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Issue № 20 SUMMER 2015 $12.00 U.S.

PRINT and

PATTERN


EDITOR IN CHIEF Anh-Minh Le

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Meg Mateo Ilasco

COPY EDITOR Kate Woodrow

MARKET EDITORS Nancy Cho, Kate Pruitt

SPONSORSHIP MANAGER Nancy Cho

CONTRIBUTING DESIGNER Kristen Hewitt

RECIPE TESTER Angie Gatan Nierva

CONTRIBUTORS Rumaan Alam, Amy Azzarito, Brock Batten, Lena Corwin, Courtney de Wet, Jen Garrido, Thayer Allyson Gowdy, Catherine Gratwicke, Kelly Ishikawa, Laure Joliet, Miranda Jones, Anne Lambelet, David A. Land, Julie Lee, Johnelle Mancha, Miguel Manso, Chadner Navarro, Janis Nicolay, Jessica Roux, Jen Siska, Dane Tashima, Claudia Uribe, Henny van Belkom

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PHOTO BY NATHALIE KRAG/TAVERNE AGENCY

3130 Alpine Road, No. 288, PMB 224 Portola Valley, CA 94028


Contents Summer 2015

FEATURES

DIVERSIONS

IN EVERY ISSUE

BOLD PLAY 32 For a young family in Brooklyn, the use of eye-catching patterns invigorates and personalizes their decor.

PRINT MATTERS 42 Learn more about the (sometimes surprising) history of some of today’s most popular motifs.

EDITOR’S LETTER

PASSPORT TO PORTUGAL 68 In Lisbon, Old World charm and the avant-garde happily coexist, providing travelers a plethora of reasons to visit.

BLOCK BY BLOCK 47 A San Francisco printmaker invites us into her studio and shares her blockprinting process.

SHOPKEEPERS’ PICKS

SEA CHANGE 88 A California artist conjures a coastal sanctuary filled with her own creations, as well as special details.

FOOT TRAFFIC 77 In British Columbia, an artist translates her original works into socks worth showing off.

VICTORIAN REVIVAL 97 These London homeowners took a hands-on approach to updating their 1890s dwelling, with stunning results. ON THE BRIGHT SIDE 106 In her Oakland abode, an interior designer deftly brings together prints of varying styles.

A VISUAL FEAST 52 A photographer proves that playing with your food can be a good—and beautiful—thing.

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MAKING THE MAGAZINE

MARKET REPORT

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14

16

CONVERSATION Anna Bond 19 SCREEN PLAY RESOURCES

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BY THE BOOK

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PRIZED POSSESSION Madeline Weinrib 128

BALANCING ACT 60 While decorating their Amsterdam home, a couple successfully reconciles their differing tastes. CLEVER COMBINATIONS 81 Reupholstering with unexpected textiles gave these pieces of furniture dramatic new looks.

DANE TASHIMA

EASY DOES IT 115 Along with their spouses and kids, a pair of friends and designers get together for a laid-back affair.

HOMEWARD

CONTRIBUTORS

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Cover Photograph by LAURE JOLIET

Cover Styling by MIRANDA JONES

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Cassandra Warner and Jeremy Floto’s home features myriad patterned wallpapers—like the geometric and the floral in daughter Luella’s bedroom. Opposite: Luella and Jeremy

compete in a friendly game of foosball. The mural was handpainted by Aurora Hales.

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BOLD PLAY

WHETHER COMPOSING ROOMS WITH A BLACK, WHITE, AND GRAY SCHEME, OR APPOINTING THEM WITH VARIED COLORFUL WALLPAPER PATTERNS, THESE BROOKLYN HOMEOWNERS DECORATE WITH APLOMB Text by RUMAAN ALAM Photographs by DAVID A. LAND Styling by COURTNEY DE WET 5


M

aybe the world would be a better place if we followed the lead of our children. In John Guare’s 1990 play Six Degrees of Separation, one of the characters reflects on this. “I remember asking my kids’ second-grade teacher: ‘Why are all your students geniuses?’” These lines are spoken by one of the main characters, an art dealer by trade. “Your grade, the second grade,” he continues, “Matisses, every one. You’ve made my child a Matisse. Let me study with you. Let me into the second grade.” Children, ignorant of rules, unaware of received wisdom, create by instinct. This sums up the approach that Cassandra Warner and Jeremy Floto took to design their Brooklyn home: freely and joyously embracing pattern and exuberant decorative flourishes, while disregarding traditional boundaries and rules.

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The couple was uniquely well suited to the task of breathing fresh life into their Crown Heights abode. They collaborate as photographers, under the professional moniker Floto+Warner (flotowarner .com), with a practice that encompasses art and editorial photography. Which means they both possess a finely calibrated eye. Additionally, Jeremy is a partner in the design company WRK, which handles a range of commercial and interior design projects; their renovation was a DIY by someone who truly knows how things ought to be done. The pair chose the space for its generous proportions and a hardto-define sense that it was somewhere they could truly make a home. “We walked in and I just knew,” Cassandra says. “I could see us living here.” As the place had sat abandoned for two years, much was required before the family, which includes daughters Luella and Orla Rae, could move in. Downstairs, that process entailed removing many of the interior walls, giving a traditional home a unique sense of flow. The large ground floor—in which a play area bleeds into the living and dining rooms, and ends at an open kitchen—was modeled on the family’s previous residence, a Red Hook loft. “The thing we loved about our loft was entertaining there,” says Jeremy. “At dinner

This page: The family gathers on a

vintage Jasper Morrison sofa; the room’s decor also includes accents such as deer hoof hooks and an Elvis bust. Opposite, top to bottom: The dining

area is appointed with a custom table, Hay chairs, and a David Weeks chandelier. Cement encaustic tiles cover the kitchen floors.


A

l a u F s e i as V

t

l na o s ea s l,

AL ca o l os A on es ngel s g e i l a es pho re ll co tographer and stylist ) e l fare to cre edib n e t f ate her artful (and o LEE U LI E 8

Text by ANH -MIN

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ogra H LE Recipes and Phot

phs b y

J


PHOTOS ON PAGES 52 AND 53 BY BROCK BATTEN.

Julie Lee’s enthusiasm for food is almost palpable. Growing up in Stockton, California, to immigrant parents, “it was a way of teaching us about our [Chinese] culture and heritage,” she says, recounting the time spent with her three sisters “around a table, talking, Joy Luck Clubstyle, making pot stickers and dumplings.” Food was also a part of the family’s livelihood: When she was born, her parents owned a donut shop. (Apple fritters are her favorite donut.) At UCLA, Julie studied abroad, an experience that proved formative. Living in Lyon, she was introduced to, and embraced, the local culinary scene. Right out of college, she decided to work in finance—but her passion for food hadn’t waned. About seven years ago, she started a blog to document her Thursday night dinners with girlfriends, recipes she was trying out, and Santa Monica Farmers’ Market discoveries. It dawned on her that snapping the outsides of the produce wasn’t always sufficient; the beauty of a blood orange was revealed after slicing it open. So she began playing with her approach to photographing her market haul. Gradually, Julie’s professional focus shifted from finance to food. Her résumé came to include catering jobs and a stint with Chef Ludo Lefebvre. Today, she is a food photographer and stylist, with clients ranging from Apple to Visit Britain.

In 2011, she began developing the collages that she has become known for and now sells as giclée prints on her website, Julie’s Kitchen (julieskitchen.me). “Food is something we need to survive,” she says, “but it is also something that’s really beautiful and can be art.” She visits the farmers’ market regularly to source items for her compositions. “Everything that I collage, I eat,” she says. Although her most popular collages are Avocadoes and Summer Tomatoes, her subject matter extends beyond fruits and vegetables: Seashells resulted from a visit to the Carlsbad Aquafarm booth at the farmers’ market, and she’s considering a cheese-themed collage. This past holiday season, she collaborated on a gift wrap kit with KBDA; she was able to manipulate Blueberries and Seashells

in Photoshop to create a repeat. Among her favorite foods to photograph are scarlet runner beans, which she grows at her Venice home. “You can open up two pods and get two totally different colors,” she says. “Sometimes they’re bright pink, sometimes deep purple. The young beans can be anywhere from white to fuchsia. There are so many natural color variations.” She likens the reveal to opening a present: “You don’t know what you’re going to get, but it’s going to be good.”

Opposite: Julie Lee rounds up

fresh produce to create her art. Below, left to right: Julie visits the

Santa Monica Farmers’ Market every week. Once she returns to her Venice kitchen, she preps the bounty for collaging.

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Grilled Peach Gazpacho Serves 4-6 SOUP 1 ½ lbs large, ripe tomatoes (my favorites are Early Girls) 2 peaches, pitted and halved 1 cucumber, peeled and seeded, roughly chopped 1 clove garlic ¼ cup red onion, roughly chopped ¼ to ½ Thai or serrano chili, roughly chopped (optional) 1 tbsp sherry vinegar 2 tbsp olive oil + 1 tsp to brush peaches salt and pepper to taste GARNISH 1 pint cherry tomatoes, halved ½ cup parsley, chopped ½ cup basil, chopped 1 cucumber, chopped 1 peach, pitted and chopped

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nasturtium leaves and flowers fruity olive oil

1. For the soup: Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Prepare an ice bath. With a paring knife, score an “x” on the bottoms of the tomatoes. Blanch the tomatoes for about 30 seconds. Remove tomatoes with a slotted spoon and place them in the ice bath. When tomatoes are cool enough to handle, slip the skins off and remove seeds. Set aside. 2. Preheat a grill or grill pan to mediumhigh. Brush flesh-sides of peaches with olive oil. Grill flesh-side down until you get nice charred grill marks, about 3-4 minutes. Set aside. 3. In a food processor or blender, purée blanched tomatoes, grilled peaches, cucumber, garlic, red onion, chili (if using), sherry vinegar, olive oil, salt, and pepper until smooth. Thin with water if necessary to reach desired consistency. Chill soup for 3-4 hours or overnight. 4. To garnish and serve: Garnish soup with halved cherry tomatoes, herbs, cucumber, peach, and nasturtium. Drizzle with olive oil.


“The grilled peaches in this chilled soup give it a subtle smoky flavor." 11


Gare do Oriente, or Lisbon Orient Station, is a major transport hub in the city. Opposite: The Avenida Infante Santo tile installation is the work of

Portuguese artist Eduardo Nery.

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From its rich and thriving tile history to heritage buildings undergoing modern transformations, Lisbon’s past-meets-present mystique has never been more alluring

PASSPORT TO

PORTUGAL

Text by CHADNER NAVARRO Photographs by MIGUEL MANSO 13


Top row (l-r): Cortiço & Netos is a family-run tile business that dates back to 1976. A façade features vibrant tiles and balconies. Fashion boutique Espaço B offers apparel and accessories. Bottom row (l-r) : One of Eduardo Nery’s colorful tile panels. Bites at casual eatery Mini Bar. Azulejos -clad buildings and surfaces are ubiquitous in Lisbon.

“OBSESSING ABOUT THE THE

Lisbon-based ilPAST IS PART OF lustrator and graphic PORTUGUESE DNA,” designer Cristiana Couceiro (who has worked with Nike and The New Yorker, among many) tells me over dinner at Mini Bar, one of the city’s restaurants du jour. “Any walk down Lisbon’s streets can tell you that. The past is everywhere, side by side with the present and the future,” she adds. The same can be applied to her work. Her creativity is often inspired by tchotchkes she finds in flea markets; among her favorites are old photographs, with which she creates collages. 70

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That we’re having this conversation at Mini Bar is appropriate. Its dining room is an homage to the heritage building that houses it: a 19th-century theatre. The menu is divided into “acts,” and some of the light fixtures are the same as what you would find in an actor’s dressing room. But the menu is playful and forward thinking. There’s a clever take on a Ferrero Rocher bonbon, which is spiked with a creamy foie gras center. And the Algarve prawn ceviche served atop half a lime and flavored with chopped chili and peanuts is an explosion of flavor, and by my estimation, one of the most delicious dishes on offer in Lisbon right now.


Top row (l-r): Trams have operated in Lisbon since the early 1900s. Memmo Hotel’s rooftop terrace. Blue and yellow has been a popular tile color combination in Portugal for centuries. Bottom row (l-r) : Chef José Avillez at Belcanto; he also runs Mini Bar.

The National Pantheon of Santa Engrácia. Mercado da Ribeira includes shops and restaurants.

But while old-meets-new is a marketing ploy for some, it’s a way of life in the Portuguese capital, which is in the middle of a transformation as it tries to crawl out of a debilitating financial crisis. The downtown area, called Baixa, forms Lisbon’s cultural and historic nucleus. During this trip, I stayed in an adjacent district, Alfama, at the twoyear-old Memmo Alfama hotel. The renovated 1800s building (where some sitting rooms were previously brick ovens) is perched above the city, so its rooftop lounges offer great vistas of red-tiled roofs and the Tagus River. You can see that there are no modern skyscrapers here; only centuries-

old towers, some of which are in terrifying disrepair. This is one of the things I find incredibly charming about Lisbon: There doesn’t seem to be any great hurry to clean things up, to make things more contemporary. Walking around Alfama or nearby Bairro Alto, the city looks, smells, and feels old. But you only have to walk through one of its doors to realize that innovative operations (even if they are informed by the past) are all around you. A picturesque, if crowded, ride on tram 15 gets you to LxFactory, a group of abandoned 19th-century textile warehouses under a bridge in Alcântara. In 2008, it was transformed into a 71


Above, left to right: Sofia Landeau of Landeau, which is known for its chocolate cake. Ler Devagar—which

translates to “read slowly”—is a hybrid bookstore, art gallery, and café.

mixed-purpose venue that now makes up Lisbon’s creative core. Artists, designers, musicians, and gourmands converge to create a bustling, contemporary mini city. Spend a whole day here, meandering from one industrial-chic space to another. Visit one of the most beautiful bookstores in the world at Ler Devagar, which has floor-to-double-

and meat stews and grilled seafood like tuna and octopus. Satisfy your sweet tooth with Sofia Landeau’s just-rich-enough chocolate cakes, and then end the evening at Casa de Morna for Cape Verdean cuisine and fabulous fado, that melancholic music that’s all about looking back at the past. Azulejos, the stunning tiles brought to Portugal by the Moors in the 15th century that continue to adorn countless buildings all over the country, are a great way to see Portuguese art for free. (Imagine if Caravaggio paintings were publicly displayed in every town in Italy.) The 19th-century building at Campo de Santa Clara by the National Pantheon is one of the most stunning examples. A baroqueinspired façade decorated in tiles of bright blues and yellows with the occasional illustration of a noble bust have made this private residence one of Lisbon’s most photographed.

Artists, designers, musicians, and gourmands converge to create a bustling, contemporary mini city. height-ceiling shelves of books and a flying bike as a centerpiece. Grab lunch at Cantina, which used to serve traditional Portuguese grub to factory workers in the 1800s. Today, the wood-fire oven is the restaurant’s main attraction alongside an international menu of fortifying dishes like bean 72

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CLEVER

combinations A BAY AREA DESIGNER TACKLES A TRIO OF SEATING PROJECTS THAT EMPLOYS CREATIVE TEXTILE IDEAS Text by ANH-MINH LE Photographs by KELLY ISHIKAWA

JOHNELLE MANCHA likes to keep an open mind. This

is true of her nine-year-old Berkeley business, Mignonne Décor (mignonnedecor.com), and the revamped furniture for which it is known. Her entrepreneurial endeavor began as a shop, carrying small household goods and some furniture. Over the years, she phased out the new products and starting bringing in “vintage textiles, rugs, glassware—things that I personally scouted,” says Johnelle. And, observing that customers were especially interested in furniture, she decided to showcase her own designs—again vintage finds, but in this case, she had reimagined them with paint, fabric, and a dose of originality. “The store has grown and changed, just as I have,” says the Bay Area native, who studied painting in college. “The concept is now creating these statement pieces.” Mignonne also offers interior design services and custom makeovers (for those who bring in their own furniture for updating). Johnelle’s husband, Brian Hill, is a carpenter and his skill set definitely comes in handy, too. According to Johnelle, “the fun part is seeing things in a new way.” On the following pages, she demonstrates how a couple of dining chairs, an armchair, and a settee can be transformed with unconventional and inexpensive upholstery: thrifted leather jackets (the seams add more character), textile remnants (supplement them and you easily have enough fabric to re-cover a chair), and a painting DIY (a simple way to make your own one-of-a-kind textile).

“The age and construction of a piece can determine whether to DIY or enlist a professional. A simple dining chair that only requires fabric, new batting, and a staple gun, is a good starter project. But if there are springs, webbing, horsehair, etc.—or if it’s something large—the job can get a lot more involved.” —Johnelle Mancha

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MODERN

remix

+ material world

take a seat The existing seat cushion was used as a template for creating a new one composed of foam and batting.

frame of reference The modern silhouette and solid wood construction of the chair appealed to Johnelle. The finish had seen better days, though, so she painted the frame white for a contemporary note.

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Upholstering with genuine leather can be pricey, so Johnelle opted for a budgetfriendly alternative: leather jackets from the thrift store.


= LUXE LOOK FOR A LOT LESS Johnelle refers to these chairs, which she purchased at a local thrift store for $2.99 each (that’s not a typo), as “floater pieces.” Their size, simple lines,

details, details Rather than repairing the damaged caning, Johnelle upholstered the backrests in a chocolate-brown suede, which she then outlined with raw nails.

and updated neutral palette allow them to work in various spaces in the home, not just the dining room. She added texture, tone, and interesting details to the chairs with smooth black leather seats (the seams of the jackets are intact), soft brown suede backrests, and industrial nail trim.

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Sea Change

A HOMEOWNER WITH A UNIQUE DUAL CAREER and AN ARTFUL EYE IMBUES AN OCEANFRONT RETREAT with SOUL Text by ANH-MINH LE Photographs by DANE TASHIMA

Bonnie Saland and Mark Beck’s Sea Ranch home counts ocean views, natural light, and a captivating setting among its virtues.

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Bonnie Saland is proof that

it’s never too late to make a change. A licensed therapist for 20-something years, more recently, she founded Philomela (philomelasweb.com), a studio that specializes in textiles and wallpapers. The seemingly sundry professions are both about “piecing things together,” she says. “It’s a weaving of disparate parts to make a whole cloth.” In her dual careers, Bonnie remarks, she is “looking into things to understand the patterns underneath.” Raised on the East Coast, Bonnie studied industrial and labor relations at Cornell University. After graduating, she


This page: Bonnie set up

a studio on the premises, and her own designs punctuate the decor in the house. Case in point: the tiles lining the coffee station in the master bedroom. Opposite: The couple

doesn’t shy away from mixing prints and styles—as witnessed in the alcove outfitted with a cowhide rug and an ornate daybed topped with pillows covered in vintage fabrics.

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moved to Los Angeles, where she worked as a labor organizer. In the early 1980s, when she and her litigator husband, Mark Beck, decided to start a family, she began considering a new career—one that she could better balance with motherhood. Bonnie trained as a therapist and received a PhD from Los Angeles’ Institute of Contemporary Psychoanalysis. But as her daughter and son grew up, she turned her attention toward art, eventually earning an MFA in 2012 from the Massachusetts College of Art and Design program at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown. “Since my first year of graduate school, I have moved fluidly between fine art methods— printmaking; painting, drawing, and collage in journal format; and small gouache paintings—into digitalized pattern making,” she says. Bonnie subsequently established Philomela, which derives its name from the Greek mythology figure who wove a tapestry to tell her story. Her patterns are often rooted in geographic, literary, and spiritual references. For instance, her Finding Tahiti line was influenced by Paul Gauguin’s journals from his two years on the French Polynesian island. Around the time that Bonnie began devoting more time to Philomela, another big change was in store. “Hitting 60,” she recalls, “I was thinking about the next chapter, and wanted a rural spot to spend more time, a place with a sense of community, particularly an artists’ community.” She and Mark were living in Pasadena, and had a condo on Catalina Island. They sold the latter and purchased a two-bedroom house in The Sea Ranch, a modernist coastal enclave about 110 miles north of San Francisco.


“THERE’S SUCH A SENSE OF IMMERSION IN NATURE WHEN YOU’RE HERE.”

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In the entry of the Oakland home she shares with her husband Andrew, son Ferris, and daughter Lily, Chloe Warner commissioned Tim Balon to create the ceiling installation, which she describes as “architectural moss.�

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ON THE BRIGHT SIDE

AN INTERIOR DESIGNER’S

PATTERN-RICH OAKL AND ABODE IS AS CHIC AS IT IS FAMILY-FRIENDLY

Even while she was studying architecture at Harvard Graduate School of Design, Chloe Warner was well aware that it probably wasn’t the right profession for her. “I had some hope that it would sink it,” she says, “but I think I knew in my heart that I was too froufrou—too into color and pattern, the decorative and ornamental.” So, after earning her degree and returning to San Francisco, where she had lived in between college and grad school, she embarked on an interior design career, launching Redmond Aldrich Design (redmondaldrich.com). Color and pattern are still her passions—and perhaps nowhere is this more evident than in her own residence. In the spring of 2011, Chloe and her husband Andrew, a real estate developer, had outgrown their two-bedroom condo in San Francisco. With their brood expanding—son Ferris, who was one year old at the time, would soon be joined by a sister, Lily—they put their home on the market. A very hot market. “We sold our place in the city really, really fast, which I thought was great news,” recalls Chloe. “But my dad was like, ‘In 30 days, you’re going to be seven months pregnant and homeless.’”

Although a bit of panic did set in, luckily, Andrew and Chloe were able to quickly close on a 1924 house across the bay, in Oakland’s Crocker Highlands neighborhood. Its four bedrooms and three and a half baths are spread across three levels that offer ample square footage for the family, plus their cat Boots. According to Chloe, the previous owner was “into color, but was advised to paint it out. When we bought it, the rooms were white. They had staged the home to be neutral.” And neutral just isn’t Chloe’s style. Not only did she fill the interior with color again, but she introduced a bevy of dynamic backdrops—from diamonds to florals. For the most part, the house only called out for cosmetic changes. A kitchen makeover would be a major undertaking, though, so it remains on the wish list. Says Chloe: “When we moved in, I remember thinking, Should we remodel the kitchen or decorate the whole house?” They chose the latter. Chloe started with the ground floor’s public spaces. The entry walls are lined in Osborne & Little’s Sweet Pea, a favorite motif of hers. To further invigorate the area, she enlisted artist Tim Balon. Employing rectangles of tissue paper, more

Text by ANH-MINH LE Photographs by LAURE JOLIET Styling by MIRANDA JONES


The living room decor includes a sofa purchased from a Salvation Army store that has been re-covered in a Lee Jofa print; a peacock chair from the Alameda flea market; custom drapes made with an Élitis fabric; and a chinoiserie credenza.

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A pair of armchairs from Barclay Butera offers a respite in front of the living room fireplace. The Roger Mßhl painting above the mantel previously belonged to Chloe’s grandparents.

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PRIZED Possession Photograph by DAVID A. LAND “When I first saw this 19 th -century Italian Majolica tulipiere, I thought the combination of the color and form was so unique. I purchased the vase about 10 years ago from a woman on Portobello Road, where I have shopped for years. I always look forward to being in London on a Saturday, so I can get up at the crack of dawn to find treasures like this. For me, when I acquire something, it’s as much about the memory of the place as it is the object itself.” Through her namesake company, MADELINE WEINRIB is able to merge her design talents, passion for travel, and commitment to ethical artisanry. The New Yorker’s timeless yet modern collection includes carpets, fabrics, pillows, and apparel. (madelineweinrib.com)

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