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Brief

S E L E C T E D WORKS

A N T O N I O

N O R S W O R T H Y

Washington State University School of Design + + Construction


(509) 715-1071 antonio@prolineplans.com

EXPERIENCE 2013-present

+Owner|Designer ProLine Plans Residential Design and Construction Documents Recent Projects: Elk River, Elk River, ID Hauser House, Hauser ID Sacheen Cabin, Newport WA Sacheen Terrace, Newport WA

2013

+Technical Consultant Washington State University School of Design and Construction Technical Consultant for 2013 Masonry Design Competition

2012

+Carpenter Mike and Tracy Byrne; residential renovation, Pullman, WA Design/build to owner’s satisfaction

2010-2012

+Engineering Technician II Nortech Environmental Engineering, Fairbanks, AK Rivendell Hall Envelope upgrades (Project Manager) HIPAS Observatory Decommissioning (CAD|Site Support) CAD drafting, research, planning, and field support

2007-2009

+Owner|Lead Carpenter Norsworthy Contracting Co. #33776 Fairbanks, AK Specialty Contractor for broad range of residential repair/remodeling projects

2009

+Carpenter Fairbanks Pipeline Training Ctr. Trust Fairbanks, AK Cartwright Build-out Metal stud framing, wood framing, thermal and moisture barrier, drywall installation, wood trim

2007-2009

+Carpenter Davis Constructors and Engineers Fairbanks, AK Fairbanks International Airport Renovation Metal stud framing, thermal and moisture barrier, drywall installation, doors, wood trim

2006-2007

+Carpenter Fountainhead Development Inc. Fairbanks, AK Ridgeview Business Project, Van Horn Industrial Complex, Wedgewood Resort Renovation Wood wall and roof framing and decking, thermal and moisture barrier, drywall installation

2006

+Carpenter Fleetwood Homes, Inc. Benton, KY


EDUCATION 2011-present

Washington State University +Architecture (B.S. Arch Studies May 2015, M. Arch May 2016) +Construction Management (Minor)

2009-2011

University of Alaska Fairbanks +Drafting Technology

2007-2010

Fairbanks Carpenter Training Center +UBC Journeyman Carpenter Training

AWARDS 2014

+ WSU Society of Latino Scientists and Engineers Scholarship

2014

+2nd Place WSU SDC Portfolio Competition

2014

+Simpson Strongtie Architecture and Engineering Scholarship

2013

+Ron Dailey and Eva Carey Endowed Alaskan Scholarship

2013

+R.H. Logan Scholarship

2012

+1st Place WSU SDC Masonry Design Competition

2012

+Honorable Mention WSU SDC Portfolio Competition

2012

+WSU SDC Architecture Development Scholarship

QUALIFICATIONS

+Certificate in Drafting Technology, UAF +Revit 2014 Certified Professional +AutoCAD 2012 Certified Professional +Rhinoceros-Grasshopper proficiency +Adobe Suite proficiency

REFERENCES

Jerry Anderson, Principal Architecture CDA (208) 819-6448


C O N T E N T S

[ 2 0 1 2 - 2 0 1 4 ]

+ PROFESSIONAL

SACHEEN CABIN ELK RIVER

01 05

+ ACADEMIC EXPERIENTIAL GEOMETRY PERFORMANCE DRIVEN DESIGN

10 18

+ CRAFT A FATHER’S LOVE

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+ P R O F E S S I O N A L


SACHEEN CABIN With over a decade of construction experience as a carpenter on residential and commercial projects, I bring a perspective to design which only a builder can. In addition to typical considerations such as circulation, egress, and maximizing views, I weigh practical matters such as framing schemes, availability of materials, and overall ease of construction, among others. This broadened perspective has afforded me many opportunities for professional freelance design work as a sole proprietor under the trade name ProLine Plans. As a professional designer I’m proud to offer homeowners and professionals design and drafting solutions they may not otherwise receive from a “drafter” with no practical building experience. For the Sacheen Cabin I was contacted by an elderly couple in Northern Washington who sought an affordable housing solution on their plot of land near Sacheen Lake. Due to their fixed income we identified a budget of $50,000 for design and construction fees at the outset. Since they would have access to inexpensive labor in the form of family and friends I was confident we could develop a solution to fit their needs. Aside from the budget my client’s requirements were simple: they needed one bedroom, a kitchen and dining area, a living area, one full bath, a utility space, a modicum of closet storage space, and an exterior deck area. We decided early to use standard stick framing for the primary structure, and developed a simple 40’ x 28’ orthogonal plan. These dimensions were derived from the economic benefit of using dimensions which matched the availability of sheet goods in multiples of four feet. The programmatic volume diagram on the following pace depicts the arrangement of spaces based on their requirements.

ECONOMICAL FRAMING 1


2009 IRC CODE ANALYSIS

FIRM: ProLine Plans ROLE: Design, Code Research, Basic Beam/Column Sizing

New Construction: Detached one-family, single-story residence-728 sq ft Deck-336 sq ft Parking Pad-520 sq ft

Calculations, Full Construction, Documents Set, Material Takeoffs

DESIGN CRITERIA Snow Load: Basic Wind Speed: Seismic Design Category: Exposure Classification: Frost Line Depth: Presumed Soil Bearing:

50 psf (Roof Live Load) 85 mph (3 second gust) C B 30” 1500 psi

10’ x 5’

10’ x 7’ 15’ x 14’ 10’ x 13’

12’ x 28’

15’ x14’

PROGRAMMATIC VOLUMES 2


PUBLIC

SEMI-PRIVATE

PRIVATE

As a way to reduce utility costs, my client opted to include a woodstove which would be supplemented by 1,500 Kw baseboard heaters. To add a feeling of spaciousness to this small plan we chose to include a cathedral ceiling in the living and kitchen areas, but kept the standard 8’ ceilings in the sleeping, bath, and utility areas. Lower ceilings there will maximize heat retention at body level and balance spaciousness with physical comfort on cold days. The sectional hierarchy that arose from these decisions is depicted at right. Starting from the exterior my client’s will enjoy their bucolic surroundings from an open air deck. In addition to entertaining guests during warm months, they will greet passers by and enjoy the sense of community in their close-knit neighborhood. Continuing through the main entry into the living and kitchen spaces my client’s will enjoy a spacious area for carrying out their daily activities while still maintaining a sense of privacy and security from the outside world. Towards the rear of the house, sleeping and bathing areas present a more intimate experience, and are reserved for the most private activities.

SECTIONAL DIAGRAM Spacial Hierarchy 3


SELECTED SHEETS Not to Scale This project required the production of a full set of construction drawings. Not only would these drawings be used for the purposes of obtaining a building permit, but it was also essential they included detailed and accurate dimensions and drawings. While the Pendoreille County Planning Department only required a basic set including a site plan, foundation plan, floor plan, wall section, radon mitigation plan, exterior building elevations, and roof framing, my clients requested additional sheets to ensure the construction was carried out as planned. The additional sheets included foundation details, deck attachment and stair details, a framing elevation, window and door schedules, and detailed sheet notes. A selection of those sheets is shown above.

In addition to the set of working drawings I developed several conceptual renders to aid my clients in their decisions. At right is a digital render showing the house in it’s context with a smaller deck and full deck overhang. Since the additional cost of the deck overhang more or less equated to the cost of a larger deck with no overhang, I presented the option as a personal preference to my clients . In the end they opted for a short overhang above the main entry door and kept the larger deck area.

DESIGN OPTION Deck Overhang 4


ELK RIVER Since Spring of 2013 I have contracted with a local architect, , Principle of in Couer d’ Alene, Idaho, to provide design and drafting services in support of various residential and commercial projects originating from his office. With my practical knowledge in construction materials and methods, as well as my expertise in design software, I provide value to by handling most technical matters such as construction and permitting drawing sets, design details, preliminary structural calculations, code research, and digital renderings for presentation. By handling the technical issues I enable Mr. Anderson to focus his efforts on schematic design, design development, contract administration, and client meetings. For the residence in Elk River, Idaho, I was provided with a preliminary floor plan for two levels of a 3,000 square foot structure. Those simple documents, shown on the following page, served as the basis for creating the digital rendering depicted at right. This conceptual view was intended to provide a rational basis for design decisions by the owner and architect. The double-height pitched ceiling imparts a feeling of openness while diffused natural light lends a soft and comfortable quality to the atmosphere of the oversized family room. The interior render was generated using geometry from the Revit model I created based on Mr. Anderson’s preliminary plans. I then transferred a base rendering of that geometry to Photoshop and, through a series of overlays and adjustments to tonal values, I developed the image shown. By working quickly and efficiently I was able to provide this render in a short time and for a low fee.

INTERIOR VIEW Digital render 5


FIRM: ProLine Plans | Architecture CDA ROLE: Code Research, Basic Beam/Column Sizing Calculations,

Full Construction Documents Set

The preliminary sketches provided by Mr. Anderson were developed with input from the owners. As shown at right this basic set included exterior and interior wall geometry with minimal dimensions, room labels, and tentative fixture and furniture placement.

2009 IRC CODE ANALYSIS New Construction: Detached one-family, single-story residence-2995 sq ft DESIGN CRITERIA Snow Load: Basic Wind Speed: Seismic Design Category: Exposure Classification: Frost Line Depth: Presumed Soil Bearing:

50 psf (Roof Live Load) 85 mph (3 second gust) C B 30� 1500 psi

After receiving the preliminary sketches I immediately undertook the task of researching the basic design criteria which would dictate the design of this 3,000 square foot residence. A quick visit to the website of the Authority Having Jurisdiction (Benewah County Building Department) yielded basic design criteria including the snow load, basic wind speed, seismic design category, exposure classification, frost line depth, and soil bearing capacity. With this information in hand I then set about the task of conforming the preliminary design to these basic guidelines. Once I developed the design sufficiently to conform to these basic requirements I was able to develop the full set of construction documents which included a foundation plan sheet, floor plan sheet, floor framing sheet, roof framing and plan sheets, mechanical and electrical sheets, floor framing sheets, roof framing sheets, section sheets, and exterior elevations sheets. Relying on my extensive construction and design experience and frequently consulting the applicable code (2009 IRC) I created all the drawings and details required for these sheets and added annotation and notes necessary to create a construction documents set conforming to an industry-recognized standard of care.

ARCHITECT’S SKETCHES 6


Using Revit 2014 and maintaining an adherence to standard industry practices, the drawings depicted here convey critical sectional information necessary for the successful construction of the residence. In addition to orienting the viewer to the sectional hierarchy created by load-bearing and partition walls, these views support and reinforce information contained on other sheets including wall thickness, insulation type and thickness, floor thickness, roof slopes, truss and joist layout, primary and intermediate footing types and locations, and room locations. Aspects of stair and header construction are also depicted here and serve to guide the builder in the execution of his tasks. These sectional views and the information they contain are crucial for supplementing the builder’s knowledge and experience and also help to ensure the architect’s and owner’s design intent is realized ultimately realized.

7

BUILDING SECTIONS


Adding an additional level of hierarchy to the information contained within the construction documents set, the drawings depicted here provide thorough annotation and detailing necessary to carry out the architect’s intent. Critical aspects of the structural system are prescriptively labeled and help to ensure the quality of construction and integrity of the life safety provisions laid out in the building code. In addition to the detailing of critical structural components, these drawings also depict interior and exterior finishes, components of the thermal and moisture envelope, and vertical dimensions not otherwise depicted in the set. Including room labels in the full height wall section also supports information on building section sheets and orients the viewer to the context of the annotation. With multiple foundation types resulting from varying load conditions, it was necessary to create a detailed view of the intermediate footings. These footings generally carry the load of partition walls only and thus are less robust than primary load-bearing footings. Drawings depicting floor framing callouts were necessary due to the critical nature of the floor framing system. This system depends on interconnecting and exposed glulam beams, laminated veneer lumber used as rim joists, and proprietary truss joist members. Considering the skill and capabilities of the contractor, I chose to compliment his abilities by include detailed information including sheathing orientation, placement of double joists below partition walls, joist type and layout, supporting wall type and layout , and also the location and type of critical Simpson hardware.

SELECTED VIEWS Not to Scale

By maintaining consideration for the construction materials and techniques likely to be implemented by the contractor and adhering to the guidance of the architect I was able to successfully create the entire set of construction documents from start to finish. The result became a detailed document suitable for ensuring the enjoyment and safety of the new home for the owner. 8


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EXPERIENTIAL GEOMETRY Led by Professor Mary Polites, this seminar focused on the development of a simple component which could be aggregated to form emergent qualities toward an architectural use. At the onset of this project students were asked to define their aims: specific outcomes which we expected to achieve through the development, refinement, and implementation of our component and the system it forms in aggregation. My aims were simple-- structural simplicity and viability as an architectural construct. Presuming simple aims would be accomplished by the use of simple geometry I began with a rectilinear plane. Through a series of simple manipulations I produced the initial working component. This component was then transformed through a series if iterations which in turn produced an array of possible volumetric configurations from which to choose for structural analysis and material behavior at a physical scale. Finite element analysis of the initial planar component informed decisions made toward structural optimization in the volumetric component. This logic was carried forward through the development process and served to reinforce decisions made in response to a formal aesthetic.

TOP PERSPECTIVE Digital Render 11


PROFESSOR: Mary Polites SEMINAR: Digital and Fabrication Logistics

PLUTONIC SOLID

Flaps

Hub

60째

60째

DEVELOPMENT SEQUENCE

12


Actual Proportions Applied Load Structural Redundancy

Redundancy Removed

Rotational Axes

Restraint Required (Glue)

1>psi

1<psi Radial Thrust

Deflection Exaggerated 5000 times

FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS Structural Optimization

13


OUTER LIP

[height, width]

After development of the component itself I shifted my focus to possible connection and aggregation strategies. Though the hermaphroditic joint never materialized as a working physical model, it was nonetheless valuable in determining the final connection logic and aggregation scheme as it’s failure set boundaries on my exploration in the form of practical constraints.

SLEEVE BODY

[height, width, thickness]

STRESS FILLET [radius]

INNER LIP

[height, width]

JOINT DEVELOPMENT

THICKENED BASE (COMPONENT OMITTED)

4’-6””

The images at left top depict the details of the idealized hermaphroditic joint: as a male end the sleeve body closes to fit snuggly in the other joint-half, while an outer lip on the closed end forms a mechanical joint with the inner lip on the open end. Stress fillets at the base of both sleeve bodies reinforce the connection to the component and prevent shear or tension failure at that critical moment of connection. Images at left bottom show the finalized component with a more simplistic connection logic. With a secondary system of variable hubs, the geometry of the component inherently supported rotation about four principal axes, allowing a multitude of possible aggregation schemes at either scale. Fabrication strategies depend on the final material, so the component was developed at physical scale to be constructed out of wood or aluminum panels.

12

’-0

1’-6”

FINAL COMPONENT Large and small

14


The final component inherits many formal and functional aspects from earlier iterations yet differentiates itself by the absence of an integrated joint. Aggregation of the final component relies on a secondary element to realize the componentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s inherent structural properties. Implementation of the final component proposes two variations: an impromptu play structure and an experiential art installation. The play structure results from aggregation of the small-scale component in sequential steps while the art installation considers an aggregation of large-scale components. Each facilitates spontaneous interaction and engagement of adults and children, and fosters collaboration at two scales--person to person and person to world.

VARIABLE HUB

15


PUBLIC SPACE

ENGAGEMENT

COLLABORATION

RENDERED PERSPECTIVE 16


An impromptu play structure begins as a series of dissociated components, perhaps located in a park or playground. Beginning in a public space would impart feelings of equitable standing and willingness of strangers to engage in the collaborative acts of building and play. As passing curiosity gives way to the primal drive to explore, participants would begin to gather and assemble the components. Bit by bit, this engagement would foster communication and exchange between individuals and groups, where the basic geometry of each component helps to create a memorable experience. The act of building is then a vehicle for meeting new people, reinforcing existing relationships, and collaborative exploration. The final structure at this scale then creates the opportunity for continued explorative play and development of new personal relationships. Children play together while adults play with the children or connect with each other at the level of relatable conversation and experiences.

FULL ASSEMBLY 17


PHOTO-VOLTAIC CELL

BATTERY BANK

FLAT PANEL LED

The alternative implementation employs components which are six times larger than the small scale aggregation. At this scale the opportunity is created for experience of the aggregation as a sculptural installation, while also demonstrating the use of self-sustaining interactive features. While the sun is up, visitors experience the dynamic shadow patterns as light penetrates the aggregationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s non-rectilinear geometry. PV cells absorb solar energy, which is in turn stored in small battery banks placed within the core of approximately half of the components. When the sun drops below the horizon, variably timed low-wat LED panels are illuminated. This illumination would be easily programmed with the use of a small, inexpensive microcontroller such as the Arduino Uno.

Using the art installation as a working example, this arrangement would be a didactic deployment where the merits of self-sustaining systems are demonstrated in a playful way. Modular components allow easy fabrication and deployment to a variety of public spaces where the final arrangement would respond to contextual conditions. In this way, the aggregation becomes part of the narrative of its chosen site and enhances the experience of place.

ALTERNATIVE ASSEMBLY 18


PERFORMANCE DRIVEN DESIGN The undergraduate architecture curriculum at WSU currently relies on a traditional approach to design where students are encouraged to develop a conceptual narrative that serves as the guiding principle for subsequent aspects of the project. That concept is cultivated in response to a specific set of program and environmental considerations-- a top down approach. Based on the capabilities and limitations of wood structural members I have developed a deployable system that, in aggregation, is capable of adapting to a range of programmatic and environmental constraints-- a bottom up approach. For this systems-based design methodology I utilized a bottom-up approach which sought to inform subsequent aspects of the design solution based on capabilities and limitations of wood as a construction material. This project evolved from an investigation into wood products for their intrinsic qualities. A survey of the vernacular use of wood in the Pullman area finds consistent themes of clapboard siding for residences and utility structures. Builders in the area likely sought the use of this rectilinear building element for its low production and maintenance cost, ease of installation, and its potential for a wide range of design schemes stemming from its modular, human-scaled dimensions. The development of a parametric algorithm enabled quick exploration of potential system configurations based on a response to material attributes and a set of defined parameters. The versatility of the system is demonstrated by three possible deployment schemes on three distinct sites across WSU and Pullman. Each are equally viable in terms of their architectural merit.

RENDERED PERSPECTIVE 19


PROFESSOR: Arash Adel STUDIO: Types, Prototypes, and Systems

SOCIAL NODE | Nevada Street Pavilion

PERFORMANCE VENUE | Open-air Theater at Kimbrough

CULTURAL ICON | Downtown foot bridge

PROPOSED SYSTEM ADAPTATIONS

20


VIEWS

LIGHT MODERATION

STRUCTURAL EFFICIENCY

MATRIX OF SYSTEM VARIATIONS Formal Attributes SHELTER ACOUSTIC RESPONSE

DESIGN PARAMETERS Experiential Conditions shelter 21

light moderation

views

acoustic response


After demonstrating the system’s versatility and successful deployment as an academic exercise, I sought to test it’s effectiveness in a real-world setting with practical constraints and limitations. As an ideal candidate for this scenario, the Pullman Civic Trust is currently finalizing plans for a new footbridge to connect walking paths between Johnson Road and Bishop Boulevard near Fireside Grille and Crimson and Grey. In addition to the physical span, the system will bridge the gap between traditional values and new ideas in performance-driven design.

SOUTH PERSPECTIVE Digital Render

DOWEL OR BOLT ASSEMBLY

STEEL BRACKET

VIEW SOUTH Digital Render

JOINERY

3” X 18” WOOD PLANK

PROTOTYPICAL SYSTEM Exploded Axon

PHYSICAL MODEL Birch Veneer, Chipboard CONCRETE FOOTING

22


6

The area map and site plan depicted at left show the context of the new bridge proposal. While existing vehicular circulation paths are maintained, pedestrian paths are enhanced as the bridge connects disjointed footpaths along the south fork of the Palouse River in Pullman.

4

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Additionally, the bridge ties the previously sparsely traveled North side of the river to the much more frequented commercial venues along Bishop Boulevard at this location.

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MAP KEY

PEDESTRIAN

1 VILLAGE CENTRE CINEMAS

VEHICULAR

2 FIRESIDE GRILLE 3 SUMMIT THERAPY

SITE PLAN NORTH

4 POOCH PARK 5 CRIMSON AND GREY 6 DENNYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

SOUTH ELEVATION 23


To test the viability of construction of the bridge proposal concept, and also to demonstrate its spacial qualities, I built a 1/16” scale model of the bridge and it’s immediate vicinity previously depicted on the site plan. Along with the aid of WSU’s fabrication facilities, great care was taken to preserve the bridge’s proportions and material attributes. An image of that model is shown at left. The addition of proportionally scaled entourage helps an observer to imagine themselves experiencing the bridge as if it were constructed full scale. Line drawings help tell the rest of the “story”.

PHYSICAL MODEL Birch Veneer, Chipboard

WEST ELEVATION 24


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A FATHERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LOVE As a full-time student working part-time as a professional designer I sometimes struggle to strike a balance between my responsibilities for those roles and my role as a husband and father to three children. This project is about an attempt to satisfy that balance while further developing my skills as a craftsman and also imparting a sense of appreciation for craft on my seven year old son, Ethan. I strive to cultivate a nurturing relationship with each of my children. As my eldest son, the dynamics of that relationship with Ethan are predicated on mutual interests and a nurturing of his curiosity in natural phenomenon and the intricacies of mechanical systems; how things work and fit together. Since the age of two Ethan has expressed a growing interest in locomotive trains and their corresponding scale models. Working with these models and studying their real life counterparts has not only increased his mechanical aptitude, but also continues to feed his insatiable thirst for knowledge on related subjects such as circuitry, transportation logic, and model building. I saw an opportunity to demonstrate to my son some of the nuances of woodcraft in the need to replace his steel bed rail. After a failed attempt to repair the rail with light gauge steel brackets it occurred to me the connections of the primary frame lacked the robustness to resist the bending stresses arising from frequent use--an intrinsic design flaw in my opinion. In itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s original configuration, the steel bed rail was intended to be secured to the primary frame via tension developed by four small diameter 3/16â&#x20AC;? steel bolts. Any force exerted on the rail developed axial bending stresses on the bolts which eventually led to fatigue and failure.

PROCESS PHOTOS 27


DESIGN CALCULATIONS *Design assumed to be controlled by bending stress with 200 lb design load Bending Moment

Allowable Bending

M=f·d = (200 lbs) 18” = 3600 in-lbs

Fb = 3000 psi for 3/4” plywood

Design Bending Stress

Unity Check

S = (b·d2) /6 fb = M / S = 3600 in-lbs / 3.75” = (40” · 0.75”2) /6 = 960 psi = 3.75”4

fb / Fb = 960 psi / 3000 psi ~ 0.31 < 1.00 GOOD!

Maximum Bending Stress fb

Fb = 3000 psi = M / S 3000 psi = M / 3.75”4 11250 = M f · d 11250 = f · d 11250 = f · 18” 625 lbs = fMAX

It was clear the solution would depend on a connection detail which essentially removed the possibility of bolt failure from the design parameters. To achieve this arrangement I opted for 5/8” A325 bolts connecting 3/4” ACX plywood to the bed’s primary frame. A total of four bolts with oversized washers yielded allowable values far exceeding the magnitude of forces the new bed rail would encounter, so I skipped those calculations. However it was important to confirm 3/4” ACX plywood would be sufficient for resisting those forces by determining the design bending stress and comparing that figure to the material’s allowable value for that property. A few basic structural calculations revealed the new rail would only experience one third of it’s allowable capacity, thus yielding a safety factor of three, which is over an above the factor included in published values.

I anticipated the design load to be approximately 200 lbs, considering various extreme loading conditions wrought by a seven year old boy. After determining whether or not the redesigned rail would be sufficient to withstand the anticipated design load, I was then curious to calculate the force required to exceed the wood’s allowable bending capacity. By my calculations, the new rail would now accommodate a force of 625 lbs applied perpendicular to the long axis grain and axial to the bolts. The final piece included wood relief work depicting a scene of my son’s favorite subject; trains. So in addition to a safe new rail for my son’s bed, this project resulted in a shared experience between Ethan and I, and was a fulfilling way to pass along my knowledge and passion to a new generation.

625 lbs MAX

FORCE DIAGRAM

FINAL PIECE A happy kid 28


thank you


A N T O N I O N O R S W O R T H Y

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Brief Selected Works_2012-2014  

Selected projects from 2012 to 2014 including professional, academic, and personal craft.

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