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EPISCOPAL SCHOOL OF ACADIANA

Upper School Handbook for Students and Parents 2011-2012

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Dear Episcopal School of Acadiana Community, Welcome to ESA! ESA is a learning community, rooted in scholarship and honor, where students and teachers learn and work together to achieve the common goals of academic excellence, leading lives of integrity, and developing the physical and spiritual dimensions of our lives. This is important work, and ESA was founded to provide a model of such an approach to teaching, learning and life for the greater Acadiana community. This Handbook is a reflection of the fact that we are one school with three divisions spread out over two campuses. You will find introductory materials and then a common set of policies and expectations that extend school-wide followed by subsections demonstrating the unique and developmentally appropriate practices for each division – Lower School (preK-3 to 5th grade), Middle School (6th-8th grade), and Upper School (9th-12th grade). Our Handbook is best understood as a guideline or framework for common understanding of our basic policies, practices, and approaches. As a framework, it is not intended to provide an exhaustive list of all policies and rules. Such a document or approach would be inconsistent with our school mission and philosophy where freedom, responsibility and accountability in all that we do are our guide stars. As a framework, it provides a philosophical context that we use in deciding matters not covered as policy, and it provides a context for addressing individual cases as the need arises. We are glad that you are with us, and we look forward to growing and learning with you as a member of our community. If you have any questions or concerns, please let us know. Respectfully,

Charles H. Skipper, Ph.D. Headmaster Episcopal School of Acadiana

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EPISCOPAL SCHOOL OF ACADIANA www.ESAcadiana.com

CONTACT INFORMATION Middle and Upper School (grades 6-12) P.O. Box 380 Cade, LA 70519 337-365-1416 phone 337-367-9841 fax 337-369-1671 athletics Lower School (preK - grade 5) 721 E. Kaliste Saloom Rd. Lafayette, LA 70508 337-993-2263 phone 337-993-3706 fax

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MISSION STATEMENT.....................................................................................................................................7 VISION AND VALUES STATEMENT .............................................................................................................7 SCHOOL MOTTO...............................................................................................................................................7 SCHOOL COLORS .............................................................................................................................................7 NAVY BLUE AND GRAY ..................................................................................................................................7 PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION......................................................................................................................8 EPISCOPAL SCHOOL OF ACADIANA ..........................................................................................................9 SEAL AND SYMBOLISM ..................................................................................................................................9 ESA ALMA MATER .........................................................................................................................................10 ESA SCHOOL PRAYER...................................................................................................................................10 IF YOU HAVE QUESTIONS ABOUT… ........................................................................................................12 ACADEMICS .....................................................................................................................................................14 ACADEMIC PROGRAM ...............................................................................................................................14 ACADEMIC CALENDAR ...........................................................................................................................14 COURSE LOAD..........................................................................................................................................14 ACADEMIC DIPLOMA REQUIREMENTS ...............................................................................................14 AWARDING OF CREDIT...........................................................................................................................16 REPORTING PRACTICES.............................................................................................................................16 REPORTS OF PROGRESS.........................................................................................................................16 INTERIM REPORTS ...................................................................................................................................17 NETCLASSROOM ACCESS .......................................................................................................................17 GRADING SYSTEM ......................................................................................................................................18 COMPUTING GRADE POINT AVERAGE ................................................................................................18 ACADEMIC HONORS...................................................................................................................................18 ACADEMIC RANKING ................................................................................ Error! Bookmark not defined. NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY ..................................................................................................................18 HEADMASTER’S LIST...............................................................................................................................19 HONOR ROLL ............................................................................................................................................19 ACADEMIC DEFICIENCY ...........................................................................................................................19 ACADEMIC PROBATION..........................................................................................................................19 STUDY HALLS ...........................................................................................................................................20 GENERAL INFORMATION ..........................................................................................................................20 UNSCHEDULED CLASS PERIODS ..........................................................................................................20 COURSE CHANGES ..................................................................................................................................20 HOMEWORK..............................................................................................................................................21 LATE ASSIGNMENTS ................................................................................................................................21 INCOMPLETES..........................................................................................................................................21 BACK-WORK AFTER SCHOOL ................................................................................................................21 EXAMS........................................................................................................................................................22 AWARDING OF DIPLOMA .......................................................................................................................22 ATHLETICS.......................................................................................................................................................23 COACHING STAFF .......................................................................................................................................23 VARSITY ATHLETIC ELIGIBILITY............................................................................................................23 PHYSICIAN’S STATEMENT ........................................................................................................................23 TEAM TRIPS ..................................................................................................................................................23 SPORTSMANSHIP.........................................................................................................................................24

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LHSAA’S REGULATIONS FOR ATHLETES .............................................................................................24 POLICIES FOR THE JENNY WARE JONES GYMNASIUM ......................................................................24 STUDENT LIFE.................................................................................................................................................26 THE HONOR SYSTEM ..................................................................................................................................26 ESA HONOR CODE ...................................................................................................................................26 HONOR COUNCIL ....................................................................................................................................27 SCHOOL DISCIPLINE...................................................................................................................................27 CODE OF CONDUCT ....................................................................................................................................28 SCHOOL EXPECTATIONS ........................................................................................................................28 DISCIPLINARY RESPONSES.......................................................................................................................29 DISCIPLINE COUNCIL .............................................................................................................................29 SEPARATION FROM ESA .........................................................................................................................30 BULLYING..................................................................................................................................................30 DISCLOSURE OF DISCIPLINARY RECORD ...........................................................................................31 SENIOR STUDENT’S CHANGE IN STATUS.............................................................................................31 DRUG AND ALCOHOL POLICY...............................................................................................................32 Prohibition from Campus and School Sponsored Events ...........................................................................32 LHSAA’S REGULATIONS FOR ATHLETES .............................................................................................32 Communication to Families Regarding Personal or Health Concerns ......................................................32 SCHOOL COUNSELING AND ASSISTANCE ...........................................................................................32 VIOLATIONS OF THE DRUG AND ALCOHOL POLICY.........................................................................33 PRESCRIBED MEDICATION ....................................................................................................................33 SEARCH AND SEIZURE POLICY................................................................................................................34 ATTENDANCE ..............................................................................................................................................34 ABSENCES FROM SCHOOL .....................................................................................................................34 EXCUSED ABSENCES...............................................................................................................................35 EXCUSED ABSENCE MAKE-UP WORK ..................................................................................................35 UNEXCUSED ABSENCES .........................................................................................................................35 CONSEQUENCES FOR UNEXCUSED ABSENCES .................................................................................36 ANTICIPATED ABSENCES .......................................................................................................................36 UNEXCUSED ANTICIPATED ABSENCES ...............................................................................................36 CONSEQUENCES FOR UNEXCUSED ANTICIPATED ABSENCES .......................................................37 ABSENCES DUE TO COLLEGE VISITS ...................................................................................................37 TARDIES.....................................................................................................................................................37 LATE TO SCHOOL.....................................................................................................................................37 CONSEQUENCES FOR TARDIES ............................................................................................................38 SIGN-IN/SIGN-OUT ...................................................................................................................................38 SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES ....................................................................................................................39 DRESS CODE .................................................................................................................................................39 FREE DRESS..............................................................................................................................................40 FORMAL DRESS ........................................................................................................................................40 TRANSPORTATION......................................................................................................................................41 AUTOMOBILES ON CAMPUS ..................................................................................................................41 BUS REGULATIONS..................................................................................................................................41 THE LATE BUS ..........................................................................................................................................42 STUDENT DROP-OFF/PARENT PARKING .............................................................................................42 GUESTS OR VISITORS ON CAMPUS .........................................................................................................42 DANCE REGULATIONS...............................................................................................................................42 LIBRARY / MEDIA CENTER USAGE..........................................................................................................42 POLICIES AND FINES ..............................................................................................................................43 PROPER LIBRARY BEHAVIOR.................................................................................................................43 ELECTRONICS ..............................................................................................................................................43 GUIDELINES FOR CELL PHONE USAGE ON CAMPUS .......................................................................43 POLICY FOR TECHNOLOGIES ...................................................................................................................44 OFF LIMITS....................................................................................................................................................45

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STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND SERVICES ...................................................................................................46 CHAPEL .....................................................................................................................................................46 ADVISING AND COUNSELING ................................................................................................................46 STANDARDIZED TESTING CALENDAR & INFORMATION ..................................................................47 ACT TEST DATES ......................................................................................................................................47 SAT I & SAT II TEST DATES .....................................................................................................................47 AP TEST DATES.........................................................................................................................................48 EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES...........................................................................................................48 STUDENT GOVERNMENT CANDIDATES................................................................................................49 CLASS OFFICERS......................................................................................................................................49 HELPFUL INFORMATION.............................................................................................................................50 MEDICAL INFORMATION ..........................................................................................................................50 PRESCRIPTION MEDICATION ................................................................................................................50 BUSINESS AND FINANCIAL.......................................................................................................................50 STUDENT ACCIDENT INSURANCE POLICY ...........................................................................................51 ASBESTOS MANAGEMENT........................................................................................................................51 LOST AND FOUND .......................................................................................................................................51 SCHOOL CLOSING .......................................................................................................................................51 STATEMENT OF NON-DISCRIMINATION POLICY................................................................................51 USE OF SCHOOL NAME & HANDBOOK....................................................................................................52

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MISSION STATEMENT Episcopal School of Acadiana is a coeducational, independent day school for students in grades pre-K through 12. Its mission is to instill in every student the habits of scholarship and honor. ESA challenges students to develop intellectually, spiritually, and physically.

VISION AND VALUES STATEMENT At ESA, we nurture the twin virtues of freedom and responsibility. We pursue these virtues in the daily life of our school by balancing joy and challenge, inventiveness and tradition, respect and informality, trust and support. We cultivate and celebrate this balance in our vibrant, eclectic community that prizes both individual freedom and cooperation. We take responsibility for what we do and say, and freely use our individual talents and strengths to become energetic citizens who sustain our community by making positive contributions. In order to accomplish ESA’s mission our students are expected to learn, live and grow through the following: Habits of honor develop in our community, which expects the choice of right over wrong. Our code of honor promotes fairness, truth, and honesty; our commitment to honor affords the freedom necessary for responsibility and the confidence that ideas, ideals, and property are respected. Habits of scholarship develop from the relationship between passionate teachers and creative students; fueled by the joy of discovery, self-motivated students exhibit an intellectual vitality which strengthens their beliefs yet inspires an open mind. Students develop intellectually in our nurturing environment where they master skills and knowledge. Students are challenged to learn, think and question critically; students take intellectual risks, learn how to express and support their ideas, and are encouraged to defend their positions. Students experience the Episcopal traditions and liturgies and they are supported in their search to discover a personal relationship with God. Spiritual development follows through sharing meaningful experiences with each other and through offering our leadership and talents at ESA and our services to the larger community. Students’ physical development is grounded in our physical education curriculum that encourages lifelong health and physical activity. Every student acquires physical skills, learns the value of competition and teamwork, and cultivates the ethos of sportsmanship.

SCHOOL MOTTO "EXCELLENCE FROM WITHIN" SCHOOL COLORS NAVY BLUE AND GRAY

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PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION Episcopal School of Acadiana holds as its basic purpose the development of an academic environment in which a student's intellectual, emotional, social and physical growth are accompanied by a corresponding spiritual and moral growth. We are an Episcopal School, a community which professes the Christian Faith as stated in the Apostles' and Nicene Creeds. Within this environment, and using the resources of the Christian Faith as practiced within the Episcopal Church, we emphasize that true learning is a cooperative effort among students, parents, faculty, administrators and staff to stimulate critical thinking, self-reliance and academic competence in a rapidly changing world. We also believe that each student, upon graduation, should be wellprepared to continue his/her education on the college level. As an Episcopal school, we affirm the educational tradition of academic freedom. The school provides opportunities for each student to achieve self-fulfillment as an individual and as a member of a community. Activities in and out of the classroom help students to recognize the need for self-discipline, a sense of citizenship within the democratic process and the development of their spiritual dimension and moral responsibilities. To these ends, we recognize that superior faculty, as well as supportive and involved parents, are of paramount importance. We recognize the importance of physical well-being in the holistic development of the individual, as well as the role of the arts in our lives as essential to understanding the culture man has created. Recreational activities promote attitudes of fair play, teamwork and leadership. Episcopal School of Acadiana seeks to instill in each student self-confidence, an awareness of one's relationship to God and man, and a continuing development of mind, body and spirit.

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EPISCOPAL SCHOOL OF ACADIANA SEAL AND SYMBOLISM The Episcopal School of Acadiana crest was designed by the late Mrs. Charles (Penny) Godchaux of Abbeville, Louisiana. Circle: Stands for eternity because it is without beginning and without end.1 Crook: "The hooked staff is a pastoral attribute in the church and a symbol of faith. By virtue of the sigmoid significance of the hook, it stands for divine power, communication and connection; because of its spiral form it is a symbol of creative power."2 Chi Rho: Formed by the two crooks - this is the earliest monogram of Christ3 from the first two letters in the word for Christ in Greek. Miter: A traditional headpiece worn by some bishops, emblematic of the highest order of the ministry. Used in this seal to denote that the Episcopal School of Acadiana is a Diocesan School and as such shares the benefit and direction of the Bishop. Jewels within the miter - there are twelve small jewels symbolizing the twelve Apostles. These are centered around a single larger jewel representing Christ. The two crosses on the miter represent the two natures of Christ. Celtic Cross (Iona): Generally associated with the Anglican, hence Episcopal, Church. The sign of the cross was "employed by early Christians to direct special attention to the sacrifice of our Lord and the manner of His death. The cross also taught the earlier Christians, as it does us, the lesson of personal dedication to our Redeemer, who commanded His followers to take up the cross."4 Laurel Leaf: Suggestive of eternity because the foliage does not wilt.1 It is a Christian symbol of triumph. (I Corinthians 9:24 - 27) Colors: Blue - signifies heavenly love and truth; "eternity, faith, and truth." Gold - "symbolizes sovereignty, the sun, love, constancy, dignity, and wisdom."5

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Symbols of the Church, Carroll E. Whittemore A Dictionary of Symbols, J. E. Cirlot 3 Saints, Signs, and Symbols, W. Ellwood Post 4 The Sign Language of Our Faith, Helen Stuart Griffith 5 Ecclesiastical Embroideries, Beryl Dean 2

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ESA Alma Mater Beneath the Oaks, Amid the Cane Beneath the oaks, amid the cane, my thoughts are always turning back again to the gentle place that formed my youth where I learned to seek and discern the truth. A place of study and a place of play; the place where I made the friends I love today, where excellence we both sought and gained, beneath the oaks, amid the cane. We stretched our minds and our bodies too, as we sought the limits of what we could do, in lab and class, on field or court, for the love of learning or the joy of sport. At times the work was hard, the play it was intense, but as we grew, it gave us confidence that there’s no height that we cannot attain, beneath the oaks, amid the cane. God grant His blessing on this place, guard and preserve it by His grace. In work and play His blessing give; that in His Kingdom may its meaning live. Make us gentle, generous, truthful and kind with gallant courage in both heart and mind, that our blessed fellowship may long remain beneath the oaks, amid the cane.

ESA School Prayer O heavenly Father, who has given us Thy Son, Jesus Christ, to be our Friend and example, help us to understand His friendship, and to do such things as will please Him. Bless us in our work and in our play. Make us gentle, generous, truthful, kind and brave. Keep us in purity of heart, and let the life of our school go on from strength to strength and have its place and meaning in Thy kingdom. All of which we ask through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

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UPPER SCHOOL HANDBOOK FOR STUDENTS AND PARENTS 2011-2012

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IF YOU HAVE QUESTIONS ABOUT… ACADEMIC ISSUES:

Classroom teacher or student’s faculty advisor US Academic Dean – Scott Chrysler

ABSENCE/ATTENDANCE:

Sign-in/out – Upper School Receptionist Infractions/rules – Andy North Anticipated Absences – Andy North

ADMISSIONS:

Jon Berthelot

ADVISOR/ADVISEE:

Andy North, Lacie Chappuis

ATHLETICS:

Mike Bourgeois

BUSINESS/FINANCIAL: Tuition, fees, etc. – Christy Harson Online Bookstore – James Dunlap BUS ROUTES/TRANSPORTATION ISSUES: Christy Harson CALENDAR:

Kathy Back

CLASS SPONSORS/TEAM LEADERS:

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Andy LeGoullon Josh Caffery Julie Dawson Ashley Jankower Yoly Mayeux Bill Wood

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Seniors – Garrett Rosen Juniors – Cindy Migues Sophomores – Summer Slater Freshmen – Andy LeGoullon

CLASS TEAMS: 11th

Summer Slater Scott Jordan Diana Maggini Brian McIntyre Elise Sonnier Joe Torres

Cindy Migues Jeff Begnaud Lisa Boyer Mike Bourgeois Jill Broussard Scott Chyrsler

12th Garrett Rosen Mark Broussard Stu Cornwell Jo Faulk Kat Movassaghi Allie Rosen

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IF YOU HAVE QUESTIONS ABOUT… CLASS TRIPS:

Individual faculty sponsor and Paul Baker

COLLEGE COUNSELING:

Scott Chrysler

DISCIPLINE:

Andy North, Paul Baker

DEVELOPMENT/FUNDRAISING: DIRECTORY CHANGES:

Susan Dunlap

Kathy Back

DRIVER’S LICENSE INSURANCE FORM: Kathy Back FACILITY USE/RENTAL:

Christy Harson

FINANCIAL AID:

Jon Berthelot

GRADES AND TEACHER COMMENTS:

Scott Chrysler

GRADE ADVISORY TEAMS:

Refer to class lists

GUIDANCE COUNSELOR:

Lacie Chappuis

HONOR CODE ISSUES:

Andy North, Paul Baker

HOT LUNCH:

Jill McGeehee

LEARNING CENTER:

Jill Broussard

NEWSLETTER:

Falcon Forecast – Susan Dunlap Oasis – Susan Dunlap

PARENTS' GROUP:

Kelly Kinsland

SCHEDULING ISSUES:

Scott Chrysler, Paul Baker

SENIOR TRIP:

Mark Broussard, Paul Baker

SPECIAL PERMISSIONS:

Andy North

STUDENT ACTIVITIES:

Andy North

TESTING:

Admissions – Jon Berthelot AP (Advanced Placement) – Scott Chrysler PSAT, PLAN, SAT, and ACT – Scott Chrysler

TRANSCRIPTS:

Kathy Back

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ACADEMICS ACADEMIC PROGRAM ACADEMIC CALENDAR The ESA academic year is divided into two semesters. Each semester consists of two grading periods and an exam period.

COURSE LOAD Every student must take a minimum of five courses each semester. The normal course load is five full-year core courses and one or two electives each semester. A core course is one in English, mathematics, science, history, world languages or computer science.

ACADEMIC DIPLOMA REQUIREMENTS Class of 2012 Episcopal School of Acadiana requires that a student earns a minimum of 23.5 units or credits to fulfill the academic requirements for a diploma. Of these 23.5 units, 15 units are in specifically required courses and 8.5 may be in courses of a student’s choice while adhering to the required distribution of units among the disciplines. Discipline English Math History Science World Languages Computer Science Health & Physical Education Visual and/or Performing Arts Public Speaking Elective

Required Units 4.0 4.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 0.5 2.0 1.5 0.5 2.0

Required Courses English I, II, III, IV in sequential order Algebra I Civics, Western Civilization, U.S. History Biology 3 units of one language Computer Science I Health & Physical Education I & II Public Speaking

Notes on Required Units: • Western Civilization may be substituted with AP European History • U.S. History may be substituted with AP U.S. History • Units earned in any course beyond those fulfilling a discipline’s graduation requirement may count as an elective unit • Eight Grade Algebra I – Successful completion (final grade of C or better) fulfills 1 required unit of mathematic for graduation • French 7 and French 8 – Successful completion of these two courses, at the recommendation of the World Languages Department, fulfills 1 required unit of world languages for graduation

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• •

Spanish 7 and Spanish 8 – Successful completion of these two courses, at the recommendation of the World Languages Department, fulfills 1 required unit of world languages for graduation Eighth Grade Computer Science I – Successful completion fulfills 0.5 required unit of computer science for graduation Enrollment in Health & Physical Education is required of all 9th and 10th grade students

Class of 2013 and Beyond To comply with the Core 4 Curriculum adopted by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education in the Fall of 2008, Episcopal School of Acadiana requires that a student earns a minimum of 24 units or credits to fulfill the academic requirements for a diploma beginning with the Class of 2013 and beyond. Of these 24 units, 21 units are in specifically required courses and 3 may be in courses of a student’s choice while adhering to the required distribution of units among the disciplines. Discipline English Math History

Required Units 4.0 4.0 4.0

Science

4.0

World Languages Computer Science Health & Physical Education Visual and/or Performing Arts Public Speaking Elective

3.0 0.5 2.0 1.5 0.5 0.5

Required Courses English I, II, III, IV in sequential order Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Pre-Calculus Civics, World History, Western Civilization, U.S. History Physics I (required of all 9th graders at ESA), Biology, Chemistry, 1 additional unit in a science courses of choice 3 units of one language Computer Science I Health & Physical Education I & II Public Speaking

Notes on Required Units: • • • • •

Western Civilization may be substituted with AP European History U.S. History may be substituted with AP U.S. History Units earned in any course beyond those fulfilling a discipline’s graduation requirement may count as an elective unit Eight Grade Algebra I – Successful completion (final grade of C or better) fulfills 1 required unit of mathematic for graduation French 7 and French 8 – Successful completion of these two courses, at the recommendation of the World Languages Department, fulfills 1 required unit of world languages for graduation Spanish 7 and Spanish 8 – Successful completion of these two courses, at the recommendation of the World Languages Department, fulfills 1 required unit of

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• •

world languages for graduation Eighth Grade Computer Science I – Successful completion fulfills 0.5 required unit of computer science for graduation Enrollment in Health & Physical Education is required of all 9th and 10th grade students

AWARDING OF CREDIT A. To receive credit in a course, a student must earn a final grade of at least D-; however, ESA reserves the right to require that any student earning a D+, D, or Dhave tutorial summer work or repeat the course before advancing to a higher level course in the subject area. Any course taken at another academic institution must be pre-approved by the Division Head if ESA credit is desired. B. Failing a course for the year will result in the student having to make up the work for the year (as directed by the teacher, department chair, and Head of Division) or repeat the course. Any course taken at another academic institution must be preapproved by the Head of Division if ESA credit is desired. Students who fail a course are may not be invited back to ESA the following year. C. Seniors must pass all courses scheduled in the senior year and may not fail the second semester of a year-long course to receive a diploma D. Eighth grade Algebra I – A student may receive an upper school credit upon the successful completion of eighth grade Algebra I with a C or better. E. French 7 and French 8 – At the recommendation of the World Language Department, a student who successfully completes both of these courses may receive one upper school foreign language credit. F. Spanish 7 and Spanish 8 - At the recommendation of the World Language Department, a student who successfully completes both of these courses may receive one upper school foreign language credit. G. Summer Program Credit All summer programs taken as a credit course must be pre-approved by the Head of Division and the appropriate department chair prior to the student's enrollment in the program. Grades earned at institutions other than ESA are not included in a student’s GPA, though will be listed on the transcript noting the appropriate awarded credit if proper documentation is received by ESA at the conclusion of the program.

REPORTING PRACTICES REPORTS OF PROGRESS ESA reports grades to students and parents at the end of each quarter. Semester grades are given at the end of the second and fourth quarters. Final course grades are the only grades

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recorded on transcripts. Students' advisors receive copies of their advisees’ grades and comments. Reports of Progress are available via NetClassroom usually by 6 pm three days after the end of a marking period.

INTERIM REPORTS Interim reports are mid-quarter reports available to parents via NetClassroom. Interim Reports serve to provide parents with a quick update regarding their student’s performance. Interims Grades will be posted for every student in every course. Should a student earn an Interim Grade of C- or below, that grade will be accompanied with a comment from the teacher. Grades of C or above might not receive a comment. For the first quarter interim, all students new to the Cade campus will receive a comment from every teacher addressing the student’s progress. Any student who is currently on Academic Probation will receive a comment on the Interim Report from every teacher.

NETCLASSROOM ACCESS ESA Middle and Upper Schools now post all Reports of Progress and Interim Reports online. Students and parents may access these reports using NetClassroom. NetClassroom is accessed using the Parents menu on the ESA website. Selecting the NetClassroom option from the menu will bring you to a page describing NetClassroom’s features and a link to the NetClassroom log in screen. Each member of a family has a unique user id and password. Families new to ESA will receive their user ids and passwords prior to the first day of classes. It is strongly recommended that each user change his or her password to one that is more convenient once logging in to NetClassroom. This can be done using the my settings menu in NetClassroom. Should a user forget his or her user id or password, it may be recovered by sending an email to netclassroom@esacadiana.com. Please be aware that NetClassroom is unable to retain historical reports and each new report posted replaces the last posted report. Families wishing to retain a copy of the Report of Progress or Interim Report for their records may either print a hard copy or save a digital version. Should a family not have access to NetClassroom, they should contact the Registrar and request a hard copy of reports to be mailed home.

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GRADING SYSTEM & CLASS RANK GRADING SCALE A

= 90-100 B = 80-89

C

= 70-79

D = 60-69

F

59-below

ESA uses a grading system that includes pluses and minuses. Letter grades correspond to the following numerical values and grade point equivalent on a student's transcript: A+ = 4.33 A = 4.00 A- = 3.67

B+ B B-

= 3.33 C+ = 3.00 C = 2.67 CF = 0.00

= 2.33 = 2.00 = 1.67

D+ = 1.33 D = 1.00 D- = 0.67

COMPUTING GRADE POINT AVERAGE ESA computes grade point averages using only grades earned at ESA. In computing GPA, ESA adds 0.67 additional quality points to grades earned in Advanced Placement courses and 0.33 to grade points earned in Honors courses. These additional points do not change the grade earned in a course but give it an additional weight when GPA is calculated. The following formula should be used when determining quality points awarded: Quality points awarded for course = (Grade in course + Weight) x Number of credits earned. No weight will be given to a grade of F.

ACADEMIC RANKING ESA does not academically rank its students.

ACADEMIC HONORS NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY The ArÊte Chapter of the National Honor Society was chartered in 1981. The National Honor Society recognizes and fosters academic achievement, character, service and leadership in secondary school students. Students who have achieved an ESA GPA of 3.33 or better and are second semester sophomores are eligible for membership. Students transferring to ESA from another school will be considered for membership after two semesters at ESA. New members are selected from this group by the Faculty Selection Committee with input from the entire faculty based on exemplified excellence in the areas of scholarship, leadership, service, and character. A student’s discipline and honor history will be considered when determining membership to NHS. Transfers from other NHS chapters must be reviewed by the Faculty Selection Committee and must conform to ESA selection standards.

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HEADMASTER’S LIST A student must receive a 3.67 grade point average and receive no grade (in any course) below a B- to receive this honor.

HONOR ROLL A student will receive Honor Roll recognition provided he or she receives no grade (in any course) below a B-.

ACADEMIC DEFICIENCY Episcopal School of Acadiana expects each of its students to make positive academic progress towards meeting diploma requirements each marking period. Failure to achieve at a level consistent with ESA’s college preparatory mission will limit a student’s options for college. The school recognizes that each student brings his or her own particular abilities, strengths, talents, and weaknesses to each class that impact how that progress is made. The school also recognizes that certain patterns develop over time with students who encounter difficulty with making adequate progress towards earning an ESA diploma. At the conclusion of each semester, each student’s grades and comments will be reviewed by the faculty to assess overall progress. Should a student not be making adequate progress, the following procedures have been established to help the family and the school evaluate if ESA is the most appropriate academic placement for the student.

ACADEMIC PROBATION A student will be placed on Academic Probation if he or she receives the following or any combination of the following: 1. three semester grades of C- or below in any courses, 2. two semester grades of D+, D, or D- or below in any course, 3. a semester grade of F in any course. Academic Probation is a signal to the student and the family that the student must focus on his or her academic preparation and commitment. A student placed on Academic Probation will have a meeting with his or her parent(s), member(s) of the Upper School administration, the student’s advisor, and all of the student’s teachers as soon as the meeting can be scheduled. At this meeting, teachers will outline their expectations and offer strategies to help the student improve academic performance. Avenues of additional academic support will also be discussed and possibly recommended to form a plan for improvement. One result of the meeting will be a specific list of improvements the student needs to demonstrate to be removed from Academic Probation. These improvements may include but are not limited to: specific grades and/or GPA earned for next semester, participation in extra help sessions, tutoring, and homework completion expectations. The student’s progress will be reviewed at a monthly faculty meeting.

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At the conclusion of the next semester, the student’s grades and comments will be reviewed by the Upper School administration to determine if improvement has been made. If the student has not improved sufficiently, the student may be asked to withdraw from ESA.

STUDY HALLS Any student who receives an interim, quarter, or semester grade in a course of C- or below; receives an Incomplete in any course; or is recommended by a faculty member will be required to have a monitored study hall the next quarter.

ACADEMIC SUPPORT PROGRAM The Academic Support program is designed to help meet the individual learning needs of students. Supporting the belief that students learn in different ways, the Director of Academic Support works with students, teachers, parents and administrators to identify individual needs and decide how best to meet those needs. Academic Support is a contracted service available on campus designed to assist students with any or all of the following skill needs: general study skills and organization; individualized study strategies matched to personal learning styles; reading and vocabulary development; special assistance to students with learning differences. Services vary based on the individual needs of the student. Students are scheduled to meet individually or in same-grade pairs for one class period each day throughout the year. Inclusion in Academic Support is based on diagnostic test results and/or consultation with parents and teachers

GENERAL INFORMATION UNSCHEDULED CLASS PERIODS ESA believes that it is important for students to learn how to effectively manage and use periods of time that are not formally scheduled. Accordingly, all Upper School students will traditionally have one or two unscheduled class periods a day. It is the student’s responsibility to make good use of this time. Seeing teachers for extra help outside of class, revising a paper, beginning the night’s homework, reviewing notes, having a study session with other students are just some ways students may choose to productively use this time. Though it is ultimately the student’s choice how this time will be used, should an individual’s academic performance fall below the school’s expectation, a formal study hall will be scheduled during one of those periods.

COURSE CHANGES All changes to a student’s course schedule must be approved by the Upper School Academic Dean, the Division Head and a parent. The student should obtain a Change of Schedule form from the Academic Dean only after fully discussing the proposed change with his or her teacher and parents. No schedule change will take effect until the form has been returned to the Academic Dean and approved by the Division Head.

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The Drop period concludes five days after first quarter interims are issued for full-year courses and five days after third quarter interims are issued for courses that begin in the spring semester. Dropping or withdrawing from a course after this period will result in the course being listed on the student’s transcript with a grade notation of WP (withdraw passing) or WF (withdraw failing) as determined by the student’s cumulative achievement in the course as of the date of withdraw.

HOMEWORK The purpose of homework is to provide reinforcement, enrichment and development of concepts introduced in class. Homework, therefore, is an essential part of the total instructional program at ESA. Teachers take their responsibility to assign meaningful homework seriously and expect students to prepare assignments carefully on a daily basis. On the average, students spend between one and two hours per day outside of classes in preparation of homework. Students need to plan their time judiciously to complete longer assignments (essays, research projects, extensive readings, etc.).

LATE ASSIGNMENTS Students are expected to complete and submit all assignments on time. Typically, an assignment will be counted late if it is not ready to hand in at the beginning of the period on the date assigned by the teacher. Any student submitting an assignment late without prior arrangement with the teacher is subject to a grade penalty of up to 20% per day late. After 5 days the student may receive a 0 on the assignment.

INCOMPLETES The Division Head must approve any incomplete grades given at the conclusion of the quarter or semester marking period. Should a student receive an incomplete grade, the Academic Dean, teacher, and Division Head will approve the timeline in which the work must be completed.

BACK-WORK AFTER SCHOOL Back-work is an after-school, supervised work environment created as a place for students to complete missing academic work. Back-work is assigned at the discretion of the classroom teacher, and meets from 3:45 – 5:00. Back-work is not optional and takes precedence over other extra-curricular obligations. A back-work appointment is at the discretion of the faculty. Some examples of reasons for back-work are:

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• • •

Catching up after a prolonged absence Unexcused absence work due (see “Unexcused Absence” in Student Handbook) Repeated failure to complete daily assignments

EXAMS The school will attempt to minimize extracurricular activities the week before exams. Teachers are asked not to assign major projects, major papers, or major tests the two school days immediately proceeding the first exam day. If for any reason a student will not be present for a scheduled exam, the student’s parent must contact the Upper School Office prior to the exam.

AWARDING OF DIPLOMA To receive an Episcopal School of Acadiana diploma, a student must complete the prescribed course of study and be in good standing.

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ATHLETICS The Episcopal School of Acadiana believes in participatory athletics. In the Upper School participatory athletics means that any student may be a member of any varsity athletic team. Being part of a team, however, does not guarantee playing time during varsity games. Playing time in varsity athletics is at the discretion of the coach. The ESA athletic program provides the opportunity for every student to participate in safe and healthy athletic experiences with an emphasis on discipline, teamwork and commitment. Through the active experience of individual and team competition, our students will come to an even greater understanding not only of the value of seeking excellence in themselves, but also in the value of that pursuit to the benefit of the team.

COACHING STAFF Coaches at ESA are employees of the school and are usually either Middle or Upper School teachers. In their role as coaches, they come under the direction of the Athletic Director, the Division Head and the Headmaster. Questions regarding sports may be directed to the Athletic Director. The Athletic Director is an advocate for both the coaches and student athletes. The Athletic Director’s job is to oversee all athletic budgets and issues related to athletics at ESA.

VARSITY ATHLETIC ELIGIBILITY All athletes are subject to the eligibility rules of the Louisiana High School Athletic Association. In addition, any athlete who receives a failing grade or an ESA GPA of 1.67 or lower shall have his or her eligibility reviewed by a committee consisting of the Division Head, Athletic Director, the player's coach, Academic Dean and the player's advisor.

PHYSICIAN’S STATEMENT All students who participate in any sport at ESA must be examined by a physician each year and present to the school a Medical Form along with a signed parent's consent form, a certified birth certificate and proof of health insurance.

TEAM TRIPS Athletes traveling on team trips continue to be under the jurisdiction of ESA. All school rules remain in effect and athletes are directly accountable to the school coach who is responsible for them and ultimately to the Dean of Students. All athletes making trips with their team on a bus will be expected to return with the team on the bus. If an athlete's parents speak directly to the coach to request permission for the student to return home with them, this privilege will usually be granted.

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SPORTSMANSHIP Athletes will conduct themselves appropriately and assume the leadership role in exemplifying good sportsmanship. Unsportsmanlike conduct will result in disciplinary action being taken by a player's coach and/or the Dean of Students. Penalties may range from benching to expulsion from school. Parents are also expected to exemplify good sportsmanship. LHSAA’S REGULATIONS FOR ATHLETES To be eligible to participate in any LHSAA sanctioned athletic program, student athletes and their parent/guardian must sign the LHSAA Substance Abuse/Misuse Contract, participation form, Consent form and the ESA Drug policy for students. This form must be signed by the student athlete and his/her parent/guardian before the student athlete will be considered eligible to participate in any LHSAA sanctioned event and at any level of play (varsity, junior varsity, sophomore or freshman). The purpose of signing the Contract and Consent Form is to secure the student-athlete's agreement and understanding that he/she will not engage in the unauthorized use/abuse of drugs, alcohol or other illegal or unauthorized, dangerous or controlled substances while a participant in any LHSAA athletic program. Furthermore, the student and his/her parent/guardian give permission and consent in advance for the student-athlete to be tested in accordance with Episcopal School of Acadiana's Drug Testing Procedures for StudentAthletes below. In those circumstances where ESA requires a student be tested, the following procedures will be employed: 1. The parent/guardian of the student will be notified of the school's decision to require the parent/guardian to test the student. 2. The parent/guardian (or other responsible adult) will be responsible for transporting the student to a certified testing agency or collection site designated by the school. 3. The testing agency will collect appropriate specimen for testing, including but not limited to hair and/or urine. 4. The testing agency will report the test results to the school. 5. If the test results are positive for alcohol, illegal drugs or other illegal or unauthorized dangerous or controlled substances, the student will be subject to disciplinary action as outlined in this handbook.

POLICIES FOR THE JENNY WARE JONES GYMNASIUM No one will be allowed in the gymnasium before school, during break or at lunch without a faculty member supervising play or practice. Inappropriate behavior will not be tolerated.

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No one will be allowed on the climbing wall in the gymnasium at any time without a faculty member supervising the use of the climbing wall.

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STUDENT LIFE The development of personal integrity and excellence of character are primary goals of the Episcopal School of Acadiana and have resulted in the creation of the ESA Honor System.

THE HONOR SYSTEM ESA HONOR CODE "As a member of Episcopal School of Acadiana, I pledge that I will not lie, cheat, or steal, or withhold information concerning those who do." Article I. Honor offenses are lying, cheating and stealing. They are formally defined as follows: Section 1. LYING is defined as presenting a false impression or giving false information to another person. Section 2. STEALING is defined as the taking of another person's property without right or acknowledgement. Section 3. CHEATING is defined as giving or receiving any unauthorized information on any quiz, test, examination or other written work. Plagiarism is a form of cheating. Plagiarism is defined as the representation of words or ideas of another's not commonly known as one's own, that is, without quotation marks, footnotes or some form of citation. Article II. If a student believes another is lying, cheating or stealing, he or she should tell the student of this suspicion and ask whether this belief has a basis. If this belief is verified, the student should be told to report himself or herself to the teacher or Honor Council. If he or she does not, the accuser should do so. Article III. The Honor Code applies to both Upper and Middle School. The Upper School Honor Council has two purposes: Section 1. Judicial - The Council will review and judge any case that comes before it concerning violations of the Honor Code. Recommendations will be made to the Division Head. Final appeal rests with the Headmaster. Appeals must be made in writing to the Headmaster within two weeks of the date of the decision. Following the decision of the Honor Council, the faculty will be informed of the council’s decision, and the outcome of the revisited in future faculty discussions related to academics, honor, and discipline. Section 2. Educational - the Honor Council will discuss the Honor System at the beginning of the year at a student assembly and at any other appropriate time. The Honor Code is in effect for all school activities. Students should write and sign the following statement on all academic work: "I pledge that I have neither given nor received unauthorized assistance on this assignment.� 2011-2012 ESA Handbook

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HONOR COUNCIL The Honor Council hears infractions of the Honor Code by members of the Upper School. The Council is student-led and overseen by the Dean of Students and faculty advisors. All discussions occurring in Honor Council meetings are completely confidential to the rest of the student body. The Honor Council is composed of: a. an elected student representative from each Upper School class b. a student representative appointed by the faculty from each Upper School class c. two faculty representatives appointed by the Division Head d. the Upper School Dean of Students who serves as the Chairman Consequences for Honor Violations: If the Honor Council determines that the student has committed an honor offense, consequences may include: -

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Counseling Warning Probation Suspension o In-School o Out-of-School Dismissal Other actions deemed appropriate by the Honor Council in consultation with the Division Head

SCHOOL DISCIPLINE Civility is the sum of the many sacrifices we are called to make for the sake of living together. We should make sacrifices for others not simply because doing so makes social life easier (although it does) but as a signal of respect for our fellow citizens, making them full equals, before both the law and before God. Rules of civility are thus also rules of morality: it is morally proper to treat our fellow citizens with respect and morally improper not to do so. Stephen L. Carter, Civility, p. 11 The ESA discipline system is built on respect, responsibility and safety. It incorporates an interventionist approach to address violations and help students modify inappropriate behavior. Our goal is for students to become proactive managers of their personal conduct and for them to demonstrate the virtue of being their brothers’ and sisters’ keepers.

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CODE OF CONDUCT By enrolling at ESA, each student agrees to abide by the school’s expectations and the spirit of those expectations, and parents agree to support the school’s policies. ESA is a school community based on strong belief in mutual trust and self-responsibility. Students enjoy privileges and freedoms in day-to-day activities that are based on each student assuming responsibility for his or her actions. It is important for students and parents to know the expectations for conduct set forth by the ESA community. These expectations grow out of genuine concern for each student’s growth and development as a happy and healthy individual guided by strong moral and ethical values. SCHOOL EXPECTATIONS The Episcopal School of Acadiana expects that every student will: A. Be honest in all matters. Lying, cheating, stealing, plagiarism and deceit are violations of the ESA Honor Code. B. Respect teachers and fellow students. Fighting with, intimidating, threatening or verbally abusing other members of the community will not be tolerated. There is to be no rude or disrespectful behavior, inappropriate language or hazing, either physical or emotional. Any form of harassment (sexual, physical, racial, religious, ethnic, homophobic, emotional or cyber-bullying), coercion or abuse is detrimental to the school community and educational environment and will not be tolerated. C. Behave appropriately. Students must respect the expectations of each teacher and of the school. Disruptive and disrespectful behavior is not acceptable. D. Take pride in keeping the ESA campus a clean and beautiful place. Students should dispose of all trash in appropriate receptacles as well as keep their lockers neat and clean. No food or drink is allowed in classrooms, chapel, library or inside the gym except during advisory period and under supervision of a faculty member. E. Meet all commitments and obligations. All students are expected to be prompt in their attendance at all scheduled classes, study halls and activities. F. Not use tobacco, alcohol, drugs, or abuse prescription medication or any other substance. Please see the Drug and Alcohol Policy below. G. Behave in a way that reflects favorably upon ESA. Sportsmanship, courtesy and appropriate dress are the hallmarks of an ESA student. Public displays of affection are not acceptable behavior. H. Respect and care for school property and the property of others. Acts of vandalism, graffiti, property damage, malicious mischief and unauthorized or inappropriate computer use or use of data on a computer is unacceptable. I. Use common sense in their actions and consider their individual safety and the safety of others. Weapons, fireworks or explosives of any kind are not permitted on ESA property or at ESA events.

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DISCIPLINARY RESPONSES Teachers generally handle minor infractions in the classroom, on campus, or at ESA activities. The Dean of Students and the Division Head coordinate Upper School discipline. Serious infractions of the Code of Conduct or repeated offenses of any kind may be referred to the Discipline Council. The Discipline Council, after a thorough examination of the infraction, makes a recommendation for disciplinary action to the Division Head who may accept, amend or override the Council’s recommendation. The Headmaster serves as the final appeal for disciplinary action. Appeals must be made in writing to the Headmaster within two weeks of the date of the decision. Students and families should be aware that any disciplinary action may be disclosed to third parties. Discipline Council meetings are reserved for a pattern of minor codes of conduct violations, as well as major disciplinary infractions. Some examples of major disciplinary infractions that may result in a Discipline Council meeting are: • Skipping Class • Disrespectful Behavior • Bullying • Fighting • Alcohol/Drug Use

DISCIPLINE COUNCIL The Discipline Council reviews cases that involve serious infractions of the Code of Conduct or repeated offenses. The Dean of Students refers cases to the Discipline Council. The Discipline Council is student-led and overseen by the Dean of Students and faculty advisors. All discussions occurring in Discipline Council meetings are completely confidential to the rest of the student body. The Discipline Council is composed of: a. one elected representative from each the ninth and tenth grade b. two elected representatives from each the eleventh and twelfth grade c. two faculty members appointed by the Upper School Head d. the Upper School Dean of Students who serves as the Chairman

Disciplinary responses include but are not limited to: • Verbal Warning and/or Instructive Activity • Loss of Privilege – This may occur if a student demonstrates an inability to handle the associated responsibility that accompanies a specific privilege. • Work Detail – This may be assigned for missed obligations or any other behavior that requires a disciplinary response. It is a period when students will work toward the improvement of the school. Work detail will be held after school, during a free period, or at the discretion of the Dean of Students. Parents are responsible for transportation to and from ESA should their student receive a work detail.

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• Saturday Work Detail – This may be assigned for an accumulation of work details, tardy offenses or at the discretion of the Dean of Students. Saturday work details will occur on designated Saturdays from 8:00 am – 11:00 am. • Suspension – A student may be suspended for a violation of the Code of Conduct, repeated violations or continued unsatisfactory behavior. • In-School – The student will report to the Dean of Students upon arrival on campus. The student will be expected to attend all classes and spend all free periods, break and lunch with the Dean of Students. Additionally, the student will spend from 3:30 - 5:00 p.m. with the Dean of Students. • Out-of-School – This suspension occurs only for serious offenses or an accumulation of offenses because ESA does not desire for students to miss academic class time. One reason for the suspension is to give the student some time at home to discuss with parents the commitment involved in living within the school’s community and the obligation of meeting its expectations. Also upon the student’s return, he or she will submit a written essay to the Division Head containing the student’s reflections on the incident that caused the suspension. The essay should also include thoughts on commitment to ESA and the student’s plan for contributing in a positive way to the ESA community. • Disciplinary Probation – This is a period of trial during which the student is expected to demonstrate, through cooperative behavior and a positive attitude, that he or she truly wishes to remain a contributing part of the ESA community and is capable of selfresponsibility. Any additional major offense or accumulation of minor offenses could result in separation from the school. • Dismissal – A student may be dismissed from the school for a violation of a school expectation, an accumulation of violations or recurring unacceptable behavior. This is a removal from the school. The student may apply for readmission after a specified length of time. • Expulsion – A student may be expelled from the school for a violation of a school expectation, an accumulation of violations or recurring unacceptable behavior. The student will not be considered for readmission. SEPARATION FROM ESA Any student who withdraws from ESA pending any disciplinary or honor action or is dismissed or expelled will not be permitted on the ESA campus nor permitted to attend any ESA-sponsored function without the permission of the Headmaster or his/her designee.

BULLYING Bullying is characterized as aggressive behavior that is intentional (not done accidentally or in fun) and it usually involves an imbalance in power. Bullying can exist in many forms, some of those can be: hitting, intimidating through gestures, social exclusion, teasing, or using technology to send insulting or harmful messages or pictures.

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Bullying is seen as a serious offense at ESA, and it differs in nature from more common interactions between students. Students will, at times, engage in name-calling, horseplay, or other activities that can be perceived as rough or even disrespectful. However, it is the nature of the relationship between the students, and the intent of the actions that determine whether bullying is occurring. Generally, the students involved in bullying are not friends. There is a power difference between the bully and victim. This difference can be seen in various forms including: difference in size, physical strength, or social groups. ESA recognizes that bullying is a serious issue, and it needs to be addressed immediately and decisively. The school will work diligently to monitor students’ behaviors on campus to ensure that bullying is not occurring. In conjunction with ESA’s efforts, we encourage parents to visit the website below in order to develop strategies to identify, address, and counsel students involved in bullying. http://www.stopbullyingnow.com/index.html

If an ESA student is found to be bullying another student, or group of students, he/she will meet with the Dean of Students. That student will begin the disciplinary process and should expect consequences beginning with suspension, up to dismissal from school. ESA views bullying as a major offense and it is not tolerated in the community. DISCLOSURE OF DISCIPLINARY RECORD Episcopal School of Acadiana is an institutional member of the National Association of College Admission Counseling (NACAC) and supports the membership policies and ethical principles included in their Statement of Principles of Good Practice. ESA’s disclosure policy was formed using NACAC’s best practices guidelines. Episcopal School of Acadiana's policy regarding disclosure of disciplinary records is that we will truthfully answer questions posed by colleges in secondary school reports, mid-year reports, and final school reports regarding disciplinary action for colleges/schools that request such information of infractions resulting in probation, suspension, or dismissal from this school. Students who have come before the Discipline Council or Honor Council or have otherwise been subjected to disciplinary action will be informed by the Dean of Students whether the offense should be reported or not. We do not report disciplinary actions that occurred at a previous school attended. Nor do we report academic probation to colleges because the student's academic performance is reflected on the student's transcript. When an application asks for information pertaining to a student's disciplinary record, the students must respond honestly and fully. The student should work closely with the college counselor to ensure that both are responding in a consistent and thoughtful manner. SENIOR STUDENT’S CHANGE IN STATUS If a senior student's disciplinary status changes after the filing of college applications, the student has the opportunity and obligation to inform all schools to which an application has

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been previously submitted or the school at which the student has submitted an enrollment deposit. The student should notify the within two weeks from the date of the change of status. Two weeks after the change in status, the college counselor will notify the colleges in writing that the student's status has changes and reason for the change.

DRUG AND ALCOHOL POLICY ESA is committed to a drug and alcohol free environment for students at ESA, to providing appropriate drug and alcohol education for our students, and to treating involvement with drugs and alcohol as a health issue as well as a disciplinary issue. Alcohol and drug involvement are violations of the laws of the State of Louisiana and incompatible with the school's mission and its daily operation.

Prohibition from Campus and School Sponsored Events ESA expects that every student will not use alcohol, tobacco, drugs, or abuse prescription medication or any other substance. Use of any of these items and/or being under their influence on the ESA campus or at any activity where ESA is either a participant or sponsor is prohibited. In addition, the act of or the attempt to purchase, procure, possess, distribute, sell or share alcohol, other drugs and controlled substances or their paraphernalia is prohibited. Any violation of this policy will result in disciplinary action, up to and including separation from the school. LHSAA’S REGULATIONS FOR ATHLETES Refer to Athletics section Communication to Families Regarding Personal or Health Concerns If faculty, coaches, advisors and administrators, in their daily contact with a student, become suspicious regarding a student's possible use of alcohol or drugs, parents can expect to be contacted by the school to schedule a conference to develop a plan of action to address the school's concerns. If a student is unable to function during the school day for any reason, the student’s parents will be contacted to pick the student up from school immediately. The parent, student and Dean of Students will meet the following morning to discuss the issue. Recommendations may include: -

Referral to a family physician for a physical examination Referral to a professional for individual and/or family counseling Referral for a school approved chemical dependency assessment unit, which may include drug screening and/or psychological counseling

SCHOOL COUNSELING AND ASSISTANCE Students who come forward voluntarily to a teacher, coach, faculty advisor, guidance counselor, chaplain or administrator to seek help for a chemical dependency will be assisted

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through the school Guidance Counselor. Please refer to the Handbook Section on Guidance Counseling. A student who voluntarily requests assistance will not be subject to any disciplinary action for that request. When students are working in a recovery program, the faculty and administration will provide reasonable support for the student's academic efforts. The student's family will give authorization to the counselor to communicate with the school regarding diagnosis, recommended plan for school study during rehabilitation and regular progress reports including any drug testing. Should a student request assistance and then not actively and willingly participate in the accepted plan of action, ESA reserves the right to revoke the student’s contract. VIOLATIONS OF THE DRUG AND ALCOHOL POLICY Any student in possession of drugs, alcohol or any other mood-altering substances, or any student under the influence of drugs, alcohol or any other mood-altering substances at any time on the school campus, while attending a school-sponsored activity or while on school transportation is in violation of the Drug and Alcohol Policy and subject to disciplinary action. The school will contact the parents of the students immediately regarding drug and/or alcohol violations. If a student is suspected of being under the influence of drugs, alcohol or any other moodaltering substances during the school day, parents will be called to pick up the student from school. The student will be required to go directly to a school-approved drug-testing agency to take a drug-screening test. The school will be given the results of the drug test. If the test results are positive for any drugs and/or alcohol, or if the student refuses to take the required drug-screening test, the student may be separated from school. ESA reserves the right to require a drug test for any student at any time. PRESCRIBED MEDICATION Students who have medication specifically prescribed by a physician to treat medical conditions and need to receive doses during the school day must have an Administration of Medication Form completed by the prescribing physician and on file in the main office. Students must keep their medication with the Upper School Office. Any student found to be self-administering prescribed medication on campus will be subject to disciplinary action up to and including separation from school. Any student who "shares," sells, or in any other way distributes his or her prescribed medication with another member or seeks to procure same from another member of the ESA community will be subject to disciplinary action up to and including separation from school.

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SEARCH AND SEIZURE POLICY To maintain order and discipline on school property and at school-related events and to protect the safety and welfare of students and school personnel, the Episcopal School of Acadiana has the right to perform unannounced inspections and searches and to seize contraband, and has the right to perform physical searches of students to determine whether they pose a threat to themselves or others. The Headmaster and authorized staff members may search a student’s pockets, purse, backpack, book bag, gym bag or other personal property, as well as student vehicles, student lockers, desks or other school property. No student may possess an illegal substance, object or contraband that constitutes a threat to the health, safety and welfare of any person or persons on school property. Contraband is all substances or materials prohibited by school policy, state or federal law including but not limited to controlled substances, drugs, alcohol, tobacco products, guns, knives, multipurpose tools such as the Leatherman, weapons or incendiary devices. All items deemed to be illegal, illicit, disruptive or a general nuisance to the mission of ESA will be seized. Storage, return or destruction of such items shall be at the discretion of the Headmaster or the Headmaster’s designate, subject to legal impoundment. To maintain overall school safety and security, the Episcopal School of Acadiana has the right to perform random and blanket searches of lockers, desks and other school property to review student possessions for health, safety and compliance with the school’s Code of Conduct and Honor Code. Students are at all times responsible for the contents of their locker(s), desk, vehicle, pockets, purse, backpack, book bag and gym bag, cell phone, laptop, and any and all electronic devices. Any contraband seized will be used as evidence in any disciplinary or legal proceedings.

ATTENDANCE ESA has clear expectations for student attendance. Students should arrive at school on time every school day, and they should be present and on time at each scheduled class or school obligation. Not only is regular attendance important for the individual student, but also the individual’s participation is important for the group as a whole. It is our belief that the ESA calendar provides ample time off for our students at strategic points of the academic year. We sincerely hope that parents will support our calendar by not removing their child from classes on days immediately preceding or following a holiday. The Dean of Students will designate any student absence as “excused” or “unexcused.”

ABSENCES FROM SCHOOL 1. The ESA school calendar provides ample time for holidays and family vacations at strategic times during the academic year. The school strongly discourages parents from removing students from classes on the days before and after a holiday.

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2. All absences must be reported by phone by a parent to the Receptionist before 8:30 a.m. If an absence is not reported by 8:30 a.m., parents should expect a phone call from the school either at home or at work. 3. All absences will be considered unexcused until a phone call or a note from a parent is received explaining the nature of the absence so that the Dean of Students can make an “excused” or “unexcused” determination. 4. When a student accumulates 10 or more absences in any class, either excused or unexcused, there will be a review by the Dean of Students and Upper School Head. Parents should expect a letter home notifying them of the status of the student’s attendance record.

EXCUSED ABSENCES Examples of absences that may be considered excused are: • Illness reported by a parent • Medical or dental treatment NOTE: Every effort should be made to schedule routine appointments (i.e. medical, dental, orthodontic) and the like during vacations and non-school hours. • School sponsored academic, athletic, or extracurricular events • College visits approved in advance by the College Counselor • Attending a college representative’s meeting on campus with teacher’s prior permission • Family emergencies EXCUSED ABSENCE MAKE-UP WORK Students should always strive to turn in work missed or assignments due during an excused absence before they are absent (i.e. athletic trips, etc.). Generally, the student may expect to submit all work missed within the same number of days he or she was absent. Students are responsible for scheduling an appointment with their teachers to confirm assignments or to request extra help. Teachers will make every effort to schedule a help session if needed. Absences during exams can create serious academic problems. Any student who for any reason will not be present for a scheduled exam should contact the Upper School Office prior to the exam. UNEXCUSED ABSENCES Examples of absences that may be considered unexcused are: • Family trips or vacations • Participation in non-ESA competitions (club volleyball, soccer, etc.) • Attending an entertainment event or social function The student is responsible for submitting all work missed during an unexcused absence on the day of return. Failure to submit work owed may result in the student receiving zeros on any or all incomplete assignments. Students are expected to be prepared for all academic work that takes place the day of their return. This includes tests, quizzes, papers and any

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homework assignments. Tests that were missed must be completed by the date designated by the teacher. CONSEQUENCES FOR UNEXCUSED ABSENCES 1. A student who receives an unexcused absence may or may not be permitted to make up the work missed in class. The individual divisions may choose to assign an appropriate grade penalty for all missed work. 2. A student who receives an unexcused absence may not participate in any athletic or extra curricular activities that afternoon or evening.

ANTICIPATED ABSENCES (Reminder: The ESA school calendar provides ample time for holidays and family vacations at strategic times during the academic year. The school strongly discourages parents from removing students from classes on the days before and after a holiday.) An anticipated absence occurs when a student will be absent for one or more days of classes for a planned non-school event. These may include, but are not limited to, such things as college visits, participation in a non-school athletic event, or special educational/leadership seminars. These absences need to be evaluated by the school well in advance of the intended date(s) of absence. The evaluation rests with the Dean of Students. Anticipated absences may be determined to be excused or unexcused. PROCEDURE: 1. A parent must call or send a note to the Dean of Students or Upper School Head at least 2 days prior to the absence stating the reason for the absence. 2. The student must pick up an Anticipated Absence Form signed by the Dean or the Upper School Head stating whether the absence is excused or unexcused. Forms will not be issued without notification from a parent. 3. The student must have all teachers fill in assignments on the form for the days the student will be absent. The student should attempt to turn in all assignments before departure unless the teacher directs otherwise. 4. The student should return the original form to the receptionist before departure. 5. A copy of the completed form will be made for the student's use. 6. Failure to follow the above guidelines may result in disciplinary action.

UNEXCUSED ANTICIPATED ABSENCES If the student and family decide to take an unexcused anticipated absence, the school will not require teachers to: • • •

prepare assignments for the time missed provide extra help to enable the student to catch up on work missed provide class notes or other assistance to the student

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The student is responsible for submitting all work missed during an unexcused anticipated absence on the day of return. Failure to submit work owed may result in the student receiving zeros on any or all incomplete assignments. Students are expected to be prepared for all academic work that takes place the day of their return. This includes test, quizzes, papers and any homework assignments. Tests that were missed must be completed by the date designated by the teacher.

CONSEQUENCES FOR UNEXCUSED ANTICIPATED ABSENCES 1. A student who receives an unexcused absence may or may not be permitted to make up the work missed in class. The individual departments may choose to assign an appropriate grade penalty for all missed work. 2. A student who receives an unexcused absence may be placed in the disciplinary process. 3. A student who receives an unexcused absence may not participate in any athletic or extra curricular activities that afternoon or evening.

ABSENCES DUE TO COLLEGE VISITS The Dean of Students may excuse an Upper School student from classes for college appointments at the request of the College Counselor. Merely visiting a campus may not excuse a student from class commitments as these trips may be made on weekends and during scheduled holidays. Students will be excused from classes only for the time required for the actual appointment and necessary travel time. When a college representative visits the ESA campus, all Upper School students are welcome to attend. Should the representative be on campus when a student has class, it is the student’s responsibility to receive permission from the classroom teacher to miss class time to speak with the representative. Freshmen and sophomores are welcome to attend any college representative meeting only if they have a free period.

TARDIES All students are expected to arrive at school on time every day and arrive at all classes and obligations on time every day. While being tardy is unavoidable at times, the ultimate decision as to whether a tardy is considered excused or unexcused rests with the Dean of Students. A student who is habitually tardy to class during the school day will be referred to the Dean of Students and may be placed in the disciplinary process. LATE TO SCHOOL Any student reporting late to school must sign in at the receptionist’s office and will automatically be given an unexcused admit slip unless a note from a parent or doctor clearly states that the tardy was unavoidable. Please be aware that arriving after the conclusion of a class will result in the student being marked as absent from that class and tardy for the class presently in progress.

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Unacceptable reasons for morning tardies include: • Oversleeping for any reason other than documented illness • Fatigue • Unsubstantiated traffic or car problems • Unspecified illness or general malaise • Generic notes asking that a student be excused but giving no reason why • Non-emergency personal or family errands A student who is habitually tardy to class during the school day will be referred to the Dean of Students and may be placed in the disciplinary process. CONSEQUENCES FOR TARDIES 1. A student who accumulates four tardies in a semester (tardy to school or tardy to class during the school day) will serve a Saturday work detail at the earliest convenience of the work detail supervisor. 2. A student who receives an unexcused late check-in after 8:30 a.m. may not participate in any athletic or extracurricular activities that afternoon or evening. 3. An extended record of tardies may result in more serious disciplinary action.

SIGN-IN/SIGN-OUT 1. Arrival at School – Students who do not use ESA transportation are expected to be at school by 7:50 a.m. Students who arrive late to school must sign in with the Receptionist and receive an admit slip for class. Students with a first period free must sign in at the receptionist’s desk upon arrival on campus. 2. Early Departure from School – Students who must leave school for any reason other than school-sponsored events must sign out with the Receptionist and present a note from a parent. Otherwise the Receptionist must speak with a parent before allowing the student to leave school before the end of the school day. NOTE: Unless the reason for checking out complies with definition of “excused absence,” a student’s absence from any class due to an early departure from school shall be considered unexcused. The student may or may not be permitted to make up work and/or may suffer a grade penalty as a result of non-participation.

3. Senior Privilege: a. Seniors who have signed permission forms are permitted to leave campus for trips to local food establishments. Signing out is required for seniors any time they leave campus. Seniors must sign out in the registrar’s office if they are leaving for the day. Parents give this permission with the approval form. If a senior is signing out sick, ESA will call the parent.

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b. Seniors whose first class is after first period must sign in with the Registrar by 8:40 a.m. If a senior's school day ends before 3:25 p.m. the senior must sign out with the Registrar before leaving campus for the day.

SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES Special circumstances may arise during the course of the year that require a student to miss an extended period of school or schedule a recurring medical appointment during the academic day. ESA will make every effort to work with students and families to ensure the student does not suffer academically should this occur. To help us prepare a plan of action for the student, parents should meet with the Upper School Head before any class time is missed.

DRESS CODE Students are always expected to dress in good taste and in compliance not only with the written code, but also with the spirit of the code. Extremes in attire and grooming are not allowed. Students must not view the flexibility of the Dress Code as a means to separate themselves from the community. Students should take pride in their appearance and dress neatly and appropriately every day. “Appropriate� means that student dress should reflect the values of the school, respect the seriousness of our academic purpose, and not distract others. All students must be in dress code for the entire school day, from 8:00 a.m. to 3:25 p.m. The Dress Code is managed at the discretion of the Dean of Students or the Division Head. Girls: Modern fashion for young women does not always have a place at school. Girls should never wear short skirts, short shorts or tight clothing, and they should never have any exposed waistline or midriff. Skirts: School plaid, khaki, gray, or navy; must be hemmed and must extend to no more than five inches from the top of the knee. Shirts: White, gray, or blue shirt with same color collar; collar must be visible with any outerwear; turtlenecks of any kind are not allowed; any t-shirt or other shirt worn under a uniform shirt must be solid white, gray, or navy. Shirts must be long enough to stay tucked. Slacks: Khaki, navy or gray. Elasticized bottoms are not allowed. Shorts: Khaki, gray or navy; must have at least a five inch inseam. Tights: Navy, white, or gray permitted under skirts. Shoes: Must have closed heel and toe.

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Boys: Boys should look neat and presentable at all times during the school day. Shirts:

White, blue, or gray shirt with same color collar; collar must be visible with any outerwear; turtlenecks of any kind are not allowed; any t-shirt or other shirt worn under a uniform shirt must be solid white, gray, or navy. Shirts must be long enough to stay tucked.

Slacks: Khaki, navy or gray. Elasticized bottoms are not allowed. Shorts: Khaki, navy or gray. May not be longer than bottom of the knee. Shoes:

Must have closed heel and toe.

For Boys and Girls: • • • • • • • • • • • •

No elasticized bottoms or warm-up type pants No “green” khaki. No navy or gray that appears to be black No jeans No turtleneck shirts No turquoise or aqua shirts Uniform shirt/collar must show with any sweater Shirts must be tucked in No short (waist length) shirts (i.e. any shirt that will not stay tucked) No logos, except manufacturers logo, on any clothing item No tight fitting shorts or slacks No excessively baggy, wide-legged or long pants No logos or writing on a student’s undershirt may be visible through a uniform shirt

FREE DRESS • • • • • • •

Generally held the last Friday of classes in each month Clothing should be in good taste Pajama pants or lounging pants are not allowed Halter tops or tops with spaghetti straps are not allowed Shorts with slogans and/or writing on the back are not permitted T-shirts with inappropriate slogans or pictures are not acceptable Shirts, shorts and skirts must comply with dress code length

FORMAL DRESS Boys

• • • •

Pleated or Plain Front Khaki Chino Pants (Dress style only.) White Pinpoint or Oxford Dress Shirt (ESA logo or plain only.) ESA School Tie Formal Dress outerwear for colder months must be navy, gray, or white.

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No sweatshirts or hooded sweatshirts

Girls

• • • • •

• •

Pleated or A-line ESA Plaid skirt, or Knee length ESA plaid walking shorts, or Pleated or Plain Front Navy Pants (Dress style only.) White Pinpoint or Oxford Dress Shirt (ESA logo or plain only.) Optional – ESA School Scarf (ESA girls finishing 5th grade in May 2008 will be given scarves; all other girls entering 6th – 12th grade can purchase the scarf through the ESA website for $25.) Formal Dress outerwear for colder months must be navy, gray, or white. No sweatshirts or hooded sweatshirts

TRANSPORTATION AUTOMOBILES ON CAMPUS Driving and parking on campus are privileges, not rights. Students and parents of drivers should be aware that: 1. All vehicles parked at school must be registered with the Dean of Students. Every student driver must complete a Permission Form and Vehicle Registration. 2. The speed limit on all campus roads is 20 MPH. 3. Students may park only in the student parking area. Only seniors may park in the senior parking area. 4. Cars should be locked when parked on campus. 5. Cars on campus are subject to ESA’s Search and Seizure Policy. 6. Other than at times of arrival or departure, students are not permitted in the parking lot for any reason unless they have the permission of the Dean of Students or a faculty member. 7. Seniors have privileges to go to local food establishments with a signed Parent Permission Form on file. 8. Students may not use their cars during the school day unless they have an authorized excuse from home. BUS REGULATIONS The safety of students using ESA transportation is very important. Therefore, students are required to follow the following regulations concerning bus transportation: 1. Students should arrive at the designated bus stop 5 minutes prior to departure. The bus will not wait. 2. Parents should arrive at the designated bus stop 5 minutes prior to arrival. The bus will not wait. 3. While waiting for the bus, students must conduct themselves in an orderly manner. 4. Students may not get out of their seats, throw objects out of the window, harass other students or the driver or generally behave in a loud or disorderly manner while riding the bus.

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5. The bus driver will report any inappropriate behavior to the Dean of Students. Unacceptable behavior on the bus may result in disciplinary action including suspension or expulsion from bus service, after-school or Saturday work detail, suspension, dismissal or expulsion from school. THE LATE BUS 1. Students are expected to notify their parents if they ride the late bus. 2. After-school supervision is provided only for school-sponsored activities. 3. Students not participating in a school-sponsored activity may not stay for the late bus without permission of the appropriate division’s Dean of Students. STUDENT DROP-OFF/PARENT PARKING Parents should drop off all students in the circle on the Middle School side of campus. Drop off at any other point creates a dangerous situation and impedes traffic flow.

GUESTS OR VISITORS ON CAMPUS Guests/visitors on campus must be approved by the Dean of Students prior to their arrival on campus. Upon arrival guests/visitors must check in with the Receptionist to get a visitor badge. Students are responsible for their guest’s/visitor’s behavior at all times. Student visitors are welcome during break and lunch. ESA discourages visitors during class time. Visitors may not attend classes with the ESA student they are visiting.

DANCE REGULATIONS 1. Dances are school-sponsored events. All school rules apply to dances. 2. Any student in possession of or under the influence of alcohol or any illegal drug upon arriving or during the dance will be detained and the parents will be called. Appropriate disciplinary action will then be taken against the student. 3. Students must arrive within thirty minutes of the beginning time. Any student arriving thirty or more minutes late will not be allowed to attend the dance and the parents will be notified. 4. Students must remain at the dance until thirty minutes before the scheduled end of the dance. No student may leave the dance prior to this time.

LIBRARY / MEDIA CENTER USAGE The Reverend R.R. Diggs Library/ESA Media Center is open from 7:45 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. and welcomes all students who come in for the purpose of study, research and pleasure reading. In addition to books, magazines and newspapers, video tapes and filmstrips, the library houses computers with CD-ROM, a hookup to the UL Lafayette library and word processing for class papers. There is also a copy machine available for student use at $.15 per page. 2011-2012 ESA Handbook

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POLICIES AND FINES It is important for students and parents to be aware that the regular check-out period for most books and magazines is three weeks with basically unlimited renewal. However, certain books such as reference books and books reserved by a teacher are ONLY checked out overnight. Fines accumulate at the rate of $.25 per day on three-week material and $1.00 per day for reference and reserve books. Student fines and IOU’s must be cleared up by the last week of the quarter or grades will be held and exams cannot be taken. These fines and fees cannot be charged to the student's account but must be paid directly to the librarian. In order to maintain a good working relationship with UL Lafayette, all books must be returned to the ESA library by May 1st or the student will have to pay for the lost/missing book. PROPER LIBRARY BEHAVIOR In keeping with the purpose of maintaining the Library in good condition for many years to come and in preserving the library as a place of quiet study, the following rules will apply: • • • •

No food or drinks of any kind in the Library No sitting or putting feet on tables, carrels, counter tops, bookshelves, etc. No talking above a whisper No computer gaming of any kind

ELECTRONICS The use of any personal music or gaming devices (CD players, MP3 players, gaming devices, iPods, etc.) during the academic day is inconsistent with the mission of ESA and is not permitted. The use of laptops, tablets and mobile devices for gaming purposes is not permitted. ESA recognizes the usefulness and convenience of cellular phones to help families keep in touch. Accordingly, ESA does permit students the possession of cell phones. This is a significant privilege that students must respect. At no time should students use cell phones during the school day without permission. Should this privilege not be respected and the following guidelines not followed, the student would lose the privilege of having a cell phone on campus. GUIDELINES FOR CELL PHONE USAGE ON CAMPUS 1. Students may not use cell phones on campus during the academic day without permission from ESA faculty/administration. All student cell phones should be turned off from 8:00 a.m. until 3:25 p.m. 2. Cell phone usage during class or chapel is strictly prohibited without the permission of the classroom teacher. Violations will result in confiscation of the phone and further disciplinary action. 2011-2012 ESA Handbook

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3. Should students need to call a parent, ESA makes school phones available for their use in the Receptionist’s office. If parents need to contact a student immediately, they should call the school receptionist. 4. Text messaging and e-mailing via cell phones are not allowed during the school day. 5. Violations will result in disciplinary action. The student will receive one warning from the Dean of Students for inappropriate cell phone use, and the phone will be confiscated for the rest of the school day. He/She will receive a Saturday Work Detail for each and any further occurrence of improper cell phone use during the school day.

POLICY FOR TECHNOLOGIES Individual users of the computer network are responsible for their behavior and communications over those networks. It is presumed that users will comply with ESA’s established standards. These rules also apply to personal laptop computers/tablets using ESA’s wireless network. All personal laptops must be configured by the ESA technology department in order to access the wireless signal. At the time of configuration, a release form will be issued to the student and must be signed by the student and his/her parent/guardian. Because the ESA computer network has limits, students must understand that the campus computer network should be used for academic or school-related purposes only. The following are not permitted on ESA computers: • • • • •

Streaming Internet audio or video that is unrelated to coursework Game or other entertainment Internet sites Uploading or downloading any type of files from the Internet Chat room or social networking sites of any kind Bypassing the school firewall

In addition to those behaviors that would violate other school expectations for conduct, the following are specifically not permitted: • • • • • • • • • • •

Engaging in criminal activities such as hacking, or criminal preparation activities such as collection of hacking information or tools Sending or displaying offensive or violent messages, pictures or language Cyber-bullying directed towards other students or faculty members Damaging computers, their systems or networks, or data contained thereon Violating copyright laws Using another’s log-on name or password with or without permission Using another’s folders, work, files or e-mail with or without permission Employing ESA network for commercial use Subscribing to news groups or lists without the approval of the Network Administrator Installing software or hardware on any workstation or server without the consent of the Network Administrator Open food or drink containers are not permitted in any of the computer labs on campus

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Violations may result in the loss of access to technologies on the ESA campus as well as other disciplinary action or legal action. Files and other communications, both active and stored on local or network hard drives, may be reviewed by the Network Administrator to maintain system integrity and insure that users are using the system responsibly. Finally, the network is provided for students to conduct research and communicate with others. Access is a privilege – not a right. Access entails responsibility.

OFF LIMITS Mr. Hebert's pond is strictly off limits. Camelot and all wooded areas or fields are also offlimits unless accompanied by a faculty member. During break and lunch periods or other free time, students are allowed in the commons area, on the playing fields or in any of the school quadrangles.

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STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND SERVICES CHAPEL Chapel is an integral part of the school day. It is a time when the school community comes together to celebrate the life of ESA, explore and nourish daily life with God and neighbor, and plan the day. Attendance at Chapel is mandatory for all students and faculty. The service of Holy Communion is celebrated monthly for all students and may be either an all-school service or a divisional service. Holy Communion services are scheduled during designated chapel times. All students and faculty attend Communion services and, as conscience dictates, participate in the services.

ADVISING AND COUNSELING ADVISORS: ESA provides a faculty advisor who monitors each student's academic achievement and sense of well-being. The Advisor is a teacher who serves as a counselor, a confidant, a facilitator, an arbitrator and a motivator. Students meet with their Advisor weekly; however, students are encouraged to seek out the Advisor any time there is a need. Parents are strongly encouraged to contact the advisors if there are general concerns regarding academic performance or social development. ACADEMIC COUNSELING: The academic progress of each student is monitored throughout the year. Regular grade level meetings and teachers’ individual contact with the Academic Dean focus consistent attention to the academic needs of each student. Monitoring a student's academic career will include an overall plan to meet the individual’s academic needs, an ongoing assessment and placement in appropriate classes as a student’s performance demands, the identification of appropriate measures to help the student maximize his or her academic success at ESA. Academic conferences with students, teachers and parents may be arranged when appropriate. Parents are encouraged to speak to their student's teacher, Advisor, or the Academic Dean regarding concerns about the academic progress of their student. PERSONAL COUNSELING: The personal needs and concerns of each student are integral to the development of a student's self-esteem and integral to the student’s academic growth. The goal of the Guidance Office is to help students explore their areas of concern in a safe and professional environment. Students seek answers to solve problems concerning interpersonal relationships, decision-making dilemmas, goal setting, time management, stress and anxiety management, career exploration and planning, and drug and alcohol education. The process of counseling our students is intended to encourage them to take responsibility for seeking appropriate solutions to problems. This process relies on the development of a close interactive relationship between student and guidance counselor. Confidentiality is held paramount. When the information given by a student is determined to be imminently dangerous to him or herself or to others, the counselor must inform responsible persons.

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Parents are encouraged to contact the counselor with any concern they might have regarding their child. COLLEGE COUNSELING: ESA is a college preparatory school. The placement of students into appropriate universities and colleges is a primary mission. The philosophy of college counseling at ESA is grounded in the idea that each student finds a college that will meet his or her needs. The College Counseling Office provides a supportive environment for informed choice by assisting the student in self-reflection, providing resource materials, offering counsel and aid in managing the mounds of paper and deadlines associated with college selection. It is, however, the student's responsibility to take the initiative in the college admissions process. It is the duty of the College Counseling Office to make sure students enter into the college selection process with a full appreciation of its importance and complexity. Students and their families decide which college to attend, but it must be an informed decision, made after careful and judicious study of the best information available.

• • •

STANDARDIZED TESTING CALENDAR & INFORMATION PSAT – Mandatory test given to all 10th and 11th grade students Scores determine qualification for National Merit for all 11th grade students. PLAN – Mandatory test in preparation for ACT, given to all 9th & 10th Graders Date: Scheduled by school, usually late spring ERB – Tests administered each spring to 6th through 9th grade students ERBs are achievement tests that report scores based on both national and independent school norms, allowing ESA to compare student achievement to other college preparatory schools.

ACT and SAT test dates and Registration Deadlines (Registration packets available in the College Counseling office)

ACT TEST DATES Test Date September 10, 2011 October 22, 2011 December 10, 2011 February 11, 2012 April 14, 2012 June 9, 2012

Registration Deadline August 12, 2011 September 16, 2011 November 4, 2011 January 13, 2012 March 9, 2012 May 4, 2012

SAT I & SAT II TEST DATES Test Date October 1, 2011 November 5, 2011 December 3, 2011 January 28, 2012

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Registration Deadline September 9, 2011 October 7, 2011 November 8, 2011 December 30, 2011

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March 10, 2012 (SAT I Only) May 5, 2012 June 2, 2012

February 10, 2012 April 6, 2012 May 8, 2012

AP TEST DATES May 7 May 8 May 9 May 10 May 11 May 14 May 15 May 16 May 17 May 18

Morning Chemistry Environmental Science Computer Science A Spanish Language Calculus AB & BC English Literature & Composition US History Biology Music Theory US Government & Politics English Language & Composition World History Spanish Literature

Afternoon Psychology Art History

European History Studio Art Physics B & C French Language & Culture Statistics

EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES ESA offers a wide range of extracurricular activities. These activities are intended to broaden the scope of a student's education and contribute to the spirit and morale of the entire school community. The following list of activities is by no means exhaustive. When strong student and faculty interest exists for a particular activity, the school administration will make every effort to accommodate the interest. Extracurricular offerings in past years have included: basketball, volleyball, cross-country, soccer, baseball, tennis, golf, track, cheerleading, yearbook, chorus, drama, community service, Outing Club, speech, The Eclectic, literary magazine, French Club and Quiz Bowl.

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STUDENT GOVERNMENT CANDIDATES EXECUTIVE COUNCIL President Virginia Walker Vice President Camille LeJeune Secretary Sarah Andry Treasurer Christine Andrus Discipline Council President Matthew Spears Honor Council President Katherine Faul 12th Grade Representatives Honor: Nick Supple

11th Grade Representatives Honor: Adela Munson

Discipline: Stephanie Wartelle

Discipline: Kelsey Wartelle

Class: Jessica Boagni, Kinsley Poppa

Class: Laura Fallis, Avery Munson

10th Grade Representatives Honor: Beth Poche’, Carla Dibbs

9th Grade Representatives Honor: Blythe Bull, Omar Munshi

Discipline : Sara Babineaux

Discipline: Audrey Gutierrez

Class : Katie Como, Guneez Ibrahim

Class: Carly Hebert

CLASS OFFICERS Each spring rising classes in the Upper School elect class officers as provided for in the Student Council by-laws. 12th Grade President………….Cole LaFleur Vice President.........Spencer Comeaux Secretary .................Caitlin Blanchard Treasurer ................Elizabeth Barron

10th Grade President .................Andrew Broussard Vice President.........Andrew Burns Secretary…………. Margaret McCarron Treasurer ................Sade’ Simien

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11th Grade President ...............Anju Mampilly Vice President.......Kennedy Kirby Secretary ...............Emily Miller Treasurer ..............Rami Dibbs

9th Grade President ...............Victoria Andry Vice President.......Ben Spears Secretary ...............Mary Carolyn Michot Treasurer ..............Jillian Chen

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HELPFUL INFORMATION MEDICAL INFORMATION State of Louisiana law requires the following information be on file at ESA before a student is permitted to attend classes: 1. A completed and signed health form 2. Immunization according to State of Louisiana requirements ESA also must have on file a certified copy of each student’s birth certificate.

PRESCRIPTION MEDICATION Any prescription medication that a student is to take while on the ESA campus must be kept with the school receptionist. The student should report to the Upper School Office when it is time to take the medication. Please see the Drug and Alcohol Policy for other important information.

BUSINESS AND FINANCIAL As outlined in the Enrollment Agreement, the following three options are offered for payment of tuition: A. One annual payment by July 20, 2011 B. Two payments: the first payment by July 20, 2011 and the second payment by November 21, 2011. C. Ten monthly payments beginning July 20, 2011, and ending April 20, 2012 *The two payment plan requires an automatic bank debit on November 21, 2011. This plan option carries a 1.0% monthly interest charge based on the outstanding tuition balance owed from July 20, 2011 until paid in full. *The monthly payment plan requires an automatic monthly bank debit from a designated bank account for the ten months listed and carries a 15% interest payment. Tuition finance fees for installment payments are due and payable each month beginning July 20th and ending April 20th. Transportation charges are billed October 1st and may be paid in two installments of one half each October 20th and December 20th. The student directory fee, Parents Club dues and incidental fees are billed September 1st and are due September 20th. Miscellaneous charges are billed every month beginning September 1st and are due the 20th of the month. If a parent's account is not paid in full or is not otherwise current at either the end of the first semester or the end of the school year, the student’s grades will not be processed and grade reports and transcripts will not be mailed until payment is received.

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STUDENT ACCIDENT INSURANCE POLICY A student accident insurance policy is provided for all students at no cost to the parents. Application packets for extended 24-hour coverage and dental riders are available in the Business Office and mailed to all parents at the beginning of each year.

ASBESTOS MANAGEMENT ESA has complied with requirements of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in maintaining an asbestos management plan for all of the school buildings. The plan, which was reviewed and approved by the EPA, is available for review by parents and employees between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.

LOST AND FOUND Books and calculators that have been lost are returned to the bookstore. Missing clothes are often put in the closet in the gym. Students can eliminate problems by putting their name on all their clothing and books, and by keeping books and clothes in their locker when these items are not in use. Books left in the classroom or outside on the ground are often easily lost or damaged. PUT YOUR NAME ON YOUR BELONGINGS AND KEEP THEM IN YOUR LOCKER.

SCHOOL CLOSING The main office of the school is open from 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday except for the following holidays when it is closed: Labor Day (Monday, September 5, 2011) Fall Break (Monday, October 17, 2011 & Tuesday, October 18, 2011) Thanksgiving Recess (Monday, November 21, 2011 – Friday, November 25, 2011) Christmas Recess (Wednesday, December 21, 2011 – Wednesday, January 4, 2012) Martin Luther King Day (Monday, January 16, 2012) Mardi Gras Recess (Monday, February 20, 2012 – Friday, February 24, 2012) Easter Recess (Friday, April 6, 2012 – Friday, April 13, 2012) Occasionally inclement weather requires ESA to close early or not to operate for a day. Listen to local radio or TV stations for special ESA instructions.

STATEMENT OF NON-DISCRIMINATION POLICY Episcopal School of Acadiana admits students of any race, color, creed, national or ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, national or ethnic origin in the administration of its educational policies, admission policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school administered programs.

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USE OF SCHOOL NAME & HANDBOOK No one is authorized to use the names “ESA” or “Episcopal School of Acadiana” for promotion or solicitation purposes without the expressed, written consent of the headmaster. The ESA “directory and handbooks for students and parents” and the information contained therein, including the names and addresses of ESA families, faculty and staff, and the names “ESA” or “Episcopal School of Acadiana,” are intended for official use by the school and the private use of the students of ESA and their parents. We ask that our families and friends not use, lend or distribute these for any commercial, political or solicitation purposes. Please contact the headmaster if you have any questions.

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ESA Student Handbook