowed us to custom tailor our clients vacations to their specific needs. Donna Borrelli Hamden Travel 2911 Dixwel Ave. #208 Hamden, CT 06518

For such a diverse industry, The BUZZ afford leads and product information that are fresh and relevant. In short it’s a great tool for the travel agent. Barbara Nichulas Byside Travel 89 Wolfs Lane Pelham, NY 10803

My sales to Antigua are up from a year ago, due in large part to the highly effective direct marketing tool you have created for us in your BUZZ editions. Thanks for the refreshing coverage. Susan M Leo Travel Consultant The Travel Collaborative A Member of the Tzell Travel Group 12 Beacon St. Somerville, MA 02143


call toll fre e

.org rbuda 888.268.4227 or visit us online www.antigua-ba


A & B Buzz Aug/Sep 2011  

Antigua and Barbuda Buzz Magazine - Culture Issue Featuring: Carnival Compendium, A&B Culturepedia, Agro Antigua, Costume Couture

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