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Oct. Issue 2011

FOR THE COMMUNITY IN WHICH WE LIVE AND BREATH

Fall Issue

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Contents

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GOTTA EAT Soup’s On....................................................6 Reel Time....................................................8 POINT/COUNTER POINT Welfare......................................................12 DIY Pest Prevention........................................14 NATURE Fall Care for Heat Damaged Yards.................16 ANTIQUES Fred’s Bargain Barn.................................18 Fenton Carnival Glass.............................19 ARTS Bangles, Baubles, and Beads...................20 Trivia Did you know...Halloween.....................24 FITNESS 5 Ways to Maintain your Weight..................28

Our Mission at Aire Magazine is to provide a positive and entertaining publication that connects our Readers with our Advertisers... who make everything possible. PUBLISHER Annette Wolf, MBA EDITOR Sandra Rose, MA PRODUCTION MANAGER Mario M. Ornelas PHOTOGRAPHY & ILLUSTRATION David B. Gray Mario M. Ornelas CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Maggie Batchelor Douglas K. Howard Lance McMurtrie Mary Morgan Mario M. Ornelas Sandra Rose Annette Wolf Aire Magazine 400 N. Washington, Suite 226 Farmington MO 63640 (573)315-7865 www.airemagazine.com info@airemagazine.com AIRE Magazine is a bi-monthly publication specializing in little known trivia, inspirational, and humorous stories for the readers’ entertainment. Aire Magazine is published by AIRE Marketing Group, Inc. AIRE Magazine is not responsible for any claims made by its advertisers. Opinions expressed by its contributing writers are not necessarily those of AIRE Marketing Group, Inc. CONTACT US: To place an advertisement in AIRE Magazine contact the advertising manager at (573)3157865 or send an e-mail to info@airemagazine. com. To have AIRE Magazine distributed in your restaurant, waiting room or place of business for pick up by our patrons call (573)315-7865 or send an e-mail to info@airemagazine.com.

FEATURE Baseball.....................................................30 Puzzles......................................................34 Fall Issue

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Gotta Eat

Soup’s On! Family Features

There’s nothing quite like a bowl of hot, savory soup to warm things up on a chilly day.

Hearty Cheddar Broccoli Soup Serves 6 to 8 1 11-ounce package Shore Lunch Cheddar Broccoli Soup Mix 1 pound ready-to-eat ham steak, cut into 1/2-inch pieces (about 2 cups) 1 14.75-ounce can creamed corn 1 6-ounce container French fried onion rings In soup pot, bring 8 cups of water to a rolling boil.Whisk in soup mix, ham and creamed corn. Bring back to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer uncovered until done, about 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Serve generously topped with French fried onion rings. Serve with freshly baked cornbread muffins and home­made potato salad.

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While making soup from scratch can be satisfying, there isn’t always enough time to devote hours to the process. That’s when products such as Shore Lunch soup mixes come in very handy. You add some of your pantry ingredients to the flavorful mixes and in no time you have a delicious, hearty soup that tastes like you spent all day in the kitchen. These easy recipes will let you ladle up home cooked goodness the whole family will love.


Rustic Chicken Noodle Soup Serves 6 to 8 1 9.2-ounce package Shore Lunch Classic Chicken Noodle Soup Mix 1 pound ground chicken, thawed 3 tablespoons tomato paste 1 10-ounce can spicy diced tomatoes with green chilies 1/2 teaspoon ground thyme In soup pot, bring 8 cups of water to a rolling boil.Spray medium non-stick skillet with cooking spray.To skillet, add chicken, cook and stir over medium heat until crumbled, about 10 to 15 minutes, set aside. To soup pot, whisk in soup mix, cooked chicken, tomato paste, diced tomatoes and thyme. Bring back to a boil.Reduce heat and simmer uncovered until done, about 20 to 25 minutes, stirring occasionally. Serve with a fresh green salad and warm crusty bread.

Inspired Creamy Wild Rice Soup Serves 6 to 8 1 10.8-ounce package Shore Lunch Creamy Wild Rice Soup Mix

1/2 teaspoon dried tarragon 1 3-pound cooked rotisserie chicken, shredded into bite size pieces 1 pound fresh asparagus rinsed; trim off fibrous ends, peel outer skin of stalks, starting just below tips, cut into bite size pieces 1 pint heavy whipping cream In soup pot, bring 8 cups of water to a rolling boil.Whisk in soup mix and tarragon. Bring back to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer uncovered for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add shredded chicken, asparagus and cream; stir to combine. Cover and simmer until done, about an additional 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Serve with fresh buttered rolls or an assortment of artisan crackers.

Beer Brat Cheddar Potato Chowder Serves 6 to 8 1 12-ounce package Shore Lunch Cheddar Potato Soup Mix 1 14-ounce package of your favorite cooked bratwurst, sliced into thin rounds (about 2 cups) 1 15.25-ounce can whole corn, drained and rinsed 1 12-ounce bottle of beer In soup pot, bring 8 cups of water to a rolling boil. Whisk in soup mix, sliced brats, corn and beer. Bring back to a boil.Reduce heat and simmer uncovered until done, about 20 to 25 minutes, stirring occasionally. Serve with home-style baked beans and your favorite coleslaw.

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Reel Time

Reel Time Irene, is not as lucky. Her character is a bit underdeveloped and nowhere near as memorable as Driver, who very quietly steals the show. There are plenty of bad guys for Driver to deal with as he tries to protect Irene and her son, Benicio, from harm. Albert Brooks is excellent as local crime boss, Bernie Ross. Oddly enough, the fact that Driver himself is a baddie somehow slips our minds. A brilliant film noir, “Drive” is an example of filmmaking at its best. The action shifts smoothly and deliberately, just as the gears in Driver’s control.

Drive (R) (2011) If there is such a thing as a low-key, high-action movie, Danish filmmaker Nicholas Winding Refn discovered the formula and put it to good use. That is not to say that this film is not violent, but it bounces deftly from a brief, fast-paced opening, to a long, slow pace in the middle, then back with a bang with a crescendo of action for the ending. All the while, the pervasive soundtrack by Cliff Martinez provides a backdrop that subtly creeps into the action. Ryan Gosling leads the cast as a soft-spoken mechanic, stunt-driver and wheelman for criminal getaways. Referred to only as Driver, Gosling controls thea film just as his character controls vehicles, with a knowl- Straw Dogs (R) (2011) Remakes can be edgeable, steady and unyielding hand. Co- good, but Sam Peckinpah’s 1971 iconic and star Carey Mulligan, Driver’s love interest, violent treatise on the innate violence that 8

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lurks in every man, “Straw Dogs,” could have been left to stand on its own. This is not to say that the 2011 film of the same title is not without merit. Were it not a remake, people would be more than satisfied with its tale of social outsiders, colliding cultures and violent revenge. It is only in comparison to the original that the current film falls short. Director Ron Lurie does his best to entertain and keep his audience in tense suspense as low-key, studious Los Angeles screenwriter, David Sumner (James Marsden), and his wife Amy (Kate Bosworth) return to rural Mississippi to live and work in her family home. Their welcome is iffy at best because it seems time has stood still in Amy’s hometown since she left, including the presence of her old high school boyfriend, Charlie (Alexander Skarsgard) and his crew of roofer buddies, the developmentally disabled man who likes young girls and the town’s drunken, retired football coach. In fact, none of the town’s folk cares much for strangers. The exhausting climax to the tale is a war of strategy and violence as David faces off against Charlie and the rest of his redneck tormentors in an ultra-violent showdown.

Moneyball (PG-13) (2011)In what could surpass “Field of Dreams” or “Bull Durham” as one of the most popular movies about baseball, Brad Pitt plays real-life Major League Baseball manager Billy Beane, the man who made a winning team out of the downtrodden 2002 Oakland A’s by relying on game statistics while sticking to a shoe-string budget. His young assistant, Peter Brand (Jonah Hill) is the man behind the Your complete attention is captured as the econometric strategy of forming a winning mild-mannered David morphs into one of the team based on figures. most aggressively violent heroes since Jodie Foster in “The Panic Room.” Ironically, David Fans of baseball, mathematical statisis working on a documentary about the World tics and people who just enjoy a good, War II Battle of Stalingrad in which the Rus- intelligent story will all be pleased with sians were badly outnumbered, but fought this film, based on the book of the same bravely, strategically and rather successfully, title by Michael Lewis. against insurmountable odds.

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Point/Counter-Point

Welfare: Do people deserve it or abuse it? By Maggie Batchelor

There are several myths about welfare, now called “Temporary Assistance,” (TA), that m ust be clarified. “People are living well off of taxpayer’s money.” Not true. The average family of three receives just $234 in cash per month. I don’t know anyone who can actually live on $234 a month. Food stamps cannot be used for essentials such as diapers and toilet paper. Only parents or legal guardians of children can receive TA. “TA recipients are lazy.” The typical TA recipients are single mothers of two youn g children. They don’t have time to be lazy. They are worried about survival: taking care of the ir children, finding and maintaining employment, housing, and transportation. “Welfare is for life.” No such thing. Missouri has a lifetime limit of sixty months. During that time, parents are required to participate in Missouri Work Assistance, a program that assists them to self-sufficiency through training, education, volunteerism, and eventually maintaining full-time em12

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ployment. There is no one specific type of person receiving TA. As a Case Manager for Missouri Work Assistance, I work with all kinds of people with a wide range of goals and I assist them to remove barriers to achieving those goals. These barriers can be as simple as not knowing how to fill out a job application or how to apply for college loans. Other barriers are harder to overcome, such as lack of housing or transportation. Some of my clients are mothers and fathers who are finishing school to better support their families. Others are working towards obtaining a GED just to get and keep a minimum wage job. Many parents are volunteering in offices, hospitals, or schools to gain work experience , while providing free help to communities as a way to earn their TA. Temporary Assistance does not cure poverty, but it does what it was intended for - to keep children fed while giving hope for their parents. Maggie Batchelor is a Case Manager for MERS/Goodwill Missouri Work Assistance, in Potosi.


By Lance McMurtrie

The question of whether or not we should continue to provide and give tax support to welfare programs is a very complex one, involving many other issues such as abuses and future funding through increased taxes. Certainly, one of the most basic questions to be addressed here is whether or not we believe that every person is entitled to a certain level of living. If the answer is yes, then we must also ask to what extent and at what cost are we responsible for providing for those less fortunate than ourselves. These are for much later discussion. We Americans are grounded in the values of our founding forefathers, namely freedom and hard work. To what extent will we live these values? Should the majority be responsible, through their hard work, for providing a certain level of living for the minority? (Steven Jobs turned down Bill Gates’ invitation to join Warren Buffet and other millionaires in giving a large portion of their wealth to help the poor.) I, along with many others, would agree that a certain level of living is not a given birthright, nor is it my responsibility to provide this level of

living for others. There will always be a few, because of illness or injury, who cannot work at all. We must provide for those in such extreme circumstances. In addition to our value of hard work, we also value one’s freedom to choose. We must acknowledge and respect an individual’s right to choose how to live his life, even if this choice is not to working to support one’s style of living. Our respect for hard work and the freedom to choose how we will live, values that so many have lost their lives defending, lead me and many others to say that welfare is not the entitlement of every American.

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DIY

PEST PREVENTION Family Features

Each year, uncontrolled bugs, including, beetles, cock­roaches, ants, centipedes, sow bugs and box elder bugs, are a relentless annoyance that homeowners across the country fight to keep out of their homes. Homeowners are faced with the uncomfortable prospect of these home invaders sullying their well-kept abodes, hiding in cracks and corners, searching for food and dragging in dirt and grime. These critters even invade the most private residential areas, including bedrooms and bathrooms. This year, with the help of Raid Max Bug Barrier and DIY Expert Lou 14

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Manfredini, homeowners will be able to take measures to help stop unwanted bugs. Manfredini has teamed up with Raid to give homeowners tools and preventative tips to ensure any home is prepared before unwanted bugs attack. His tips have given homeowners across America the confidence and peace of mind that their families and homes are protected against uncontrolled pests. “As a contractor, one of the issues I often came across when tearing down walls was finding a bug infestation,” said Manfredini. “Infestations can be easily handled with a few smart home solutions that start to work in minutes and can be long-lasting. It’s all about being prepared.”


Worst Offenders nOne German cockroach means there could nAmerican cockroaches are typically be hundreds or even thousands inside the outdoor species that enter homes in southern regions of the U.S. looking for home. A cock­roach can live weeks without food and water. eating. If you see one, treat your home immediately.

nBox elder bugs invade in the fall to stay nA 2010 Raid Max Bug Barrier survey found that 69 percent of women most warm and protected for the winter. worry about ants and 44 percent worry about cockroaches invading their homes.

Source: SC Johnson Entomology Research Center

Prepare, Prevent and Patch

As a DIY expert, homeowners frequently ask Manfredini how they can get their home to look its best, maintain its value and keep unwanted bugs away. Manfredini shares three key guidelines for approaching home improvement and repelling pests: prepare, prevent and patch.

Prepare the Deck

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uncontrolled pests and bugs. Cockroaches, ants, box elder bugs and centi­pedes prefer to lurk under the kitchen sink or behind walls, potentially causing unseen infestation. Manfredini recommends Raid Max Bug Barrier; the automatic battery operated trigger lays down a continuous stream of formula which starts working within minutes and is long-lasting. Simply spray the entire perimeter of the home indoors and out, paying special attention to gaps in the walls, doors and windows where insects can enter the home.

Before the family starts spending more time on the deck, take a close look at wooden planks and the foundation for n Patch the Walk signs of rotting or splitting. Walk the deck carefully while checking for protruding Before summer officially begins, check the nails, loose railings and other safety driveways and walkways. If they’re pitted, hazards. After making any needed repairs, chipped or cracked, consider repairing carefully clean and re-seal the wood. A them and re-sealing with an asphalt or pressure washer will do a great job getting concrete sealer. Patching these surfaces the deck clean. Then let it dry for at least helps stop ants from nesting near the 48 hours before applying an oil-based deck home. stain. Also, check for signs of potential “Ultimately, the biggest mistake to home bug infestations. To help keep unwanted maintenance is not doing it,” Manfredini bugs out of the home, spray the perimeter said. “With people spending their money with Raid Max Bug Barrier. cautiously these days, prevention is key.” For more information about Manfredini n Prevent Uncontrolled Pests As the warmer months roll in, so do and Raid Max Bug Barrier, please visit www.KillsBugsDead.com. Fall Issue

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Nature

Fall Care for Heat Damaged Yards Family Features

Photo Courtesy of Getty Images

From yard work and pest control to cleaning and taking care of home systems, there’s a lot that goes into maintaining a house. Everything Home offers practical tips and expert know-how to help anyone take good care of their home. Extreme weather over the summer left a lot of lawns and landscapes showing signs of damage. With some time, patience and work, it’s possible to get your yard back in order and ready for the winter. “Signs of typical summer wear and tear on lawns were amplified as they were stressed by the above-normal temperatures experienced across the United States,” said Ben Hamza, Ph.D., director 16

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of technical operations at TruGreen, the nation’s largest professional lawn care service. “Fall is the ideal time to nurture lawns and landscapes to help ensure your yard’s health for spring.”

Assess

Thoroughly walk your property and inspect the lawn, trees and shrubs. Note patchy areas, where grass has thinned out or is in need of valuable nutrients and appears as light green. Also look

for weed and plant pest infestations and overgrown trees and shrubs, especially those with the potential for interfering with roof and power lines. Consider a qualified expert, such as TruGreen, to properly gauge your lawn and landscape needs.

Replace

Fall is the right time to seed bare lawn areas and overseed existing grass to improve lawn thickness and density. After a detailed inspection


of your lawn’s trouble spots, your TruGreen specialist could recommend one of several reseeding techniques: • Spot Seeding — fills in small areas that are thin or infested with weeds. • Overseeding — generally used for larger areas where the turf is thin, but not bare. • Slit Seeding — a premium service using a specialized machine to cut slits into the soil and sow turf seeds directly into the slits. Lightly rake an inch of surface soil to remove dead debris and properly prepare the area for seeding. Choose a grass seed that is the same type as the grass already growing in your lawn. Lightly apply seed to the soil surface and gently pack to firm the seed into the soil. Apply a light layer of straw or seeding mulch to encourage

rapid seed germination. Water lightly until the seed has fully emerged. Do not apply crabgrass preventive to newly seeded areas of your lawn.

Feed

maintain your yard’s appearance and health: • Rake and clean. Keeping leaves and debris cleared off your lawn will keep your lawn healthier. • Continue to clear away debris that can become matted and damage your lawn. • Inspect your landscape mulch in the fall. Clean up beds, refresh mulch and make sure that no more than two to three inches of mulch remains in the beds. • Do not walk on frostcovered lawns. Doing so may cause brown footprints to appear later. These footprints may remain visible until spring green-up begins.

Fall feeding gives roots of lawns, trees and shrubs the energy needed to prepare for a healthy spring green revival. Be sure to keep fertilizer on target to prevent run-off. Using a trained specialist, such as TruGreen, for insect and disease control measures customized to your region will help trees and shrubs thrive. If you fertilize your own lawn, make sure you read and follow the product directions and sweep all With these tips, your fertilizer granules that may reach pavement back onto lawn and landscape can recover from the difficult your lawn. summer and spring back into shape next year. For Maintain Throughout the fall, there more expert advice, visit are things you can do to www.TruGreen.com.

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Fred’s Bargain Barn By Sandra Rose

Jim Rauls, one of three co-owners of Fred’s Bargain Barn in Fredericktown, may very well be one of the first “flea marketers” in Missouri. In the business for over fifty years, Jim and his partners opened Fred’s Bargain Barn at its current location nine years ago. Fred’s Bargain Barn is not what you might expect of the typical antique store, nor is it the typical flea market; antiques and collectibles of all shapes, sizes and value can be found throughout the vendors’ booths. Jim emphasized three simple rules that must be followed by each of his vendors: the item must be something that cannot be bought at a larger, chain store; it must be cleaned; and, the item must be reasonably priced. Jim remembered how years ago, when he first started in the business, this kind of shop was often a “gathering place for neighborhood folks.” Such is not the case today, but according to Jim, your shopping experience at Fred’s Bargain Barn should always be “fun” just like it was in those early days. In addition, Jim reminds us that shopping at a flea market is actually the recycling of usable items and most definitely teaches the shopper something about the previous generation. Take a ride out to Fred’s Bargain Barn in Fredericktown; experience and enjoy exactly what Jim tells us about shopping at a flea market. One more thing, as Jim Rauls reminds, “when you see something that you really like, buy it before someone else does.” Fred’s Bargain Barn & Flea Market 7138 Hwy 67 Fredericktown, MO 63645 (573)783-2295 18

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FENTON CARNIVAL GLASS By Sandra Rose

Fred’s Bargain Barn & Flea Market

Antiques Resale Collectibles Dealer booths Consignments

One of the most widely recognized and most popular kinds of art glass collected today is “carnival glass.” First produced on a large scale in 1908, by the Fenton Art Glass Company, carnival glass was also mass produced that same year by the Northwood Glass Company of Wheeling, West Virginia Carnival glass, sometimes called “dope” glass by glass makers of the time, was treated when hot with metallic sprays, vapors or fumes. This “doping” or treatment was a relatively safe method for the mass production or iridized glass. The sprays, vapors and fumes that were used on the hot glass formed a very lustrous coating on the glass which was described as

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the “colors of the rainbow seen in a floating soap bubble.” In addition to Fenton and Northwood, Imperial Glass, Westmoreland, Dugan, and Millersburg also mass produced carnival glass. The term “carnival glass” did not come into popular usage until sometime in the 1950s, when this glass was often given as a prize at a carnival. Prior to this time, most companies referred to “carnival glass” as “iridized glass.” The root word “iris” is from the Greek word for rainbow, thus “iridescent glass.” Blue, green and marigold appear to be the most common and most popular colors of this iridescent glass. The makers of carnival glass, except for Northwood, usually did not label their carnival pieces. These beautiful sparkling pieces of luster glass are often identified by the patterns of glass which were attributed to the various companies. Some of Fenton’s most popular patterns are “dragons and lotus” and the “peacock tail.” Beginning in the 1940s, Fenton developed their lines of art glass, namely Burmese and Satin Glass, using various forms and colors of matte opaque glass. During the 1950s,

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Florist & Gift Shop

Fenton introduced one of their most popular lines that of “milk glass.” Milk glass, and the ever popular “hobnail” are “white glass that looks like porcelain.” Fenton would also introduce popular colors in the hobnail glass, but white hobnail has always remained the most popular. The beauty and popularity of Fenton art glass remains today, especially in the carnival glass where pieces are found ranging from $5.00 to $19,000.00 for a rare pitcher and tumbler set. Collectors may collect the same color, type of glass, style or design ever on the look-out for that one of a kind piece.

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Art

BANGLES, BAUBLES and BEADS

Photography & Article By Mario M. Ornelas

Interested in jewelry for as long as she can remember, Ashley Snider works with multiple mediums. In one childhood photo she is seen wearing jewelry up and down her arm; in yet another photo, Ashley is wearing ten bangles. When she was about five years old, an aunt would give her beads with which to make her own jewelry. It was only about four years ago that she discovered and fell in love with resin jewelry, especially its versatility. Wandering through a craft store one day, she found a book that really piqued her interest. After reading only a few pages, she decided that this was a must hobby for her. (sounds funny to me, not sure if its right or not.) Ashley bought the book and all of the supplies she thought she would need to get started. Ashley soon discovered that the resin she had originally purchased was too soft for jewelry and had to buy a better resin. 22

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She’s come a long way since she made that first batch of resin. Ashley Snider’s jewelry has been available at various craft fairs and local festivals in the Parkland area such as Farmington’s Country Days, the Baptist Home’s Craft Fair, and a local “Girls’ Night Out” event. A fan of Andy Warhol, pop art, and Abstract Expressionism, Ashley explains that she is most inspired by “everyday life.” Ashley offer a strong word of caution to anyone wishing to work with resins: read and carefully the directions on the bottles of chemicals you work with. You will probably ruin something at sometime when you work with resins, and never, ever taste the resins. Look for Ashley’s original designs throughout the Parkland area; she always delighted to make a custom piece for anyone who requests it. Fall Issue

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Trivia

Did you know HALLOWEEN Celtic festival “Samuin” (Summer’s End) comprises the origins of Halloween traditions. Pumpkin carvings were believed to ward off evil spirits by the Celts. But they carved turnips instead of pumpkins. In North America, around $3 billion is spent on costumes alone. Around 1.1 billion pounds of pumpkins were produced in 2009, for Halloween. Pumpkins also come in colors of blue, green, and white. If you see a spider on Halloween, it is believed to be the spirit of a loved one watching over you. Halloween was brought to North America by immigrants from Europe who would celebrate the harvest around a bonfire, share ghost stories, sing, dance, and tell fortunes. “Halloween” the movie was made in only 21 days in 1978, on a very limited budget. The movie was shot in the spring and used fake autumn leaves 24

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Vampire s Family Features

Vicious-Delicious Vampire Cake Makes about 16 servings

Pound Cake (recipe available at www.wilton.com ) Dimensions 3-D Skull Pan Buttercream icing Black Icing Color Red Sparkle Gel Black string licorice Prepare pound cake in Skull Pan following recipe instructions. Cool completely. Assemble skull halves, attaching with icing, on cake board or serving plate. Tint small amount of icing black with icing color. Tint remainder of icing gray with small amount of black icing color. Fill in indented mouth and eye area with black icing; smooth with finger dipped in cornstarch. Build up cheeks and nose with gray tinted icing. Cover skull with tip 18 gray stars. Add tip 8 black outline eyebrows. Pipe tip 5 white teeth, fangs and eye highlights. Add red Sparkle Gel lips. Insert licorice for hair.

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&


& Werewolves Werewolf Furry Finger Cookies Makes about 3 dozen cookies

Finger Cookie Pan 1 cup (2 sticks) butter, softened 1-1/2 cups granulated sugar 1 egg 1-1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract 1/2 teaspoon almond extract (optional) 2-3/4 cups all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon salt 3 tablespoons cocoa powder Flaked coconut Brown Icing Color Black spice drops Preheat oven to 350째F. Lightly spray Finger Cookie Pan cavities with vegetable pan spray. In large bowl, beat butter and sugar with electric mixer at medium speed until well blended. Beat in egg and extracts; mix well. Combine flour, salt and cocoa powder; add to butter mixture. Beat until well blended. Press dough into prepared pan cavities, filling 2/3 full. Bake 9 to 10 minutes or until light brown around edges. Cool in pan 10 minutes. Turn pan over; lightly tap pan to remove cookies. Cool completely on cooling grid.

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Fitness Many people think that maintaining a healthy weight always means making drastic changes to their diets. But here are five easy changes you can make that will help keep you on track toward reaching your goal.

Five Easy Ways to Help Manage Weight 28

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1.Divide your plate. When putting food on your plate, fill half of it with veggies or salad (but watch out for fatty dressings).One-quarter of the plate should have lean protein, such as fish, chicken or beef that’s been grilled, baked or poached. And the last quarter of the plate should be a healthy starch but don’t load it up with butter or oil.


2.Go for fruit. Fruit has good-for-you vitamins and antioxidants, and it contains fiber, which can help you feel more satisfied. And studies show that consumption of fiber is associated with lower body weight measures in U.S. adults. Try some berries - blueberries, raspberries or strawberries are great on top of cereal or salads, or served with a little part-skim ricotta cheese. 3.Plan ahead. If you know that every afternoon you get hungry and end up heading to the vending machine, be prepared with better alternatives. A nutritious snack such as a piece of fruit, or a Special K cereal bar, will take care of that temptation and give you a way to stave off cravings. With 90 calories, and now with three grams of fiber, Special K cereal bars are a tasty option for weight-managers. For more information,

visit www.specialk.com/cereal-bars 4.Keep hydrated. Feeling tired or hungry? You may just be thirsty. Make sure you get at least six glasses of water a day. Water helps your body transport nutrients and eliminate toxins. Add a cucumber or lemon slice to jazz up the taste. 5.Close the kitchen. Heading into the kitchen can mean heading straight for temptation. As soon as you finish with each meal, clean up the dishes and turn off the lights. Tell yourself that the kitchen is closed, and then find an activity in another room of your house – preferably one that gets you moving.

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Feature

IS GONE

By Douglas K Howard

“Baseball breaks your heart,” wrote former MLB commissioner A. Bartlett Giamatti. “It is designed to break your heart. The game begins in the spring, when everything else begins again, and it blossoms in the summer, filling the afternoons and evenings, and then as soon as the chill rains come, it stops and leaves you to face the fall alone.” Baseball was once known as “America’s Pastime,” a moniker tarnished and increasingly held in question in recent years, in part because of scandals over the 1994 players strike, steroids usage and the increasing popularity of football and other sports. It is the oldest of America’s major sports, side winding and evolving through the years, from the “dead-ball era” that produced Babe Ruth and Jackie Robinson’s valiant entry into the game to today’s money-hungry, steroidclouded relic. Though the game’s nickname 30

Fall Issue

continues to evoke warm fuzzies, it’s often complicated with dark clouds of its being outdated, its slow pace and its isolation from the common fan. Then again, no other sport is as linked to our romanticized nostalgia of summer, filled with vacations, beaches, barbeques and fun. Britain can have its Shakespeare, France can stand up and salute the Bastille, but as far as we Americans are concerned, we’ve got our summers and they’re filled with hot dogs and double plays.” The “Boys of Summer,” as we call the players, signify a unique relationship that speaks not only to the present but to our collective, uniquely American past. The game is filled with clichés like “there’s always next year” and “even the best hitters fail seven times out of ten.” That’s the nature of the game. The beauty of baseball


is in those glorious moments: the walk-off homer, the magnificent defensive play, the no-hitter on the mound, but they remind us that, for most of us, those spectacular flashes of brilliance don’t come along all the time. It is in our failures and disappointments that we come to understand the infinity of hope. The game is as much about stoicism as it is winning; there’s an ironic beauty in Casey striking out in the bottom of the ninth. Baseball has been a part of my life for a long time now. I remember my brother, coming home from college, bringing me a box of Upper Deck baseball cards, when I was still in high school, and us just sitting on the living room floor, excitedly opening tinfoil packages and laughing and just talking. I was ecstatic. At the time, I thought that those feelings went on forever. I couldn’t have understood that the heyday of the Whitey ball era was swiftly drawing to a close, or that

years later a masterful manager, Tony LaRussa, would send my favorite team to another round of playoff appearances. It goes in cycles: always the despair of summer waning, but then something magical happens to put things right again: after months of cold and rain, the sun peeks out. Every spring, every team starts out with equal chances of making the World Series. We here in Eastern Missouri and the surrounding areas have always enjoyed a particularly close relationship with our baseball teams, whether the Cardinals, or the Royals, or the Cubs, or White Sox. Part of its great American identity has been in its essential Midwestern mindset. This is a bit ironic, because for most of its early history, baseball was mainly a Northeastern, urban sport. As documentarian Ken Burns writes, “One of the most persistent myths about baseball is that it is a small-town game, a link with a somehow simpler, rural past. It is true that most, if not all, of the men who first played the game that we now know learned to hit and throw and catch in the towns and villages in which they spent their boyhoods before coming to the biggest of our big cities.” It’s this rural Midwestern feel that gives baseball its “authentic” American identity. Scores of baseball movies and fantasies are based on Midwest locations: Major League, set in Cleveland; Field of Dreams in Iowa; even The Natural, featuring a New York team, had its iconic scene (in which the main character, as a rookie, struck out “the Slugger,” a thinly veiled reference to Babe Ruth) in a field. We Midwesterners like to think of ourselves as less complicated, more honest and to-the-point, even as Missourians taking the state nickname of the “Show-Me State.” It’s this hard-working, spin-free character that’s at the heart of our love for the game. Fall Issue

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“I like our interest in sports,” opined Walt Whitman. “Ball, chiefest of all—baseball particularly. Baseball is our game: the American game: I connect it with our character.” I think it’s in this quote that Whitman, never shy to toot his own horn, speaks to what was already an evolving connection between our vision of America and the grand old game. It makes for a beautiful, if not entirely realistic, story of a common past, a brotherhood of integrity, and an essential goodness inherent in our being American. This is the last great American myth. Those values are particularly relevant to us in the Midwest, who like to see ourselves as “purer” and “more value-driven” than our neighbors; that connects us to baseball that much more concretely. Whether that could be proven in some sort of scientific survey is completely beside the point—a myth is an

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essential story we tell ourselves in order to understand who we are; George Washington cutting down the cherry tree and Christopher Columbus “discovering” America are but a couple. What they tell us is that we as a people should value being stubborn and honest and on the side of the good, even though it’s hard to find people who would disagree with that statement. It says as much about who we want to be as who we really are. And that is truly a beautiful thing. Baseball has always been a kind of metaphor for life, for me. Play a hard nine. Confidence on the mound is everything. Do what you can do, don’t worry about trying to hit a home run every at-bat. The game, as Yogi Berra said,” ain’t over ‘ til it’s over.” Baseball is seasonal—just as summer comes and goes each year, anticipated in the icy days of early spring, toasted and remembered in the glory of fiery autumn, so baseball, in many ways summer’s best expression, sings its arrival with the arrival of pitchers and catchers in Florida and Arizona every year, while the spring peepers start getting warmed up, and fight their tired way out into the dank darkness of winter as the last of the color fades from the trees in early November. Yet there’s always a serendipitous note of hope ringing in that last out, always the old line coming out of your belly about how there’s “always next year.” I can always count on the troubles of life being there, but there is also always this spinning bird of joy and hope— infinite, always rising up from its own ashes, always a new season, a glorious over-thewall catch, an out-of-the-blue rookie, a magnificent squeeze play, a remarkable three-run walk-off job. Something I’ve never seen before, and can’t wait to see again. Summer is gone; it will be here again.

“...have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become.” Being the richest man in the cemetery doesn't matter to me. Going to bed at night saying we've done something wonderful, that's what matters to me. -Steve Jobs

1955 - 2011 Select a cookie number 1-10 and then turn to page 37 to read your fortune.

Fortune Cookies

10 1

5

4 8

2

7

3

6 9

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Puzzles

Most of us look at success in the same positive way. It’s how we deal with our failures... that determines what we get out of life.

Why worry? If you’ve done the very best you can... worrying won’t make it any better.

Find Five Differences. Answers on page 37. 34

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-Walt Disney


E D G G C C M C L P B V G I F

S A W T H A A E H C S A A I E

C N R I I E N P E A R W T E N

H D V Z L T R T S L R C W G N

A E E Y I K O K I I H D N G E

L L H L A M J C I G C Q O P L

O I P L A N T A I N O U F L T

Across 1. Member of a largely pastoral Islamic people who live in Kurdistan 5. Asian capital 10. Door fastener 14. Give sanction to 15. Submersible warship usually armed with torpedoes 16. Bit 17. Carouse 20. Banana oil, e.g. 21. “___ moment” 22. Aquatic mammal 23. Mauna ___ 24. Ear membrane that vibrates to sound 27. A pint, maybe 28. Native of Thailand 29. Gangster’s gun 31. Genre of and architecture in reaction against established modernism 38. Pat on the back? 39. Bacteria discovered by Theodor Escherich 40. Flight data, briefly 42. .0000001 joule 43. Slander 45. Crumb 46. Small terrestrial lizard of warm regions of the Old World 48. Costa del ___ 49. Social 51. Barbershop quartet

T O E T U C H I C O R Y M A U

P N O V C V Y A M D N Y D N R

U N G F A C R E S S N I F T N

M P U R P L E B R O C C O L I

P S U B E E T E C A O H C N P

K O O L R E K A K L H K O G T

I P R Y S E N N E C A R R O T

N O L L E E K S S A G E N A B

members 53. Become assimilated into the body 54. Extraordinarily courageous 58. Succulent 60. Bone-chilling 61. Advertising sign 64. Adroit 65. Black 66. Challenge 67. Government tax on imports or exports 68. Breaks 69. 60’s hairdo

To PRINT these puzzles out, click on the printer icon and select the pages you want to print. (left, right, or both) Bean Beet Caper Capsicum Carrot Chard Chicory Chili Chive Cole Corn Cress Dandelion 26. One of the two branches of the Finno-Ugric family of languages 28. Cooking meas. 30. 20-20, e.g. 31. Rid of impurities 32. Gallery occupied by a church organ 33. Wood sorrels 34. Birdbrain 35. Twelfth month of the civil year 36. Unable to hear

Eggplant Eschalot Fennel Fitch Garlic Gherkin Gourd Greens Kale Leek Lentil Maize Okra

Onion Pea Plantain Pulse Pumpkin Purple broccoli Sage Soy Tomato Turnip Yam

anything 37. Made from residue of grapes or apples after pressing 38. Doozy 41. Leave in, as text 43. Hawaiian tuber 44. Cut, maybe 47. One of two basic subdivisions of a tribe 50. “To do” list 52. Contemptuous look

53. Squirrel nests 55. Daughter of Zeus 56. “Aeneid” figure 57. “___ it the truth!” 58. Make sense, with “up” 59. Moldovan monetary unit 62. Bobby of hockey 63. Prefix with classic

Down 1. 100 of equal 1 ruble in Russia 2. Decree 3. Indian side dish of yogurt and chopped cucumbers and spices 4. Fraction of a newton 5. Small crude shelter 6. Dislike, and then some 7. Extremely 8. Horse opera 9. “Am ___ believe ...?” 10. Clue 11. Blood carrier 12. Brace 13. Chaplain in one of the military services 18. Milk-Bone biscuit, e.g. 19. Adult female 25. Archer, at times

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E D G G C C M C L P B V G I F

S A W T H A A E H C S A A I E

C N R I I E N P E A R W T E N

H D V Z L T R T S L R C W G N

A E E Y I K O K I I H D N G E

L L H L A M J C I G C Q O P L

O I P L A N T A I N O U F L T

T O E T U C H I C O R Y M A U

P N O V C V Y A M D N Y D N R

U N G F A C R E S S N I F T N

M P U R P L E B R O C C O L I

P S U B E E T E C A O H C N P

K O O L R E K A K L H K O G T

I P R Y S E N N E C A R R O T

N O L L E E K S S A G E N A B

Fortune Cookies

1.) You find beauty in ordinary things, do not lose this ability. 2.) Something you lost will soon turn up. 3.) Love is like wildflowers...it is often found in the most unlikely places. 4.) You have a deep appreciation of the arts and music. 5.) None of the secrets of success will work unless you do. 6.) The smart thing is to prepare for the unexpected. 7.) In the end there are three things that last: faith, hope and love; and the greatest of these is love. 8.) Your heart is pure, and your mind clear, and your soul devout. 9.) Love is the only medicine for a broken heart. 10.) You are talented in many ways.

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AIRE October Ezine 2011