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Anselm Cheung Yin Ngai 2010251762 The University of Hong Kong ARCH 3002 Architectural Design VI Olivier Ottevaere Spring Semester, 2013


Duality

Merging High-Density Housing with the Rural Landscape In China’s quest to be a world power, the city of Chongqing – an industrial and shipping giant – is a key player and a model for many more eager cities. In recent years, the city of 28 million population has seen astonishing development. The urban core – home to a quarter of the people – has sprawled outwards with thickets of new apartment blocks along with throngs of skyscrapers at the fringe of the city, which has long been a place where households improvise inventive uses of land. Amidst excitement for a brighter future, the megacity is keen to exploit space, adopt the new and disregard the traditional. People are brought closer to each other, but the sense of closeness goes the other way. The value of community are obscured by the delirium of development, of material wealth, and of class and superiority. It seems that the new physical proximity of people from all walks of life accentuates the many conflicts between rural and urban lifestyles. No two cities are the same. The concept of a model city, after all, means that individual characteristics are rejected. This project explores the duality of city development and takes a new look into the plurality of a city that is running fast. Rapid urbanisation poses the risk of killing the city’s individuality and turns its cultural richness into a homogenous, inorganic mass of sameness. The Chinese dream, after all, may not be the same for everyone.

Photo Credits: Urban China 城市中國


Site Surrounding

XiaoShiZhi

Farm converted from barren land

Sichuan Art Academy

Built Area Rural Area

Site


View of the Yuzhong Peninsula (CBD area) from the Site

View of the Site


Massing Experiment 1:500


Terracing Massing

Reference Terracing Apaartment Complex in Chongqing


Situated at the urban fringe, the site’s surrounding area is being engulf by the developer’s typical gated communities. It is also situated at a critical position where the cable car arrives from the Yuzhong peninsula (i.e. the CBD), and where the future metro station will be constructed. In the project, Instead of letting the generic towers to march in, the layer of ground is lifted up and housing units are consequently inserted underneath it.

Cave Dwelling in Henan Province, China

Cave Dwelling in Henan Province, China

Photo Credits: Architecture without Architects. Rudolf Bernasky

Photo Credits: Architecture without Architects. Rudolf Bernasky

Lai Tak Estate, Hong Kong

Wah Fu Estate, Hong Kong

There are precedents where habitats are constructed around internal courtyards and even built underground. There are cave dwellings in Henan province, where living quarter are recessed from the underground courtyard. This spatial configuration allows the apartment to keep warm in winter and cooler in summer. In Hong Kong, public housing has been built around internal courtyards. In Lai Tak Estate and Wah Fu Estate, the light shafts at the same time improves ventilation.


Massing Experiment 1:500


Geometry of the Plan Circle Packing Experiment


Massing Experiment 1:200

Tectonic Experiment 1:200


Geometry of the Courtyard Responsive to Winter Solstice Sunlight The site given of 3500 square meter is a slope that rises from the river level to the cliff. In Chongqing, the typical solution to deal with the slope is terracing, that is the existing condition. In terms of massing strategy, given the Floor Area Ratio (FAR) requirement of 7, the ‘ground’ is lifted up, resulting in a mass with a steeper slope and larger volume. Then, the operation is to punctuate the mass with ‘light shafts’, which enables the mass to be illuminated internally. To respond to the increasing depth towards the higher slope, the size of these apertures is adjusted to increase amount of sunlight to enter the building. The geometry of the light shafts is further manipulated so that they respond to the lower sunlight in winter. Hence, the elliptical shape. The building is also lifted up 6 meters above ground so that the ground level is permeable to pedestrians. The operation frees up the ground level for people. The top level of the complex also connects the surrounding urban entrances.

Generative Diagrams


Section at AA’

(Original Scale: 1:100)


Ground Plan (Original Scale: 1:200)

First Floor Plan (Original Scale: 1:200)

Some units can access to their own gardens, or gain access to the upper ground directly. Otherwise, the common corridors connect them. The units are provided at least 2 escape routes. Meanwhile, as both top level and the 'ground' are connected to the surroundings, residents can choose either to go up or down in case of emergency.


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Seventh Floor Plan (Original Scale: 1:200)

Top Plan’ (Original Scale: 1:200)


There are 3 types of units. Majority of the units will be the 'Double-faced', receives mostly direct and reflected radiation. Single-faced units are situated at the Northern side of the courtyard, and receive mostly direct sunlight. Duplex units are situated at deeper corners. Double floor height at the living quarters.


Public Ground

Courtyard

Upper ‘Ground’ (as well as the roof)


Lower Public Ground

Lower Public Ground


Site Plan

(Model at 1:200)


Elevation West (Facing Yangtze River)

Tectonic Model 1:50

Section Cut South

Section Cut East

Section Cut North


Courtyard and the Lift Core

Top View

Lower Public Ground


Upper Ground

The Courtyard

The Courtyard


Plateau for Activities

The Courtyard


Top View

Top View

Top View


Winter Solstice

Summer Solstice


View of the Site from the Cable Car 19th January, 2013



Experimental Collective Housing Proposal