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The Body S en so ry This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Here for the first time, and often later, the inclination toward printing and graphics would emerge out of a deep subconscious." At the age of 18, Werkman began working as a routine type sorter, or "printer's devil", for a printer, publisher and vookseller in a nearby town. He also wrote occasional pieces for the company's newspaper and helped to set the type for it. On the side, he dabbled in photography, going so far as to print his own business card. Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with

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Mi n d

S ens o ry

Fa b ri c , S ki n o f t he Bo d y

This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's

This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's

This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's


S pa c e

Inner Ski n o f Arc hite c t ure

This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's

This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's

RI BA Comp et it ion Mec hanic al

Krump

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To i l e t

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From Fa br i c t o C l o t h e s

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E x t re m l y Tr a n s p a re n t

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6 0 cm B r i dge

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Japanese Armour

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A rc h i t e ct s

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Pe r s on a l B l o g

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T h e M e adow B r i dge

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Tr a n s f o r m e r Ta bl e

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Krump Th e Release o f a Bod y' s Min d This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only

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Toil et s S ensory E x perimen t i n L i mited S pac es This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only

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T oil e t s S e nsory E x perimen t i n L i m i ted S p ac e s 28

This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only


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T o i l et s Sen so ry E x perimen t in Limited Spaces This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only

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F r om F a b ri c t o C l ot he s Weavi ng the Inte rac t ive Space 28

This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only


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T o i l et s Sen so ry E x periment in Limited Spaces 29 This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only


T o i l et s Sen so ry E x periment in Limited Spaces 28

This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only


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T o i l et s Sen so ry E x perimen t in Limited Spaces This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only

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T o i l et s Sen so ry E x periment in Limited Spaces 28

This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only


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T o i l et s Sen so ry E x periment in Limited Spaces 28

This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only


To i le ts S e nso r y E x pe ri m e nt i n Li mi t e d S p a ce s This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only

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T o i l et s Sen so ry E x periment in Limited Spaces 28

This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only


To i le ts S e nso r y E x pe ri m e nt i n Li mi t e d S p a ce s This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only

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T o i l et s Sen so ry E x perimen t in Limited Spaces This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only

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T o i l et s Sen so ry E x perimen t in Limited Spaces This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only

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T h e M ea d o w B ri d g e 28

This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only


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To i le ts S e nso r y E x pe ri m e nt i n Li mi t e d S p a ce s This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only

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T o i l et s Deck composition plan 1:100 - The pattern is based on the Fibonacci "sunĂ&#x;ower" spiral - Flowers arranged in a two lines composition - Flowers diameter varies from 1800 to 2400 mm (18 to 24 in the model) - Circular holes are 50 mm in real bridge (0.5 mm in the model)

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Sen so ry E x periment in Limited Spaces This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only


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Toil et s S ensory E x perimen t i n L i mited S pac es This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only

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E xt rem el y Tr a n spa ren t Interactive Sen sory Instal latio n This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only

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Extre m e l y Transpa r e nt I nt e r a c t i ve S e nsory I nst a l l a t i on 28

This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only


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T o i l et s Sen so ry E x perimen t in Limited Spaces This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only

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T o i l et s Sen so ry E x perimen t in Limited Spaces This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only

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6 0 c m B ri d g e Man ufacture & Material T estin g 28

This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only


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T o i l et s Sen so ry E x periment in Limited Spaces 28

This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only


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Ja pa n ese A rm o u r Weavin g T estin g This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only

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Ar c h i t ec t s Manu facture & Mate rial T estin g This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only

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T o i l et s Sen so ry E x periment in Limited Spaces 28

This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only


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To i le ts S e nso r y E x pe ri m e nt i n Li mi t e d S p a ce s This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only

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Pe r s on a l B l o g Manu f acture & Materi a l T estin g 28

This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only


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T o i l et s Sen so ry E x periment in Limited Spaces 28

This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only


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T o i l et s Sen so ry E x periment in Limited Spaces 28

This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only


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Tra ns f or m e r Tab l e M a n u f ac tu re & M a t e ri al Testi ng 28

This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only


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Toil et s S ensory E x perimen t i n L i mited S pac es This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only

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T o i l et s Sen so ry E x perimen t in Limited Spaces This was the second edition of statutes printed for De Ploeg after Werkman became a member. The cover, shown here, displays the De Ploeg logo designed by member Ali Pott. This was selected as part of a competition in 1919 and was used in several versions. The bold use of foreshadows Werkman's later typography. The literaty value of Blad voor Kunst was negligible, but it was the first attempt in Groningen to produce a magazine devoted to modern art. Werkman's striking cover consisting of black and yellow retangles on a red background clearly reflects the influence of De Stijl. The use of purely abstract forms represents a major step for Wrekman. This flyer announced the publication of The Next Call. At the bottom of the sheet the publisher was listed as "Travailleur en Cie" ("Workman & Others" in French), but everyone knew it was Werkman fron the address "Lage der A13" An attraction to printing manifested itself early in life. Werkman's younger brother Martinus Hendrick wrote that one of his earliest childhood memories was of Werkman printing a newspaper during a winter evening under lamplight: "The secret world of printing types must have attracted him even through he had barely turned eight... Those who knew Werkman were hardly surprised when his printing company collapsed in 1923. Willem Sandberg later sommented that anything practical was beyond Werkman's grasp and Werkman's assistant Bos recalled how when some new company stationery had arrived wit the telephone number missing, Werkman's nonchalant reaction was, "Oh well, just leave it as it is. I've already had enough bother with that telephone." The third number of The Next Call, mailed on 12 January 1924, was visually the least captivation. Published only

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Mock up 1