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A NEEDLE PULLING THREAD Life goes better with needlework

FREE SAMPLE ISSUE! practice makes perfect french knots Artist profile - cynthia mcnair all about needles & threads get ready for summer with knit & crochet tops

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4 Colleen Blackwell McMahon quilting Summer Breezes Patio Quilt

8 Hellen Bell sewing Beach Bag

12 Elaine’s Tech Tips quilting Needles & Thread

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14 Susan Fletcher

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shashiko & appliqué Padded Laptop Envelope

20 Cynthia McNair fibre art Artist Profile

22 Lori Franko

knitting Fitted Top with Cables

26 Laura Gebhardt crochet Summer Lace Top

30 Deanne Fitzpatrick rug hooking Three Sheep

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34 Janet Morningstar cross stitch Springtime Friends

38 Carol Arsenault

embroidery Flowerpot Pincushions

contents

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editor's let ter

Life goes better with needlework

PUBLISHER, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF, ART DIRECTOR Carla A. Canonico carla@ANPTmag.com PUBLISHER, ADVERTISING SALES John De Fusco john@ANPTmag.com PHOTOGRAPHERS John De Fusco, Carla A. Canonico, Alessia De Fusco QUILTING EDITOR CROCHET EDITOR Nellie Holmes Laura Gebhardt nellie@ANPTmag.com laura@ANPTmag.com QUILTING CONTRIBUTOR BEADING EDITOR Elaine Theriault Brenda Franklin brenda@ANPTmag.com KNITTING CONTRIBUTOR Cynthia MacDougall ASSISTANT EDITOR cynthia@ANPTmag.com Luigina Baratto luigina@ANPTmag.com COPY EDITOR Rosalie I. Tennison GRAPHIC & WEB DESIGN rosalie@ANPTmag.com Derek Goode derek@ANPTmag.com CREATIVE ADVISOR Judith Marquis PROOFREADER Erica Killins

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Designers and other contributors who would like to be considered for future issues please email Carla with a brief description of your work and your proposed project for the magazine.

SPECIAL THANKS TO Alessia and Adriano, mom and dad. A Needle Pulling Thread® is a registered trademark. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. ©2014 A Needle Pulling Thread. All rights reserved. All designs, patterns, and information in this magazine are for private, non-commercial use only, and are copyrighted material owned by their respective creators or owners.

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Here's a sampling of the creativity, inspiration, projects, and articles that you'll find in every issue of ANPTmag. Although, this free sample is but a fraction of what's in every much anticipated issue. In the full issue, you’ll find chapters dedicated to quilting & sewing, knitting & crochet, and embroidery categories, providing inspiring and fun projects, technical articles, and ideas on how to mix needlework mediums. Our photography will entice you, our layout will surprise you, and our colour palettes are...delicious. You are at the heart of everything we do. We encourage you to pick up a new form of needlework and excel in it, mix needlework media, and repurpose needlework. Explore new takes on traditional needlework and why ‘life goes better with needlework’.

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quilt, knit, sew, crochet, cross stitch, bead, embroidery, hook a rug, love A NEEDLE PULLING THREAD

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summer breezes patio quilt

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A former owner of a quilt shop in Brockville, Colleen found that being a business person left her little time to create. “When I owned the store, I wanted to make something out of the beautiful fabric that would arrive, but I had to stitch a sample instead,” she says. “After five years, I was exhausted from being a sole proprietor and I wasn’t doing what I loved which is designing and making quilts.” “I have always loved colour and texture,” Colleen continues, “and I love the challenge of putting fabric together. Whenever I do something, I do it because I am enjoying playing with the fabric.”

believes this need to create and the process of getting from start to finish is part of her heritage. Her mother and grandmother sewed and her father loved math. Colleen believes she inherited gifts from both parents that make her the quilter she is today. For her patio quilt, Colleen encourages makers to play with the fabric. This is not a difficult project, she says, but it offers the maker an opportunity to try different fabric and colour combinations. If you are a “fabric junkie”, like Colleen, you may have some interesting fabrics in your stash that would make wonderful patio quilts.

“This is an easy, relaxing project,” Colleen says. “Play with the fabric and try it in many colour combinations.”

Starting with doll clothes, Colleen has being sewing something since a young age. Eventually, she sewed clothes for her children. But, when her mother took a quilting class, Colleen began to learn what her mother had and that is when she became a quilter. “I love math and figuring, and I will doodle quilt designs in a notebook,” Colleen says of her designing process. “I love to figure out the yardage requirements and what sizes the pieces need to be cut.” She

quilting 4

Colleen Blackwell McMahon

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Colleen remembers standing on tiptoe in a store and stroking a bolt of fabric when she was a very little girl and that love of texture and colour blossomed over the years. “Fabric speaks to me and I fall in love with it and then I need to work with it,” she admits. “I get comfort from touching fabric; it’s my solace.” It seems fitting that a designer who gets solace from fabric and who loves colour, would give quilters a design that offers both comfort and brightness. Even on a rainy summer day, Colleen’s patio quilts will be welcome on a covered porch. z

Photo this page by Yuriy Brozdnychenko.

t’s hard to imagine that summer could be warmed or brightened anymore, but designer Colleen Blackwell McMahon has found a way. Her patio quilts can be thrown nonchalantly over a wicker chair or draped over a picnic table or bundled onto a hammock to add another shot of colour or a touch of warmth to an otherwise glorious summer day.


I get comfort from touching fabric; it’s my solace

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instructions This is a perfect project to use the 5” charm packs available in quilt shops or you may prefer to cut 5” squares from your stash. skill level  easy

sewing Use an accurate ¼” seam allowance.

finished measurements 41” square [105cm] block size  9” x 9” [23cm] finished materials 36 – 5” x 5” squares of assorted fabrics [12.5cm x 12.5cm] 36 – 2½” x 2½” [6cm x 6cm] squares, assorted colours of tone on tone or solid fabrics ½ yd [.5m] contrasting colour - sashing and inner border 1¼ yd [1.15m] print - outer border (cut on the lengthwise grain of fabric) ½ yd [.5m] binding 47” x 47” [119cm x 119cm] backing fabric 47” x 47” [119cm x 119cm] batting cutting WOF - Width of Fabric blocks 36 assorted 5” x 5” [12.5cm x 12.5cm] charm squares From the tone on tone or solid coloured fabrics cut 36 2½” x 2½” [6cm x 6cm] squares sashing and inner border Cut 6 strips 1¼” x 9½” [3cm x 24cm] vertical sashing Cut 4 strips 1¼” x 29” [3cm x 74cm] horizontal sashing, top and bottom inner borders Cut 2 strips 1¼” x 30½” [3cm x 79.5cm] side inner borders outer border Cut 2 strips 6” x 30½” [15cm x 77.5cm] length of fabric Cut 2 strips 6” x 41½” long [15cm x 105.5cm] length of fabric

1. Draw a diagonal line across the wrong side of each of the 2½” [6cm]squares. Diagram A.

Diagram A 5" [12.5cm] square

2. Place a 2½” [6cm] square on the bottom corner of a 5” [12.5cm] square, right sides together. Sew along the drawn line on the 2½” [6cm] square. Diagram B. 3. Trim the excess fabric away from the corner leaving a ¼” seam allowance. Diagram C. 4. Press the triangle towards the bottom corner. Trim to 5” [12.5cm] if necessary. 5. Arrange four of the 5” [12.5cm] squares together in a pleasing colour arrangement, ensuring that the corner triangles meet in the middle. Diagram D.

Diagram B 2½ " [6cm] square

6. Make a total of nine blocks. Blocks should measure 9½” x 9½” [24cm x 24cm] unfinished. 7. Use Diagram E as a guide for sewing the sashing and borders to the quilt. Sew the vertical sashing to the blocks. Press seams towards the sashing. 8. Sew the blocks in rows of three. Sew a total of three rows. Alternate pressing directions in each row.

Diagram C

9. Sew the top and bottom inner borders to the quilt. Press all borders towards the outside of the quilt. Sew the side inner borders to the quilts. 10. Sew the outer borders following the same order as the inner borders.

binding Cut 5 strips 2½” [6cm] x WOF Diagram D

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Diagram E

finishing the quilt 1. Cut backing and batting 3 inches larger than the quilt on all sides. 2. Using a hard surface, secure the backing (right side down) with masking tape or clamps. 3. Lay batting and quilt top (right side up) on backing, smoothing away any wrinkles. 4. Baste layers together. 5. Quilt as desired. 6. Square and trim up the quilt around all sides.

binding the quilt 1. Sew all the binding strips end to end using a mitred join. Press seams open. 2. Fold the length of the binding in half and press to create a double fold binding. 3. Using a generous ¼” seam allowance, sew the binding to the quilt. 4. Fold to the back and hand stitch in place. 

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Beach Bag

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Helen Bell

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instructions materials

Outer bag fabric: 45” [114cm] wide – ½ yd [0.5m] Lining fabric: ½ yd [0.5m] Fabric for bathing suit appliqué (back & front): fat quarter – 1 Thin batting: 3/8 yd [0.4m] Fusible web: ½ yd [0.5m] Bag handles: 4” [10cm] – 1 pr. Bathing suit templates for appliqué – 2

finished measurements

12"h x 12"w x 2½"d [30.5 x 30.5 x 6.5cm]

Outer bag

Note: All seam allowances are ¼” [6mm] 1. Cut 2 – 12½” [32cm] blocks from the outer bag fabric. Fold into quarters and finger press the folds. 2. Cut 2 pcs of batting same size as outer fabric blocks. 3. Trace the templates onto the paper side of the fusible web. Roughly cut out the pieces and fuse to the back of the bathing suit fabric. 4. Cut out the templates on the lines. 5. Remove paper backing from the templates and fuse to the right side of the fabric blocks. 6. Place a piece of batting behind each fabric block and appliqué the bathing suit using your favourite method. Quilt as desired. 7. For the gusset, cut 1 – 3” [7.5cm] strip x the width of the fabric. Remove the selvage and cut 4” [10cm] off the end of the strip. Cut a strip of batting the same size as the fabric strip. 8. Spray baste the batting to wrong side of strip and quilt it as desired. 9. Optional Side Pocket: (skip this step for no pocket) Use the piece cut from the gusset of the outer fabric a) Hem both 3” [7.5cm] edges. b) Position the pocket on the side gusset 8” [20.5cm] from top edge and sew in place. 10. With the block on top and starting at the left edge of the block, sew the gusset to the block, pivoting at corners. 11. Sew other block to the other side of the gusset.

Lining

1. Cut 2 – 12½” [32cm] squares from the lining fabric. 2. Cut 1 – 3” [7.5cm] strip x the width of the fabric for the gusset. 3. Remove selvage and proceed as for outer bag. 4. Repeat the gusset assembly as for outer bag minus the quilting. 5. Apply gusset to squares as for outer bag, leaving a small opening at the bottom of the inner bag for turning later.

Handles

1. Cut 4 pcs. – 3” x 4” [7.5cm x 10cm] from outer fabric for loops. Note: The loops support the handles. 2. Fold the strips in half lengthways, right sides together and stitch. 3. Turn right side out and press with seams in centre. Fold in half with seams together. 4. Pin the fabric loops 3” [7.5cm] in from the outside edges of one block, on each side of the outer bag, raw edges together. Assembly 1. Turn inner bag inside out. Place the outer bag inside, right sides together and line up the side seams. 2. Sew all the way around the top edge of the bag. Turn right side out. 3. Press and top stitch the top edge. Slip-stitch the opening in the bottom of the inner bag. This bag is reversible plus you can remove the pink handles and use then on a new bag of any size. Hope you have fun using your beach bag! 

Helen’s Tips

Appliqué tip: To help with removing the paper backing from the fusible web on your appliqué, try scoring the paper with a pin or the end of a pair of scissors. The paper will peel away with ease. Basting tip: When basting is necessary in the case of appliqué placement, spray basting is the easiest method. “505 Temporary Fabric Adhesive” is my favourite. It is acid free and does not gum up your needle.

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Front

Bathing Suit Templates

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Back

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Elaine’s Tech Tips™ Needles and Thread

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lot of time, care and money go into choosing fabrics for a new project. Equal care should be given to choosing the right needles and thread for assembling and quilting the project. An incorrect combination may result in frustration from broken or shredded threads and a project that doesn’t look its best. While the sewing machine is often blamed, more than likely it is an incorrect combination of needle and thread that is causing the problem. Here are some of the key points to watch for next time you are having issues with your piecing or quilting.

There are two things to consider when purchasing needles – the type of needle and the size. While there are many different types and sizes of needles these are the basic ones that are used for piecing, appliqué and/or quilting.

needle sizes

(The smaller the number on the package, the smaller the needle) 60/8 – use with monofilament, silk or lightweight bobbin threads for appliqué or quilting 70/10 – use with lighter weight threads for appliqué, piecing and quilting 80/12 – use with regular piecing thread, for appliqué, piecing or quilting 90/14 – use with heavier threads for topstitching, appliqué, quilting 100/16 – use for heavier threads for topstitching, appliqué, quilting

needle types Universal needles – This is a great, general purpose needle that can be used for piecing and quilting. Microtext Sharp – The point is very thin and very sharp which makes it a great needle for top stitching, precision piecing and quilting. Topstitch – These needles have a large eye and can accommodate thicker threads. Used for topstitching and quilting. Metallica – The eye and the groove in the back of the needle are larger to accommodate metallic threads. Quilting – The point is specially designed to allow easy penetration of the quilting layer which will help decrease skipped stitches. Denim/Jeans – The blade (shaft) of this needle is very strong and there is very little flex on the needle which can help reduce needle breakage and skipped stitches. It’s great for making rag quilts, topstitching and quilting.

Keep your needles organized in a box, together with a screwdriver.

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Different needle sizes.

Some tips to help get the most of your needles: • Buy quality needles. • Make sure you are using a brand name that is appropriate for your sewing machine. • Needles dull quickly. Therefore you must change the needle often. How often? Approximately every 8 hours of sewing. How does one estimate 8 hours of sewing? Prewind 4 bobbins and when they are empty – change the needle. This would also be a good time to clean the lint out of the bobbin area of the sewing machine. • If you run over a pin, change the needle. The needle will likely have developed a burr which can snag your fabric and cause damage. The needle may even be bent ever so slightly from hitting a pin and will not sew a proper stitch. • To dispose of your needles in a safe way use a small container like a film canister or pill bottle. Keep the container until it’s full. Then tape the cap shut and dispose of the container. Photos courtesy of Elaine Theriault.


• Keep all your sewing machine needles in one box, along with a screw driver (needed to change the needle) and the disposal container. When you do need to change the needle, there will be no excuse for not finding the right tool. • Make sure you are using the right needle for the right job. Evaluate the type of the fabric you are using and the thickness (weight) of thread – it doesn’t make sense to use a fine needle on denim – the needle will simply bend and break. On the other hand, you don’t want to be using a 100/16 for piecing with regular 50 weight thread. The needle is simply too big for the job. • It is possible to interchange the needles and their original purpose (yes – you can quilt with the 60/8), but you must be careful of drag on the quilt top or the needle will flex and result in broken or bent needles. • Slow down! Sometimes there is no other way than reduce speed to prevent shredding or breakage on some of the specialty threads.

A variety of thread weights.

many ply the thread is made of. If you see 50/3 on a spool, this means the thread is a 50 weight 3-ply thread. A 50/3 is a stronger thread than 50/2 ply thread and thus better for construction. Use the 50/2 for decorative purposes.

Thread for piecing Choose a 50/3 ply thread for all your piecing. Do not use Hand Quilting thread in the sewing machine. There is a special coating on this thread which can cause issues with the tension on the sewing machine. Do not use thread which is labeled Different types of needles are available for different needs and thread weights. Machine Quilting for piecing. This is a thicker thread meant for QUILTING, not piecing. While it is possible to use the universal or Microtext Sharp for My preference is to match the type of thread to the type of most everything you do, it’s important to be aware of the other fabric in the quilt. If the quilt is made of cotton fabrics, then needles and to change to the specialty needles when you have I use cotton thread for the construction. If the fabric in the problems. Sometimes changing to the next size larger needle (of quilt is mixed, then I can use polyester thread. To keep things the same type) will solve the problem. Shredding mostly occurs simple – I only purchase cotton thread since most of my prowhen the hole punched by the needle is too small for the thread jects are made with cotton fabrics. and the friction this creates will cause the thread to shred. To keep things simple, I mostly use a Microtext Sharp 80/12 for all my piecing and quilting. Should I run into problems like thread breakage or shredding, then I change to a more appropriate needle type and size. I am more apt to be concerned with the size of the needle than the type of needle. Thread Quality Thread quality significantly impacts the quality of the finished product. Ensure that you are using quality threads for every aspect of the project. The “three spools for $1.00” deal is not a good purchase and may end up in costly repairs to your sewing machine or repairs to the project. Thread Weight Thread weight is an indication of the size of the thread. The larger the number, the finer the thread. This number is indicated on the spool and may or may not also indicate how

Colour of Threads While we might buy different colours of thread for every project when we sew clothing, this is not necessary for quilting. If the tension of the machine is properly set, the stitches will not show from the front and therefore the colour of thread will not matter. You should be able to piece a dark quilt with light thread and no one will be the wiser. My preference is to use a neutral colour, light grey or beige for all my piecing. Using one colour also allows you to buy larger, more economical spools of thread. A word of caution – make sure you and your machine like the type of thread before you make an investment in that brand/colour. The exception to this one colour for all projects is a white quilt. The beiges and greys will shadow through the white so I will choose a white thread for a white project.

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Padded Laptop Envelope

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summer day, a leafy tree, a comfortable chair and time to take your laptop outside to write a letter or send an email. To protect it, carry the laptop in a felted wool case you can make yourself. Covered with sashiko, beads and appliqué abstract flowers, the pattern comes from British Columbia designer Susan Fletcher. Her technique is non-traditional, but easy to master, so you could make another case to give to a friend.

"My technique makes doing sashiko different than the norm," Susan comments from her home in Gibson’s Landing. "It is easier and allows you to do sashiko on any type of fabric." Susan traces her design on fusible interfacing and presses it onto the back of the fabric. The design is stitched from the back of the piece. The interfacing gives the fabric more body and is hidden by the lining of the project. Susan has been doing sashiko for many years and now designs patterns for sashiko projects under the name Alder Spring Design. "I deliberately did all the traditional designs, but now I am starting to branch into other images, such as dragonflies and fish." Susan uses many media for her sashiko. This project uses felted wool and she likes using perle cotton rather than sashiko thread. She says often the project or the fabric will dictate what type of thread she might use and, sometimes, the project dictates the fabric.

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Susan Fletcher

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"When I started doing sashiko, I tried to use materials that were easily accessible," Susan explains. "I go to second hand shops to find wool that can be felted and I make some of my own projects out of recycled clothes." She adds that Canadians, like herself, who live in isolated areas, such as small towns, the North or coastal communities, learn to make do with what is available. Susan began designing because she doesn’t like making the same pattern twice. By creating her own designs, she could make one and then move on to the next project. Designing also allows her to try different techniques. She also set up a website, www.sashikostitchers.com to give other sashiko stitchers a forum for their creativity. For her laptop case project, Susan challenges the maker to personalize the project. "If you don’t like where I’ve placed the flower put it where you like it." She also says, if you don’t like the beads leave them off, but if you do embellish with beads, make sure you stitch them down twice so they are pulled into the wool. Maybe you don’t want to write a letter on your laptop, but you want to be outside on a beautiful summer day. Leave the laptop in your office, and take this project outside to work on instead. z

Susan Fletcher Alderspring Design 1.886.986.5957 www.alderspringdesign.com


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instructions This laptop envelope provides good protection for your laptop as it is padded enough to buffer bumps. It is also ideal for placing inside a brief case or carry-all bag. skill level intermediate finished size 11" x 13" x 1½" [28 x 33 x 4cm] materials wool fabrics ½ yd [0.5m] of 36" wide dark green scraps of dark pink for flowers 12" x 18" [30.5 x 45.5cm] medium pink 12" x 18" [30.5 x 45.5cm] bright green fabric 7⁄8 yd [0.8m] pre-quilted fabric for lining threads embroidery floss, #8 perle cotton or Aurifil lana threads for hand stitching in the following colours: medium green, medium brown, pink, purple Size 7 embroidery needles incidentals 12" x 14" [30.5 x 35.5cm] lightweight non woven white fusible interfacing 20" x 36" [51 x 91.5cm] quilt batting pink seed beads permanent fabric marking pen 1yd [1m] white freezer paper scissors Snap, Velcro or button temporary fabric adhesive instructions cutting 1. Cut the following pieces each 11½" x 14" [29 x 35.5cm]: Two of dark green wool, two quilt batting, two lining, and one interfacing. 2. Cut the following pieces each 2½" x 11" [6 x 28cm]: One dark green wool, one quilt batting, one lining. 3. Cut the following pieces each 2½" x 14" [6 x 35.5cm]: One dark green wool, one batting, one lining.

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4. Cut an 11½" square from the pink wool. Fold in half to form a triangle, then cut along the fold. Fold one triangle in half, measure in 5¾" [14.5cm] from the fold and mark that point. Cut away the triangle. Draw a right angle line from that point to create a small triangle. Repeat at the other end. Use this piece to cut the other pink triangle of wool to match. Cut one piece of quilt batting using one of the pink pieces as a template. 5. Trace the appliqué designs on to the dull side of the freezer paper. Cut along drawn lines and press freezer paper templates to the appropriate coloured wool. Cut wool along the edge of the drawn lines. stitching the sashiko background 1. Lay the interfacing piece over the sashiko design and trace the design onto the interfacing using the marking pen. 2. Fuse the marked interfacing onto the back of the dark green wool rectangles. 3. Visit www.sashikostitchers.com for step by step directions with photographs. appliqué the front 1. Using the photograph on page 15 as a placement guide, use temporary fabric adhesive to baste the wool appliqué pieces on the front of the sashiko stitched fabric. Overcast stitch them to the background using various coloured threads. Tip: Stitch the pieces down with thread that is close in colour and add different coloured threads later. A brighter or darker coloured thread looks great. 2. Once the pieces are stitched in place, the fun begins. Using threads and beads, embellish the appliqué with simple running stitches, tiny crosses, or any other decorative stitch. 3. Place project right side down and steam press.

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assembling the outside of the laptop envelope 1. Pin the matching dark green pieces and the quilt batting together. 2. Lay the appliquéd front face up on a flat surface. Quilt batting will be pinned to its back. Match and stitch each side and bottom piece to it. Quilt batting will be pinned to their backs and stitched along with the pieces. Centre these pieces before sewing. 3. Bring the bottom short side corner edges together and stitch. The envelope will now be like a box with one end missing and no top. 4. Take the remaining dark green envelope (with the batting pinned to its back) and match the edges to the side edges of the piece that was just sewn. Stitch in place. 5. Trim away batting close to the seams. assembling the inside of the laptop envelope 1. Sew the lining pieces together in the same way as the outside pieces. 2. Turn the top edge down ½" [13mm] and stitch to hold it in place. adding the envelope flap 1. Lay the triangular batting on a flat surface. Place the two pink pieces over it. Stitch all sides except the long bottom one. 2. Trim the interfacing very close to the seam, then turn right side out and press. 3. Lay the flap onto the front of the bag with the long edge matching the top edge and the point laying toward the centre of the bag. 4. Pin together the pink fabric and the green fabric that are laying together at the top of the bag. There should only be one layer of each fabric. Cut the batting back ½" [13mm]. finishing 1. Push the inside lining bag into the outside bag and line up the top edges. Hand or machine stitch them together. 2. Add a snap, Velcro or button to the flap to keep it closed. 


short flower leaf

tall flower leaf short flower leaf

tall flower stem

short flower blossom

short flower blossom tall flower leaf

tall flower leaf

tall flower blossom

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Personal note Cloth is a deceptively humble material to work with; it lacks the status of paint or marble or metal. Yet it is cloth that receives us at birth and covers us at death. In the past the cloth used for these and other ceremonial occasions in life, was lovingly individually made and embellished. These cloths, often being embellished with symbols of family, social, and religious membership, added both beauty and significance to life. Cloth, made beautiful and used in this way, made art part of everyday practice, rather than a separated activity that only certain people could do. I believe in ordinary people making things with their hands. I believe it is important to have around us things which were created by people we know and love. So I began by making things. And now I make up directions and drawings and photographs so that other people can make those things too.

Susan Fletcher answers our questions: 1. Which famous person inspires you? Novelists who help me see the world differently, such as Alice Munro or Margaret Lawrence. 2. What music are you listening to right now? Nothing, I like silence. 3. What are you reading right now? Say you are one of them by Uwem Akpan. 4. Where did you go on your most recent holiday? Pacific Rim National Park, Tofino, on the west coast of Vancouver Island. 5. If you couldn’t do what you’re doing right now, what would you be doing? I would paint or sculpt.

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Susan's TIPS yy When using woven wool fabric for appliqué, the raw edges do not need to be turned under. Wash and dry the wool in the machine before using. This will cause the fibres to tighten and felt together enough and allow project to be washed after being made. Hand dyed wool fabric does not need to be washed as it has already been felted. yy Sashiko stitching is personal, similar to handwriting. The length of the stitch should be the length that feels and looks right to you. The important thing is to keep stitches consistent in length.


Artist Profile Cynthia McNair www.cynthiamcnair.com

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ynthia McNair immigrated to Canada in 2003. When she arrived she was intrigued by the number of quilt and fabric stores she saw and although she had never picked up a needle in her life, she immediately began to see the possibilities of this art-form.

In England she had been trained in Ceramic Restoration, an exacting work, requiring that the piece be returned to an almost original state. Colour matching is a major part of the work. So after a career of 14 years in private practice, her eye was keen and her hand was steady – she felt she was ready to begin quilting.

Canadian Garden

As her husband will attest, even sewing on buttons challenged her. Choosing fabrics and calculating the yardage required to make a quilt were complete mysteries. So it was with fear and trepidation that she decided to take some lessons to acquire new skills – and hopefully make new friends. Within six months of her arrival in Canada, she took a class at Cotton by Post in Ailsa Craig to make a twin size bed quilt. Her initial fear subsided and turned to pleasure when she created a reasonable piece of work. Her confidence in her new abilities has grown with each quilt she made, and she now refers to herself as a fibre artist.

Reflections

Moraine Lake was entered in the O Canada Exhibit at the International Quilt Festival in 2011.

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Karen’s Vision

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Urban Growth


As a member of the Studio Art Quilt Associates, Cynthia took part in a group project to reproduce the painting Saint Sauveur by Anne Savage. Twenty artists worked together, each one working on their section of the painting. The project was accepted for display at the International Quilt Festival with a description and is entitled Laurentian Foothills. Ipperwash Sunset

“I love the design process,” says Cynthia. “It provides a challenge. The actual thinking and working out of a new project is exciting.” The inspiration for her work can be triggered by a piece of fabric, a word, or just something in nature. She finds that her work encompasses trees and plants, and she loves to look to her surroundings for inspiration. She always finds something that will start the design process. If she’s working on a landscape, she could be working from a photograph, such as the wall quilt Moraine Lake. She found the photo on the internet and obtained permission from the photographer to reinterpret it. Cynthia explains that the process usually starts by transferring the photograph onto acetate using an overhead projector, enabling her to choose the size she wants for the design. Once she decides how big the piece will be, the design is projected onto plain white paper. The outline of the main elements is drawn out and shadow details are filled in. Then she uses tracing paper to make pattern pireces and transfers them to the chosen fabrics. “I also love to manipulate fabrics for landscape quilts,” says Cynthia. She’ll start by sewing several different strips of fabric together to create the main tree and then scrunch it together to give the impression of bark; this is then pinned and stitched to the background. Once she’s sure that everything is in place, she stitches the trunk down. This is done either by ‘catching’ the fabric in certain spots, or stitching by machine. A lot will depend on the look she wants to give her tree! The leaves can be pieces of fabric stitched together to give an impression of leaves, but, she has been known to sit quietly for hours cutting out individual leaves!

Homage to Klimt machine quilted by Kara Zupko. Photos courtesy of Cynthia and Stuart McNair. A NEEDLE PULLING THREAD

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materials Ram Wools Summer Alpaca, 80% pima cotton, 20% baby alpaca 112.5m/50g XS S M L 5 5 5 6 needles 3.25mm straight pair and 3mm 40cm circular, cable needle, stitch holder. tension 25 sts and 35 rows = 10cm over stocking stitch. finished measurements (Allow for stretch) XS S M L Bust 32" 34.5" 37" 39.75" 81.5cm 87.5cm 94cm 101cm Waist 25" 27.5" 30" 32.5" 63.5cm 70cm 76cm 82.5cm Length 20" 20.5" 21" 22" 51cm 52cm 53.5cm 56cm abbbreviations K = knit P = purl sl1, K1, psso = slip one stitch without working, knit one stitch, pass slipped stitch over knit stitch K2tog = knit two stitches together M1 = make one stitch by lifting the strand between stitches from the row below and then knit through the back. pattern stitches LACEY RIB STITCH Row 1: *P2, yo, K2tog,* end with P2 Row 2: *K2, P2,* end with K2 Row 3: *P2, ssk, yo,* end with P2 Row 4: As row 3. Repeat these 4 rows for pattern CABLE PANEL PATTERN Row 1 and all wrong side rows: P to first marker, slip marker, K2, P6, K2, slip marker, P to next marker, slip marker, K2, P6, K2, slip marker, P to end. Row 2: K to first marker, slip marker, P2, slip 2 to cable needle, hold in front of work, K2, K2 from cable needle, K2, P2, slip marker, K to next marker, P2, K2, slip 2 to cable needle, hold to back, K2 from cable needle, K2, K2 from cable needle, P2, K2 end. Row 4 and 8: K to marker, slip marker, P2, K6, P2, slip marker, K to next marker, slip marker, P2, K6, P2, slip marker, K to end. Row 6: K to first marker, slip marker, P2, K2, slip 2 to cable needle, hold to back, K2 from cable needle, K2, K2 from cable needle., slip marker, K to next marker, P2, slip 2 to cable needle, hold in front of work, K2, K2 from cable needle, K2, P2, K to end.

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â—?

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fitted top with cables

Lori Franco

A NEEDLE PULLING THREAD

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knitting

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Instructions shown are for size XS (S) (M) (L). When only one instruction appears, it applies to all sizes. LOWER FRONT Cast on 90 (98) (106) (114) sts. First row (wrong side): *K2, P2*, end with K2. Work 20 rows in Lacey Rib Stitch Next Row, establish Cable Panels as follows K18 (20) (22) (24), place marker, P2, K6, P2, place marker, K34 (38) (42) (46), place marker, P2, K6, P2, place marker, K18 (20) (22) (24). Work following Cable Panel Pattern, AT THE SAME TIME making decreases on 8th row once, then on following 10th rows twice, as described below: K to within 2 sts of first marker, sl1, K1, psso, work across 10 sts of cable panel, slip marker, K2tog, K to within 2 sts of next marker, , sl1, K 1, psso, work across 10 sts of cable panel, slip marker, K2tog, K to end. 78 (86) (94) (102) sts remain. Note: For those that require extra length, a few extra rows can be worked before the first increase row. A few more rows can be worked at the shoulders to balance out the extra length. Make increases on following 8th row once, and following 10th rows, twice as given below: K to within 1 st of first marker, M1, K 1, slip marker, work 10 sts of cable panel, slip marker, K1, M1, K to within 1 st of next marker, M1, K 1, slip marker, work across 10 sts of cable panel, slip marker, M1, K to end. 90 (98) (106) (114) sts. Work 7 rows in Cable Panel Pattern without shaping. Work next 6 rows as follows: Row 1 (right side): Purl Row 2: Knit Row 3: *P2, K2,* end with P2 Row 4: *K2, P2,* end with K2 Row 5: Purl Row 6: Knit UPPER FRONT BODICE Work 4 rows in stocking stitch. Establish bust shaping as follows: K28 (30) (32) (34) M1, place marker, K1, M1, K32 (36) (40) (44), M1, place marker, K1, M1, K28 (30) (32) (34). 94 (102) (110) (118) Increase on each side of marked stitch in this manner on following 4th (4th) (4th) (6th) rows 3 (4) (4) (4) times more. 106 (118) (126) (134) sts, ending on an increase row. Work 3 (3) (3) (5) rows without shaping. Decrease on each side of marked stitch on next row and following 4th rows 2 times, as follows: K to within 2 sts of marker, sl1, K1, psso, slip marker, K1, K2tog, K to within 2 sts of second marker, sl1, K1, psso, slip marker, K1, K2tog, K to end. 98 (110) (118) (126) sts, ending on a decrease row. Work 3 rows without shaping.

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Shape neckline K28 (31) (33) (35), sl 1, K1, psso, slip marker, K1, K2tog, K6 (8) (10) (12). Place the last 37 (42) (46) (50) sts worked on a holder. Cast off 20 (22) (22) (22) centre stitches. K6 (8) (10) (12), sl 1, K1, psso, slip marker, K1, K2tog, K28 (31) (33) (35). Working the remaining 37 (42) (46) (50) sts only, decrease 1 st at neck edge on next 5 rows AT THE SAME TIME, make a decrease on either side of marked stitch on following 4th row once more. 30 (35) (39) (43) sts. Work these remaining stitches without further shaping for 9 (9.5) (10) (11) inches [23 (24), (25.5), (28) cm] from the first row of upper bodice. (Length can be adjusted at this point.) Shape shoulders Cast off 6 (7) (8) (9) sts from shoulder edge on alternate rows 4 times. Cast off remaining 6 (7) (7) (7) sts on following alternate row. Work 37 (42) (46) (50) sts remaining on holder in the same manner, reversing neckline, bust and shoulder shaping. LOWER BACK Work as given for Lower Front up to Upper Front Bodice. UPPER BACK BODICE Work remaining 90 (98) (106) (114) sts in stocking stitch for 9 (9.5) (10) (11) inches [23 (24), (25.5), (28) cm], ending on a wrong side row. K35 (40) (44) (48) sts. Place last 35 (40) (44) (48) sts worked on a holder. Cast off centre 20 (18) (18) (18) sts. Work remaining 35 (40) (44) (48) sts as follows: Dec 1 st at neck edge on every row, 5 times. AT THE SAME TIME cast off 6 (7) (8) (9) sts from shoulder edge on alternate rows 4 times. Cast off remaining 6 (7) (7) (7) sts on following alternate row. NECK BAND Sew shoulder seams. Beginning at left side shoulder seam and right side facing, using circular needles, pick up and K 40 (44) (46) (46) evenly down left neck edge, to front cast off edge, 20 (22) (22) (22) from cast off edge, 40 (44) (46) (46) along right front neck edge to right shoulder seam. Pick up and K1 from shoulder seam, 7 to back cast off edge, 20 (18) (18) (18) from cast off edge and 7 to left shoulder seam. Pick up and K1 from shoulder seam and join into round. 136 (144) (148) (148). Number of stitches can be adjusted if length was added at the shoulder. Knit one round, Purl one round. Cast off knitwise. ARMHOLE BANDS Measure 3” [7.5cm] up from first row of upper bodice along side edges of both front and back pieces and place a marker. Sew side seams from cast on edge to markers. Beginning at top of side seam, with right side facing, using circular needles, pick up and K 36 (40) (44) (48) sts along armhole edge to shoulder seam. Repeat from shoulder seam to side seam on opposite edge. 72 (80) (88) (96) Number of stitches can be adjusted if length was added at the shoulder. Knit one round, Purl one round, cast off knitwise. Sew in ends. 


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Summer Lace

a

s a child, I was fascinated by the sight of my mother knitting and begged her to teach me. By the time I was seven, I had ‘mastered’ garter stitch - meaning there were hardly any wavy edges on my dolls’ scarves from accidental increases and decreases or holes from dropped stitches. So, I moved onto sweaters for my tiny family. Eventually, I learned that gauge is not just a suggestion. Once I learned that important lesson, my dolls wore sweaters that actually fit them.

In my early 20s, I fell in love with a crocheted baby shawl pattern and decided that our soon-to-be baby simply had to have it. The fact that I couldn’t crochet was no deterrent. I would teach myself. I soon learned this was easier said than done! My natural awkwardness at learning a new skill was compounded by the fact that I chose to learn with bedspread weight cotton and a small steel hook. The stitches were small and hard to see and the hook and fine thread were difficult to manipulate. I spent many frustrating summer days on our apartment balcony learning to crochet, complicated by the ball of cotton occasionally bouncing through the railings and onto other balconies. My husband made several new friends in the building chasing that elusive ball of cotton for me! However, I persevered and eventually became confident enough to buy the yarn for the shawl and complete it before our son was born. I was amazed at how much easier it was to crochet with a larger hook and thicker yarn - a lesson my students today are probably very glad I learned! I tried out other needle arts over the years - cross stitch, needlepoint, macramé, sewing, rug hooking - but knitting and crocheting are still my favourites. It’s, perhaps, natural that after I left my career in the business world I turned more and more to my favourite hobbies. Then, I had of a brilliant idea - why not make some money using my skills? Thus, my career as a craftsperson was born. I quickly learned two things. One, that I get bored making the same item over and over again (try crocheting and starching 250 snowflakes in a week and you may see why!) and, two local craft fairs in my area were not the best venues for selling labourintensive items. There ended my career as a craftsperson. About this time, I was thumbing through a crochet magazine when I saw an invitation to designers to send for the editorial guidelines. This sounded like an interesting career opportunity so I decided to give designing a try. I’ve since learned that many designers have formal training in art or fashion design. If I’d known that at the time I might not have been bold enough to send for the guidelines.

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I sold my very first design, a starched pineapple angel, two months later. Encouraged by this early success, I submitted several more items to various crochet magazines and was able to sell most of them also. I kept thinking I would run out of ideas but that hasn’t happened yet, thank goodness. Inspiration can strike at any time though so I carry a notebook and pencil with me always and jot down or quick-sketch ideas when they come to me. I design items for all skill levels from beginner to advanced, in thread and yarn, knit and crochet, Tunisian crochet, broomstick lace - you name it and I’ll give it a shot. I’ve designed doll clothes, baby layettes, afghans and home décor items. My favourite designs are wearables for children and adults. My garments are more classic than trendy and I enjoy playing with textures, patterns and colours. Fortunately for me and my short attention span, there really is no typical day in designing. A day could involve working up samples for photography, trying out new yarns from various companies, sketching design ideas for future presentations, writing patterns or articles for publication, preparing lessons for future classes or researching fashion and colour trends. I’m also planning a website where my published work can be viewed, but I tend to be impatient with anything that takes away from my designing time so this is a back burner item. I don’t currently sell designs or patterns directly to the public but this may be a future possibility, especially if that website ever gets set up! Most of my design samples are given to charities such as seniors’ residences and shelters for abused women or the homeless, but I occasionally give them to family members or friends who request a particular item. I’ve kept a few of my personal favourites. I’ve taught knitting and crochet classes and seminars for several years at local yarn shops, at night school and at the Creative Sewing and Needlework Festival. I’m also a member of the Toronto Hookups Chapter of the Crochet Guild of America (CGOA) and a professional member of CGOA. These activities provide great opportunities to connect with supportive people who are interested in the same things I am and to learn from others - after all, designing is a very solitary business. I’ve been a freelance designer of crochet and knitting patterns for 10 years now and I still get a thrill out of opening a book or magazine and seeing how my design looks professionally photographed. Every day I’m grateful to be self-employed and able to work from my home at something I love to do. z


Laura Gebhardt

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crochet

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instructions skill level  intermediate finished measurements Bust - X-Small – 32” [81cm]; Small – 36” [91cm]; Medium – 40” [101.5cm]; Large – 44” [112cm]. Instructions are given for smallest size with larger sizes following in parentheses ( ). One number or set of instructions shown applies to all sizes. materials Bernat Cool Crochet (70% cotton/30% nylon; 1 ¾ oz/50g, 200 yd/182m per ball) #74008 Summer Cream (A) – 3 (3, 4, 4) balls #74009 Neapolitan Shades (B) – 1 (2, 2, 3) balls Crochet hooks: 3.75mm and 3.50mm Tapestry needle tension 24 sts and 19 rows = 4” [20cm] over bodice patt abbreviations hk: hook ch: chain sl st: slip stitch sc: single crochet beg: beginning lp: loop patt: pattern rem: remaining (remainder) sk: skip yo: yarn over rd(s): round(s) RS: right side WS: wrong side sc2tog: single crochet 2 together esc: extended single crochet (see Special Stitches) psc: picot single crochet (see Special Stitches) sh: shell (see Special Stitches) special stitches Extended single crochet (esc): Insert hk in indicated st, yo and draw up a loop, yo, draw through one lp on hk, yo and draw through 2 lps on hk. Picot single crochet (psc): Sc in indicated st, ch 3, sl st in top of sc just made. Shell (sh): (Sc, ch 3, 3 dc) all in same st or sp. BODICE BACK Row 1: (RS) With larger hk and A, ch 99 (111, 123, 135), esc in 5th ch from hk (4 sk ch count as esc, ch 1 and sk ch sp), *ch 1, sk next ch, esc in next ch, rep from * across. 97 (109, 121, 133) sts. Row 2: Ch 3, turn ( counts as esc, ch 1); esc in next esc, *ch 1, sk next ch-1 sp, esc in next esc, rep from * across. Rows 3 to 26 (28, 30, 32): Rep Row 2. Shape Armholes (right side) Row 27 (29, 31, 33): Sl st in 1st 8 (10, 12, 12) sts, ch 1, patt across to last 8 (10, 12, 12) sts; turn, leaving rem unworked. 81 (89, 97, 109) sts.

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Row 28 (30, 32, 34): Ch 3, turn, patt across. Row 29 (31, 33, 35): Ch 1, turn; esc in next esc, patt to last esc, leave rem ch 3 unworked. 77 (85, 93, 105) sts. Row 30 (32, 34, 36): Ch 3, turn, patt across. Rep last 2 rows 0 (1, 1, 2) times more, then continue even in patt on rem 77 (81, 89, 97) sts until armhole measures 7” (8”, 8”, 9”) [18cm (20cm, 20cm, 23cm)] from beg of shaping, ending with RS row. Fasten off. BODICE FRONT Work as given for back until armhole shaping is complete, ending with WS row. Shape Left Shoulder Row 31 (35, 37, 41) (right side): Patt across 21 (23, 25, 29) sts. Row 32 (36, 38, 42): Ch 3, turn, patt across. Row 33 (37, 39, 43): Patt across 19 (21, 23, 27) sts. Rep last 2 rows once, working in patt across 17 (19, 21, 25) sts on last row, then continue even in patt until armhole depth is same as back. Fasten off. Right Shoulder Row 31 (35, 37, 41): Skip next 35 (35, 39, 39) sts and rejoin yarn in next esc. Ch 3, patt across to end. 21 (23, 25, 29) sts. Row 32 (36, 38, 42): Patt across. Row 33 (37, 39, 43): Ch 1. Turn. Esc in next esc, patt to end. 19 (21, 23, 27) sts. Rep last 2 rows once, then work even in patt on rem 17 (19, 21, 25) sts until Right Shoulder matches Left. Fasten off. SLEEVES With larger hk and A, ch 83 (91, 95, 99) and work in patt as given for back on 81 (89, 93, 97) sts until 8 rows are completed. Shape Cap Row 9: Sl st in 1st 8 (10, 12, 12) sts. Ch 1, patt to last 8 (10, 12, 12) sts. Ch 3, turn, leaving rem unworked. 65 (69, 69, 73) sts. Row 10: Ch 3, patt across. Row 11: Ch 1, turn; esc in next esc, ch 1, patt to last esc, leaving beg ch 3 of previous row unworked. 61 (65, 65, 69) sts. Row 12: Ch 3, turn; patt across. Rows 13 & 14: Rep Rows 11 and 12. 57 (61, 61, 65) sts. Rows 15 - 16: Work even in patt. Rows 17 - 22: Rep Rows 11 & 12. 45 (49, 49, 53) sts. For Extra Small only Rows 23 - 26: Rep Rows 11 and 12. 37 sts. Rows 27 - 30: Ch 1, turn; esc in next esc, ch 1, patt to 2nd last esc, leave next esc unworked. (21 sts) Fasten off at end of Row 30. For Small and Medium Sizes only Rows 23 & 24: Work even in patt. Rows 25 - 30: Rep Rows 11 and 12. 37 (37) sts. Rows 31 - 33: Ch 1, turn; esc in next esc, ch 1, patt to 2nd last esc, leave next esc unworked. 25 (25) sts. Fasten off at end of Row 33.


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For Large Size only Rows 23 & 24: Work even in patt. Rows 25 - 34: Rep Rows 11 and 12. (33 sts) Rows 35 & 36: Ch 1, turn; esc in next esc, ch 1, patt to 2nd last esc, leave next esc unworked. Row 37: Patt across and fasten off. Assembly Sew front to back at shoulders. Sew sleeves in place at armholes having centre of sleeve at shoulder seam. Sew sleeve and side seams. Neck Edging Rd 1: With RS facing and smaller hk and A, join in 1st free st after right shoulder seam, ch 1, sc evenly around neck edge having an even number of stitches and join with sl st to 1st sc made. Fasten off. Rd 2: Join B in same sc, ch 1, sc in same st, *psc in next sc, sc in next sc, rep from * around working sc2tog in each back and front neck corner. Fasten off and darn in ends. Hem Border With larger hk, join B in free lp of beg ch after side seam. Row 1: Ch 1, sh in same lp, *sk next 3 lps, sh in next lp, rep from * around and join with sl st to 1st sc made. 48 (54, 60, 66) sh. Rds 2 – 11 (13, 15): Turn; sl st in next 3 dc and in ch-3 sp., ch 1, sh in each ch-3 sp around and join with sl st to 1st sc made. Fasten off at end of last rd and darn in ends. Sleeve Borders Rep Rds 1 – 5 (5, 7, 7) of Hem Border.  Laura Gebhardt lauracrochet@yahoo.ca

Laura’s TIPS

This top can easily be lengthened by working several more inches of the bodice pattern before shaping the armholes.

Leave long tails at the beginning and end of your work and use the tails for seaming. It cuts down on the number of ends to darn in. After making the turning chain, turn your work counter-clockwise (or left to right); it lines the chain stitches up so you can work into them more easily. Each decrease for shaping is actually a double decrease (1 ch plus 1 esc.) Therefore 4 stitches are decreased on each decrease row (2 at each end). Stitch counts are given after decrease rows to eliminate confusion.

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Three Sheep S

heep are the natural subject for hooked mats made with wool. This little design is more playful than realistic because the wooly part of the sheep is outlined in bright colours. The faces are hooked simply in solid black. The landscape is a mixture of soft medium to light greens highlighted with the same colours I used to outline the sheep. When you hook the landscape, hook it in organic lines rather than straight lines because this will make the land look more natural. Add a few bits of light blue or any floral colour with greens.

rug hooking 32

This will give depth and interest to the land underneath the sheep. The sky is accented in this rug with a few curlicues which repeats the curly theme of the sheep. The biggest mistake people make when they begin hooking rugs in a primitive style is to try to make everything perfect. Primitive rug hooking uses many types and styles of wool materials, even some silks. When I hook I use many different weights and widths of wool strips. If I tried to get every loop perfectly even I would only frustrate myself.

Deanne Fitzpatrick

A NEEDLE PULLING THREAD

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Instead, I take a freestyle approach to making mats, and try to let the materials speak for themselves. Each wool acts in a different way, and if you let it do its thing, the wool itself can be very expressive and add a lot to your rug. Hooking rugs is a simple craft that you can easily teach yourself. It is an environmentally friendly craft that recycles old clothing and cloth scraps. It requires no energy sources but your own hands, and is a beautiful meditative craft that you can do as the world goes on around you.  z

Inspired Rug-Hooking: Turning Atlantic Canadian Life into Art By Deanne Fitzpatrick $22.95 paperback, 144 pages, 978-155109-780-0 Publication date: September 21, 2010


4”

Enlarge to approximately 200%

Three Sheep 8 “x 24”

Deanne Fitzpatrick Rug Hooking Studio 33 Church Street Amherst, Nova Scotia B4H 3A7 1.800.328.7756 www.hookingrugs.com A NEEDLE PULLING THREAD

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instructions skill level easy

finished size 8" x 24" [20 x 61cm]

materials fabric 12" x 28" [31 x 71cm] burlap or linen backing wools One piece measuring 3" x 9" [7.5 x 23cm] for each colour: black, cream, white, red, mauve, navy, royal blue, sky blue (1 each of light and medium blue), greens (various greens totalling 1 yard for fields). Scraps of: rust, gold, yellow, purple and dark green to add accents to fields. incidentals medium size hook scissor large quilting or hooking rug basic instructions for hooking a rug 1. Copy the pattern and transfer the design to burlap or linen. 2. Place the burlap onto an embroidery frame or quilting hoop. It should lie flat and be tight like a drum. As you hook, keep your burlap tight on your frame as this makes the hooking quite a bit easier. 3. The wool should be clean and ready to use. Cut it into any width from ¼" [6mm] to ½" [12mm] strips. Tip: A simple method for cutting wool is to take an 8" x 4" [20 x 10cm] rectangle of wool cloth, fold it accordion-style and cut it into strips. This saves a lot of time and works best with 5½" scissors as they have a shorter blade. 4. Take a strip of wool and hold it underneath the burlap. Hold your hook in your hand as you would a pencil. Put the hook through a hole in the burlap, wrap the wool around the hook on the underside of the burlap and pull the end of the wool up through the hole. Continue doing this with the same strip of wool, pulling it up loop-byloop to the top side of your pattern. See Photos 1 and 3.

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5. It is a good idea to start by outlining something near the centre of your pattern. Continue to hook in every second or third hole, depending on the width and thickness of your wool. See Photo 2. 6. When the strip is used up, pull the end of the strip to the top side of your pattern and clip the end so that it is an even height with your loops. Your loops should be ¼" [6mm] to 1⁄3" [9mm] in height. 7. You can hook in straight or curved lines. Never cross the paths of your wool on the back of the fabric. Always clip the wool and start in a new place, rather than carrying a colour across the back of your mat, because this will make your rug bulky, messy and easy to pull out. 8. Continue to hook by outlining and filling in all the areas of your rug. Do not hook too tightly or your mat will not lie flat. It is the packing of the loops together that keeps the loops from falling out, but if you pack it too tightly your rug will curl up. finishing the rug 1. There are many ways of finishing the edges of a rug: • black cotton twill tape can be sewn by hand around the outside edges of the rug. Hook right up to the twill tape or sew it on after the rug is hooked. When the rug is complete roll 2" [5cm] of the excess burlap into the twill tape and hand sew it along the backside of your rug. • If the rug is going on the wall you can fold the excess burlap along the backside of the rug and sew it up. 2. Pressing the rug with a hot iron and a wet cloth is recommended. This is called “blocking” the rug and it helps give the rug a finished patina and even-out the loops.

3. When hooking try not to hook from left to right instead cover many parts of the rug’s area in case you should run short of wool. If this happens more wool of a slightly different colour can be added to complete the rug. It may even enhance the primitive quality of the design. 4. Hooking rugs is meant to be a pleasant pastime. To avoid getting sore shoulders or hands take lots of breaks and make sure you are sitting in a comfortable position and that your body is relaxed. If you are comfortable, relaxed, and have support for your back, the hooking will go along much more easily.  

1

2

3

Instruction photographs courtesy of Deanne Fitzpatrick. A NEEDLE PULLING THREAD

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hooked on books

Appliqué & Embroidery Fundamentals By Janice Vaine

If you love the beauty of personalized embroidery, hand appliqué and artful embellishments, Janice Vaine’s new book, Appliqué & Embroidery Fundamentals is for you. Eighteen basic embroidery stitches and embellishing techniques with step-by-step instructions and large illustrations allow you to create as you wish. Or choose to begin with one of the small projects provided. More than 300 full-color photos provide inspiration and guidance. A ‘must have’ for every stitcher’s library. Complete alphabet and full block pattern. Project inspirations. 128 pages, ISBN 978-1-935726-18-0 www.landauercorp.com

Rug Hooker’s Companion

Tunisian Crochet Encore New stitches, new techniques, new patterns by Sheryl Thies

Sheryl is back with more of her beautiful Tunisian crochet designs which so many crocheters – and knitters – have been waiting for! • Get excellent value with 16 all-new patterns for women’s garments and accessories • Learn the basics, which any confident beginner can master, plus in-depth techniques such as double-ended Tunisian crochet, short-row shaping using Tunisian crochet and mitred Tunisian crochet • Discover a wide range of stylish projects that don’t require fitting 80 pages, ISBN 978-1-60468-225-0 www.martingale-pub.com

By Donna Hrkman

Finally – a handy, easy-to-use book with the answers to all your rug hooking questions! What type of wool should I use? How much wool do I need? Can I use wool yarn? How do I transfer my design to the backing? How do I start dyeing? How do I steam my piece and groom my rug? How do I finish my rug or hand my piece? Full of tidbits of information for beginning rug hookers and experienced hookers alike, this small book is what the rug hooking world has been waiting for! Drop it in your bag to have on hand whenever and wherever you need it. 122 pages, ISBN 978-1-881982-83-8 www.rughookingmagazine.com

Quilting Sashings & Settings the basics and beyond

Needleturn Appliqué

Prepared to DYE

by Angela Lawrence

by Gene Shepherd

Along with tips on manipulating color, value and the scale of fabric pattern, Jean Ann teaches the little ‘tricks’ she uses to make a unique quilt with simple techniques. Her motto? “Simplicity always works.”

This book is about everything needed to create beautiful needleturn appliqué projects, from preparing the appliqué shapes and transferring the projects to learning the appliqué stitch. Large, clear photos ‘walk’ you step-by-step through techniques such as stitching perfect points, curves, and deep ‘V’ points.

by Jean Ann Wright

Contents include: Basic Sashings, Block-to-Block Settings, Diagonal Settings, Strippy Settings, Medallion Settings, Circle of Nine Settings. 22 successful projects, complete instructions, full color photos and illustrations, mix and match sashing and setting inspiration. 144 pages, ISBN 13-978-1-935726-16-6 www.landauercorp.com

The basics & beyond

Dyeing Techniques for Fiber Artists

Learn 6 key elements for selecting fabric and explore design inspirations. 9 appliqué projects several with color options will inspire you to practice and perfect each of the techniques taught. 96 pages, ISBN 13-978-1-935726-17-3 www.landauercorp.com

The ultimate dyeing handbook for fiber artists! You’ll learn many different ways you can use commercial acid dye to produce fantastic effects in fiber of all kinds for hooking, prodding, punchneedle, appliqué, knitting, crochet, and more. You’ll also learn to bleed, marbleize and marry found wool to produce gorgeous colors and patterns without any added dyes. Included are instructions for preparing different kinds of fiber for dyeing, information on setting up and furnishing your dye space, and hundreds of useful tips from a master dyer. With step-by-step demonstrations of 19 different dyeing methods in many variations, this book is bound to have the perfect process to get the results you want. 186 pages, ISBN 978-1-881982-92-0 www.rughookingmagazine.com

A NEEDLE PULLING THREAD

free sample issue

35


“I would sit beside her quietly while she stitched and I remember thinking that I had never seen her look more happy and serene.”

I

Springtime Friends

ran a successful needlework business for four years. The reason I opened a needlework shop was because I loved cross stitch. The irony is that after I opened the business, I no longer had time to stitch. I didn’t pick up a needle once during those four years. Burnt out after working 16 to18 hour days, my health took a negative turn. After a short stay in the hospital, I realized something needed to change. I closed the business and picked up my needle once again. There is no needlework shop where I live and I had ideas of my own, so Moonlight Inspirations was born a little over one year ago. I have never looked back. I have been blessed with the best husband and children a woman could ever hope to have. Brant helps me with the model framing, packaging, shipping and my children Jarrod and Jade love evaluating designs and giving their input. Jade, age five, is already creating her own original designs. Jade does not want to pursue a career in cross stitch designing however. Her dream is to become a “rock star”. My first exposure to any form of needlework came when I was four. My mother was working on a needlepoint piece which featured a lone deer in the woods. I would sit beside her quietly while she stitched and I remember thinking that I had never seen her look more happy and serene. Needlepoint must be magical! I vowed that one day I would sit with my needle in hand and experience that magic for myself. When I was 19, I worked for a security company doing alarm monitoring. During the day shift, the supervisor used to sit and stitch. I had never seen anything like it. It certainly wasn’t the needlepoint I had seen before. The fabric was blank. I would watch her create these pictures out of nothing and it amazed me. One day I asked her what it was and she explained to me that it was called counted cross stitch.

36

A NEEDLE PULLING THREAD

free sample issue

Within a week I had purchased a little Christmas ornament counted cross stitch kit that came with its own cute little frame. It sat for another couple of weeks before I had the courage to open it up and begin the preparations. That was the beginning of what was to become an enduring passion. My designs lean mostly towards colourful, whimsical country/primitive. I enjoy designs that bring a smile to people’s faces. I enjoy using bright colours which really pop out at you. Sometimes I like combining elements that, at first glance, seem unsuited to each other. Why are there pineapples sitting on the grass beside the tree? I don’t know. One day I opened the design I was working on and there they were, clear as day. They know why they are there and that is good enough for me. Embellishments are often used in my designs. I really like the feel and texture of buttons, charms and beads. They add a third dimension. When I use embellishments in a design, I include them in the chart pack as a convenience to stitchers. Until now, I have designed mostly framed pieces. In the future, I will be releasing some pillows, bookmarks, ornaments, table runners, towels, placemats and sachets. I am also working on some baby sets which consist of a matching afghan, sipper cup, bib, hooded towel, booties, hat and birth announcement. I have no formal art training but drew cartoon characters before I hit my early teens. I am really learning as I go. When inspiration comes knocking, I am quick to fling the door wide open and most often, I am surprised at what is on the other side. I hope stitchers are enjoying my designs as much as I’m enjoying the journey in designing them. z


Janet Morningstar

A NEEDLE PULLING THREAD

â—?

cross stitch free sample issue

37


instructions measurements 8” x 11.5” [20.3 x 29.2cm] 112 x 163 stitches

Threads

materials Fabric: 28 ct. Blueberry Marbled, Hand Dyed Jobelan Use 2 strands of floss for all cross stitches and one strand for the backstitching and straight stitching. Stitch over 2 fabric threads for 28ct fabric. Stitch over 1 fabric thread for 14ct fabric. Note: We recommend the use of 28 ct. fabric because of the three-quarter stitches. backstitching DMC 3371 (Black Brown) for the cat’s eyebrows and around entire cat. DMC 310 (Black) is used for all other backstitching and straight stitching. French knots for the top bird’s eye in DMC 951 and the bottom bird’s eye in DMC 310. Placement for the dragonfly button is indicated by the X on the left side of the pattern and for the butterfly button is indicated by the X on the lower right side of the pattern. Note: You can use any colour you wish to secure the buttons. Some people prefer to use colourless thread. We used DMC 3750 to secure the dragonfly button and DMC 422 to secure the butterfly button. finishing TIPS Jobelan is a very soft fabric and quite often, no ironing is needed before framing provided you have not left any hoop marks on the fabric. If you need to iron your finished piece, use a gentle setting and no steam. Iron before attaching the buttons or, if the buttons have already been attached, avoid touching the iron to them as they are plastic. 

Back Str DMC # Anchor Anchor # XBack X Str DMC ID ID X Back Str DMC ID Anchor ID X Back Str DMC ID Anchor ID X Back Str DMC ID Anchor ID X Back Str DMC ID Anchor ID X Back Str DMC ID Anchor ID X Back Str DMC ID Anchor ID † X Back Str DMC ID Anchor ID † DMC 3350 59 3350 59 X Back Str ID Anchor ID † DMC 3350 59 X Back DMC ID Anchor † DMC 3350 59 X Back Str ID Anchor ID 3350 59 X Back Str DMC ID Anchor ID † † DMC 3350 59 X Back StrStr ID Anchor IDID † 3350 59 X Back Str DMC ID Anchor ID † 3350 59 X Back Str DMC ID Anchor ID \ DMC 3350 59 X Back Str ID Anchor ID \ † † 150 65 150 65 3350 59 X Back Str DMC ID Anchor ID \ † DMC 3350 59 X Back Str ID Anchor ID \ † 150 65 3350 59 X Str DMC ID Anchor ID 150 65 3350 59 X Back Str DMC ID Anchor ID DMC 150 65 \ † \Back † X Back Str DMC ID Anchor ID 150 65 3350 59 X Back Str DMC ID Anchor ID \ † 150 65 3350 59 \ † 150 65 3350 59 X Back Str DMC ID Anchor ID g 150 65 3350 59 X Back Str DMC ID Anchor ID g \ † \ DMC 3740 872 † 3740 872 150 65 3350 59 X Back Str ID Anchor ID g \ † 150 65 3350 59 X Back Str DMC ID Anchor ID g \ † 3740 872 150 65 DMC 3350 59 X Back Str ID Anchor ID 3740 872 † 150 65 3350 59 X XBack Back BackStr Str Str DMC DMC DMC ID ID 3740 Anchor Anchor ID g \ † g \ 3350 59 X ID Anchor ID 3740 872 150 65 DMC 3350 59 X Back Str ID Anchor IDID g \ 3740 872 † DMC 872 150 65 g \ † X Back Str DMC ID Anchor ID 3740 872 150 65 3350 59 a Back Str DMC ID Anchor ID 3740 872 150 65 3350 59 a gX \ † g 597 168 \ † X Back Str ID Anchor ID 597 168 3740 872 150 65 DMC 3350 59 a X X X Back Back Back Str Str Str DMC DMC DMC ID ID ID Anchor Anchor Anchor ID IDID g \ 3740 872 † 150 65 3350 59 a g \ † † 597 168 3740 872 150 65 3350 59 X Back Str DMC ID Anchor ID 597 168 \ 3740 872 † 150 65 DMC 3350 3350 59 59 a X Back Str DMC ID Anchor ID g \ † a g 150 65 3350 59 X Back Str DMC ID Anchor ID 597 168 3740 872 † 150 65 3350 59 a X Back Str DMC ID Anchor ID g 597 168 \ 3740 872 † a g \ DMC 3350 59 597 168 3740 872 150 65 w 3350 59 X Back Str ID Anchor ID 597 168 3740 872 † 150 65 w DMC 597 168 a X Back Str DMC ID Anchor ID g \ † † † a 502 877 g \ DMC 3350 59 X Back Str ID 502 Anchor 877 597 168 3740 872 150 65 w DMC DMC 3350 3350 3350 59 59 59 ID a X Back DMC ID Anchor g 597 168 \ 3740 872 † 150 65 w a g \ \ † 502 877 597 168 3740 872 150 65 DMC 3350 59 X Back StrStr ID 502 Anchor 877 IDID g 597 168 \ 3740 872 † DMC 150 150 65 65 w 3350 59 a X Back Str DMC ID Anchor ID g \ † w a 3740 872 150 65 3350 59 X Back Str DMC ID 502 877 Anchor ID 597 168 \ 3740 872 150 65 w DMC 3350 59 a X Back Str ID 502 877 Anchor ID g 597 168 \ † w a g † 150 65 502 877 597 168 3740 872 4 150 65 3350 59 X Back Str DMC ID 502 Anchor 877 ID 597 168 \ 3740 872 4 † w DMC 3350 59 a X Back Str ID Anchor ID g \ \ \ † w 472 253 a g 150 65 3350 472 59 253 X Back Str DMC ID 502 877 Anchor ID 597 168 3740 872 4 DMC DMC 150 150 150 65 65 65 w 3350 59 a X Back Str ID 502 877 Anchor ID DMC 502 877 g 597 168 \ DMC 3740 872 4 † w a g g \ † 472 253 502 877 597 168 3740 872 150 65 3350 472 59 253 a X Back Str DMC ID 502 Anchor 877 ID g 597 168 \ DMC 3740 3740 872 872 4 † 150 65 w 3350 59 a X Back Str DMC ID Anchor ID g \ 4 † w 597 168 3740 872 150 65 DMC 472 3350 253 59 502 877 g 597 168 3740 872 4 150 65 w DMC 472 3350 253 59 a 502 877 g \ 4 † w a \ DMC 3740 872 † 472 253 502 877 597 168 ð 3740 872 150 65 3350 472 59 253 502 877 g 597 168 ð \ 4 † 150 65 w DMC 3350 59 a g g g \ 4 † 3011 846 w a 3740 872 150 3011 65 846 DMC 472 3350 253 59 502 877 597 168 ð DMC DMC 3740 3740 3740 872 872 872 4 150 65 w DMC 472 3350 253 59 a 502 877 g 597 168 ð \ 4 † w a a g \ † 3011 846 472 253 502 877 597 168 3740 872 150 3011 65 846 w DMC DMC 3350 472 59 253 a 502 877 g DMC 597 597472 168 168 ð \ DMC 253 3740 872 4 150 65 w 3350 59 a g ð \ 4 502 877 597 168 3740 872 DMC 3011 150 846 65 472 253 a 502 877 597 168 ð 3740 872 4 DMC 3011 150 846 65 w 472 253 a g ð \ 4 w g 597 168 \ 3011 846 472 253 502 877 _ 597 168 3740 872 DMC 150 3011 65 846 472 253 a 502 877 _ g ð \ 3740 872 4 DMC 150 65 w a a a g ð \ 830 277 4 w 597 168 3740 830 872 277 DMC 3011 150 846 65 472 253 502 877 _ DMC DMC 597 597 597 168 168 168 ð 3740 872 4 DMC 3011 150 846 65 w 472 253 a 502 877 _ g ð \ 4 w w a g \ 830 277 3011 846 472 253 502 877 DMC 597 168 3740 830 872 277 4 150 3011 65 846 w 472 253 a DMC 502 502 877 877 _ g 597 168 ð 3740 872 4 DMC 150 65 w a _ g ð DMC 472 253 502 877 597 168 830 3740 277 872 3011 846 w 472 253 502 877 _ 597 168 ð DMC 830 3740 277 872 4 DMC 3011 846 3011 846 w a _ g ð 4 a DMC 502 g 830 277 3011 846 472 253 2 502 877 597 168 3740 830 872 277 3011 846 w 472 253 2 a _ g 597 168 ð DMC 3740 872 4 w w a _ g 612 832 ð 4 502 877 597 612 168 832 DMC 830 3740 277 872 3011 846 472 253 2 DMC DMC 502 502 502877 877 877 877 _ 597 168 ð DMC 830 3740 277 872 4 3011 846 w 472 253 2 a _ g ð 4 4w w a g 612 832 830 277 3011 846 472 253 502 877 597 612 168 832 ð DMC 3740 830 872 277 4 3011 846 w DMC DMC 472 472 253 253 2 a 502 877 _ 597 168 ð 3740 872 4 w 2 a _ 3011 846 472 253 502 877 DMC 612 597 832 168 830 277 4 3011 846 472 253 2 502 877 _ DMC 612 597 832 168 ð 830 277 4 w 2 a _ ð w 472 253 a 612 832 830 277 3011 846 7 472 253 502 877 DMC 597 612 168 832 830 277 4 3011 846 7 w 2 a DMC 830 502 877 _ DMC 597 168 ð 4 w 2 a 167 374 _4 ð 472 253 502 167 877 374 612 597 832 168 830 277 DMC 3011 846 7 DMC DMC 472 472 472 253 253 253 277 2 502 877 _ DMC 612 597 832 168 ð 830 277 4 3011 846 7 w 2 a _ ð ð4 4 w a 167 374 612 832 830 277 3011 846 472 253 502 167 877 374 _ DMC 597 612 168 832 ð 830 277 4 DMC 3011 3011 846 846 7 w 472 253 2 502 877 _ DMC 597 168 ð 4 7 w 2 830 277 3011 846 DMC 472 253 167 502 374 877 612 832 ð 830 277 3011 846 7 472 253 2 DMC 167 502 374 877 _ 612 832 ð 4 7 w 2 _ 4 3011 846 w 167 374 612 832 830 277 À DMC 3011 846 DMC 472 253 502 167 877 374 612 832 ð 830 277 À 4 7 w 472 253 2 502 877 _ ð ð 4 7 869 944 2 _ 3011 846 472 869 253 944 DMC 167 502 374 877 612 832 830 277 À DMC DMC 3011 3011 3011 846 846 846 832 7 DMC 472 253 2 167 502 374 877 _w DMC 612 612 832 ð 830 277 À 4 7 w 2 _ _ð ð 4 w 869 944 167 374 612 832 830 277 3011 846 472 869 253 944 2 DMC 502 167 877 374 _ 612 832 ð DMC 830 830 277 277 À 4 3011 846 7 DMC 472 253 2 502 877 _ ð À 4 7 612 832 830 277 3011 846 DMC 869 472 944 253 167 374 _ 612 832 830 277 À 3011 846 7 DMC 869 472 944 253 2 167 374 _ ð À 4 7 2 ð 830 277 4 869 944 167 374 612 832 ( 830 277 3011 846 DMC 472 869 253 944 167 374 _ 612 832 ( ð À 4 3011 846 7 DMC 472 253 2 _ _ _ ð À 4 951 1010 7 2 830 277 3011 951 846 1010 DMC 869 472 944 253 167 374 612 832 ( DMC DMC 830 830 830 277 277 277 374 À 3011 846 7 869 472 944 253 2 167 374 _ DMC 612 832 ( ð À 4 7 2 2 _ ð 4 951 1010 DMC 869 944 167 374 612 832 830 277 3011 951 846 1010 7 472 869 253 944 2 167 374 _ DMC 612 612 832 832 ( ð 830 277 DMC 167 À 3011 846 7 DMC 472 253 2 _ ( ð À 167 374 612 832 830 277 DMC 951 3011 1010 846 869 944 2 167 374 612 832 ( 830 277 À DMC 951 3011 1010 846 7 869 944 2 _ ( ð À 7 _ 612 832 ð 951 1010 869 944 167 374 5 DMC 612 832 830 277 DMC 3011 951 846 1010 869 944 2 167 374 5 _ ( ð 830 277 À 3011 846 7 2 2 2 _ ( ð 3772 1007 À 7 612 832 830 3772 277 1007 DMC 951 3011 1010 846 869 944 167 374 5 DMC DMC 612 612 612 832 832 832 ( 830 277 À DMC 951 3011 1010 846 7 869 944 2 167 374 5 _ ( ð À 7 7 2 _ ð 3772 1007 951 1010 869 944 167 374 612 832 830 3772 277 1007 À DMC 3011 951 846 1010 7 869 944 2 DMC 167 167869 374 374 5 _ 612 832 ( 830 277 À DMC 3011 846 7 2 5 _ ( 869 944 167 374 612 832 DMC 3772 830 1007 277 951 1010 7 869 944 167 374 5 612 832 ( DMC 3772 830 1007 277 À 951 1010 7 DMC 944 2 5 _ ( À 2 167 374 _ 3772 1007 951 1010 869 944 S 167 374 612 832 DMC 830 3772 277 1007 951 1010 7 869 944 S 2 5 _ 612 832 ( DMC 830 277 À 7 7 7 2 5 _ 3371 382 ( À 167 374 612 3371 832 382 DMC 3772 830 1007 951 1010 869 944 S DMC DMC 167 167 167277 374 374 374 5 612 832 ( DMC 3772 830 1007 277 À 951 1010 7 869 944 S 2 5 _ ( À À 7 2 _ 3371 382 3772 1007 951 1010 DMC 869 944 167 374 612 3371 832 382 ( 830 3772 277 1007 À 951 1010 7 DMC 869 869 944 944 S 2 167 374 5 612 832 ( DMC 830 277 À 7 S 2 5 951 1010 869 944 167 374 DMC 3371 612 382 832 3772 1007 À 951 1010 869 944 S 167 374 5 DMC612 3371 612 382 832 ( 3772 1007 À 7 S 2 5 ( 7 869 944 3371 382 3772 1007 951 1010 # DMC 869 944 167 374 DMC 3371 832 382 3772 1007 À 951 1010 # 7 S 2 DMC 951 167 374 52 612 832 ( À À 7 S 2 3863 1084 5 ( 869 944 167 3863 374 1084 3371 612 382 832 3772 1007 DMC 951 1010 # DMC DMC 869 869 869 944 944 944 1010 S 167 374 5 DMC 3371 612 382 832 ( 3772 1007 À 951 1010 # 7 S 2 5 ( (À À 7 2 3863 1084 3371 382 3772 1007 951 1010 869 944 167 3863 374 1084 5 DMC 612 3371 832 382 ( 3772 1007 À DMC 951 951 1010 1010 # 7 869 944 S 167 374 5 DMC 612 832 ( À # 7 S 3772 1007 951 1010 869 944 DMC 3863 167 1084 374 3371 382 ( 3772 1007 951 1010 # 869 944 S DMC 3863 167 1084 374 5 3371 382 ( À # 7 S 5 À DMC 951 1010 7 3863 1084 3371 382 3772 1007 8 DMC 951 1010 869 944 167 3863 374 1084 3371 382 ( 3772 1007 8 À # 7 869 944 S 167 374 5 ( ( À # 7 3862 903 S 5 951 1010 DMC DMC 869 3862 944 903 3863 167 1084 374 3371 382 3772 1007 8 DMC DMC 951 951 951 1010 1010 1010 1007 # 869 944 S 3863 167 1084 374 5 3371 382 DMC 3772 ( 3772 1007 8 À # 7 S 5 5( ( À 7 3862 903 3863 1084 3371 382 3772 1007 951 1010 DMC DMC 869 3862 944 903 S 167 3863 374 1084 5 3371 382 ( DMC 3772 3772 1007 1007 8 À 951 1010 # 869 944 S 167 374 5 ( 8 À # 3371 382 3772 1007 951 1010 DMC 3862 869 903 944 3863 1084 5 3371 382 3772 1007 8 951 1010 # DMC 3862 869 903 944 S 3863 1084 5 ( 8 À # S ( 3772 1007 À 3862 903 3863 1084 3371 382 O 3772 1007 951 1010 DMC 869 3862 944 903 3863 1084 5 3371 382 O ( 8 À 951 1010 # DMC 869 944 S 5 5 5 ( 8 À 310 403 # S 3772 1007 951 310 1010 403 DMC 3862 869 903 944 3863 1084 3371 382 O DMC DMC 3772 3772 3772 1007 1007 1007 382 8 951 1010 # 3862 869 903 944 S 3863 1084 5 DMC 3371 382 O ( 8 À # S S 5 ( À 310 403 3862 903 3863 1084 3371 382 3772 1007 951 310 1010 403 # DMC 869 3862 944 903 S 3863 1084 5 DMC 3371 3371 382 382 O ( 3772 1007 8 DMC 3371 951 1010 # DMC 869 944 S 5 O ( 8 3863 1084 3371 382 3772 1007 DMC 310 951 403 1010 3862 903 S 3863 1084 3371 382 O 3772 1007 8 DMC 310 951 403 1010 # 3862 903 S 5 O ( 8 # 5 DMC 3371 382 ( 310 403 3862 903 3863 1084 3 3371 382 3772 1007 951 310 1010 403 3862 903 S 3863 1084 3 5 O ( 3772 1007 8 DMC 951 1010 # S S S 5 O ( 501 878 8 # 3371 382 3772 501 1007 878 DMC 310 951 403 1010 3862 903 3863 1084 3 DMC DMC 3371 3371 3371 382 382 382 O 3772 1007 8 DMC 310 951 403 1010 # 3862 903 S 3863 1084 3 5 O ( 8 # # S 5 ( 501 878 310 403 3862 903 3863 1084 3371 382 3772 501 1007 878 8 DMC 951 310 1010 403 # DMC 3862 903 S DMC 3863 3863 1084 1084 3 5 3371 382 O 3772 1007 8 951 1010 # S 3 5 O 3862 903 3863 1084 3371 382 DMC 501 3772 878 1007 310 403 # 3862 903 3863 1084 3 3371 382 O DMC 501 3772 878 1007 8 310 403 # DMC 3863 1084 S 3 5 O 8 S 3863 1084 5 501 878 310 403 3862 903 b 3863 1084 3371 382 DMC 3772 501 1007 878 310 403 # 3862 903 b S 3 5 3371 382 O DMC 3772 1007 8 # # # S 3 5 895 1044 O 8 3863 1084 3371 895 382 1044 DMC 501 3772 878 1007 310 403 3862 903 b DMC DMC 3863 3863 3863 1084 1084 1084 3 3371 382 O DMC 501 3772 878 1007 8 310 403 # 3862 903 b S 3 5 O 8 8 # S 5 895 1044 501 878 310 403 3862 903 3863 1084 3371 895 382 1044 O DMC 3772 501 1007 878 8 310 403 # DMC 3862 3862 903 903 b S 3863 1084 3 3371 382 O DMC 3772 1007 8 # b S 3 310 403 3862 903 3863 1084 DMC 895 3371 1044 382 501 878 8 310 403 3862 903 b 3863 1084 3 DMC3862 895 3371 1044 382 O 501 878 8 # b S 3 O # DMC 903 S 895 1044 501 878 310 403 $ DMC 3862 903 3863 1084 3371 895 382 1044 501 878 8 310 403 $ # b S 3863 1084 DMC 3862 3 3371 382 O 8 8 # b S 3346 267 3 O 3862 903 3863 3346 1084 267 895 3371 1044 382 501 878 DMC 310 403 $ DMC DMC DMC 3862 3862 3862 903 903 903 903 b 3863 1084 3 895 3371 1044 382 O 501 878 8 310 403 $ # b S 3 O O8 8 # S 3346 267 895 1044 501 878 310 403 3862 903 3863 3346 1084 267 3 DMC 3371 895 382 1044 O 501 878 8 DMC 310 310 403 403 $ # DMC 3862 903 b 3863 1084 3 3371 382 O 8 $ # b 501 878 310 403 3862 903 DMC 3346 3863 267 1084 895 1044 O 501 878 310 403 $ 3862 903 b DMC 3346 3863 267 1084 3 895 1044 O 8 $ # b 3 8 DMC 310 403 # 3346 267 895 1044 501 878 6 310 403 3862 903 3863 3346 1084 267 895 1044 O 501 878 6 8 $ # 3862 903 b DMC 3863 1084 3 O O O 8 $ # DMC 720 326 b 3 310 403 3862 720 903 326 3346 3863 267 1084 895 1044 501 878 6 DMC DMC 310 310 310 403 403 403 403 $ 3862 903 b DMC 3346 3863 267 1084 3 895 1044 O DMC 310 501 878 6 8 $ # b 3 3 O 8 # DMC 720 326 3346 267 895 1044 501 878 310 403 3862 720 903 326 b 3863 3346 1084 267 3 895 1044 O DMC 501 501 878 878 6 8 310 403 $ 3862 903 b DMC 3863 1084 3 O 6 8 $ 895 1044 501 878 310 403 DMC 720 3862 326 903 3346 267 3 895 1044 501 878 6 310 403 $ DMC 720 3862 326 903 b 3346 267 3 O 6 8 $ b O 501 878 8 720 326 3346 267 895 1044 ä DMC 501 878 310 403 DMC 3862 720 903 326 3346 267 3 895 1044 ä O 6 8 310 403 $ 3862 903 b 3 3 3 O 6 8 3733 75 $ b 501 878 310 3733 403 75 DMC 720 3862 326 903 3346 267 895 1044 ä DMC DMC 501 501 501 878 878 878 878 6 310 403 $ DMC 720 3862 326 903 b 3346 267 3 895 1044 ä O 6 8 $ b b 3 O 8 3733 75 720 326 3346 267 895 1044 501 878 310 3733 403 75 $ DMC 3862 720 903 326 b 3346 267 3 DMC 895 895501 1044 1044 ä O 501 878 6 DMC 310 403 $ DMC 3862 903 b 3 ä O 6 3346 267 895 1044 501 878 DMC 3733 310 75 403 720 326 b 3346 267 895 1044 ä 501 878 6 DMC 3733 310 75 403 $ 720 326 b 3 ä O 6 $ 3 895 1044 O 3733 75 720 326 3346 267 1 895 1044 501 878 DMC 310 3733 403 75 720 326 b 3346 267 1 3 ä O 501 878 6 DMC 310 403 $ b b b 3 ä O 3822 295 6 $ 895 1044 501 878 3822 295 DMC 3733 310 75 720 326 3346 267 1 DMC DMC 895 895 895403 1044 1044 1044 ä 501 878 6 DMC 3733 310 75 403 $ 720 326 b 3346 267 1 3 ä O 6 $ $ b 3 O 3822 295 3733 75 DMC 720 326 3346 267 895 1044 501 878 3822 295 6 310 3733 403 75 $ 720 326 b DMC 3346 3346 267 267 1 3 DMC 895 1044 ä 501 878 6 310 403 $ b 1 3 ä 720 326 3346 267 895 1044 DMC 501 878 3822 295 3733 75 $ DMC 720 326 3346 267 1 895 1044 ä 501 878 3822 295 6 3733 75 $ b DMC 895 1044 1 3 ä 6 b 3346 267 3 3822 295 3733 75 720 326 C 3346 267 895 1044 DMC 501 878 3822 295 3733 75 $ DMC 720 326 C b 1 3 895 1044 ä 501 878 6 $ $ $ b 1 3 3012 844 ä 6 3346 267 895 3012 1044 844 DMC 501 878 3822 295 3733 75 720 326 C DMC DMC 3346 3346 3346 267 267 267 1 895 1044 ä DMC 501 878 3822 295 6 3733 75 $ 720 326 C b 1 3 ä 6 6 $ b 3 3012 844 3822 295 3733 75 720 326 3346 267 895 3012 1044 844 ä DMC 501 878 3822 295 6 3733 75 $ DMC 720 720 326 326 C b 3346 267 1 895 1044 ä DMC 501 878 6 $ C b 1 3733 75 720 326 3346 267 DMC 3012 895 844 1044 3822 295 6 3733 75 720 326 C 3346 267 1 DMC 3012 895 844 1044 ä 3822 295 6 $ C b 1 ä $ DMC 720 326 b 3012 844 3822 295 3733 75 9 720 326 3346 267 895 3012 1044 844 3822 295 6 3733 75 9 $ C b 3346 267 1 DMC 3346 DMC 895 1044 ä 6 6 $ C b 3810 168 1 ä DMC 720 326 3346 3810 267 168 3012 895 844 1044 3822 295 3733 75 9 DMC DMC 720 720 720 326 326 326 267 C 3346 267 1 DMC 3012 895 844 1044 ä 3822 295 6 3733 75 9 $ C b 1 ä ä6 6 $ b 3810 168 3012 844 3822 295 3733 75 DMC 720 326 3346 3810 267 168 1 895 3012 1044 844 ä 3822 295 6 DMC 3733 3733 75 75 9 $ 720 326 C 3346 267 1 DMC 895 1044 ä 6 9 $ C 3822 295 3733 75 720 326 DMC 3810 3346 168 267 3012 844 ä 3822 295 3733 75 9 DMC 720 326 C 3810 3346 168 267 1 3012 844 ä 6 9 $ C 1 6 3733 75 $ 3810 168 3012 844 3822 295 ! 3733 75 720 326 DMC 3346 3810 267 168 3012 844 ä 3822 295 ! 6 9 $ DMC 720 326 C 3346 267 1 ä 6 9 $ 3864 831 C 1 3733 75 720 3864 326 831 DMC 3810 3346 168 267 3012 844 3822 295 ! DMC DMC 3733 3733 3733 75 75 75 326 9 720 326 C DMC 3810 3346 168 267 1 3012 844 ä DMC 720 3822 295 ! 6 9 $ C 1ä 1ä ä 6 $ 3864 831 3810 168 3012 844 3822 295 3733 75 720 3864 326 831 C DMC 3346 3810 267 168 1 3012 844 ä DMC 3822 3822 295 295 ! 6 3733 75 9 720 326 C DMC 3346 267 1 ä ! 6 9 3012 844 3822 295 3733 75 DMC 3864 720 831 326 3810 168 1 3012 844 3822 295 ! 3733 75 9 DMC 3864 720 831 326 C 3810 168 1 ä ! 6 9 C ä DMC 3822 295 6 3864 831 3810 168 3012 844 3822 295 3733 75 720 3864 326 831 3810 168 1 3012 844 ä ! 6 3733 75 9 DMC 720 326 C 1 1 1 ä ! 6 9 C 3822 295 3733 75 DMC 3864 720 831 326 3810 168 3012 844 DMC DMC 3822 3822 3822 295 295 295 75 ! 3733 75 9 DMC 3864 720 831 326 C 3810 168 1 3012 844 ä ! 6 9 C C 1 ä 6 3864 831 3810 168 3012 844 3822 295 3733 75 9 DMC DMC 720 3864 326 831 C 3810 168 1 DMC 3012 3012 844 844 ä 3822 295 ! 3733 75 9 DMC 3733 720 326 C 1 ä ! 3810 168 3012 844 3822 295 DMC 3733 75 3864 831 C 3810 168 3012 844 3822 295 ! DMC 3733 75 9 3864 831 C 1 ä ! 9 1 3012 844 ä 3864 831 3810 168 3012 844 3822 295 DMC 3733 75 3864 831 C 3810 168 1 ä 3822 295 ! DMC 3733 75 9 C C C 1 ä ! 9 3012 844 3822 295 DMC 3733 75 3864 831 3810 168 DMC DMC 3012 3012 3012 844 844 844 3822 295 ! DMC 3733 75 9 3864 831 C 3810 168 1 ä ! 9 9 C 1 ä 3864 831 3810 168 DMC 3012 844 3822 295 ! 3733 75 9 3864 831 C DMC 3810 3810 168 168 1 3012 844 3822 295 ! DMC 3733 75 9 C 1 DMC 3864 831 3810 168 3012 844 3822 295 9 3864 831 3810 168 3012 844 DMC 3822 295 ! 9 C DMC 3822 295 1 ! C DMC 3810 168 1 3864 831 3810 168 3012 844 3822 295 9 3864 831 C 1 3012 844 DMC 3822 295 ! 9 9 9 C 1 ! 3810 168 3012 844 DMC 3822 295 3864 831 DMC DMC 3810 3810 3810 168 168 168 3012 844 DMC 3822 295 !1 9 3864 831 C 1 ! ! 9 C 3864 831 3810 168 3012 844 DMC 3822 295 ! 9 DMC DMC 3864 3864 831 831 C 3810 168 3012 844 3822 295 ! 9 C 3864 831 3810 168 DMC 3012 844 ! 3864 831 3810 168 DMC 3012 844 ! 9 C 9 3864 831 C 3864 831 3810 168 DMC 3012 844 ! 9 C 3810 168 DMC 3012 844 DMC 3012 ! !! 9 C 3864 831 3810 168 DMC 3012 844 DMC DMC 3864 3864 3864 831 831 831 844 3810 168 DMC 3012 844 ! 9 C ! 9 C 3864 831 3810 168 DMC 3012 844 ! 9 3864 831 3810 168 DMC 3012 844 ! 9 DMC 3864 831 3810 168 3864 831 DMC 3810 168 ! 9 ! 9 DMC 3864 831 3810 168 ! 9 3864 831 DMC 3810 168 ! 3864 831 DMC 3810 168 DMC 3864 831 3810 168 !9 DMC 3810 168 9 ! 9 3864 831 DMC 3810 168 ! DMC 3864 831 3810 168 ! DMC 3864 831 DMC 3864 831 ! ! DMC 3864 831 ! DMC 3864 831 ! DMC 3864 831 DMC 3864 831 !! DMC 831 DMC3864 38643864 831 DMC 831

Janet Morningstar A huge thank you goes out to Erica Nielsen Killins for stitching the model for us.

38

A NEEDLE PULLING THREAD

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A NEEDLE PULLING THREAD

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39


Flowerpot pincushions

{

{

Getting tired of losing your pins and needles while you are working? Need a quick gift for a dear friend? Scared of French knots? Stitched on just a small piece of fabric and using only threads that you have in your stash, you'll never hesitate over a French, or colonial, knot again. Bring one of these cheery little flower pots into the light and you'll always have somewhere for your needles.

instructions

skill level easy finished measurements 1½" x 2" [3.7 x 5cm]

materials

any piece of 5" [12.5cm] square cotton fabric selection of various coloured threads or variegated threads. Note: Perfect project to ‘raid’ your stash and use leftovers. Variegated threads will add dimension to the completed knots. milliners or straw needles 4" [10cm] hoop small piece of coordinating ribbon small 1½" [3.7cm] terra cotta/clay flowerpot stuffing hot glue gun tracing pencil

embroidery 40

embroidery 1. Place pot upside down on fabric and trace around the top. 2. Put fabric into hoop and make sure it is as tight as possible. 3. Fill in the circle with French and Colonial knots. Use as many different combinations of thread and wraps as desired, this will add dimension to the overall look of the ‘flowers’. 4. Fill the circle completely randomly scattering the knots without any discernible pattern. assembly 1. Once the embroidery is complete, cut out the circle leaving a ½" [1.3cm] edge. 2. Put some stuffing into the flowerpot. 3. Glue the ½" [1.3cm] edge of the fabric to the inside rim of the flowerpot using the hot glue gun. 4. When there is only a small opening left, put more stuffing in, as much as possible to make the top fuller. 5. Glue the last piece shut. 6. Place a small piece of ribbon around the top of the flowerpot and glue in place.  

demystifying knots Using the correct type of needles – milliners or straw – is so important when working with knots, particularly when working bullion knots. It’s also advisable to place fabric in a hoop as tight as possible. This allows the use of both hands, if necessary, when placing the hoop on the table. French knots can be one or two wraps and as many strands of thread as desired. Make sure to change to larger needle if using more strands or thicker thread. Colonial knots differ from French knots. They are slightly more oval in shape and look like a coffee bean.

French knots

Carol Arsenault

A NEEDLE PULLING THREAD

Colonial knots

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Carol Arsenault Curlypow Embroideries Curlypow3@hotmail.com

A NEEDLE PULLING THREAD

â—?

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41


BUSINESS DIRECTORY

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Art of Fabric 955 Brock Rd Unit 1B, Pickering, ON L1W 2X9  905.420.1101  artoffabric.ca   shop@artoffabric.ca A creative shop offering quality fabrics, specializing in Canadian designed batiks. Large selection of art supplies for textile arts & the latest notions. Authorized Bernina dealer providing quality service&support. Classroom rental space available.

Country Concessions 1 Dufferin St, Cookstown, ON L0L 1L0  705.458.4546 or toll-free 1.888.834.4407  countryconcessions.com  quilting@countryconcessions.com Visit our lovely and unique quilt shop in the quaint village of Cookstown. We have over 7000 bolts of cotton fabrics plus a wide selection of patterns, books & notions. You will be soglad you came for a visit.

Hardanger House 4708 52 St, PO Box 1223, Stettler, AB T0C 2L0  403.742.2749 or toll-free 1.866.742.2749   tnplisting.com/hardanger-house.html Patterns from Canadian, American and European designers, linen and evenweave fabrics from Zweigart, DMC pearl Cottons, Caron Collection threads, and all the related stitching accessories are kept in stock. Many additional items can be special ordered.

Brenda Franklin Designs 7570 Mapleton SR 18 RR 1, Alma, ON N0B 1A0  519.638.9958   bfdesigns.on.ca  help@bfdesigns.on.ca More than 500 charts available for counted needlework, latch hook rugs, beadwork, beaded knits and knitting patterns. Mail/fax order or ask for our products at your local shop. Contact us for custom designs or needle felted sculpture.

Cozy Corner “a quilter’s playground” 7801 - 17 Ave, PO Box 366, Coleman, Crowsnest Pass, AB T0K 0M0  403.562.2699   aquiltersplayground.com   cozycor@shaw.ca We have one of Canada's largest displays of baby lock machines in our Inspiration Gallery. 20+ machines to test drive before you buy. We are also an authorized Accuquilt GO! retailer. Check our website.

Haus of Stitches 626 Main Street, Humboldt, SK  S0K 2A0  306.682.0772 or toll-free 1.800.344.6024  hausofstitches.ca Our one of a kind store offers everything you need for sewing, quilting, knitting, rug hooking and needlework.

Bra-makers Supply 308 Ottawa St N, in the Heart of the Fabric District! Hamilton, ON L8H 3Z9  905-538-1396   bramakerssupply.com  CustomerService@Bramakers.com World's largest source for bra-making and corset supplies, including patterns, books, elastics, underwires, foam bra & swim cups, laces, clips, corset coutil, busks and boning. Classes all year around in bra-making, panties, swimwear & corsetry.

Creative House Sewing Centre 129 Ave i South, Saskatoon, SK  S7M 1X7  306.652.0455  stitch.ca   info@stitch.ca Sales and Service of Janome and Elna sewing machines and sergers. We offer a full range of sewing notions and threads, as well as quilting, sewing classes, and creative events in our 300 sq. ft. classroom. Service is our most important product.

Brampton Sew & Serge 289 Rutherford Rd S, Unit 7, Brampton, ON L6W 3R9  905.874.1564   bramptonsewnserge.com  monique@bramptonsewnserge.com Welcome to Your One Stop Sewing Centre! We are authorized dealers of Baby Lock, Husqvarna Viking, and Singer sewing machines and sergers. We also offer a full schedule of sewing classes for everyone. Brantford Fabrics 128 Nelson St, Unit 3, Brantford, ON N3S 4B6  519.304.8220   facebook.com/BrantfordFabrics  BrantfordFabrics@live.ca A retailer of fine fabrics and notions. We carry products for quilting, sewing, embroidering, and tailoring. We also have a complete line of classes available from beginner sewing to embroidery and kids too! Bytowne Threads - Ottawa, ON  1.888.831.4095   bytownethreads.com  mlj@bytownethreads.com Featuring AURIfil® thread from Italy. Extra-long staple Egyptian cotton threads: 12wt, 28wt, 40 wt & 50 wt - 252 colours. Bobbin threads, black & white: 60 and 80 wt. Polyester threads 240 high-sheen colours. Wool threads 180 colours. Canadiana Needlecrafts 2008 1574 Angus St, Regina, SK  S4T 1Z1  306.525.4890 or 1.800.667.5841  canadiananeedlecrafts.com  info@canadiananeedlecrafts.com We are Home to Zweigart Fabrics, DMC products, Mill Hill Beads, Kreinik Threads. Everything you need to get your stitching project done, or start a new one. We ship all around the world. Christine’s Swedish Weaving 151 Military Rd, PO Box 517, Lancaster, ON K0C 1N0  613.347.9046   funandfastpatterns.ca  christine@funandfastpatterns.ca Christine’s carries ALL the Monk’s cloth colours, 2X2 and Huck Toweling as well as the # 5 Perlé Coton yarns to bodkin needles and has notions galore. She sells patterns & books (hers & others), everything you need to weave and is constantly growing.

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A NEEDLE PULLING THREAD

Divine Stitches West Half 10910 102 Ave, Fairview, AB T0H 1L0  780.835.2403 Indulge your creativity at Divine Stitches – with lovely fabrics & yarns; artful threads; beads & embellishments; notions for sewing, quilting, knit & crochet; BabyLock machines & Daylight lamps. Unique quilts, bags & folios for purchase. Eliza's Buttons & Yarn 110 Little Ave Unit 8, Barrie, ON  L4N 4K8  705.725.8536  elizaknits.com   eliza@elizaknits.com Elizabeth welcomes you to her knitting haven. Our store has everything you might need, from needles and yarn all the way to buttons. All of the contact information you will ever need is below. We would love to see you and what you’ve been busy creating! Stop on by! Evelyn's Sewing Centre / The Quilt Store 17817 Leslie St, Unit 40, Newmarket, ON L3Y 8C6  905.853.7001 or toll-free 1.888.853.7001  thequiltstore.ca Evelyn's Sewing Centre in Newmarket is your Quilt Store Destination! The staff here at Evelyn's is always on hand to provide Quilt Wisdom, Quilt Inspiration and most of all we pride ourselves as the place to make... All Your Quilt Dreams Come True! Flare Fabrics Online Store  1.888.973.5273   flarefabrics.ca  info@flarefabrics.ca A Canadian online fabric store specializing in handmade batiks and bold, modern cottons. With competitive prices and free shipping on all our Canadian orders, why shop in the U.S.? Quality fabrics, great selection and prices, exceptional service. Gitta's 271 Lakeshore Rd E, Mississauga, ON L5G 1G8  905.274.7198   gittas.com  questions@gittas.com Gitta's, named after owner Gitta Al-Basi, nestled in the east village of Port Credit, is the place where stitchers meet with their stitching friends, shop for stitching supplies and see the new stitching designs from Europe and the United States.

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Joyce's Sewing Shop 325 Wortley Rd, London, ON N6C 3R8  519.433.5344  joycessewingshop.com  joycesewingshop@bellnet.ca Our mission is to make sewing fun by providing professional training to teach the benefits of sewing, to provide excellent service and quality products to make your sewing easier and to provide friendly customer service to make you a happy sewer. Knit One Sew Too 4050 Walker Rd, Windsor, ON N8W 3T5  519.966.7444  knitonesewtoo.ca  shannon@knitonesewtoo.ca We carry Husqvarna Viking sewing & embroidery machines, a full selection of stabilizers and machine embroidery threads as well as Ashford Spinning Wheels and Looms & other supplies for the fibre artist. Kniterary & Hedgehog Stitchery 229 Brock St N, Whitby, ON L1N 4H6  905.668.8368   kniterary.com  reachus@kniterary.com Located in downtown Whitby 5 mns north of hwy 401. We carry quality natural yarns and knitting & crochet supplies. Classes. Friendly atmosphere in century home. Berocco, Debbie Bliss, Sublime, Mission Falls, Manos del Uruguay are a few of our yarns. Log Cabin Yardage Online from Ajax Ontario  416.818.1393   logcabinyardage.com  info@logcabinyardage.com LCY is your Canadian Online source for the newest exciting novelty and designer fabrics, kits and odds and ends. Follow on Facebook for enticing fabric pictures, promotions and programs. Join the newsletter at www.logcabinyardage.com for rewards. Mad About Patchwork Online Store PO Box 412, Stittsville, ON K2S 1A5  madaboutpatchwork.com Online fabric shop featuring modern fabrics from Denyse Schmidt, Patty Young, Amy Butler, Kaffe Fassett and more. Great selection of Kona cotton solids, and shot cottons from Westminster. $5.95 flat rate shipping in Canada, free over $150. My Sewing Room 148-8228 MacLeod Trl SE, Calgary, AB T2H 2B8  403.252.3711   mysewingroom.ca  Queenofeverything@mysewingroom.ca Canada's Largest Independently Owned Quilting Store with fabric, patterns, kits, notions, sewing machines and more! My Sewing Room boasts over 10,000 bolts of 100% cotton fabric from designers and manufacturers from around the world.


My Sewing Room 20 Argyle St N, Caledonia, ON N3W 1B6  289.284.0549   mysewingroom.net  mysewingroom@shaw.ca Located in downtown Caledonia we cater to quilters but also have basic sewing supplies.Fabric selection ranges from solids to prints in kids, novelty, batiks, flannels & backings. Class schedule includes quilts to simple projects for adults or children.

Sewing Machines Etcetera 4155 Fairview St Unit 3, Burlington, ON L7L 2A4  905.639.5525  sewetc.com   info@sewetc.com At Sewing Machines Etcetera we have been in business since 1992, we will consistently and joyfully adapt to changes in technology and the marketplace, so we can offer the best in sewing related products and service to our whole community.

The Stitcher's Muse 4 - 70 Church St, Nanaimo, BC  V9R 5H4  250.591.6873    thestitchersmuse.com  info@thestitchersmuse.com A divine little shop with supplies for all your hand stitching needs! Friendly, knowledgeable, helpful staff. Cross stitch, canvaswork, needlepoint, embroidery, counted thread, lace making and more. Books, patterns, fabric, threads, tools.

Pine Ridge Knit & Sew 17477 Hwy 2 PO Box 68, Trenton, ON K8V 5R1  613.392.1422  pineridgeknitsew.com  yvette@pineridgeknitsew.com We have knitting machines by Artisan and Silver Reed, embroidery machines by Husqvarna/Viking & White. Sewing notions and supplies, books and software. Hands-on lessons and classes. Wide variety of yarns, threads, dress and pant zippers.

Snow Goose Quilting 5110 50th St, Tofield, AB T0B 4J0  780.662.2022   snowgoosequilting.com  fran@snowgoosequilting.com A large collection of quilters' cottons, flannels, batiks and Australian aboriginal prints. Kits, notions, threads and all the tools you need to create your work of art. Come and sit long, talk much and laugh often.

Upper Canada Quiltworks PO Box 64, Brockville, ON K6V 5T7  613.345.3956 Fax: 613.342.3327  uppercanadaquiltworks.com Visit us online for a wide selection quilt patterns and books. Techniques include felted wool, fusible appliqué, punchneedle, rag quilting and printing photos on fabric.

Rags to Rugs Craft Shoppe 98 Water Street, Pictou, NS B0K 1H0  902.485.2775 or toll-free 1.800.249.7465  ragstorugs.com  linda@ragstorugs.com Rug hooking supply store offering hooks, frames, rag cutters, new and recycled wool, dyes, scissors, rug hooking books and a variety of other rug hooking supplies. We feature the Bluenose Rug Hooking Patterns. Rosalie I. Tennison, Quilt Appraiser Certified by American Quilters’ Society 2005 Newmarket, ON  905.953.1441   R.Tennison@sympatico.ca What if something happens to your treasured quilt? Do you have written proof of its value for your insurance company? Get an appraisal now. Sew Fancy Inc. Guelph, ON  519.824.4127   sewfancy.com  sales@sewfancy.com Your Premier Canadian Source for Specialty Sewing Supplies including Smocking, Heirloom Sewing, Goldwork, Silk Ribbon Embroidery, Needle Tatting, Swarovski Crystals, Sashiko, Quilting and more. Visit the website for the latest in sewing supplies. Ruby Pearl Quilts 500 King St W, Suite 8, Oshawa, ON L1J 2K9  905.436.3535   rubypearlquilts.com  joy@rubypearlquilts.com We are your full service source of professional quilting equipment, products, & courses. Led by 44 years of sewing experience & more than 20 years of quilting experience, we have the experience necessary to help you push your hobby to the next level! Ruti's Needlebed 10 Thomas St, Mississauga, ON L5M 1Y5  905.821.9370   ruti.ca Mississauga's Finest Quilting and Knitting Store!! Come see our huge selection of yarn, fabric, supplies, sewing machines and knitting machines…a local store for all your quilting, sewing, knitting needs! We offer a wide variety of classes. Sew 'n Knit 'n Serge 15 Gower St, Toronto, ON M4B 1E3  416.752.1828 or toll-free 1.800.836.6536  sewknit.ca   info@sewknit.ca Knitting machines, sewing machines, repairs, parts for Passap, Studio, Singer, Silver Reed, Superba, White. Sewing notions and supplies, books, ball yarns, coned yarns, TAMM yarns, Paton's yarns, Bernat yarns, Phentex yarns, Bernat kits & crafts.

Stitch-It Central 189 Thames Street S, Ingersoll, ON N5C 2T6  519.303.1563  stitchitcentral.ca   sales@stitchitcentral.ca Stitch-It Central is a store to satisfy all your cross stitching needs. We have everything such as notions, books & magazines, project kits, charts, gift collections & certificates, papers & accessories, fabrics and linens, and so much more. Stitcher's Nook 50 Stadacona St W, Moose Jaw, SK S6H 1Z1  306.692.5377  stitchersnook.ca  stitchersnook@sasktel.net In the heart of beautifully historic Moose Jaw, just off Main Street, a stitching store. An intimate space with a broad range of goods for knitters, crocheters, sewists & needleworkers of all stripes. Bring your project to work on, or find a new one! Sue's Quilting Studio 22 Main St E, PO Box 427, Vankleek Hill, ON K0B 1R0  613.678.3256   suesquiltingstudio@bellnet.ca  facebook.com/pages/Sues-Quilting-Studio/ 101057286682381 Where Friends gather! Speciality fabrics, notions, courses & long arm quilting in the Gingerbread Capital of Ontario, an hour from Montreal, Ottawa & Cornwall. Join our Wednesday afternoon quilters to share ideas & help promote our quilting passion. That Sewing Place 16610 Bayview Ave #10, Newmarket, ON L3X 1X3  905.715.7725   thatsewingplace.ca  jaret&liana@thatsewingplace.ca Introducing That Sewing Place as your sewing source and Authorized Dealers for Bernina and Brother machines. Jaret & Liana focus on placing your sewing needs first, providing outstanding support, service, and training. The Fabric Box 371 Main St E, Hawkesbury, ON K6A 1A8  613.632.7172   fabric-box.com  perfectfabric@bellnet.ca We have a wide selection of fabrics, threads, tools and so much more to help you finish your sewing projects with style! To find out more give us a call during store hours, or better yet drop by, we are always happy to help! The Stitching Corner #2, 185 First St E, Cochrane, AB T4C 2E9  403.932.3390   stitchingcorner.ca  nygabe@telus.net Your Needlework Shop in Cochrane.

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A NEEDLE PULLING THREAD

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baby

Sweet

my

44

issue 2014


Sew your style, your way. More than a sewing machine.... a source of inspiration. The innovation and capabilities of Brother sewing and embroidery machines make them a source of inspiration to design, create, fashion, DIY, or continue a tradition. With over 100 years of experience and 50 million sewing machines sold, Brother continues to innovate with cutting-edge technologies that help you make your ideas come to life. To find the machine that suits your unique style, to locate your nearest dealer or to get exclusive deals and the latest news, visit:

www.brother.ca/inspiration

DreamWeaver™ XE

Inspiring creativity for generations. Brother and its logo are trademarks of Brother Industries, Ltd., Japan. All specifications are subject to change without notice. All registered trademarks referenced herein are the property of their respective companies. ©2013 Brother International Corporation (Canada) Ltd., 1 rue Hôtel de Ville, Dollard-des-Ormeaux, Québec H9B 3H6


pure Holidays. perfection

Perfected.

ColourTouch TouchScreen Screen PFAFF® creative™ Color 180° viewing angle! More brilliant than ever before. Patent pending & only from PFAFF® Ribbon Stitches New sewing technique to create amazing embellishments!

PFAFF® creative™ Colour Touch Screen 180° viewing angle! More brilliant than ever before.

Faster than ever! 30% faster embroidery speed* Perfect stitch quality.

Patent pending & only from PFAFF® Ribbon Stitches new sewing technique to create amazing embellishments!

*On average versus model. Average speed varies depending on hoop and type of embroidery.

Faster than ever! 30% faster embroidery speed* Perfect stitch quality. *On average versus creative sensation model. Average speed varies depending on hoop and type of embroidery.

PFAFF® exclusive Perfect embroidery on a wide variety of fabrics, even with novelty thread.

PFAFF® exclusive ActivStitch™ technology Perfect embroidery on a wide variety of fabrics, even with novelty thread.

The Original IDT™ System Absolutely even fabric feed from both the top and the bottom.

The Original IDT™ System Absolutely even fabric feed from both the top and the bottom.

Challenge your imagination!

2013 KSIN Luxembourg II.S.ar.l. All rights reserved. All statements valid at time of printing. Printed on environmentally friendly paper. Patents protecting this product are listed on a label positioned underneath the Sewing Machine. AFF, PERFECTION STARTS HERE, IDT (image), CREATIVE, CREATIVE SENSATION and ACTIVSTITCH are trademarks of KSIN Luxembourg II, S.ar.l.

• ... see stitches in actual size and embroidery designs in true colour on the brilliant PFAFF® creative™ Colour Touch Screen. • ... design new unique and personal stitches using the exclusive Stitch Creator™ feature. • ... easliy combine multiple designs directly on screen using on-screen customizing. • ... express my personal style with all the built-in designs and fonts. • ... use the original IDT™ System to get absolutely even fabric feed.

“I’m always searching for inspiration, new skills to master, and opportunities to express my own personal style. With My PFAFF® creative™ 3.0 Sewing and Embroidery Machine I can ...”

Great Financing Packages GreatFinancing Financing Packages Great Packages Available OAC. Available OAC. Available OAC. Ask for details! Askfor for details! Ask details!

www.pfaff.com/ca/en ©2013 KSIN Luxembourg II.S.ar.l. All rights reserved. PFAFF, PERFECTION STARTS HERE, IDT, CREATIVE SENSATION and CREATIVE are trademarks of KSIN Luxembourg II, S.ar.l.

ANPTmag FREE Sample Issue!  

Here's a sampling of the creativity, inspiration, projects, and articles that you'll find in every issue of ANPTmag. In the full issue, you’...

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