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Job roles in the tevevision and film industries By Anthony lewis


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unner

Salary-ÂŁ8 to ÂŁ9 Contracted Job hours- 30-35 hours Job description Production Runners assist wherever they are needed on productions and their duties vary depending on where they are assigned. They may be involved in anything from office administration or crowd control to public relations and cleaning up locations. Runners are usually employed on a freelance basis, are not very well paid, and their hours are long and irregular. The work is usually extremely varied and the Runner role offers an opportunity to learn about

Training and qualification

Relevant courses include: television/film/media/radio production; media and broadcasting skills; multimedia; drama and theatre.

every aspect of the industry, providing a good entry-level role into the film and television industry.


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esearcher Salary-ÂŁ22000-25000 Freelance and contracted Job hours - vairable

Job description A programme researcher provides support to the producer and production team. Researchers contribute ideas for programmes, source contacts and contributors and collect, verify and prepare information for film, television and radio productions. A researcher can work on a wide variety of programmes or within one subject area. The work involves organising, planning and researching everything that will

Training and qualification Employment is generally precarious. Staff jobs are extremely hard to come by and researchers are generally taken on for specific projects or programmes (often lasting no more than two or three months). In order to secure regular employment, freelancers need to build up a reputation. Large corporations, such as the BBC, employ some researchers on permanent contracts. Unsocial worki

happen during the programme - who will be interviewed; location; will the film crew fit; does the budget stretch? The researcher has a responsibility for fact checking, writing briefs for presenters and ensuring that there is adherence to appropriate legislation relating to the production. The role may also be known as a specialist, live-footage or picture researcher, broadcast assistant or assistant producer. The job can be seen as an apprenticeship for the producer role and a chance for ambitious recruits.


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ditor

Salary-ÂŁ25,000 Contracted Job hours- 30-40 hours Job description A magazine features editor is responsible for the content and quality of their publication and ensures that stories are engaging and informative. Most opportunities are in large publishing companies that produce a wide range of titles. These include weekly and monthly consumer or lifestyle titles, which are commonly referred to as ‘glossy’ magazines.

Training and qualification Specialist Researchers are likely to be graduates of Art, Architecture, Theatre, Interior or 3D Design courses. Some individuals may also undertake higher level courses in Film and/or Theatre Production Design. After training, it is equally important to acquire on the job experience of how Art Departments work. Individual course accreditation in certain subject areas is currently being piloted.

However, features editors are also employed by trade magazines, specialist publishers, online media and in-house magazines. Magazine features editors do not always need specialist knowledge of the subject they cover, unless the content is highly technical, although an interest in the subject is usually expected


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irector

Salary-£8 to £9 Contracted Job hours- 30-35 hours

Job description Production Runners assist wherever they are needed on productions and their duties vary depending on where they are assigned. They may be involved in anything from office administration or crowd control to public relations and cleaning up locations. Runners are usually employed on a freelance basis, are not very well paid, and their hours are long and irregular. The work is usually extremely varied and the Runner role offers an opportunity to learn about

Training and qualification While there are numerous training courses and reference books on directing, formal qualifications are not necessary to become a Director. Studying the art and craft of directing is important, but the role can only really be mastered through in-depth practical experience. Writing a screenplay, directing one’s own short film or an amateur play, are all good starting places. Extensive industry experience is also crucial to this role; up-to-date knowledge of filmmaking techniques and equipment is vital, as is learning how to work with actors to create a performance.

every aspect of the industry, providing a good entry-level role into the film and television industry.


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loor Manager

Salary-£16,000 - £22,000. Contracted -Freelance Job hours- 14 hours day Job description Television floor managers ensure that sets, props and technical equipment are safe, ready to use and in the right position prior to filming. They have a liaising and coordinating role, acting as the link between the director and the many people involved in a production. It is the floor manager’s responsibility to pass on cues to presenters and guests to ensure timings are met and the broadcast goes smoothly. The floor manager ensures that events go according to a set

Training and qualification Although this area of work is open to all graduates, the following degree and HND subjects may increase your chances: media studies; drama/theatre studies; photography/film/television. Entry without a degree or HND is common and many floor managers hworked their way up to this position from a more junior or related role.

plan and that people taking part know their particular roles and how it fits in with whatever else is happening. The work is mainly studio-based, but may also include outside broadcasts, depending on the production.


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ocation manager

Salary-Up to 45,000 Contracted -Freelance Job hours- change with jobs

Job description Location managers are responsible for making all the practical arrangements for film or photographic shoots taking place outside the studio. Productions are made in a wide range of places and location managers need to research, identify and organise access to appropriate sites. As well as arranging and negotiating site use, the role usually includes managing sites throughout the shoot-

Training and qualification Although this area of work is open to all graduates, a degree, HND or foundation degree in a subject related to communication or media studies, or photography, film or television, may increase your chances.

ing process. This involves working to strict budgetary and time limits and maintaining a high standard of health and safety and security. The demands of organising crews and dealing with a range of people make this an intense and varied role.


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op

Salary-£60k-£100k Contracted Job hours- 30-35 hours

Job description

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oPs must discover the photographic heart of a screenplay, using a variety of source material including stills photography, painting, other films, etc. They realise the desired look using lighting, framing, camera movement, etc. DoPs collaborate closely with the camera crew (Camera Operator, 1st and 2nd Assistant Camera, Camera Trainee and Grips).

Training and qualification

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tills photography provides a good all round understanding of composition and light. The National Film and Television School’s MA in Cinematography provides the opportunity to specialise, and is taught by practising DoPs. Although DoPs do not need to have electrical qualifications, they do need to understand the functions of a variety of lighting equipment, and to have thorough knowledge of cameras, lenses and film stocks. They may have previously studied Drama, Stills Photography, or Art, or taken a Film/Media

During filming, DoPs also work closely with the Gaffer (whose lighting team are key to helping create the required look of the film), the Production Designer, Costume Designer, and the Hair and Make Up Department.


Camera op

Salary-Depends on skill Contracted Job hours- 12- 14 hours

Job description

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amera Operators usually begin work at the end of pre-production and, if the budget allows, attend the technical recces with other Heads of Department. They work closely with the Director of Photography (DoP), Director and Grip, and are responsible for the 1st Assistant Camera (AC), 2nd Assistant Camera (AC) and the Camera Trainee. After the Director and DoP have

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Training and qualification

o specific qualifications are required to work in this role, although film schools and training courses offer a good basic grounding in the skills and knowledge required and in practice many Camera Operators have studied for higher level qualifications. The most useful courses offer practical experience and may also include work experience placements. Relevant courses include City & Guilds courses, BTEC HNC/HNDs, Foundation degrees, first degrees and postgraduate qualifications in media, film and TV production or cinematography. Basic stills photogra-

rehearsed and blocked the shots, the Camera Operator and DoP decide where to position the camera, and what lenses and supporting equipment to use. Camera Operators liaise with the Grip and other Heads of Department, and keep them informed about how the position and movement of the camera might impact on their work load. They oversee the preparation and checking of camera equipment. During shooting, Operators are responsible for all aspects of camera operation, enabling the DoP to concentrate intensively on lighting and overall visual style.


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ound tech

Salary-ÂŁ16000-ÂŁ35000 Contracted Job hours- 30-35 hours Job description

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ound technicians are required to assemble, operate and maintain the technical equipment used to record, amplify, enhance, mix or reproduce sound. They identify the sound requirements for a given task or situation and perform the appropriate actions to produce this sound. Sound technicians of different types are required in a range of industries including film, broadcasting

Training and qualification

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good general education will be useful. GCSEs or A-levels in maths and physics and qualifications in electronics will be particularly beneficial. The following degree/HND subjects may increase your chances of success:

(radio or television), live performance (theatre, music, dance), advertising and audio recordings.


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roducer

Salary-£18,200 -£25,000 Contracted and freelance Job hours- long hours

Job description Producers are highly self-motivated individuals, who have the final responsibility for all aspects of a film’s production. There are so many ways of being a Producer. Very often the Producer is the first person to become involved in a project, even before the writer, or they may be the agent-style Producer who focuses on the deal. Generally though, the Producer shepherds the film from inception to completion and beyond, starting long before the film-making

Training and qualification The training we fund addresses priorities identified through industry research. In 2013/4, our priorities are: Craft and technical skills Production management VFX Career and business support Digital content and audience choice Developing writers, producers and directors

process and continuing to talk about and sell the picture long after everyone else has gone on to other projects. Â Top film makers work with the same people over and over again, which is why it is important for those who wish to make a career in the Production Office to gain respect by being a reliable, trustworthy and enthusiastic Production Assistant or Runne


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ine Producer

Salary-£40,000 to £50,000 Contracted and freelnce Job hours- variable Job description The Line Producer is one of the first people to be employed on a film’s production by the Producer and Executive Producers. Line Producers are rarely involved in the development of the project, but often play a crucial role in costing the production in order to provide investors with the confidence to invest in the project. As soon as the finance has been raised, the Line Producer supervises the preparation of the film’s budget, and the day-to-day plan-

Training and qualification The training we fund addresses priorities identified through industry research. In 2013/4, our priorities are: Craft and technical skills Production management VFX Career and business support Digital content and audience choice Developing writers, producers and directors

ning and running of the production. Line Producers are usually employed on a freelance basis. They must expect to work long hours, though the role can be financially very rewarding. Career advancement is based on their experience and reputation. Where a Line Producer has a creative input to the production, he or she is often credited as a Co-producer.


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xective producer

Salary-ÂŁ80000 lower in new Contracted and freelance Job hours- depends on job

Job description Production Runners assist wherever they are needed on productions and their duties vary depending on where they are assigned. They may be involved in anything from office administration or crowd control to public relations and cleaning up locations. Runners are usually employed on a freelance basis, are not very well paid, and their hours are long and irregular. The work is usually extremely varied and the Runner role offers an opportunity to learn about

Training and qualification The training we fund addresses priorities identified through industry research. In 2013/4, our priorities are: Craft and technical skills Production management VFX Career and business support Digital content and audience choice Developing writers, producers and directors

every aspect of the industry, providing a good entry-level role into the film and television industry.


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esigner

Salary-vairable Contracted and freelance Job hours- viarable Job description

Production Designers may be asked to look at scripts before a Director is approached, to provide estimates of the projected Art Department spend on films. When Production Designers first read a screenplay, they assess the visual qualities that will help to create atmosphere and bring the story to life. After preparing a careful breakdown of the script, they meet with the Director to discuss how best to shoot the film, e.g. to decide: whether to use sets and /

Training and qualification The training we fund addresses priorities identified through industry research. In 2013/4, our priorities are: Craft and technical skills Production management VFX Career and business support Digital content and audience choice Developing writers, producers and directors

or locations; what should be built and what should be adapted; whether there is a visual theme that recurs throughout the film; whether there are certain design elements that may give an emotional or psychological depth to the film; whether CGI (computer generated imagery) should be used. Production Designers must calculate the budgets, and decide how the money and effort will be spent. These discussions are followed by an intense period of research during which Production Designers and their Specialist Researchers source ideas from books, photographs, paint-


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unner

Salary-ÂŁ8 to ÂŁ9 Contracted Job hours- 30-35 hours Job description Production Runners assist wherever they are needed on productions and their duties vary depending on where they are assigned. They may be involved in anything from office administration or crowd control to public relations and cleaning up locations. Runners are usually employed on a freelance basis, are not very well paid, and their hours are long and irregular. The work is usually extremely varied and the Runner role offers an opportunity to learn about

Training and qualification

Relevant courses include: television/film/media/radio production; media and broadcasting skills; multimedia; drama and theatre.

every aspect of the industry, providing a good entry-level role into the film and television industry.

Job roles