Page 1

HA

m R Le

ER

THE RED ROOSTER CoOKBOOK

www.pavilionbooks.com

D

ROOST

RE

MARCUS SAMUELSSON

UK £25.00

MARCUS SAMUELSSON

THE COOKBOOK


First published in the United Kingdom in 2017 by Pavilion 43 Great Ormond Street London WC1N 3HZ Copyright © 2016 by Marcus Samuelsson Foreword © 2016 by Hilton Als Photographs © 2016 by Bobby Fisher Historical photography on pages 4 and 8 by Gordon Parks, courtesy of and © The Gordon Parks Foundation Illustrations © 2016 by Rebekah Maysles and Leon Johnson Background image © Reinhold Leitner/Shutterstock.com Book design by Toni Tajima First published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company, 3 Park Avenue, 19th Floor, New York, New York 10016. www.hmhco.com All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be copied, displayed, extracted, reproduced, utilised, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise including but not limited to photocopying, recording, or scanning without the prior written permission of the publishers. 978-1-91121-663-6 A CIP catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library. 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Reproduction by Mission Productions Ltd, Hong Kong Printed and bound by 1010 Printing International Ltd, China This book can be ordered direct from the publisher at www.pavilionbooks.com

To the people of Harlem, especially the generation before mine who cared, restored and fought for uptown, to make sure Harlem would be a special neighboUrhood in the greatest city – a place I am lucky to call home.


T{LLLLLLLLLLLL B{LLLLLLLLLLLL acknowledgements 7

foreword by hilton als 9  preface 13

Introduction 17  The Pantry 25 At the Bar  35  Birdland 69

The Monday Classics  103  El Barrio Night  133 Big Day Wednesday  163  Fridays at Ginny’s  191 

Saturday on My Block 223

Sunday Brunch  249  Sunday Jazz 277 Family Meals  301

Giving Thanks in Harlem 329

It’s Always Sweet in Harlem  355 index 379


The Savoy Makes 1 cocktail

3 seedless green grapes 4 seedless red grapes 15ml/½fl oz fresh lemon juice 25ml/1fl oz agave syrup 35ml/1¼fl oz vodka

This is our tribute to the Savoy Ballroom, “the home of happy feet” on Lenox Avenue between 140th and 141st Streets, where blacks and whites danced together. We served this sprightly drink the night the Rooster first opened its doors.

1  Put 2 green grapes and 2 red grapes into an old-fashioned glass and muddle. Pour in the lemon juice, agave and vodka, and fill the glass with ice. Transfer to a cocktail shaker and shake well.

2  Pour back into the glass. Spear the remaining grapes onto a small bamboo skewer and lay across the top of the drink.

Lissette Tabales has been behind the bar at the Rooster since we opened, and this is her favourite cocktail. Herby, puckery Campari and bourbon make a perfect cocktail. “It’s a drink for the Campari lover”, she says.

1  Pour the vermouth, Campari and bourbon into a cocktail shaker. Fill with ice and shake well.

2  Strain into a cocktail glass and garnish with the orange wedge.

Bourbon Negroni Makes 1 cocktail

15ml/½fl oz sweet vermouth (we use Antica Formula) 25ml/1fl oz Campari 60ml/2fl oz Fig and Pear Bourbon (see page 47) 1 orange wedge

Dark rum, white rum, pineapple and lime juices, and coconut water make this cocktail an island carnival!

Rum Rum Punch Makes 1 cocktail

1  Pour the coconut water, pineapple juice, lime juice and both rums into a cocktail shaker. Fill with ice and shake well.

2  Strain into an ice-filled collins glass or tumbler.

60ml/2fl oz coconut water 60ml/2fl oz pineapple juice 15ml/½fl oz fresh lime juice 60ml/2fl oz white rum 60ml/2fl oz Goslings Black Seal rum

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At the Bar

51


TH E BA R PL AY LIS T “LIT TLE RED ROOST ER” “LIQUID LOVE” “I’LL NEVER FALL IN LOVE AGAIN” “CR AZY LOVE” “COME TO MY DOOR” “LIT TLE RED ROOST ER” “AS” “HARLEM RIVER DRIVE”

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Big Mama Thornton Chris Turner Dionne Warwick Akie Bermis s Jos é James The Rolling Stones Stevie Wonder Bobbi Humphrey


T{LLLLLLLLLLLL B{LLLLLLLLLLLL acknowledgements 7

foreword by hilton als 9  preface 13

Introduction 17  The Pantry 25 At the Bar  35  Birdland 69

The Monday Classics  103  El Barrio Night  133 Big Day Wednesday  163  Fridays at Ginny’s  191 

Saturday on My Block 223

Sunday Brunch  249  Sunday Jazz 277 Family Meals  301

Giving Thanks in Harlem 329

It’s Always Sweet in Harlem  355 index 379


At the Bar COPS LIFT A GLASS and toast grifters they haven’t caught yet. Men dressed in summer wool gabardine and women in silk sip and nibble as they watch the exchange. Two men hold hands and neck when they think no one is watching, and older people look on and cluck about the outrageousness of young love. Musicians and hustlers grip the curve of the bar counter for dear life, since both need a kind of reprieve they can only find inside these four walls. Everybody is listening to the saxophonist play “Yesterdays”. The song both swings and hurts at the same time. Always, there is a bite of this, a taste of that, and oysters for everyone. Women ask for peach wine and get it. Brothers call out, “Give me that hooch”, and the bartender knows exactly what they mean. All kinds of elbows touch: mailmen’s and maids’, church goers’ and choir girls’, politicians’ and their potential constituents’. Both black and white patrons taste their drinks, and every now and then, they eat Southern food at the bar and savour, since everybody knows the real world waits right outside the door. Just for a moment, the best drinks in Harlem smooth over differences between race and status. And well, if they don’t do that, they give folks enough room to learn something they didn’t know about themselves: with the right sort of music, all manner of people can groove to the same beat.

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Corn Bread SPICED BUTTER We use this butter as a flavour enhancer – you find it in a lot

This is right up there with the Fried Yardbird as a core recipe at the Rooster. We even have someone dedicated to making all our corn bread. Charles Webb, a former Alvin Ailey dancer, is the keeper of our secrets. I knew from the beginning how I wanted it to taste, but we continue to tinker and change the recipe. This version is very moist, almost custardy. It will keep for 4 days, but a better plan is to freeze individual slices.

Makes 1 (23cm x 12cm/9in x 5in) loaf

of recipes in the book. It has a hint of funk, like the funk of fermented foods, the new wave of flavour to follow umami. There are a lot of versions of spiced butter in Ethiopia. My version is true to that made by my wife Maya’s tribe, the Gurage. ► Melt 900g/2lbs unsalted butter in a saucepan over a low heat. Add 2 finely chopped garlic cloves, 2 finely chopped shallots,

140g/5oz plain flour

11/2 tablespoons coriander seeds, 1 tablespoon cumin seeds,

180g/6¼oz coarse yellow cornmeal

11/2 teaspoons fenugreek, 11/2 teaspoons ajwain (see page 27),

100g/3½oz caster sugar

a 5cm/2in piece of ginger (peeled, sliced and smashed),

1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon, and 1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric. Simmer very gently for 30 minutes to infuse the flavours. Keep an eye on this; you don’t want the milk solids to brown. ► Skim off all the foam and any floating seeds, and let the butter sit for about 10 minutes for the milk solids to settle on the bottom. ► Carefully pour the spiced butter through a sieve lined with a few layers of muslin into a container, leaving the solids behind. Let it cool, then cover and refrigerate. It will keep for months. ► This makes about 750ml/26fl oz.

1  Preheat the oven to 160ºC/325°F/Gas Mark 3. Spray a 23cm x 12cm/9in x 5in loaf tin with non-stick spray.

2¼ tsp baking powder

2  Whisk the flour,

cornmeal, sugar, baking powder, Aleppo pepper and salt together in a bowl.

1½ tsp Aleppo pepper (see page 27) 1½ tsp coarse sea salt 425ml/15fl oz soured cream

3  Whisk the soured cream, buttermilk, eggs, yolk and melted butter together in another bowl until smooth.

360ml/12½fl oz buttermilk 2 large eggs 1 large egg yolk

4  Pour the wet ingredients

2 tbsp unsalted butter, melted and cooled

into the dry and stir until combined. Fold in the corn.

5  Scrape the batter into

the loaf tin and smooth out the top. Bake until the bread is browned and pulling away from the sides of the tin and a skewer poked into the centre comes out clean, about 60 minutes.

6  Cool on a rack for

20 minutes. Run a knife around the sides of the tin to loosen the sides and turn out the loaf. You can cut it now – the slices will be messy – or cool completely.

120g/4½oz corn kernels (fresh or thawed frozen)

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There are plenty of things to spread on corn bread – like either the Bird Funk or Chicken Liver Butter (both on page 82) – but I do love the way sage honey butter melts into the bread when it’s warm: Beat 2 tablespoons honey and 12 ripped fresh sage leaves into 115g/4oz softened unsalted butter. Check it for salt. Cover and refrigerate the honey butter for at least an hour to give the sage a chance to work its flavour into the butter, but take it out of the refrigerator at least 15 minutes before serving.

At the Bar

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CORN BREADCRUMB VINAIGRETTE Like every restaurant, we need to be frugal. Crumbs from leftover corn bread, along with some chilli and shallot, make for a very tasty vinaigrette. Use it on sturdy greens like romaine or escarole. ► Heat 180ml/6fl oz olive oil in a frying pan over a medium-high heat. Add 2 finely chopped garlic cloves, 2 finely chopped shallots, 1 finely chopped poblano chilli, and 3 tablespoons corn breadcrumbs. Sauté, stirring or tossing, until the shallot and poblano have softened and the crumbs are browned, about 5 minutes. Whisk in 3 tablespoons rice vinegar and the juice of a lemon. Season with 1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds, a few drops of Worcestershire sauce, 1 teaspoon Aleppo pepper (see page 27), and salt and pepper. Scrape the vinaigrette into a bowl and keep it covered for an hour or two or use it immediately. Right before you use it, stir in 1 tablespoon chopped fresh chives. ► Makes about 360ml/12½fl oz.

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Obama’s Short Ribs Serves 4

Short ribs marry with many flavour combinations, and they taste much more expensive than they are. I chose plum sauce as an accent to this super-delicious braise; it adds an elusive flavour. We served this as part of a special menu when President Obama came to the Red Rooster, and it’s a hit every time we put it back on.

→ You’ll have extra braising liquid. Freeze it in ice cube trays, and you’ll have flavour bombs to use in pan sauces or pasta.

4 (230g/8oz) boneless short ribs Coarse sea salt and freshly ground black pepper 2 tbsp grapeseed oil 1 onion, chopped 1 carrot, chopped 2 celery stalks, chopped 1 lemongrass stalk, trimmed, smashed and finely chopped (see page 28) 3 garlic cloves, chopped 1 (2.5cm/1in) piece ginger, peeled and finely chopped 120ml/4fl oz dry red wine 750ml/26fl oz beef or chicken stock 120ml/4fl oz plum sauce 60ml/2fl oz soy sauce 2 sprigs thyme 2 sprigs flat-leaf parsley 2 bay leaves Horseradish, preferably freshly grated, for serving

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1  Preheat the oven to

160°C/325°F/Gas Mark 3.

2  Pat the meat dry with

paper towels and season all over with salt and pepper.

3  Heat the grapeseed oil

in a large casserole over a medium-high heat. When it shimmers, add the short ribs and brown on all sides, about 2 minutes per side. Put them aside on a plate.

4  Add the onion, carrot,

celery, lemongrass, garlic and ginger to the pot. Season with salt and cook, stirring often, until the onion softens, about 5 minutes. Pour in the wine and cook, stirring to dissolve any of the brown bits that may still be on the bottom of the pot. Add the stock, plum sauce, soy sauce, thyme, parsley and bay leaves, and bring to a simmer. Return the short ribs to the pot, along with any of the juices, cover,

and slide the pot into the oven. Braise until the meat is fork-tender, about 11/2 hours.

5  Transfer the meat to a

plate. Strain the braising liquid into a fat separator. Discard the bay leaves and put the vegetables into a food processor. Process until smooth. Add 360ml/12½fl oz of the defatted braising liquid to the processor and pulse to combine. Return the sauce to the casserole and check for salt and pepper. Bury the short ribs in the sauce, cover and leave on the back of the stove until you’re ready to serve.

6  Reheat the short ribs in the sauce.

7  Divide the short ribs between four shallow bowls. Top each with a spoonful of sauce. Put the rest of the sauce in a bowl for passing round at the table, along with a bowl of horseradish if you’d like.


Obama’s Short Ribs Serves 4

Short ribs marry with many flavour combinations, and they taste much more expensive than they are. I chose plum sauce as an accent to this super-delicious braise; it adds an elusive flavour. We served this as part of a special menu when President Obama came to the Red Rooster, and it’s a hit every time we put it back on.

→ You’ll have extra braising liquid. Freeze it in ice cube trays, and you’ll have flavour bombs to use in pan sauces or pasta.

4 (230g/8oz) boneless short ribs Coarse sea salt and freshly ground black pepper 2 tbsp grapeseed oil 1 onion, chopped 1 carrot, chopped 2 celery stalks, chopped 1 lemongrass stalk, trimmed, smashed and finely chopped (see page 28) 3 garlic cloves, chopped 1 (2.5cm/1in) piece ginger, peeled and finely chopped 120ml/4fl oz dry red wine 750ml/26fl oz beef or chicken stock 120ml/4fl oz plum sauce 60ml/2fl oz soy sauce 2 sprigs thyme 2 sprigs flat-leaf parsley 2 bay leaves Horseradish, preferably freshly grated, for serving

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1  Preheat the oven to

160°C/325°F/Gas Mark 3.

2  Pat the meat dry with

paper towels and season all over with salt and pepper.

3  Heat the grapeseed oil

in a large casserole over a medium-high heat. When it shimmers, add the short ribs and brown on all sides, about 2 minutes per side. Put them aside on a plate.

4  Add the onion, carrot,

celery, lemongrass, garlic and ginger to the pot. Season with salt and cook, stirring often, until the onion softens, about 5 minutes. Pour in the wine and cook, stirring to dissolve any of the brown bits that may still be on the bottom of the pot. Add the stock, plum sauce, soy sauce, thyme, parsley and bay leaves, and bring to a simmer. Return the short ribs to the pot, along with any of the juices, cover,

and slide the pot into the oven. Braise until the meat is fork-tender, about 11/2 hours.

5  Transfer the meat to a

plate. Strain the braising liquid into a fat separator. Discard the bay leaves and put the vegetables into a food processor. Process until smooth. Add 360ml/12½fl oz of the defatted braising liquid to the processor and pulse to combine. Return the sauce to the casserole and check for salt and pepper. Bury the short ribs in the sauce, cover and leave on the back of the stove until you’re ready to serve.

6  Reheat the short ribs in the sauce.

7  Divide the short ribs between four shallow bowls. Top each with a spoonful of sauce. Put the rest of the sauce in a bowl for passing round at the table, along with a bowl of horseradish if you’d like.


Whole Fried Fish with Grits

Spicy, moist fish with a cornmeal crust paired with lush, cheesy grits has got to be one of my favourite combinations. Swedes would eat a dish like this with a knife and fork; Africans would eat it with their hands – pulling off a morsel of fish and swiping it through the grits with their fingers. All would be equally tidy at the table.

→ Start soaking the grits the night before.

Serves 6

FOR THE CREAMY GRITS

FOR THE DIPPING SAUCE

225g/8oz stoneground grits, soaked overnight in a large saucepan with 1.1 litres/ 37fl oz water

4 tbsp olive oil

550ml/19fl oz milk 180ml/6fl oz double cream 360ml/12½fl oz chicken stock 1 tsp white miso 30g/1oz unsalted butter, softened 60g/2¼oz Cheddar cheese, grated 50g/1¾oz Parmesan cheese, freshly grated

Juice of 2 lemons 1 tbsp Korean hot pepper paste (gochujang; see page 29) 1 tsp fish sauce 1 tbsp chopped fresh coriander 1 tsp brown sugar

FOR THE FISH 3 (680g/1½lbs each) red bream or sea bass, scaled and gutted

¼ tsp freshly grated nutmeg

1 (7.5cm/3in) piece ginger, peeled and grated

Coarse sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

4½ tsp Korean hot pepper paste (see page 29) 1½ tsp toasted sesame oil 75g/2½oz cornflour 135g/4¾oz cornmeal 1 tbsp coarse sea salt Groundnut oil for frying

FOR THE CREAMY GRITS 1  Add the milk, cream, broth and miso to the grits and their soaking water and bring to a simmer, stirring, over a mediumhigh heat. Turn the heat down to low, cover, and simmer for 20 minutes. Give the grits a good stir every 5 minutes. Put the saucepan in a frying pan of barely simmering water for at least 20 minutes. When you’re ready to serve, stir in the butter and cheeses, and season with the nutmeg and salt and pepper to taste. FOR THE DIPPING SAUCE

2  Stir all the ingredients together.

FOR THE FISH

3  Cut several slashes to

the bone on both sides of the fish. Mix the ginger, chilli paste and sesame oil. Rub over the fish – including inside the cavities.

continued on page 182 →

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Whole Fried Fish with Grits

Spicy, moist fish with a cornmeal crust paired with lush, cheesy grits has got to be one of my favourite combinations. Swedes would eat a dish like this with a knife and fork; Africans would eat it with their hands – pulling off a morsel of fish and swiping it through the grits with their fingers. All would be equally tidy at the table.

→ Start soaking the grits the night before.

Serves 6

FOR THE CREAMY GRITS

FOR THE DIPPING SAUCE

225g/8oz stoneground grits, soaked overnight in a large saucepan with 1.1 litres/ 37fl oz water

4 tbsp olive oil

550ml/19fl oz milk 180ml/6fl oz double cream 360ml/12½fl oz chicken stock 1 tsp white miso 30g/1oz unsalted butter, softened 60g/2¼oz Cheddar cheese, grated 50g/1¾oz Parmesan cheese, freshly grated

Juice of 2 lemons 1 tbsp Korean hot pepper paste (gochujang; see page 29) 1 tsp fish sauce 1 tbsp chopped fresh coriander 1 tsp brown sugar

FOR THE FISH 3 (680g/1½lbs each) red bream or sea bass, scaled and gutted

¼ tsp freshly grated nutmeg

1 (7.5cm/3in) piece ginger, peeled and grated

Coarse sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

4½ tsp Korean hot pepper paste (see page 29) 1½ tsp toasted sesame oil 75g/2½oz cornflour 135g/4¾oz cornmeal 1 tbsp coarse sea salt Groundnut oil for frying

FOR THE CREAMY GRITS 1  Add the milk, cream, broth and miso to the grits and their soaking water and bring to a simmer, stirring, over a mediumhigh heat. Turn the heat down to low, cover, and simmer for 20 minutes. Give the grits a good stir every 5 minutes. Put the saucepan in a frying pan of barely simmering water for at least 20 minutes. When you’re ready to serve, stir in the butter and cheeses, and season with the nutmeg and salt and pepper to taste. FOR THE DIPPING SAUCE

2  Stir all the ingredients together.

FOR THE FISH

3  Cut several slashes to

the bone on both sides of the fish. Mix the ginger, chilli paste and sesame oil. Rub over the fish – including inside the cavities.

continued on page 182 →

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Devilled Eggs with ChickenSkin Mayo Serves 6 as an appetizer

FOR THE CHICKEN-SKIN MAYO 2 fried chicken drumsticks (from Fried Yardbird, page 85) 180g/6¼oz mayonnaise Coarse sea salt

FOR THE DEVILLED EGGS 6 large eggs 60g/2¼oz mayonnaise

½ tsp sweet paprika

No gathering in the South would be complete without a platter of devilled eggs. What sets ours apart is the bed of rich chicken-skin mayonnaise we serve them on. Tradition has it that the best way to eat a devilled egg is in one bite, but with this mayo, you’re going to want to double dip. We make our own duck salumi (Chinese dried duck sausage), but you should be able to find it in Asian stores or online. If not, you can use duck salami instead.

FOR THE CHICKEN-SKIN MAYO 1  Pull the meat and skin off the chicken bones and put into a food processor. Process to a fine mince. Add the mayonnaise and process, scraping down the sides as needed, until very smooth, 5 to 6 minutes. Taste and season with salt. Scrape the mayo out into a bowl, cover and refrigerate until you need it. It will keep for up to 2 days.

Coarse sea salt Chopped fresh chives and duck salumi for garnish (optional)

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FOR THE DEVILLED EGGS 2  Put the eggs in a saucepan in a single layer, cover with cold water by 5cm/2in, and bring to a boil over a medium-high heat. Cover the pan, turn off the heat, and leave for 12 minutes. Drain the water off the eggs and shake the eggs in the pan, cracking the shells. Cover

with cold running water. Pour the water off and fill again with cold water. Then let the eggs cool for a few minutes.

3  Peel the eggs and slice

them in half lengthways.

4  Carefully pop the

yolks out of the whites and put them in a mini food processor with the mayonnaise and paprika. Process until completely smooth. Taste and season with salt. (You can also do this in a bowl, mashing and stirring with a fork.) Scrape the filling into a piping bag.

5  Spread half the chickenskin mayo on a platter. Set the whites on the mayo, pipe in the filling, and garnish with chives and salumi if you want.


Devilled Eggs with ChickenSkin Mayo Serves 6 as an appetizer

FOR THE CHICKEN-SKIN MAYO 2 fried chicken drumsticks (from Fried Yardbird, page 85) 180g/6¼oz mayonnaise Coarse sea salt

FOR THE DEVILLED EGGS 6 large eggs 60g/2¼oz mayonnaise

½ tsp sweet paprika

No gathering in the South would be complete without a platter of devilled eggs. What sets ours apart is the bed of rich chicken-skin mayonnaise we serve them on. Tradition has it that the best way to eat a devilled egg is in one bite, but with this mayo, you’re going to want to double dip. We make our own duck salumi (Chinese dried duck sausage), but you should be able to find it in Asian stores or online. If not, you can use duck salami instead.

FOR THE CHICKEN-SKIN MAYO 1  Pull the meat and skin off the chicken bones and put into a food processor. Process to a fine mince. Add the mayonnaise and process, scraping down the sides as needed, until very smooth, 5 to 6 minutes. Taste and season with salt. Scrape the mayo out into a bowl, cover and refrigerate until you need it. It will keep for up to 2 days.

Coarse sea salt Chopped fresh chives and duck salumi for garnish (optional)

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FOR THE DEVILLED EGGS 2  Put the eggs in a saucepan in a single layer, cover with cold water by 5cm/2in, and bring to a boil over a medium-high heat. Cover the pan, turn off the heat, and leave for 12 minutes. Drain the water off the eggs and shake the eggs in the pan, cracking the shells. Cover

with cold running water. Pour the water off and fill again with cold water. Then let the eggs cool for a few minutes.

3  Peel the eggs and slice

them in half lengthways.

4  Carefully pop the

yolks out of the whites and put them in a mini food processor with the mayonnaise and paprika. Process until completely smooth. Taste and season with salt. (You can also do this in a bowl, mashing and stirring with a fork.) Scrape the filling into a piping bag.

5  Spread half the chickenskin mayo on a platter. Set the whites on the mayo, pipe in the filling, and garnish with chives and salumi if you want.


Curried Goat Stew Serves 4 to 6

2 tbsp grapeseed oil 4 red onions, roughly chopped 4 garlic cloves, crushed 1 (8mm/¹ ⁄ ³ in) piece ginger, peeled and smashed 1 lemongrass stalk, trimmed, smashed and finely chopped (see page 28)

There’s always a Caribbean family that seems to take over the farmers’ market on my block each weekend. They usually serve something curried – sometimes goat, sometimes chicken – with roti flatbread. It’s rustic and lip-smacking good. Perfect block-party food. Like any stew, this will be even better the next day, so make it in advance if you can.

1.6kg/3½lbs bone-in goat stewing meat 60ml/2fl oz water Coarse sea salt 2 tbsp chopped fresh coriander

FOR SERVING

1 cinnamon stick

Rice

4 green cardamom pods, crushed

Roti (page 239)

2 or 3 fresh curry leaves (see page 27) 2 tsp garam masala 2 large ripe tomatoes, chopped 800g/1¾lbs tomato passata 500ml/17fl oz chicken stock 240ml/8fl oz coconut milk 2 yellow plantains, cut into 8mm/¹ ⁄ ³ in dice 3 carrots, chopped

Picklz (see Pickles at the Rooster, page 244)

1  Heat the oil in a large casserole over a medium heat. Add the onions, garlic, ginger, lemongrass, cinnamon, cardamom pods and curry leaves. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the onion is turning golden, about 15 minutes. Add the garam masala and cook, stirring, for 1 minute.

1 tsp ground turmeric 1 tbsp curry paste (hot or mild)

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Perfect block-party food.

2  Add the chopped

tomatoes and passata, the chicken stock, coconut milk, plantains, carrots, turmeric and curry paste. Bring to a simmer and cook, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes to start developing the flavours.

3  Stir in the goat meat,

bring back to a simmer a and cook for 10 minutes. Stir in the water, turn the heat down to low, and partly cover the casserole. Simmer, stirring and scraping the bottom of the pot occasionally, until the meat is tender, about 11/2 hours. Season with salt.

4  Spoon the stew into a

serving bowl and garnish with the coriander. Serve with rice, roti and Picklz.


Curried Goat Stew Serves 4 to 6

2 tbsp grapeseed oil 4 red onions, roughly chopped 4 garlic cloves, crushed 1 (8mm/¹ ⁄ ³ in) piece ginger, peeled and smashed 1 lemongrass stalk, trimmed, smashed and finely chopped (see page 28)

There’s always a Caribbean family that seems to take over the farmers’ market on my block each weekend. They usually serve something curried – sometimes goat, sometimes chicken – with roti flatbread. It’s rustic and lip-smacking good. Perfect block-party food. Like any stew, this will be even better the next day, so make it in advance if you can.

1.6kg/3½lbs bone-in goat stewing meat 60ml/2fl oz water Coarse sea salt 2 tbsp chopped fresh coriander

FOR SERVING

1 cinnamon stick

Rice

4 green cardamom pods, crushed

Roti (page 239)

2 or 3 fresh curry leaves (see page 27) 2 tsp garam masala 2 large ripe tomatoes, chopped 800g/1¾lbs tomato passata 500ml/17fl oz chicken stock 240ml/8fl oz coconut milk 2 yellow plantains, cut into 8mm/¹ ⁄ ³ in dice 3 carrots, chopped

Picklz (see Pickles at the Rooster, page 244)

1  Heat the oil in a large casserole over a medium heat. Add the onions, garlic, ginger, lemongrass, cinnamon, cardamom pods and curry leaves. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the onion is turning golden, about 15 minutes. Add the garam masala and cook, stirring, for 1 minute.

1 tsp ground turmeric 1 tbsp curry paste (hot or mild)

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Perfect block-party food.

2  Add the chopped

tomatoes and passata, the chicken stock, coconut milk, plantains, carrots, turmeric and curry paste. Bring to a simmer and cook, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes to start developing the flavours.

3  Stir in the goat meat,

bring back to a simmer a and cook for 10 minutes. Stir in the water, turn the heat down to low, and partly cover the casserole. Simmer, stirring and scraping the bottom of the pot occasionally, until the meat is tender, about 11/2 hours. Season with salt.

4  Spoon the stew into a

serving bowl and garnish with the coriander. Serve with rice, roti and Picklz.


Sunday Tomato Eggs Serves 4

1 tbsp olive oil 115g/4oz cooking chorizo, chopped 1 onion, chopped 2 tbsp finely chopped celery 2 garlic cloves, chopped 400g/14oz tomato passata 1 tbsp capers, drained 3 Kalamata olives, pitted and chopped 1 chipotle in adobo, finely chopped

Tomatoes, celery, capers, horseradish – these ingredients remind me of a Bloody Mary. And that would not be a bad choice to accompany these eggs.

→ If you can find Mexican soft chorizo, you won’t need to chop it. But the commercial stuff comes in casings, which need to be removed, and the sausage will have to be chopped. → Think about who you’re cooking for. If your guests aren’t fans of runny yolks, cover the pan while you cook the eggs.

1  Heat the olive oil in a large cast-iron frying pan over a medium heat. Add the chorizo, onion, celery and garlic, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onion starts to soften, about 5 minutes. Stir in the passata, capers, olives, chipotle and water, and bring to a simmer. Simmer until the sauce is thick, 5 to 7 minutes. Stir in the horseradish and season with salt and pepper.

2  Crack each egg into

the sauce and cook until the whites are set, 5 to 6 minutes.

3  Put a piece of toast on

each of four plates. Spoon 2 eggs onto each piece of toast and divide any sauce left in the pan. Top the eggs with burrata if using, drizzle with extra-virgin olive oil, tear the basil leaves and drop on top, and serve.

60ml/2fl oz water 1½ tsp horseradish, preferably freshly grated Coarse sea salt and freshly ground black pepper 8 large eggs 4 slices country bread, toasted 230g/8oz burrata, at room temperature, cut into pieces (optional) Extra-virgin olive oil 4 fresh basil leaves

“We just know inside that we’re queens. And these are the crowns we wear.” – Felecia McMillan, journalist, From Crowns: Portraits of Black Women in Church Hats by Michael Cunningham and Craig Marberry

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Sunday Tomato Eggs Serves 4

1 tbsp olive oil 115g/4oz cooking chorizo, chopped 1 onion, chopped 2 tbsp finely chopped celery 2 garlic cloves, chopped 400g/14oz tomato passata 1 tbsp capers, drained 3 Kalamata olives, pitted and chopped 1 chipotle in adobo, finely chopped

Tomatoes, celery, capers, horseradish – these ingredients remind me of a Bloody Mary. And that would not be a bad choice to accompany these eggs.

→ If you can find Mexican soft chorizo, you won’t need to chop it. But the commercial stuff comes in casings, which need to be removed, and the sausage will have to be chopped. → Think about who you’re cooking for. If your guests aren’t fans of runny yolks, cover the pan while you cook the eggs.

1  Heat the olive oil in a large cast-iron frying pan over a medium heat. Add the chorizo, onion, celery and garlic, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onion starts to soften, about 5 minutes. Stir in the passata, capers, olives, chipotle and water, and bring to a simmer. Simmer until the sauce is thick, 5 to 7 minutes. Stir in the horseradish and season with salt and pepper.

2  Crack each egg into

the sauce and cook until the whites are set, 5 to 6 minutes.

3  Put a piece of toast on

each of four plates. Spoon 2 eggs onto each piece of toast and divide any sauce left in the pan. Top the eggs with burrata if using, drizzle with extra-virgin olive oil, tear the basil leaves and drop on top, and serve.

60ml/2fl oz water 1½ tsp horseradish, preferably freshly grated Coarse sea salt and freshly ground black pepper 8 large eggs 4 slices country bread, toasted 230g/8oz burrata, at room temperature, cut into pieces (optional) Extra-virgin olive oil 4 fresh basil leaves

“We just know inside that we’re queens. And these are the crowns we wear.” – Felecia McMillan, journalist, From Crowns: Portraits of Black Women in Church Hats by Michael Cunningham and Craig Marberry

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Uncle T’s Meatballs Serves 4

The staff first tasted these meatballs when we started to develop the recipe for Streetbird, my second Harlem restaurant, and they were a favourite right out of the gate. They’re tender, with an extra-crisp exterior, and served on a rich, thick ragu with a spoonful of ricotta and a shower of lemon zest. Of course, I think of my Uncle T, who took me fishing when I was young. But the Uncle T here is universal, a tribute to every Italian-American uncle.

FOR THE MEAT SAUCE

FOR THE MEATBALLS

1 small onion, chopped

450g/1lb boneless, skinless chicken thighs, cut into chunks

1 small carrot, chopped 1 celery stalk, chopped 2 tsp olive oil 230g/½lb minced beef 230g/½lb minced pork

½ tsp hot red pepper flakes 2 tbsp tomato purée 180ml/6fl oz chicken stock 60ml/2fl oz dry white wine 400g/14oz tomato passata

115g/¼lb chicken livers 90g/3¼oz dried breadcrumbs 120ml/4fl oz double cream 1 large egg 2 tsp fresh lemon juice

½ tsp chopped fresh oregano ½ tsp chopped fresh thyme leaves ½ tsp ancho chilli powder Coarse sea salt

½ tsp sugar 1 tsp grated lemon zest

FOR SERVING

1 tsp chopped fresh oregano

Groundnut oil for frying

Coarse sea salt

Ricotta cheese Grated Parmesan cheese Grated lemon zest Freshly ground black pepper Toasted country or sourdough bread

FOR THE MEAT SAUCE 1  Put the onion, carrot and celery into a food processor and process until very finely chopped.

2  Heat the oil in a

saucepan over a mediumhigh heat. Add the beef and pork, and cook until browned, about 8 minutes. Stir constantly at the beginning. Once the meat is in small crumbles and is no longer pink, you can stir occasionally.

3  Add the finely chopped

vegetables, the red pepper, flakes and tomato purée and cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Add the stock and wine, and cook, stirring and scraping to deglaze the pan, for 2 minutes. Add the passata and sugar, and bring to a simmer. Turn the heat down to low and simmer until very thick, 50 minutes to 1 hour.

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Uncle T’s Meatballs Serves 4

The staff first tasted these meatballs when we started to develop the recipe for Streetbird, my second Harlem restaurant, and they were a favourite right out of the gate. They’re tender, with an extra-crisp exterior, and served on a rich, thick ragu with a spoonful of ricotta and a shower of lemon zest. Of course, I think of my Uncle T, who took me fishing when I was young. But the Uncle T here is universal, a tribute to every Italian-American uncle.

FOR THE MEAT SAUCE

FOR THE MEATBALLS

1 small onion, chopped

450g/1lb boneless, skinless chicken thighs, cut into chunks

1 small carrot, chopped 1 celery stalk, chopped 2 tsp olive oil 230g/½lb minced beef 230g/½lb minced pork

½ tsp hot red pepper flakes 2 tbsp tomato purée 180ml/6fl oz chicken stock 60ml/2fl oz dry white wine 400g/14oz tomato passata

115g/¼lb chicken livers 90g/3¼oz dried breadcrumbs 120ml/4fl oz double cream 1 large egg 2 tsp fresh lemon juice

½ tsp chopped fresh oregano ½ tsp chopped fresh thyme leaves ½ tsp ancho chilli powder Coarse sea salt

½ tsp sugar 1 tsp grated lemon zest

FOR SERVING

1 tsp chopped fresh oregano

Groundnut oil for frying

Coarse sea salt

Ricotta cheese Grated Parmesan cheese Grated lemon zest Freshly ground black pepper Toasted country or sourdough bread

FOR THE MEAT SAUCE 1  Put the onion, carrot and celery into a food processor and process until very finely chopped.

2  Heat the oil in a

saucepan over a mediumhigh heat. Add the beef and pork, and cook until browned, about 8 minutes. Stir constantly at the beginning. Once the meat is in small crumbles and is no longer pink, you can stir occasionally.

3  Add the finely chopped

vegetables, the red pepper, flakes and tomato purée and cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Add the stock and wine, and cook, stirring and scraping to deglaze the pan, for 2 minutes. Add the passata and sugar, and bring to a simmer. Turn the heat down to low and simmer until very thick, 50 minutes to 1 hour.

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4  Stir in the lemon zest

and oregano, and taste for salt. You can make this a day ahead. Add the zest and salt after you reheat the sauce.

7  Add the minced chicken and livers, the lemon juice, oregano, thyme, ancho chilli powder and a big pinch of salt. Mix well. Cover and refrigerate for 30 minutes.

FOR THE MEATBALLS

5  Put the chicken thighs

and livers through a meat mincer (start with the thighs) or mince them in batches in a food processor.

6  Mix the breadcrumbs,

cream and egg together in a large bowl. Leave for a few minutes so the breadcrumbs can soften.

8  Preheat the oven to

180°C/350°F/Gas Mark 4. Line a rimmed baking sheet with baking parchment.

9  Roll out 16 golf ball–

sized meatballs. Put them on the baking sheet and bake until cooked through, 30 minutes.

TO SERVE

10  Heat 8mm/1/3in of

groundnut oil in a castiron frying pan over a medium-high heat. Add the meatballs and fry until browned and crisp all over, about 3 minutes total.

11  Spoon a generous

amount of the sauce into four shallow bowls. Top each with 4 meatballs, a spoonful of ricotta and some grated Parmesan. Finish with a sprinkling of lemon zest and a grind or two of pepper. The toast is for wiping up the sauce.

CHICKEN-SKIN POP This is a great snack for family and friends. ► Bring a saucepan of water to a boil. Add the skin from 6 chicken thighs, bring back to a boil and blanch for 1 minute. Drain and dry the skin on paper towels. ► Fill a saucepan one-third full with groundnut oil. Set the pan over a medium-high heat and heat the oil to 180°C/350°F. Dust the skins with a teaspoon of Chicken Shake (page 84) and dredge lightly in flour. Fry the skin until brown and crisp, 3 to 4 minutes. Drain on paper towels and season immediately with salt. The skins will continue to crisp as they cool. ► Pop 100g/3½oz popcorn in 3 tablespoons groundnut oil in a large heavy pan over a medium heat. Dump the popcorn into a big bowl, drizzle in a little melted butter and add a teaspoon of Chicken Shake. Toss. Crumble in the chicken skins and toss again. Pop!

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4  Stir in the lemon zest

and oregano, and taste for salt. You can make this a day ahead. Add the zest and salt after you reheat the sauce.

7  Add the minced chicken and livers, the lemon juice, oregano, thyme, ancho chilli powder and a big pinch of salt. Mix well. Cover and refrigerate for 30 minutes.

FOR THE MEATBALLS

5  Put the chicken thighs

and livers through a meat mincer (start with the thighs) or mince them in batches in a food processor.

6  Mix the breadcrumbs,

cream and egg together in a large bowl. Leave for a few minutes so the breadcrumbs can soften.

8  Preheat the oven to

180°C/350°F/Gas Mark 4. Line a rimmed baking sheet with baking parchment.

9  Roll out 16 golf ball–

sized meatballs. Put them on the baking sheet and bake until cooked through, 30 minutes.

TO SERVE

10  Heat 8mm/1/3in of

groundnut oil in a castiron frying pan over a medium-high heat. Add the meatballs and fry until browned and crisp all over, about 3 minutes total.

11  Spoon a generous

amount of the sauce into four shallow bowls. Top each with 4 meatballs, a spoonful of ricotta and some grated Parmesan. Finish with a sprinkling of lemon zest and a grind or two of pepper. The toast is for wiping up the sauce.

CHICKEN-SKIN POP This is a great snack for family and friends. ► Bring a saucepan of water to a boil. Add the skin from 6 chicken thighs, bring back to a boil and blanch for 1 minute. Drain and dry the skin on paper towels. ► Fill a saucepan one-third full with groundnut oil. Set the pan over a medium-high heat and heat the oil to 180°C/350°F. Dust the skins with a teaspoon of Chicken Shake (page 84) and dredge lightly in flour. Fry the skin until brown and crisp, 3 to 4 minutes. Drain on paper towels and season immediately with salt. The skins will continue to crisp as they cool. ► Pop 100g/3½oz popcorn in 3 tablespoons groundnut oil in a large heavy pan over a medium heat. Dump the popcorn into a big bowl, drizzle in a little melted butter and add a teaspoon of Chicken Shake. Toss. Crumble in the chicken skins and toss again. Pop!

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HA

m R Le

ER

THE RED ROOSTER CoOKBOOK

www.pavilionbooks.com

D

ROOST

RE

MARCUS SAMUELSSON

UK £25.00

MARCUS SAMUELSSON

THE COOKBOOK

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