Issuu on Google+

meadow

Annie Palone Spring 2013 Portfolio

Master of Landscape Architecture 2013 Graduate Portfolio Program in Sustainability

University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture

butterfly rain garden

b


Design Philosophy

How do people imagine the landscape they find themselves in? How does the land shape the imagination of people who dwell in it? These questions from Barry Lopez’s Arctic Dreams frame my long-standing interest in landscapes. Sustainability and social resiliency are necessary to the way forward. From my undergraduate investigations of literature and art, to agriculture, food, and human geography, to my graduate studies of landscape architecture, and urban design, the making of meaningful places for human occupation underlies my academic interests and design philosophy. I believe that landscape architecture is the most meaningful way to change the fabric of the cities in which we live, and look forward to being a part of that change.


Contents

Design

Design Waller Creek: A Competition

01

Braid Waller Creek

04

Life Cycles Cemetery

08

Traverse the Slope

12

Emergent Education

13

Topographic Modeling

15

Shed[+] Public Interest Design

16

5x5 / Detail Model

17

Summer 2012 Internship Fall 2011

Spring 2012 Spring 2011

Build

Spring 2013 Fall 2010

Summer 2010

GUADALUPE NEIGHBORHOOD

Spring 2012 / 2011

Conceive Annie Palone 2011 thorbjornthankyou.indd 1

4/20/12 6:44 PM

Alpine Transect

18

Float, Mist, Play

20

Whale Pavilion

21

ResumĂŠ

Fall 2012

Spring 2011 Spring 2013

22


Design Waller Creek: A Competition - Cultural Resource Mapping An International Design Competition for Waller Creek, Austin, Texas

MLK

Team CMG + Public Architecture Culture + Community Group 15th

These cultural resource maps, and those on the following pages were made in order to understand the cultural richness surrounding the project site, Waller Creek, on the eastern border of downtown Austin, and to understand the character of the intervention we would propose.

12th 11th

8th 7th 6th

4th

Cesar Chavez

River / Holly

Lady Bird Lake

East - West Connections across IH-35

East-West Connectivity

N

Arts

0

500’

Arts Resources - Galleries, Museums, Institutions

1000’

2000’

IH-35 vehicular access bike route

N

0

500’

10

Museu Gallery Hybrid Live M


Internship Summer 2012 - Summer Associate at Public Architecture

Garza School

Frank Erwin Center Unemployment Tax Assistance Hearon Respite Center (ATCIC)

State Capitol Building

State Capitol Central Health Governor's Mansion Capitol C omplex Visitors Center

Coalition of Texans Kealing with School Disabilities

Lott Park

Symphony Square

G

Henry Faulk Library

Splash Park Playground

Franklin BBQ ProArts Victory Grill AMOA / The Paramount Arthouse Blackshear Elementary

Preschool

Salvation Army ARCH Caritas

Antone’s

2009 Homelessness Survey Boundary

State Cemetery

Stubb’s BBQ Headhunters Driskill Hotel Red Eyed Fly Alamo Drafthouse Beale St Tavern Beerland The Parish Red7 Venue222 The Stage Flamingo Cantina The Velveeta Room Esther’s Follies Easy Tiger

Downtown Austin Community Court

Childrens’ Museum

City Hall

Austin Children’s Museum

Convention Center

Moonshine

Moonlight Tower French Legation Texas State Cemetery Progress Food Truck Park Coffee

Divers Arts

Travis Co. Family Support Services

Ironworks Long Center for Performing Arts

Congress Bridge Bat Colony Terrazas Library Austin Travis County Integral Care

Sanchez Elementary School

MACC

Metz Elementary School Festival Beach Community Garden

Martin Middle School

Resources for Kids - Schools, Playgrounds, Attractions

ools, Playgrounds, Cultural Attactors

South Congress

N

0

500’

Social Services + Homeless Populations (Perceived)

1000’

2000’

Schools K - 12 School Property Playgrounds Field Trip Destinations Playing Fields

Social Service Providers + WC Homeless Population

N

0

500’

Cultural Resources - Regional, City-wide + Local

1000’

2000’

Social Service Providers Homeless Individuals observed** Homeless Individuals observed*

Cultural Resources

05-06/2012 - Data collected by A. Palone during afternoon and evening site visits.

1-2

03/27/09 - Data collected by UTSOA students in Bjorn Sletto’s CRP386: Social Life of Public Spaces.

1-2

01

N

0

500’

10

Region City-w Neighb City of


Design Waller Creek: A Competition

Cultural attractions and parkland in downtown Austin.


Local, City-wide, and Regional Cultural Attractors: Parks, Open Spaces, Museums, Galleries, Historical Sites, Venues, Hike and Bike Trails, etc., are mapped as a means for understanding the context of our proposal for a new Waller Creek District. Cultural attractions and parkland in downtown Austin.

02


Design Waller Creek: A Competition

Culture and Community Group Working Drawings with Final Board Ideas


Internship Summer 2012 - Summer Associate at Public Architecture

THE SCORE FOR PUBLIC LIFE

Design Waller Creek: A Competition

Waller Creek will be a destination for the rich culture of Austin to evolve and thrive.

RESPOND

The design has only begun. We will continue to listen, learn, and ask the people of Austin to share their vision for Waller Creek.

There should be amenities for all levels of income.

The history of I-35 is hurtful to people who remember that that was once East Avenue. It was the only place the races got to interact.

Mandy DeMayo, HousingWorks Austin

It can’t be contrived. It has to relate to the culture of Austin. Representative, Real Estate Council of Austin

Team CMG + Public Architecture Culture + Community Group

The challenge is how do we make Waller Creek welcoming to our full community?

The regeneration of Waller Creek is an unparalleled opportunity to invest in Austin’s culture of creativity.

Between 8th and 9th, that used to be a swimming hole. It was crystal clear.

Cookie G. Ruiz, Ballet Austin Sabino Renteria, East Cesar Chavez Neighborhood Association

Austin’s just growing and growing. That’s great, but how do we maintain our cultural legacy?

Meredith Powell, Art Alliance Austin

Lisa Byrd, African American Cultural Heritage District

Lori Renteria, East Cesar Chavez Neighborhood Association

Access to fresh food does not exist in this part of Austin.

We don’t want Austin to lose its vibe.

Walter Moreau, Executive Director, Foundation Communities

Bob Lander, Austin CVB

So far, we’ve talked to: Affordable Living Foundation Communities / ECHO - Ending Community Homelessness Coalition / HousingWorks Austin /Austin CHDO Roundtable / Guadalupe Neighborhood Development Corporation Art & Culture Art Alliance Austin / Okay Mountain / Austin Film Society / Ballet Austin / Big Medium / DiverseArts / MINDPOP Music Austin Music People / Austin Symphony Orchestra Communities Downtown Austin Neighborhood Association / East Cesar Chavez Neighborhood Association / GAIN - Guadalupe Association for an Improved Neighborhood Economic Development Austin Convention & Visitors Bureau / Real Estate Council of Austin / Austin Revitalization Authority / Downtown Austin Alliance Education Texas River School Food Slow Food Austin Health & Recreation Central Health Heritage African American Heritage Cultural District Mobility Movability Austin / Mellow Johnny’s Bike Shop

ENGAGE

We’re innovating how large scale civic projects are conceived and created by experimenting, taking risks, learning as we go, and getting you involved.

Act Now!

Online

Stewardship

Art

We will be using quick-build prototyping, ephemeral events, and temporary structures to support uses during the design and construction process to learn what works and how to get it right.

Visitors will be able to share stories, stay connected, and contribute to a living archive of digital media dedicated to enriching the experience of Waller Creek through Zeega, an online software built by our team.

We can’t do this alone. Through volunteer programs and partnerships, individuals and local institutions will work hand in hand to ensure the health and success of Waller Creek.

Art will connect with the people and communities of Austin and enhance the distinctive characteristics of Waller Creek, physically, historically, and culturally.

Let’s not wait for the ribbon cutting.

Capturing your stories and ideas.

?

A site for interactivity and discovery.

Left: Development Sketches for Public Architecture’s programming boards. Right: Final Competition Board.

zeega

Intensity

Phase 1 Act Now - Early wins

Waller Creek will be a hub for Austin’s creative and entrepreneurial spirit through an unfolding mix of activities that engage communities, support public life, and catalyze economic development.

Phase 4 Stewarding

awn ecL nt/R Eve

N I A ST

s ning event munal di cale com Large-s

ACTIVATE

ht nig vie mo or tdo Ou

ent nam our all t leyb Vol

ite -led s Artist

ion orat expl

etings Community me

-up lean ay c ek-d Cre rs anne ing b ayfind ype w Protot

E

ENGAG T ips partnersh ultural n of c ivatio Cult

n esig ek d Cre s on ion stat each Info outr lder eho k a t S

tion stora nk re ek ba t: cre rojec ice p Serv

treet Third S

Waller beach - mockup

CMG + Public Architecture: Final Competition Board (7 of 8)

s erie s zz s t re ja erse Ar qua iv ny S er: D pho artn Symential p Pot

trial plaza -

District bike tours

eek site Waller Cr

tours

T ES

kup moc ad sh p Spla

k ee Cr er all W

SXSW Events

SU

g Bi

storytelling Zeega / online

rk wo ch at ots n P Ro ba n Ur ba t rs: Ur rke m rtne r a a ma nf lP ce ba tia du Ur oten Pro P

se ou aH Te

ning program Creative leartn : MINDPOP Potential par er

Pl ay gr ou nd

ram prog ence resid s-intive ams Crea ry progr discove n’s Museum e es and scienc r: Austin Childr l a r u t Na tial partne Poten

Gopher Projects / Fusebox Austin / Big Medium Incubation Design+Build Coalition Play Austin Food

Phase 3 Expanding

en ard lg ina dic Me

Activities on Waller Creek will be enriched through partnership with local organizations. Here are a few potential partners: Art & Culture Art Alliance Austin / Central Health / Austin Travis County Integral Care Children’s Museum Urban Patchwork / Urban Roots / Slow Food Austin Education Austin Youth River Watch / Texas River School / African American Cultural Heritage District Music Austin Music People / DiverseArts / Austin Symphony Orchestra Delight MINDPOP

Phase 2 Building the place

D es tin at io n

CREATE

Health & Recreation

Ask not what your park can do for you.

Collaborators Public Architecture (lead) Cynthia Garcia Brad Leibin Annie Palone John Peterson CMG (support) Chris Guillard Imani Hamilton Willett Moss Art Alliance Austin Meredith Powell Fyoog Dan Cheetham

ak O

e ac sp ic st ou ac

e ctiv era Int

Art classes

ture fea ter wa

ion vil Pa

Austin FOOD & WINE Festival le ho ng mi im Sw

Youth water quality monitori ng Potential Pa rtner: Austin Youth River Watch Waller C reek histo ry exhibit Potential p artner: Afric an American Cultural Heritage D istrict

trail -use multi Creek

Time

Art & Culture

Incubation

Play

Health & Recreation

Food

Education

Music

Delight

The site will function as a living ecosystem of evolving events, exhibitions, and permanent works exploring the social, historical, and natural ecologies here.

Austin has a significant creative and entrepreneurial community. Waller Creek will function as a new center for incubatory programming in key cultural areas including food, art, and music.

The varied open spaces and ecocorridors of Waller Creek will be a setting for exploration and discovery for children and adults through creative learning programs as well as interactive playscapes.

In addition to traditional running trails and bike lanes, Waller Creek will bolster Austin’s healthy living in a more holistic way, including produce markets and outdoor health, healing, & fitness initiatives.

It’s hard to ignore the role of food in the social and cultural life of Austin. Food programming will take on a range of forms, including urban farming, food trucks, as well as culinary incubation and communal dining events.

Educational programming such as art classes, history exhibits, and eco-tours will enhance the experience of the site while home agricultural workshops and jobskills training will strengthen surrounding communities.

Austin is the mecca for live music and a training ground for talent. Waller Creek will provide a diversity of venues for Austin’s upand-coming and established music communities to experiment and perform.

Not all programming on Waller Creek needs to serve a purpose beyond the fundamental of all reasons to visit a park: sheer delight!

03


Braid Waller Creek Austin, Texas Instructor Duration

Allan Shearer 16 weeks

Collaborators

Christopher Murton Katherine Phillips Kevin Sullivan

Award

UTSOA Design Excellence Fall 2011

Publication

ISSUE: 008, UTSOA 2012

Design Concept Using the metaphor or “big idea” of braiding to guide our design decisions, we strove to create a district with recognizable identity, based on prioritized objectives from the Waller Creek Conservancy. We translated “accessibility,” “non-exclusionary uses,” “protect and enhance the environment” and “engage the creek,” into “Gather,” “Thicken,” “Strengthen,” and “Wrap.” Our design proposes multi-use developments connecting to pedestrianized streets, creekside trails, and bike paths. We zoomed in to redesign four expanded parks, which we believe are the key to making significant changes within the new district and existing downtown core.

before

BRAID four sites

WIDTH

urban design

OVERLAP Transformation Diagrams and Plan

after

connections


Landscape Architectural Design, Fall 2011 Eighth Street MEANDER RELAX habitat vegetation filtration flood control herons turtles fish

slow dine enjoy walk engage jog drink

The Sixth Street CHANNEL COLLECT retention vegetation filtration corridor grackles songbirds fish

dine drink intersect meet rest shope gather

BRAID of the Waller

Creek District tightens and loosens in response to corridor

width,

while movement, activity, environment, and experience

overlap and intertwine to E. Fourth Street GREEN FIELD CONNECT infiltration vegetation habitat flood control seasonal bloom songbirds squirrels

art community play create shop bike dwell

create a place at the leading edge of Austin’s sustainable future.

Palm Park RIPARIAN SLOPE PLAY infiltration sedimentation vegetation habitat interaction seasonal bloom songbirds squirrels fish

splash slide family community tag run learn stay jump

04


Braid Waller Creek - Four Sites

Brackenridge Hospital

Waterloo Park

WC Tunnel Intake Facility

Future high-rise residential

State Capitol Symphony Square & Serrano’s

Red River MusicDistrict

East Sixth Street Sixth Street

Brush Square

HOPE Farmers’ Market & Artists’ Studios

Downtown Commuter Rail Station

Austin Convention Center

Mixed-use, Low-rise Residential

Palm School: Community Center and Education

Waller Creek Hotel

50-story hotel under development, proposed completion 2015

Ironworks BBQ

Rainey Street District

Future high-rise, high-density residential infill

Austin Rowing Club Boathouse & Concessions

Waller Beach & Lady Bird Lake Trail

waterways Waller Creek trail illumination shade

Context: Downtown Austin’s riparian parks, trails, and play spaces

Murton . Palone . Phillips . Sullivan

Mexican American Cultural Center

commercial - hotel commercial - restaurant low-rise mixed use high-rise mixed use

Transformation Diagram

parks community parking structure imageable subdistricts

pedestria bike prio bus prior waller cr


Proposed District Diagram and Four Precedents: Four Sites

8th Street - Sunken Bridge

RO&AD, Netherlands

8th Street - Sunken Bridge

6th Street - Canal Café

Café de Jaren, Amsterdam, Netherlands

6th Street - Canal Café

E. 4th Street - Art Park Storm King Art Center, New York

E. 4th Street - Art Park

Palm Park - Slide World

MVVA Teardrop Park, NYC

Palm Park - Slide World

05


Braid Waller Creek - Four Objectives

parking lots bus + train stops bike racks

public transit

bike

gathering areas

benches

transition

car

road

destination

sidewalk

movement

pedestrian

transition openings crossings

1

shade

Gather

Provide Access

ada ramp stairs

paths

2

lighting

Thicken Maximize Non-exclusionary Uses

tree canopy ground veg gathering area path adjacent district

mechanically stabilized earth retaining

visible riparian vegetation pools

engaged buildings

creek

creek corridor incised bank

3

path

concrete retaining wall

Strengthen Protect and Enhance the Environment

4

Wrap Engage the Creek


Objective 1: “Gather” “Gather” Existing

“Gather” Proposed

fair

fair

good

excellent

excellent

Evaluation

System

bus, train, car

good

bike routes

entrances

System

Evaluation

creek trail

bus, train, car

bike routes

entrances

creek trail

06


path at creek

failed wall

Braid Waller Creek - Palm Park ENGAGEMENT

Site Analysis and Site Design Fifth and Red River Streets, Austin, Texas

Palm Park

playful, active, family-oriented

Palm Park is a forgotten place, made invisible by broken access and crumbling infrastructure. We have proposed an active, play-oriented park for young families, at the meeting point of two north-south pedestrian promenades, to bring life and laughter back to an under loved corner of the city. GATHER

existing

Existing

Proposed GATHER

ACCESS

Existing ADA Deeply incised banks, an abandoned swimming ramp pool, lack of safe or secure access, and exposure to speeding traffic and noise pollution from IH35 make this once vibrant neighborhood park THICKEN anything but inviting.

ACCESS

ADA ramp out of use pool

THICKEN

USES

USES

Proposed A wide grassy hillside invites children to run and play; a series of slides makes traversing pooling thesabine slope more fun; boardwalk paths engage pedestrian theway creek and aquatic wildlife, while capturing sediment and creating habitat; and a hotel wine STRENGTHEN bar lets adults relax as they watch the activity below.

broken path

broken path

ENVIRONMEN

path at creek

failed wall

ENGAGEMENT

pooling

STRENGTHEN

ENVIRONMENT

path at creek

WRAP

sabine pedestrian way

WRAP

ENGAGEMEN


proposed

07


Life Cycles - Cemetery Lost Pines Habitat Conservation Plan Area, Bastrop, Texas Instructor Duration Collaborator

Jason Sowell 12 weeks Jessica Zarowitz

Project Type

Cemetery

moderate severe

Our ecological design for a cemetery east of Austin responds to the idea that life cycles– from life, to death, to regeneration– by creating frameworks that are filled in through the repetition and variation of designed and ecological elements.

Burned Lost Pines

The nested scales of markers, plots, plazas, disposition areas, and cellular cemetery phases, operate together to highlight diversity and resilience, while working ecologically to create a patch-corridor matrix. Similarly, project phasing creates a matrix of disturbance and regeneration, focusing the impact of cemetery building into small footprints across time.

2011 Wildfire burn zone

Lost Pines Habitat Conservation Plan Area

Lost Pines Pinus taeda

Houston Toad Bufo houstonensis Bastrop Lost Pines

Critical habitat Wildfire Burn Zone City of Bastrop 6 5

6 10

4

1

1

10

4

9

8

3

1

5

6

101-120

9

8

3

5

4

61-80

7

121-140

9

8

1

Bastrop State Park

high Site

2 7

5

81-100

low

6 10

4

9

5

10

4 8

3

1

10

4 3

7

41-60

3

2

9

2

1

6 10

4

1

7

10 8

3

7

2

6

5

2

21-40

3

2

9

8

6 5

10

4

1

7

1 - 20

year

5

8

3

phase

9

6

2 7

8

141-160

1

2 7

9

161-180

10

181-200

Project Phasing

Colorado River

Context

Topography


Comprehensive Landscape Studio, Spring 2012 riparian

swales

meadow

pollina

new forest

phase

established forest

forma

riparian

swales

built roads

meadow

pollinator garden

proposed r

riparian

swales

built roads new forest

rivers phase 1 + 2 vegetation

chapels + pedestrian

meadow

pollinator garden

proposed roads established forest

lakes ponds formal+ vegetation

co 10’water contour

new forest

phase 1 + 2 vegetation

pedestrian paths

floodplain

established forest

formal vegetation

10’ contours

Bastrop State Park

mausole

swales

built roads

rivers

chapels + buildings

scatter

pollinator garden

proposed roads

lakes + ponds

water columbaria

natural +

phase 1 + 2 vegetation

pedestrian paths

floodplain

mausolea + columbaria

nursery

built roadsvegetation formal

rivers 10’ contours

chapels buildings Bastrop +State Park

scatter

proposed roads

lakes + ponds

water columbaria

natural + traditional burial

pedestrian paths

riparian floodplain

swales + columbaria mausolea

built roads nursery

rivers

10’ contours

meadowState Park Bastrop

pollinator garden

proposed roads

lakes + p

new forest

phase 1 + 2 vegetation

pedestrian paths

floodplai

established forest

formal vegetation

10’ contours

Bastrop

Providing diverse spaces for humans, flora, and fauna, the project promotes the recognition of life cycles and their power to transform life, landscape, and experience. Site plan

08


Life Cycles Three Objectives Three objectives drive the design: the reclamation of the site for flora, fauna, and human users; the diversification of ecosystems, habitat types, and experiences; and the personal and abstract memorialization of deceased and wildfire.

Reclaim: Life cycles of a Bastrop Pine

habitat

contour felling

erosion control

industry

snag

reforestation

Reclaim Reforestation and recycling are emphasized: snags left by the wildfire are retained for habitat and erosion control; upcycled lumber is used for buildings, boardwalks and benches; mulch and seeds support reforestation. Fire ecology informs the use of controlled burns to prevent future wildfires, control non-native plants, and promote a patchy ecological mosaic.

retaining


Diversify: successional fire ecology & plant palette

Memorialize: marker concept

Meadow

Understory

Pollinator

Ornamental

Forest

Little bluestem

Possumhaw

Cardinal flower

Mexican plum

Loblolly pine

Green sprangletop

Common hackberry

Autumn sage

Eastern redbud

Eastern red cedar

Indiangrass

Honey mesquite

Firecracker Plant

Roughleaf dogwood

American elm

Blackwell switchgrass

Hercules club

Flame Acanthus

Desert willow

Chinkapin oak

Illinois bundleflower

Flameleaf sumac

Lantana

Texas persimmon

Bur oak

Partridge pea

Blackhaw

Mexican Honeysuckle

Native pecan

Maximilian sunflower

Mexican Oregano

American sycamore

Purpletop

Trumpet Creeper

Post oak

Whorled milkweed

Turk’s Cap

Schizachyrium scoparium Leptochloa dubia

Sorghastrum nutans Panicum virgatum

Desmanthus illinoensis

Chamaechrista fasciculata Helianthus maximilianii Tridens flavus Asclepias verticillata L.

Green comet milkweed Asclepias viridiflora Raf.

Ilex decidua

Celtis occidentalis

Prosopis glandulosa

Zanthoxylum clava-herculis Rhus copallinum

Viburnum prunifolium

Lobelia cardinalis Salvia greggi

Russelia equisetiformis Anisacanthus quadrididus Lantana horrida Justica spicigera

Poliomintah longiflora Campsis radicans

Prunus mexicana

Cercis canadensis

Cornus drummondii Chilopsis linearis

Diospyros texana

Pinus taeda

Juniperus virginiana Ulmus americana

Quercus muehlenbergii Quercus macrocarpa Carya illinoinensis Platanus occidentalis Quercus stellata

Malvaviscus arboreus var. drummondii

White Mistflower Ageratina wrightii

Diversify Colonization by diverse (native) plants and animals is encouraged, in order to improve ecosystem resiliency. The endangered Houston Toad, native plant species, and beneficial pollinating birds and insects are prioritized through the plant palette and protection of riparian zones.

Memorialize The resting places of the deceased are marked by local Leuder’s limestone, copper alloy, and shadows. A pattern derived from a rasterized aerial image of burned Bastrop pines perforates copper plates, allowing light and vegetation to pass through, and accommodating personalization.

09


Life Cycles

Memorial Plaza & Water Columbaria


Mausolea

10


Scatter Plazas


memorial plaza + columbaria mausolea scatter plaza natural + traditional burial

memorial plaza + columbaria mausoleua

scattering plazas natural burial Phase 1 Section Key & Plan Zoom

Natural Burial

11


Traverse the Slope Doherty Park, Charlestown, MA Instructor Duration

Hope Hasbrouck 3 weeks

Design Objective Introduce new ADA compliant walkways across a 40’ grade change, while maintaining three original puddingstone staircases designed by Olmsted & Co. in 1897.

Conceptual Intent Extend the park’s formal central axis with a grand staircase shaded with flowering trees, and extending the tripartite organization of the Olmsted & Co. site design by offering three options: an ADA compliant path, a new axial staircase, and the original staircases. Topographic model

Section key

Olmsted & Co. stairs

Site sections


Design and Visual Studies 2, Spring 2011

Hand-drawn with graphite and transfer marker on Swarthmore paper and vellum.

Medford Street

Bunker Hill Street

Saint Martin Street

Planting plan

12


Emergent Education University of Texas Marine Science Institute Port Aransas, Texas Instructor

Coleman Coker

Duration

7 weeks

Collaborators Tim Campbell Todd Ferry Garland Fielder Matt Krowlick Jon Mautz Lauren Mullane Annie Palone Katherine Russett Jessica Zarowitz Awards

site Port Aransas Corpus Christi

Mustang Island

Gulf of Mexico

UTSOA Design Excellence Spring 2013 AIA Austin Student Award

This studio began with an examination of Complex Adaptative Systems, the Texas Coast, and its barrier islands; it is accompanied by a seminar “Measuring the Poetic,” which looks to thinkers from Bachelard and Heidegger, to Palasmaa and Zumthor.

vehicular circulation central flyways

mississippi flyways pedestrian circulation

N

built

sun |summer

sun |winter water

This built group work satisfies the clients’ desire for an educational seating area on a sloping site in MSI’s (constructed) Wetlands Education Center, while engaging the idea of creating an experience rather than an object.

natural

wind

austin marine science institute

gulf of mexico port aransas

Project development was driven by a series of conceptual and design objectives that focused on creating a space that would let students visiting the site have an embedded experience of the wetland, rather than being disconnected spectators.

austin

254 miles Edwards Plateau

context

South Texas Plains

Blackland Prairies

Post Oak Savannah

Gulf Coast Prairies + Marshes

port aransas


conceptual drivers

design drivers

embeddedness

emergence

integration

encounter

porosity

observation

hurricanes

wind

light footprint

ecoregion mid-coast barrier islands + coastal marshes

barrier island formation

water ecotope prevailing wind

dune

experience vortex

release

2

discovery

5

seats

6

return

enclosure / pinch point

6

bench

wetland grass zonation

path

camphorweed + seaoats marshay cordgrass + dropseed smooth cordgrass + black mangrove

flocking birds

4

shade

helical flow zone protected from wind

entry

shadow and sunlight

3-in-1

zone protected from wind

vortex

1

3

foredunes interdune flats + coastal grassland salt flats + brackish/salt marshes

dune formation

threshold

framed views

brown pelicans

5 encounter

wetland grass association high marsh mid marsh low marsh / water’s edge

wetland grass morphology + experiential embeddedness

integral experience

1

2

4 3

concept

13


elevation

corpus christi ship channel animal rescue keep (ark)

site wetlands education center noaa / nerr

university of texas marine science institute

context plan

visitor’s center

N

0’

25’

50’

100’


0

1

2

4

8 6

7

5

4

3

2

1

WETLAND EDGE (AVERAGE)

site plan

SEA LEVEL

14


Concrete Bench and Oyster Gabion

C et cr on e #3 ar eb R 2 x 4 u St ds 2 x 4 es gl An 1� G io

ab n ys

O rs te

experience + construction

Context


design + build

15


Topographic Modeling Sierra Vieja Mountains, West Texas Instructor Duration

Jason Sowell 3 weeks

Design Objectives This series of models and drawings explores representational tropes in landscape architecture. The models take a 24� x 6� topographic map section, using it to generate a series of hand-cut chipboard, dowel, and cast plaster models. The fineness of representational resolution versus interpolation varies across the four models. The drawings zoom in on: a sequence of sections cut across an ephemeral creek; a transect drawing of plants and geologic features that might be found on the site; and a constructed perspective of the northern end of the point model.

Projection

triangulated regular network

Context

Pantera Series/Riverwash Scotal Series

A - brown gravelly/sandy loam Ck1 - brown gravelly loamy sand Ck2 - brown very gravelly loamy coarse sand C - brown stratified very gravelly coarse sand

A - brown gravelly sandy clay loam Bk - yellowish brown very gravelly sandy clay loam R/Bk - white fractured tuffaceous rock C - unweathered tuff bedrock of the Pruett Formation

Transect

Site


Design and Visual Studies 1, Fall 2010

Systems + Surfaces

contour, point, grid, solid hand-cut chipboard + dowel

Sectional Sequence

Assembled Topography

16


Shed [+] East Austin, Texas Instructors

Barbara Brown-Wilson Bryan Bell

Duration

6 weeks

Collaborators

Danica Adams Emily McMillan Christopher Murton Natalie Thomas Bea Vithaya

Award

Texas ASLA Merit Award 2012

GUADALUPE NEIGHBORHOOD

Design Objective

This intensive design/build studio to “green Austin’s alleys,” yielded an exploration of maximizing the usefulness of backyard spaces for low-income residents, on a thousand dollar budget. Our process began with conversations with community members and representatives of two neighborhood development non-profits – Austin Community Design and Development Center (ACDDC) and Guadalupe Neighborhood Development Corporation (GNDC) – testing our idea of a multipurpose structure to provide outdoor living space, accommodate chickens, a greenhouse, composting, rainwater collection, and shaded seating. Their feedback transformed our concept, reprioritizing storage as the major need of community members, which became the driver for the project. This line of thinking culminated in the building of a prototype shed[+] unit, for Roland, a GNDC renter in East Austin. The structure is built from 2” x 4” and 4” x 4” lumber and upcycled shipping pallets that provide structural integrity and visual interest. Keeping cost low, so that the unit would be affordable for virtually any resident of Austin was another important consideration. Using shipping pallets and standard lumber kept the cost of the structure around $500. The facade is made from sanded acrylic panels to achieve translucency without transparency, in order to achieve the team’s architects’ vision of a “glowing box” at night. This selection of finishing material added significantly to the final cost of the unit. The prototype Shed [+] provides 120 square feet of storage with an attached chicken coop, built from pallets treated with a Japanese scorching technique to make them impervious to water and fire.

neighborhood character study

SHED [+] a kit of parts for “greening” your backyard: multivalent, site-specific, pragmatic, modular a kit of parts for “greening” your backyard: choose the components you want to design & build your perfect outdoor space.

multivalent / site-specific / pragmatic / modular kit of parts.

the yard.

make it more.

the goal.

relax play grow make practice hide maintain rest host plan perform decorate store gather escape eat interact

bedroom studio office greenhouse retreat shed coop garden dining room workshop

for the backyard to become a place of greater productivity, safety, value, and pleasure for residents and neighbors.

food production fruit, vegetables, chickens compost nutrient recycling rainwater collection storage vegetation / native landscaping play structure indoor /outdoor features seating / gathering / work space habitat creation shade


Public Interest Design, Summer 2011

storage before

construction & details

plan and elevation

after

chicken coop & shed

17


5x5

Student Design Competition - Spring 2012

Harry Ransom Center Courtyard University of Texas Austin, Texas Award Duration

Second Place 10 days

A simple white pine recliner, three and a half feet wide is designed to fit into one of the twenty 5’x5’ planter boxes behind UT’s Harry Ransom Center, creating a multipurpose space for one to three users. The lounge’s angled back provides a wind break, and flowers and herbs in a raised planter box add ambience without permanence. The resulting space encourages relaxation, conversation, and study.

lax

grow

bask

nge

study

5x5 5x5

5

relax

grow

bask

lounge

meet

perform

study meet

perform learn

learn A simple white pine recliner three and a half feet wide fits into the

A simple white p interior of one o a multipurpose s support provide pine planter box 5’x5’of the existing sa


Detail Model

Technology Workshop 2, Spring 2011

Dania Park, Malmรถ, Sweden Thorbjorn Andersson, SWECO Architects Instructor / Duration Jason Sowell / 4 weeks Collaborator

Tim Campbell

Detail Model 1:10 detail model of the sea wall and bastion at Dania Park, Malmรถ, Sweden. LAR 385L introduces an understanding of the materials and measures used in the making and management of built landscapes.

Annie Palone 2011

18


Three Vertical Gardens

Mont Blanc 4807 m Monte Rosa Matterhorn 4634 m 4478 m Finsteraarhorn 4274 m

N

ThinkSwiss Headquarters New York, New York

4500 meters

Instructors

Hope Hasbrouck David Heymann

4000 meters

Duration

9 weeks

3500 meters

Collaborator

Ethan Bennett (M.Arch I)

u

axim

ge M

3000 meters

ra Ave

all Sm

2500 meters

im

er

umm

mS

imu

Min

igh

eH erag

Av

Pico d’Aneto (Pyrenees) 3404 m

t

eigh

H um

Max

ubs

Shr

t

eigh

nH

tatio

ege mV

Gran Sasso (Abruzzi) 2914 m Triglav (Julian Alps) 2863 m

evel

wL Sno ture

Pas

S

el

Lev

ine

L Tree 2000 meters

1500 meters

Max.

adow

y Me

e Ha

g Avera

tion

Eleva

l

Leve

o for m

rees ous T

cidu st De

1000 meters

transect 500 meters

Mapping Switzerland to NYC

sea level

Alpine transect

Concept

Design Objective This conceptual project maps explores vertical gardens by transplanting Swiss landscape experiences into three vertical gardens in a New York City skyscraper. The most developed, “the Wild” (next page), folds an Alpine transect into a sixteen-story glass geometry that occupies the building’s facade.

Manhattan, NYC

Context

Lower East Side

United Nations + East River


Advanced Design, Fall 2012 One building, Three gardens

the garden | collects + moves water

the common | connects earth to sky

the wild | Alpine ascent in NYC

garden | collects and moves water vertical moss wall | Patrick Blanc

vine ribbon | MFO Park, Raderschal, Z端rich

alpine transect | hanging garden

common | connects earth to sky wild | alps in nyc

18


Vertical Garden: “The Wild” an Alpine Transect in NYC

Vegetative Community : 1800- 4000m Finish Floor Elevation : 180’

Vegetative Community : 2000- 2600m Finish Floor Elevation : 135’

Vegetative Community : 900- 3000m Finish Floor Elevation : 90’

Alpine Snow Beds + Scree Fields

Alpine High Meadows

Pastures + Conifers

peak

Vegetative Community : 1800- 2500m Finish Floor Elevation : 45’

Vegetative Community : 900-1600m Finish Floor Elevation : 150’

Vegetative Community : 1500- 2780m Finish Floor Elevation : 105’

Rock Communities

Sub-Alpine Wildflower Meadows

Dwarf Shrub Heath


peak

Vegetative Community : 1600- 2280m Finish Floor Elevation : 60’

Springs + Flushes

valley peak

Vegetative Community : 1200- 1500m Finish Floor Elevation : 0’

European Broadleaf Forest

valley

valley

1 3 4 peak 2 Seasonal Color + Character by Zone

5

6

7

8

valley

Vegetation Model - Alpine “Lace”

Transect Mapping

19


Float, Mist, Play Zilker Park, Austin, Texas Instructor Duration

Hope Hasbrouck 7 weeks

Conceptual Objective The dense program and use of the Barton Springs area is mirrored across the park from the creekshore to the lake-shore, siting three interventions – docks for promenade and sailing, misting stations for cooling down, and a multigenerational play area – in a part of the park not utilized by events including Blues on the Green and Austin City Limits. The proposal seeks to introduce an intensely programmed area similar to Barton Springs Pool along the shoreline of Ladybird Lake, increasing the accessibility of the water’s edge.

Existing area of dense program with The density of use at Barton Springs is pool, playgrounds, theater, concessions, MIRRORED across the park from the and boat rentals creek’s shoreline to the lake’s

Proposed site of high-density use on Lady Bird Lake, with misting stations, sailboat rentals, game courts, and play structures

mirror

Lady Bird Lake Trail

Botanical Gardens

Site of Interventions

float Zilker Events

mist play

Zilker Zephyr

Green Belt

site context

Barton Springs

Lady Bird Lake Trail


Design and Visual Studies 2, Spring 2011 float

mist

site plan

play

meadow

planting plan

butterfly rain garden

bosque

allĂŠ

planting palette

20


Whale Pavilion University of Texas Marine Science Institute Port Aransas, Texas Instructor Duration

Coleman Coker 2 weeks

Corpus Christi

Port Aransas, Mustang Island

Conceptual Design The pavilion is designed to display the skeleton of a Fin Whale (Balaenoptera physalus) that washed up on the beach in Port Aransas in February of 2010.

Padre Island

The pavilion’s roof acts as a shroud for the whale’s skeleton, while its columns are intended to stand as a lasting memorial - in the language of abandoned piers - even after a hundred years, when the barrier island has gone under the sea. The reflection of water and skeleton cast by a pool beneath the whale evoke memory and create a space for reflection in its other sense.

canal + coastline site

prevailing wind

context

experience view of entry sequence educational seating area

Marine Science Institute Wetlands Education Center

Marine Science Institute Visitors’ Center

whale pavilion

Resiliency statue

proposed dune bus turnaround pervious pavers

proposed dunes

expanded parking bus drop-off

expanded parking

proposed dunes + native vegetation bus parking

plan

N

0

25

50

100

200’

Balaenoptera physalus


Poetics of Building - Advanced Design, Spring 2013

shroud

memorial

experience view from bus drop-off

concept

reflection

corrugated metal

concrete + wood

water

21


Education Master of Landscape Architecture 2013

Graduate Portfolio Program in Sustainability University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture

Bachelor of Arts - English major, Studio Arts minor

Stanford University, California

Geography + Development Studies (minor equivalent)

Queen’s University, Kingston, Canada

Ecovillage Design Education

GAIA Institute, Findhorn, Scotland

Art + Italian

Studio Art Centers International & FUJI Studio, Florence, Italy

High School Diploma

Noble & Greenough School, Dedham, Massachusetts

2003 2007 2006

Skills 2003 1999

Experience

Lectures & Exhibitions, University of Texas School of Architecture, Austin, Texas

Ground Truth, Austin, Texas

Emerald Hummingbird Designs, USA + Canada + United Kingdom

Hannah Bistro + Seaside Pub, Hyannis, Massachusetts

2004 - present

Continuing Graduate Fellowship, 2012-2013 Mebane Travel Prize for travel to Guatemala, January 2011

2004 - 2006

2007 - 2008

Cheesemonger + Retail Associate at organic bakery with artisan cheeses

The Organic Farm Shop, Abbey Home Farm, Cirencester, United Kingdom

2006

World-wide Opportunities on Organic Farms

VB Farms + Sunshine Organics + CCOF, Santa Cruz, California

2008 - 2010

Assistant Manager, Bartender, Employee Training, Server

Pan Chancho Bakery + Café, Kingston, Ontario

Braid Waller Creek, UTSOA Design Excellence, December 2012

Office Manager, Photoshop Editor, Account Executive

researching “farm to market to table,” local vs. commercial commodity chains

2004 - 2006

Farmers’ Market Sales + Office Assistant

Tutor and Academic Editor, USA + Canada

Emergent Education, ISSUE: 009, UTSOA, May 2013 Environmental Readings, Center for Sustainable Development Working Paper Series, University of Texas at Austin, April 2013, Co-Editor and Contributing Writer Braid Waller Creek, ISSUE: 008, UTSOA, May 2012

1998 - present 2007 - 2008

Custom Art Commission; Design, Event Planning, Catering for Ecologic launch

Ragged Hedge Fair, Abbey Home Farm, Cirencester, United Kingdom

Publications

Writing and organizational skills for high school to graduate students

Canyon Sound Flower Essences, Kingston, Ontario

Lake | Flato Scholarship, Fall 2010

Undergraduate Application Essays, Montauk and Klein, Eds. How To Get Into the Top Colleges. New York: Prentice Hall Press, 2000.

Management, Marketing + Organization

Emergent Education, UTSOA Design Excellence, May 2013 SHED[+], Texas ASLA Student Collaboration Merit Award, 2012

Agriculture + Cuisine

Emergent Education, Austin AIA Student Award, May 2013

2010 - present

Lead designer of hand-made jewelry + crafts

UTSOA Extraordinary Service in Landscape Architecture, May 2013

Landscape consulting + design start-up

Kennan Ward Photography + WildLight Press, Santa Cruz, California

2012

Summer Associate working with CMG on “Design Waller Creek: A Competition”

2012 - 2013

Mebane Gallery Staff

Public Architecture, San Francisco, California

Awards

Design, Planning + Production

Adobe Creative Suite, ArcGIS, AutoDesk CAD and 3DS Max, Drafting & Drawing, Graphic Design, Microsoft Office, Project Management & Organization, Research, Writing & Editing

2006

100% Green Powered Festival: Planning, Organization + Event Management

WE Players, Stanford and Alameda, California

2001 - 2006

Director’s Assistant; Photographer; Prop Manager; “Player”

22


anniepalone@gmail.com Š 2013 Annie Palone


May 2013 Comprehensive Portfolio of MLA Work