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DUBLIN SUMMER FESTIVAL

€2.00 - £1.50 - N500

2013 EDITION

OFFICIAL NCI MAGAZINE

30

LIVING LEGEND

SEGUN ODEGBAMI

14Models of CULT URE 08

“...promoting Irish-Nigerian relations and celebrating Nigerian culture in Dublin”. CLLR. OISÍN QUINN

DECLARES

NCI OPEN!


t: +353 - 87 762 1660, +353 87 296 9613 e: info@ddymensions.net w: www.ddymensions.net


EDITORIAL TEAM C.E.O Yemi Adenuga Editor-in-Chief Deji Adenuga Contributors Tope Ben Adeboboye Kunle Animashaun Lexy-Mojo Eyes Godfrey Chimbganda Paul Kelly

Âť CONTENTS Goodwill Message................................................... 7 Models of Culture ................................................... 14 In Pursuit of Glory ...................................................20 - 21 Culture & Tourism - Ogun State ............................28 Living Legend ......................................................... 30

Editorial Design Magicfingerz.com Photography Studio 66 Marketing Loretta Adenuga Sales Toun Reilly Promotions Vickie Robert Published by: D-dymensions Communication Ltd www.ddymensions.com Distributed by: Nigerian Carnival Ireland Ltd 161 Woodlands, Navan, Co. Meath - Ireland T: +353 872 969613 +353 87 762 1660 E: info@nigeriancarnivalireland.net W: www.nigeriancarnivalireland.net

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by :

Aisling GalaTent

03 | NCI 2013


Director's Note “We have laid the foundation for a better life. Things that were unimaginable a few years ago have become everyday reality. I belong to the generation of leaders for whom the achievement of democracy was the defining challenge.”

In January 2013, Ireland opened its doors to hundreds of thousands of friends and family from all over the world, calling them home to gatherings in villages, towns and cities. The Gathering Ireland 2013 is a spectacular, year-long celebration of all things Irish. With thousands of Nigerians, now naturalised-Irish living in Ireland, this was an opportunity to be part of the ‘tracing your roots’ concept, which encouraged people to embrace their roots and share the beautiful things that make them the good people they are. In bring the re-union to live, Nigerian Carnival Ireland (NCI) 2013 worked with the theme; GATHERING FOR INTEGRATION. From the welcome ceremony which saw the launch of the NCI food festival, to the NCI Fashion show with fashion designers from several countries of the world, to the cracking of the ribs at the Comedy/Awards night, NCI 2013 was indeed a gathering of multicultural Ireland. In spite of the many challenges encountered, NCI is proud, for the fourth year running, to have giving participants from all over the world the opportunity to identify with and promote their rich cultural heritage. We are simply grateful to everyone who made NCI 2013 possible. The Lord Mayor of Dublin, Councillor Oisin Quinn, Go raibh míle maith agaibh for hosting the NCI team at the mansion House and launching the NCI 2013 Road show. We thank the Nigerian and South African Ambassadors and Embassies in Ireland for their support and endorsements. Julius ‘D’Genius’Agwu, you made us laugh so much, we cried at the NCI comedy night, Cheers. Many thanks to the CEO and staff of Heritage confectioneries, Algomex shipping, Solarconsult, FitzPatrick Funitures Navan, OPW, Aisling Gala Tent, Legendary Gold, Rock of Ages, Vicky Roberts Hospitality, Simply Glamorous Fashion, Studio 66, MegaVision and MagicFingerz. We’ll also like to thank all our exhibitors at the welcome ceremony, fashion show and Grand Carnival. We appreciate unrelenting and kind support of all our Patrons, our Media partner AIT International, and our amazing NCI Team and volunteers. 2014 will see Nigeria celebrating the centinary, (amalgamation of Southern and Northern protectorate, by Lord Lugard in 1914). Nigerian Carnival Ireland will also be celebrating its 5th Anniversary. There is so much to look forward to and I hope you will make plans to, not only join, but also support us in our celebrations. Until then, I leave you with the words of the legendary Tata Nelson Mandela “We have laid the foundation for a better life. Things that were unimaginable a few years ago have become everyday reality. I belong to the generation of leaders for whom the achievement of democracy was the defining challenge.” - Speech to Parliament in Cape Town, March 26, 1999. Yemi Adenuga NCI Carnival Director

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ANTHEM

THE NATIONAL

"Arise, O Compatriots" Arise, O compatriots, Nigeria's call obey To serve our Fatherland With love and strength and faith. The labour of our heroes past Shall never be in vain, To serve with heart and might One nation bound in freedom, peace and unity.

O God of creation Direct our noble cause Guide our leaders right Help our youth the truth to know In love and honesty to grow And living just and true Great lofty heights attain To build a nation where peace And justice shall reign.

THE FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF NIGERIA

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AMBASSADOR’SGOODWILL MESSAGE as well display the strong unity that bound a people of about 170 Million. The common shared value of a multicultural and pluralistic society awesomely demonstrated in the NCI’s colourful parade makes it unique among other carnivals. Another dimension and attraction to this epoch-making event is its ability in the promotion of Nigeria’s tourism sector, trade and investment opportunities, human and natural resources that abundantly exist in the country. It is therefore pertinent to note that since the return of democratic rule in Nigeria in 1999, government has continued to demonstrate strong determination and courage in harnessing this diverse socio-economic and cultural heritage for the benefit of the Nigerian people. The current administration has left no stone unturned in taking bold steps to advance this process as contained in the transformation agenda of President Goodluck Ebele Jonathan, GCFR. These efforts are beginning to translate into tangible and intangible deliverables in some key sectors of the economy considering the huge amount of inflow of Foreign Direct Investment into Nigeria in the last two years thereby creating wealth and employment.

It is with great pleasure that I welcome you all to another edition of the Nigerian Carnival Ireland tagged “NCI 2013”. As the annual socio-cultural gathering take centre stage from 12th – 18th August, 2013 across Ireland, the celebration is expected to be conducted amidst pomp and pageantry, and the event will attract participants and special invitees from all over the world. Since inception, the NCI has continually played a pivotal role in advancing Nigeria’s rich diverse socio-cultural and unique heritage

In this regard, I welcome Nigerians, non-Nigerians and friends of Nigeria to take full advantage of the NCI celebrations packaged with exciting and exhilarating programmes that include cultural parades, fashion show, dinner and comedy nights. It is my humble desire therefore that we continue to renew our cherished friendship and cooperation in the spirit of celebrating Nigeria’s rich and diverse cultural heritage by turning out in numbers to make the NCI 2013 a resounding success. Felix Yusufu Pwol Ambassador of the Federal Republic of Nigeria To the Republic of Ireland

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Good Wishes from

The Lord Mayor of Dublin Oisín Quinn As first citizen of Dublin I was delighted to assist in the launch of the Nigerian Carnival Ireland 2013 road show as one of my earliest events as Lord Mayor in June 2013. I am delighted to hear the Carnival in August was a success. Integration and Interculturalism are a core aspect of Dublin City Council’s work and a key element in my vision as Lord Mayor is encouraging leadership within the Migrant and new communities in Dublin. The prevention of racism and discrimination and the promotion of diversity advantage is very important in our city and ensuring Dublin is an equal, diverse and welcoming place. The role of all communities is important in this and I would like to commend the Nigerian Community for their passion, creativity and engagement in promoting Irish-Nigerian relations and celebrating Nigerian culture in Dublin. One of the main projects of this year is the promotion of the right to vote in the upcoming local elections of 2014. I formally launched this campaign with the Minister of Justice Mr. Alan Shatter TD and migrant leaders in the Mansion House on November 4th and I would like to encourage all Nigerians, regardless of citizenship, to register to vote on www.dublincity.ie before November 25th and to use their vote in the elections next May. Finally I would like to wish the Nigerian Community and Nigerian Carnival Ireland all the very best in the events planned for the year ahead.

Oisín Quinn Lord Mayor of Dublin 08 | NCI 2013


CULTURAL INTEGRATION IN IRELAND

AFRICAWORLD PARTNERS NIGERIAN CARNIVAL IRELAND By Paul Kelly

The partnersip between Nigerian Carnival Ireland (NCI) and AfricaWorld newspaper has a history that stretches back to the founding of AfricaWorld itself, two years ago. Each year since, we have reported on and admired the growing cultural festival that is the NCI. Recently, AfricaWorld celebrated our second anniversary with a pan-African lecture in Wynn’s hotel, Dublin. Our celebrations were attended by representatives from across the African community and it brought home how

interdependent we all are in our quest to further cultural integration in Ireland. Indeed, for AfricaWorld, NCI has always been a particularly important partner in promoting African culture in Ireland. Part of the reason for this is because we have so much in common: we are both African start-ups who were founded on a shoe-string budget during the height of the recession, we both cater to a wide audience which encompasses the whole of Ireland and we both have ambitions to improve and expand our respective enterprises. Most of all, however, it is our vision that drives us together. AfricaWorld’s

“Unless the hunted gives their account, the story of the hunt will always favour the hunter”. motto is a phrase that has often been repeated since its coining in May 2011: “Unless the hunted gives their account, the story of the hunt will always favour the hunter”. It is a phrase that has continued to ring true as we report on events across Ireland and Africa and it is a phrase that speaks to the shared vision of cultural integration that AfricaWorld and NCI have always espoused. Assisting cultural integration in Ireland has never been an easy task. Racist attacks and abuse have been an ever present threat and it is easy to get discouraged. The Immigrant Council of

Ireland has recently found that there are at least five racist incidents in Ireland every week. Indeed, this figure is likely to be far higher, as it is estimated that only 13% of victims report the incident to the Gardaí. A new online system for reporting racist abuse reported 60 attacks in its first month in operation. The problem is worsened by the fact that even some who would support us do not understand our vision. There are many who hugely support Africans in Ireland and have paved the way for their citizenship which can be seen clearly in

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the recent number of citizenship ceremonies which

AfricaWorld reported on last October. But many of them often see citizenship as a gift, rather than the two-way relationship that allows a modern multicultural state to function. The problem with this perspective on integration is that it ignores the beautiful cultural richness that Africa has to offer Ireland, a richness that both AfricaWorld and the NCI have always sought to highlight. For NCI, such efforts have functioned primarily through the annual carnival which has grown and expanded year by year. Now in its fourth year, the carnival travels around Ireland to ensure that the whole country can witness the beautiful

cultural heritage of Nigeria. The finale in Dublin, where it all began, is always the highlight. This week-long celebration saw about 15,000 people last year and has come a long way from the one day event that began it all. This year, it opened with a food festival, then wnet on to feature a red carpet fashion show, a Grand Carnival in the Phoenix Park and a comedy night featuring A-list comedian Julius ‘D Genius’ Agwu. Throughout it all, AfricaWorld was on hand to assist in publicising and reporting on the carnival, ensuring the richness of the events reached even those unable to attend. Such efforts necessarily began slowly. For NCI, the great breakthrough in their first year was the ability to use the Phoenix Park: “Everyone said we couldn’t do it,” Carnival Director Yemi Adenuga told AfricaWorld. “That we couldn’t get the Phoenix Park that it’s much too big. And we thought, why not? Who says that we can’t go mainstream and use the phoenix park?”

And ever since, the Phoenix Park has been the centrepiece for NCI’s Grand Carnival, providing opportunities for exclusive performances and displays by cultural groups, as well as a chance to hear folktales, to eat traditional food and wear traditional clothes, to learn some Nigerian arts and crafts and listen to Nigerian music. Similarly, the beginnings of AfricaWorld were equally humble. We began with just a thought in the mind of our editor, Ukachukwu Okorie, while he was walking through Glasnevin Cemetery one night. The setting wasn’t the brightest omen and, indeed, AfricaWorld has always had to weather the storm of the international recession with almost no financial resources. Since those days, however, we have come a long way. Our readership has exploded, rising to over 40,000 people, with hundreds of unique visitors viewing our website every day. We’ve brought in new columnists, even while we continue those columns that have made us so successful such as the Pride of Africa, DIMPKA and the Return of the Native. We have gone from just reporting on cultural events to even organising some ourselves. We have become known as the newspaper of choice across the African community in Ireland. If all goes well, we will even launch a separate magazine by the end of the year. Pushing the integration agenda forward has been difficult for both AfricaWorld and NCI, but these struggles have only made us stronger. Our efforts have also been rewarded. Apart from the aforementioned citizenship ceremonies, a variety of new education initiatives have begun and African culture has become more and more visible across Ireland. While neither NCI nor AfricaWorld can claim to be the driving force behind cultural integration in Ireland, we can take pride in knowing that we, with so many other organisations, are successfully improving the image of Africa across the country and, indeed, the world.

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Sunday Service 11am - 1.30pm Bible Study Thursday: 6pm - 7.30pm Prayer Meeting Friday: 6pm - 7.30pm Every 1st Day of the month “Start with Jesus” Prayer Meeting Counselling (By Appointment)


NCI EXTRACT

Models of culture By Kunle Animashaun

As humans, the questions about identity and culture will always exist in our consciousness. This is because culture plays an important role in the evolvement of who we are. Of course, the concept of culture is very complicated with regards to its meaning and implications. Culture is what a group of people share in common in terms of heritage, language, social habits, music and arts.

We are all aware of the lack of ethical culture in the political terrain of our dear nation, especially as regards ineptitude of leadership and erosion of integrity and the concomitant effect of how these has for some time now being threatening to thwart the country’s developmental aspirations. Consequently, it is my belief that with our individual talents, strengths, backgrounds and ideas; we can start to show the outside world that we are much more than some of these negative representations.

My fellow As a Yoruba man, I understand the importance of culture. Through our cultures, both in the traditional Nigerians, I make It is about the uniqueness of the African in me. I revel in sense and ethical sense, we can redefine the bold to say that the enduring legacies of my traditions. As a patriotic perceptions of the outside world about now is the time for Nigerian, I love the diverse background that I come from. Nigeria and about us as a people. us to appraise Interestingly, because Nigeria is a multi-ethnic nation with ourselves and start various cultural groups, the country can be aptly described to inculcate the culture of honesty, truth, fair play, and justice in as a hotbed of varied cultural affiliations. So, I am proud to our country. Now is the time to show the world the basic tenets proclaim the fact that I grew up learning, abiding by and extoling of most of our traditional tribal beliefs about hard work, my traditional cultures. perseverance, love and respect for one’s neighbour. However, for me, there is much more to culture than meets the These unique traits are ensconced in our cultural heritage and eye. That is why, in this article, I will like to examine culture from ethically we must henceforth make them fundamental to our way a wider perspective. Away from the traditional definition of of life. Through our cultures, both in the traditional sense and culture that many people are conversant with; let us look at the ethical sense, we can redefine the perceptions of the outside definition of culture that focuses on the outlook, attitudes, values, world about Nigeria and about us as a people. goals, and customs shared by a society, most especially, the values of what is acceptable as being right or wrong. There are many socio cultural groups from Nigeria in Ireland. They are comprised of friendly, articulate and enterprising I sincerely believe that an important culture that we must imbibe individuals most of whom had excelled in their vocational in Nigeria is the culture that reflects our ethos as a nation. endeavours. Amongst the members of most of these social clubs Through this cultural renaissance that I am advocating, we must, are professionals and very successful businessmen and women. as a matter of urgency set standards for how we define ourselves. Each of these groups are redefining a new perception of Nigerian Therefore, the culture of mediocrity should have no place in our culture in terms of promoting our cultural heritage but most national psyche. What we need is a culture of excellence in all importantly promoting the new understanding of our culture of spheres of our national life. friendliness as Nigerians. The culture of violence like the one being perpetrated by I sincerely believe that we all have the potential to promote the disgruntled elements in some sections of the country must be vibrancy and uniqueness of our cultural heritage; however, we replaced with a culture of dialogue. The culture of political must also not forget to embrace a culture of decency, ethics, intolerance and brigandage in our politics must be denounced to standards and values as an integral part of our identity. promote an atmosphere of peace and security in our nation. 14 | NCI 2013


THINKING GLOBAL The world population is at an all time high and well, everything seems to be ever so evolved when it comes to innovation but have you tapped into your Innovative self to make a mark on this world. I just turned 30 and I have surely been thinking about the global impact I can make in the next 10years more than ever. The best way I guess, is to view the world as one market of 7 billion people and sell a product that may be needed by all or solve a problem that is universal to all. Whether you are in Lagos or Dublin or Rio or Auckland, we all now have the ability to share information and sell to someone miles away from where you are. I’m talking about “Communication at the click of a button”. So why not think Global? Whatever you good at, you might as well take it to the world. So much information is out there and networking is way easier. People these days easily latch on to what’s popular even if it’s for just a month, billions would have bought into whatever has been deemed a must have. I was involved in the introduction and tours of a number of artists from Africa and Europe in the last 5 years most notably Kirk Franklin and the creators of Krump a hip-hop dance style form South Central LA. I didn’t travel I just booked and gave instructions and helped market on the internet and well, the impact was enormous and forever I believe the world is small. You can know what’s happening in Zambia even when you’re in Dublin, if you have your communication channels right. Money can be transferred at a click of button. It is very much a small world for those

THE WORK AT YOUR

DOORSTEP - Godfrey Chimbganda

“ ...an event that can make me proud as African and create urban/African culture, theatrical moments that will go down in history as what changed the city of Dublin” who see the world as accessible and take the blinkers of the focus of just that their small street and workplace. I joined the Nigerian Carnival Team in their 3rd year course. I had heard of the Brixton Carnival and wanted that kind of an event in my city, Dublin; an event that can make me proud as African and create urban/African culture, theatrical moments that will go down in history as what changed the city of Dublin. An event that will bring thousands to gather because somehow, they feel like this carnival thing has cool vibe. I was appointed the Road Campaign Manager and big dreams that are global started coming to mind. Everything begins local so yes the first road show last year was local. The second introduced the Road Show, which includes flyers distribution in different cities and towns in all over Ireland, with pomp and pageantry starting from Dublin. The Road Show was declared open in Dublin by the Lord Mayor of Dublin, our own Cllr Oisin. We brought the Nigerian talking drum “gangan” to Galway, Limerick, Cork, Drogheda, Balbrigan, just to mention a few. By God’s grace, next year we’ll we go bigger. When in a few years the Nigerian Carnival Ireland Road Show goes viral, remember, we think global! To us you are our colleague in the village. 17 | NCI 2013


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ry mix of of a contempora The CD consists extremely is s ck tra ch of the African music. Ea every listener aranteed to bring enjoyable and gu ing. to their feet danc

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IN PURSUIT

D

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OF GLORY - TOPE BENNYADEBOBOYE

“One of the things Nigeria needs is good face, good image. In Ireland, like in other parts of the world, Nigeria has been stereotyped negatively.” - Deji Adenuga

eji Adenuga, remember him? He’s the suave A-list actor and husband of delectable broadcaster, Yemi Adenuga. For many years, he straddled both the stage and the screen, bringing immense delight to many homes through his acting. Then, with neither a warning nor a farewell, Deji disappeared, simply vanishing from the cinemas and the home videos. His fans were left with nothing but the old films he had been involved in before his sudden departure, even as they wondered what actually happened to their beloved entertainer. “Well, I relocated, like people would say, to join my family in Ireland. That was in 2006,” the actor told the reporter recently at a chance meeting in Lagos on his way back to Dublin. But he denied abandoning the theatre totally, saying it was unthinkable that he would run away from what had become a passion for him. So what has been happening to Adenuga since he ‘ported’ to the Irish Republic? A lot, he says. Right now, the project that dominates Adenuga’s passion is the Nigerian Carnival Ireland (NCI). So, what is the Nigerian Carnival Ireland all about? One of the things Nigeria needs is good face, a good image. In

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Ireland, like in other parts of the world, Nigeria has been stereotyped negatively. They say we are corrupt, fraudulent etc. But show me anywhere in the world where there are no corrupt and fraudulent people. So they have stigmatized us. But it’s of no use arguing and defending what is bad. So we decided to tell them that no, that’s not all that we are about. If you say we are fraudsters, that’s just a minute percentage of us. Maybe .00005 per cent of us are fraudsters. But if such are the people they meet all the time, that would be enough for them to stigmatize us. We want to come up and fight that negative stereotype. “And I can tell you that we have achieved a lot in the area of rebranding Nigeria, in the area of presenting Nigeria to the world. When we started the carnival in 2010, we had to meet a committee to approve a venue for us. And that was a very precious space for them. But that was where we wanted. When we met the committee, they were impressed that Nigerians could be that organised and orderly, that intelligent. They said this was not what they read in the newspapers. After the event, they said we could be using the place every year. So, that’s why we decided to be holding the Nigerian Carnival, and we’ve been able to achieve our main objectives.”

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His wife, Yemi, one of the most popular broadcasters who delighted millions of viewers with her radio and TV programmes, including “Straight from the heart” on AIT, was the first to relocate abroad. You asked the husband why the wife also decided to abandon her fans. But he quickly came to her defence.

“It’s also a platform for cultures to interact. So it’s not for Nigerians alone”.

“She did not abandon her fans and the industry. You are a journalist, but that’s not the only thing you can do. As an intelligent, very creative journalist that I know you are, if you decide to digress into any other area in life, you will do well. That’s what I want people to try and explore. I’m not just an actor; I am much more than that. My wife is not just a broadcaster; she could do much more than that. After she took a break from broadcasting, she has done several other things, and she has done very, very well in those areas. But she has not abandoned broadcasting. We are coming back fully, and with a big bang.” Back to the Nigerian Carnival Ireland, how is it staged each year? Adenuga explained: “Well, the Nigerian Carnival Ireland is a platform to showcase Nigeria, our culture, our traditions, our dances, our food, every good thing about Nigeria. It’s to promote Nigeria, to promote tourism in Nigeria, to promote the good image of Nigeria. It’s also a platform for cultures to interact. So it’s not for Nigerians alone.

We want other ethnic groups in Ireland to come together, to showcase their cultures, to interact with us and know who we are. It started as a one-day event, but by the grace of God, today, it’s has become a one-week event.” “We want to bring Nigerians from everywhere in the

world to Ireland and enjoy the beauty of the Nigerian community in Ireland. If you want to enjoy your holiday, come over during the carnival, and you’d have loads of fun. We have a column on our website for international participants. When people go there, they can see how to be part of the carnival.” Asked how supportive the Nigerian government has been in driving this patriotic initiative, Adenuga shook his head. “This is a private initiative. It’s our own way of making our contributions to the progress and promotion of the image of Nigeria. “To be honest, we have not actually approached the government. And the reason is, I don’t like to say to people, I can do this, I can do that. I like to show to people what I can do. Now that we have built the Nigerian Carnival to a very commendable level now, we have been approaching people from government quarters, and they’ve been showing interest. I’m sure that when we bring the full gist of the Nigerian Carnival to their table, they would respond positively and fund us.” (An excerpt from The Sun News July 10 2013 by Tope Adeboboye.)

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His wife, Yemi, one of the most popular broadcasters who delighted millions of viewers with her radio and TV programmes, including “Straight from the heart” on AIT, was the first to relocate abroad. You asked the husband why the wife also decided to abandon her fans. But he quickly came to her defence.

“It’s also a platform for cultures to interact. So it’s not for Nigerians alone”.

“She did not abandon her fans and the industry. You are a journalist, but that’s not the only thing you can do. As an intelligent, very creative journalist that I know you are, if you decide to digress into any other area in life, you will do well. That’s what I want people to try and explore. I’m not just an actor; I am much more than that. My wife is not just a broadcaster; she could do much more than that. After she took a break from broadcasting, she has done several other things, and she has done very, very well in those areas. But she has not abandoned broadcasting. We are coming back fully, and with a big bang.” Back to the Nigerian Carnival Ireland, how is it staged each year? Adenuga explained: “Well, the Nigerian Carnival Ireland is a platform to showcase Nigeria, our culture, our traditions, our dances, our food, every good thing about Nigeria. It’s to promote Nigeria, to promote tourism in Nigeria, to promote the good image of Nigeria. It’s also a platform for cultures to interact. So it’s not for Nigerians alone.

We want other ethnic groups in Ireland to come together, to showcase their cultures, to interact with us and know who we are. It started as a one-day event, but by the grace of God, today, it’s has become a one-week event.” “We want to bring Nigerians from everywhere in the

world to Ireland and enjoy the beauty of the Nigerian community in Ireland. If you want to enjoy your holiday, come over during the carnival, and you’d have loads of fun. We have a column on our website for international participants. When people go there, they can see how to be part of the carnival.” Asked how supportive the Nigerian government has been in driving this patriotic initiative, Adenuga shook his head. “This is a private initiative. It’s our own way of making our contributions to the progress and promotion of the image of Nigeria. “To be honest, we have not actually approached the government. And the reason is, I don’t like to say to people, I can do this, I can do that. I like to show to people what I can do. Now that we have built the Nigerian Carnival to a very commendable level now, we have been approaching people from government quarters, and they’ve been showing interest. I’m sure that when we bring the full gist of the Nigerian Carnival to their table, they would respond positively and fund us.” (An excerpt from The Sun News July 10 2013 by Tope Adeboboye.)

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NCI Road

Show ( Dublin - Galway Balbriggan)

NCI Road @ Galway City

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NCI OPENING CEREMONY/ FOOD FEST

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NCI Fashion Show

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FACES AT NCI

GRAND CARNIVAL FURZE ROAD, PHOENIX PARK-DUBLIN

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NIGERIAN CARNIVAL IRELAND

DINNER/AWARD NITE D’Genius CARLTON HOTEL, TYRELLSTOWN -DUBLIN

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CULTURE & TOURISM

OGUN STATE

TIVE IN PERSPEC- Deji Adenuga

Ogun State is an embodiment of outstanding traditional cultures which over time have been refined without distortions to make them internationally attractive and alluring and the State the tourists’ delight. From Ijebu to Remo to Egba and from Yewa to Ijebu, there abound spectacular tourist attractions that could leave the most cynical tourist gasping for breath. Perhaps the most popular tourist attraction in the State is the Olumo Rock located in the heart of Abeokuta, the State Capital.

Legendary tales has it that it protected the people of Egba against enemy attacks during the frequent wars that characterized the ancient city centuries. Olumo Rock is a massive outcrop of granite rocks of primitive formation from which Abeokuta, meaning “under the rock”, the capital of Ogun State derive its name. The Rock is sacred to the Egbas because it was the place where they found refuge from their attackers in the days of internecine wars. By l83O, the main body of the Egba has already settled at the site of the Olumo and the refuge provided by the rock marked the end of their wonderings and struggles for existence. From that time onwards they have regarded Olumo Rock as their protection shrine and so made annual sacrifice to its deity. The importance of Olumo Rock to the Egba is conveyed in the assertion that Abeokuta was the gift of the Olumo, as Egypt was the gift of the Nile. To the Egbas, Olumo Rock stands not only as a monument of faith in unity but also a source of strength and unfailing protection and sustenance from the Supreme Being who led their ancestors through the perplexities of life safely to Abeokuta.

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Officially known as AT3, Olumo Rock is located off Alatise between lkija and Ikereku neighbourhoods of the town. The highest point of Olumo is about 137 metres above sea levels. Looking from the top one would appreciate the wisdom of the first settlers to have chosen such a perfect bulwark against I\XIVREPMRZEWMSRß

belief that whoever visits her shrine and asks for anything in sober reflectfon will have his request met. The Bilikisu of romance was said to be the Biblical Queen of Sheba. She was an Arab and a traveller. She was said to have met King Solomon with whom she fell in love and became one of his numerous wives. Later, the Queen Sheba in her age returned to

The name 'Olumo’ – “God built” is derived from the fact that rock is naturally surrounded by caves. One of which is about twenty feet long and twenty five feet wide. This has slab like stones which appear to serve as seats used by the ancient dwellers. It probably was used as a hall of conference room. Another cave, some twenty metres long and seventy metres wide, appears to be actual dwelling place. It has five built in rooms with a long GSVVMHSVYWIHEWWMXXMRKVSSQOMXGLIRERHWXSVIß

Oke-Eri where she died and was buried. Apart from these, there are also the old Manse at Ogbe in Abeokuta and Madam Tinubu Shrine in Ilaro, Tongeji Island in Ipokia, St. James Anglican School in Ota, Ijamido River shrine also in Ota and Area J4 Forest Reserve all of which offer remarkable tourist attractions.span style and there is River Yemoji which has a REXYVEPW[MQQMRKTSSPEX-NIFY3HIß (Culled from Online Nigeria and edited by Deji Adenuga)

&MPMOMWY7YRKFS7LVMRIß Bilikisu Sungbo Shrine, another popular tourist centre in Ogun State is located at Oke Eri near Ijebu Ode, off the ijebu-ode/ibadan road in the Ijebu Ode Local Government area. The Shrine lies, less than 125 Kilometres from Abeokuta the Ogun State capital, 50 kilometres from Ibadan the Oyo State capital and some 100 kilos from Lagos.It could be reached by QSXSVZILMGPIXLVSYKL1SXSVEFPIVSEHWß There is a sign on the lbadan/ljebu main road which proclaims "Ogun State Tourist Centre Bilikisu'", Here one turns off to reach XLIWLVMRIß Bilikisu Sungbo was otherwise regarded as the Biblical Queen of Sheba .Hear tomb the shrine is fast becoming the "Mecca" of Nigeria. For every year the period of Moslem festivals, religious groups, of different faith converge at the shrine to offer prayers and seek the favour of the spirit of the devout woman. The great attention that Bilikisu still commands, derives from the 32 | NCI 2013


LIVING LEGEND:

segunOdegbami One of Africa's all-time greats, a football legend, former Captain of the Nigerian Football team (the Super Eagles) and an Ambassador for sports, Chief Patrick Olusegun Odegbami (often shortened to Segun Odegbami), popularly known as the "Mathematical", was born on August 27, 1952 in Abeokuta, Ogun State and he grew up in the Northern city of Jos, Plateau State. Chief Segun Odegbami attended and graduated from Nigeria's premier technical institution, The Polytechnic, Ibadan where he studied Engineering. He was a great delight to watch in the 70’s and 80’s as he dazzled his fans and mesmerized his opponents on the pitch, dribbling with dexterity and superlative intelligence in his days as a Nigerian

football forward, for which he was nick-named “Mathematical Odegbami. He was famous for his skill on the ball, speed and precision of his crosses from the right wing. Many years ago, a radio commentator, Earnest Okonkwo, in his commentaries, gave him that sobriquet. Whether he was referring to the precision of his movement and passes or to his background as a Mechanical Engineer, no-one was ever able to find out before Ernest died. But that nickname stuck and all those familiar with African football in the 1970s and 1980s are most likely to recall Mr. Mathematical and his famous number 7 shirt! The right winger rose to fame with IICC Shooting Stars of Ibadan (now known as 3SC of Ibadan) and played there throughout his entire career, from 1970 to 1984. Odegbami was a part of the club's golden era and played a key role when they became the first Nigerian outfit to win a continental title - the African Cup 33 | NCI 2013

Winners Cup (1976). It was after this brilliant performance that he got his first cap for the Green Eagles (as the national team was known then) in the match against Sierra Leone on 16 October 1976.

His greatest moment came in 1980 when he inspired Nigeria to a first ever African Nations Cup title against Algeria. Dreaded by defenders, his two goals in the 3-0 victory over Algeria in the final went a long way towards earning him the Eagles captaincy and second place to Cameroon's Jean-Manga Onguene in the 1980 African Footballer of the Year race. Odegbami played his last game for Nigeria on 30 October 1981 having won 46 caps and scored 23 goals for Nigeria, but went on with his club career for another three years. That eventually ended with Shooting Stars' loss to Zamalek in the final of the 1984 Champions Clubs Cup (now known as the Champions League). After calling time on a fairly successful career, he became an author, journalist and respected football commentator/administrator. He was the Chairman of Nigeria's 2010 World Cup bid. He launched a book sometime ago in the city of Abuja and I’ll pick one of the quotes from the lauching to round up LIVI±ßß±-R7IKYR3HIKFEQM[IWIIE great footballer, who never relied solely on the gift of being a natural footballer, but digressed in so many ways to make himself relevant to the Nigerian society after his football career”.


Soaringwith the

Nigerian Carnival Ireland Lexy Mojo-Eyes President / CEO Legendary Gold Limited

We are very pleased to be part of the Nigerian Carnival Ireland for the 2nd consecutive year. Last year was the first time we presented the Nigeria Fashion Show in Dublin. This is after 13 years of presenting it in other major cities like Paris, Milan, New York, Atlanta, Washington DC, Houston, Stockholm, Tel Aviv, Karachi, Cape town, Johannesburg etc. Last year being our first, we presented only 3 designers. It was a sort of a finding mission for us. But this year, we are presenting more designers and we promise a bigger and better fashion show. The Nigeria Fashion Show as part of the Nigeria Carnival Ireland will grow from strength to strength. I must commend D-dymensions Communications ably led by Yemi & Deji Adenuga for their foresight and relentless hard work in putting together the Nigerian Carnival Ireland. The event has not only encouraged economic and cultural growth between Nigeria and Ireland, it has also created a window of business opportunities for Nigerian businesses to thrive during the period of the carnival. We at Legendary Gold Limited are very proud to be partnering with D-dymensions Communications. For sure, the Nigeria Fashion Show at the Nigeria Carnival Ireland next year will be mind blowing especially as we plan to bring designers from various African countries to Dublin for the event. Enjoy the show.

34 | NCI 2013


35 | NCI 2013


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NIGERIAN CARNIVAL IRELAND (NCI) is the first of its kind celebration of Nigeria and Nigerians in the Republic of Ireland, bringing Nigerians...

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