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ANNE MA SELECTED W O R K S 2013-2016


ANNE MA Yale School of Architecture // MArch I // 2016 Sheridan College // Graduate Cert. Comp Animation // 2012 University of Waterloo // Hon. B.AS // 2011 A PORTFOLIO OF RECENT WORK

annemony © 2014

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INTRODUCTION / Paprika.001.1

annemony © 2014

Comic series titled ‘Paprika!’ started and produced for Yale School of Architecture studentrun quarterly publication by the same name. started in Fall 2014

#Studio life / Paprika.001.2

FIG U RE


ARCHITECTURE 01 > SCHLUCHT HALLE 02 03 a 04 05 06 b 07 c 08 09 d 10

> > > > > > > > > > > > >

DANCE PROJECTION MACHINE TONGHUI URBAN LABORATORY A GUIDE TO THE PEOPLES-AMBITIOUS HAPPY LAND WASSERGEIST FRACTURED GROUND THE GREAT WHITE WHALE PENN DESIGN ILLUSTRATION ARTIFICE MONSTER DWELLING CODE JUNCTION PRISM FORMERLY KNOWN AS THE CUBE YSOA BP 2014 WEBSITE DESIGN TERMINUS

ILLUSTRATION & 11 > METROPOLIS OTHER 12 > ORNEMEKAMI 13 e 14 f g 15

> > > > > >

GEHRY-GO-ROUND KITBASHING THE NYC FREE SPEECH KIT KUKY WORLD DRAWING & PHOTOGRAPHY BOTTA RECONSTRUCTED

PROFESSIONAL 16 > DURHAM COLLEGE CENTRE FOR FOOD 17 > 18 >

UTM INSTRUCTIONAL CENTRE HUMBER DESIGN CENTRE


annemony © 2014

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INTRODUCTION / Paprika.001.1

annemony © 2014

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#Studio life / Paprika.001.2

FIG U RE


ARCHITECTURE 01 02 03 a 04 05 06 b 07 c 08 09 d 10

> > > > > > > > > > > > > >

SCHLUCHT HALLE DANCE PROJECTION MACHINE TONGHUI URBAN LABORATORY A GUIDE TO THE PEOPLES-AMBITIOUS HAPPY LAND WASSERGEIST FRACTURED GROUND THE GREAT WHITE WHALE PENN DESIGN ILLUSTRATION ARTIFICE MONSTER DWELLING CODE JUNCTION PRISM FORMERLY KNOWN AS THE CUBE YSOA BP 2014 WEBSITE DESIGN TERMINUS

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SCHLUCHT HALLE //

BAVARIAN RADIO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA CAMPUS YSOA 1011a / Year 3, Semester 2 Advanced Design Studio 2016 Critic / Frank Gehry w/ Trattie Davies Model exhibited at 2016 YSoA year-end show “Out with a BANG� This new concert hall design and building for the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra is sited in a up and coming development in East Munich. The building is spread out like a campus, addressing not only the inner programmatic characteristics of the Orchestra and Academy, but also the vibrant and multi-use surroundings of the site. The primary focus for the project was developing the main concert hall and evoking a feeling when one enters. In this case, the curves and colour splashes of the Antelope Canyon in Arizona became the main inspiration for the hall, along with the texture and quality of musculature and icebergs. The combination of these inspirations result in a striking and grand space for the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra to share their music to the world.

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BRSO Campus The Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra Music Campus celebrates the BRSO and the new Hall (Schlucht Halle), Music Education (scholarship and study of music) and the Community (the urban development surrounding the site). The experience of the building is like moving among a mini campus that has focus on these three things. The primary driver for the design is centered around the interaction of the orchestra and the main hall and the music academy associated with the orchestra. Each programmatic element on the campus exhibits a unique personality and quality that together contribute to the larger body of the BRSO. Inspired by the free-flow and loose conceptual diagram of Cedric Price’s Fun Palace, the spaces between these characters become significant in its interstitial space and the way the characters are connected.

INSPIRATION AND PRECEDENT

ADMIN

8 ACADEMY

SERVICE

HALL

PUBLIC SPACE

SUPPORT SPACE

POND CHAMBER HALL

‘MUSIC PALACE’ SKETCH

PROGRAMMATIC ORGANIZATION


Looking at the beyond the given site at the larger context of Munich, the current city center consists of buildings built from the ground up after 1945. The buildings are rooted in history but also a facade for what used to stand there. On the other hand, the site for the BRSO’s new building is just outside one of Munich’s major train stations, Ostbahnhof. The land has roots as a Potato farm and product manufacturing. The new development involves new mixed-use residential and work buildings among clusters of existing unique program such as Potato farm silo turned Rock Climbing hub, Hamburger wholesale, night clubs and small concert venues. The cluster of varied program works well with the Fun Palace spirit of the project, and serves as a complementary site for the BRSO Campus.

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SITE ANALYSIS AND DIAGRAMMATIC PARTI


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ACADEMY

ORCHESTRA ROOMS

OUTDOOR PERFORMANCE BEYOND

POTATO POND

MASSING MODEL ITERATIONS

BUILDING LONG SECTION

BACKSTAGE


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PROGRAM MASSING

MAIN HALL

PRE-CONCERT

MAIN ENTRANCE

FRONT LAWN

LOBBY

STAGE AND ORCHESTRA PIT


CAFE

PUBLIC PASSAGE

FRONT LAWN

MAIN ENTRY PLAZA

GIFT SHOP

BOX OFFICE

PRE-CONCERT GARDEN WALK ADMINISTRATION

MAIN HALL

SERVICE & LOADING

ARTIST’S ENTRY

GRAND HALL SCREENING PIT

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BACKSTAGE

ORCHESTRA WAITING

POTATO POND CHAMBER MUSIC HALL OUTDOOR PERFORMANCE

MUSIC FOLLY

BACK LAWN RESTAURANT AND BAR

ACADEMY MUSIC LABS

GROUND FLOOR PLAN


ADMINISTRATION

MAIN HALL

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MUSIC LIBRARY PRACTICE ROOMS CHAMBER MUSIC HALL EXERCISE ROOM

COURTYARD BELOW

ACADEMY MUSIC LABS

UPPER LEVEL FLOOR PLAN


Schlucht Halle The design of the hall began with a contextual study of organs and muscles. The feeling of the hall evolved to adapt the natural formations of canyons, in particular, Antelope Canyon and The Wave, both in Arizona. While the building is made up of spread out individual programs that pull away from the hall, the feeling inside the hall pulls inward instead. This feeling is represented as sweeping forms that come out from the walls and form the bays for seating. The vibrant explosion of colour as inspired by Antelope Canyon is brought into the hall as well, emphasized through the seating fabric to further evoke the feeling of the canyon. The ceiling of the hall also adapts the sweeping forms, except in more individualized textured ‘sheets’ that overlap and form the convex bowl shape for acoustic reasons.

INSPIRATION AND PRECEDENT

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1/8” = 1’-0” CONCERT HALL MODEL


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133’

133’

171’

91’

91’

HALL PLAN

171’


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22’

33’

50’

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37’ 38 49’

HALL SECTIONS


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CONCERT HALL ITERATIONS


TEXTURE MODEL TESTS

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CEILING ITERATIONS

CONCERT HALL PLAN ITERATION


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CANYON STUDY SKETCHES


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DANCE PROJECTION MACHINE // A DANCE CENTER FOR NEW YORK

YSOA 1011a / Year 1, Semester 1 Architectural Design / 2013 Critic / Joyce Hsiang published in Retrospecta 37/ 2013-2014 This project turns to the spectacle of performance to activate its site by not only being contained to the interior, but also experienced at an urban scale. Located directly adjacent to the High Line in New York, the building is envisioned as a ‘vertical High Line’. Program and activity are extended upwards in a series of interlaced circulation and occupiable spaces. The ‘programmatic scaffold’ extends upwards through the building, producing voids in the structural lattice. Facades are designed for video projection, in addition to the enclosed volumes of dance studios and lounges scattered throughout. The single anomaly is a ‘red whale’ theatre, a beacon that highlights the two primary features of the design, serving both interior performance within as well as a surface for external projection. Finally, the public corridor stemming from the ground floor plaza weaves its way up the building accented in the same vibrant red. plans, section and perspectives hand-drawn on velum, compiled in pshop

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LATTICE EXTENSION

Visualizing the Vertical Highline. The building extends itself enough to accomodate the programmatic requirements, while piecing together a cohesive play between voids and solids. The question can be asked whether the economy of such a project is feasible if it were to continue to grow. Perhaps a new skyscraper or residential project can carry through the ideologies of such a feat in the ever growing fabric of New York City.

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BIRDS EYE VIEW

VOIDS

ANOMALY


CLINIC/ LOUNGE

STACKS DANCE STUDIO LOUNGE

WC

DANCE STUDIO

LOUNGE

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DANCE STUDIO

FILM STUDIO

ADMIN

MAIN AUDITORIUM

LOBBY

CAFE LOADING

3/16” [1:64] SECTION


Facades are designed to display projection art both internally between program volumes as well as externally towards the city. OUTDOOR PROJECTION THEATRE

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A B C D E F G H I J

MULTI-USE PLAZA CAFE SEATING OUTDOOR PERFORMANCE RECEPTION MEDIA LIBRARY STORAGE COAT CHECK LOADING WC LOADING DRIVEWAY

GROUND FLOOR PLAN


LINEAR PROGRAM ORGANIZATION

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K L M N O P

MULTI-USE PLAZA BELOW CAFE STORAGE BELOW OPEN LOUNGE UPPER LOBBY HIGHLINE ENTRANCE

SECOND FLOOR PLAN


8TH FLOOR PLAN DANCE CLINIC CLINIC LOUNGE CLINIC WC

7TH FLOOR PLAN DANCE STUDIO SKY LOUNGE

6TH FLOOR PLAN DANCE STUDIO SKY LOUNGE WC

PROJECTION LOCATIONS

5TH FLOOR PLAN DANCE STUDIO FILM STUDIO BLACK ROOM

4TH FLOOR PLAN ADMINISTRATION OFFICES AND STAFF LOUNGE AUDITORIUM BALCONY LEVEL

3RD FLOOR PLAN AUDITORIUM AUDITORIUMBREAK-OUT SPACE MINI BAR

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2ND FLOOR PLAN UPPER LOBBY AND OPEN LOUNGE CAFE 2nd – 8th FLOOR PLANS

WASHINGTON ST & W 13 ST.


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Early conceptual sketch for Circle Campus & Egg Plaza

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03

TONGHUI URBAN LABORATORY // PEOPLES-AMBITIOUS HAPPY LAND

YSOA 1106a / Year 3, Semester 1 Advanced Design Studio / 2015 Critic / Alan Plattus w/ Andrei Harwell Collaboration / Chengqi John Wan Nomination, H.I. Feldman Prize 2016 Exhibited in 2016 YSoA student year-end show, “Out with a BANG� GROUND-UP URBANISM What if urban design straddles both local and regional ambitions, yet remains meaningful and relevant to the communities it serves? The Tonghui riverfront in central Beijing is a difficult, forgotten post-industrial railway landscape, only because its latent potential has not been realized. These places can be the foundations for insurgent public spaces; selfmade urban spaces that range from reclaimed and re-appropriated sites, to temporary events and informal gathering places. We approach the question of city-healing not through a singular top-down strategy, but instead through the analysis of site-specific, unique situations. This produces urban experiments which address both the problems and opportunities of found urban sites. We see programme not as a singular, unyielding thing, but as a limitless list of possibilities generating a continuous urban laboratory in which both public and private are engaged in the process of urban development, represented through narratives that capture the intricacies of human inhabitation.

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“...insurgent public spaces challenge the conventional, codified notion of public and the making of space.” Jeffery Hou Insurgent Public Space: Guerrilla Urbanism and the Remaking of Contemporary Cities, 2010

Forgotten spaces are forgotten only because their potential has not been realized. These spaces can be the foundations for insurgent public spaces, self-made urban spaces that range from reclaimed and reappropriated sites, temporary events, and informal gathering places. Our strategy stems from identifying and appropriating such spaces as starting points for a larger system of urban growth. This begins with an analysis of top-down planning, via the question of how today’s urban planners approach the redevelopment of the site. We propose a parallel set of strategies that work in conjunction; a participatory tactical urbanism that would enable us to approach insurgent spaces effectively.

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The result of this parallel process is something we imagine will result in a ‘new urbanscape’. This in turn segues into two distinct streams. In one stream, the development stabilizes, potentially becoming institutionalized and naturalized by the government; something ‘official’. In the other stream, the project becomes abandoned, forgotten and obsolete; something ‘unofficial’. Together they create a balanced urbanism, both existing within the city as counterpoints to each other. As the ‘unofficial’ site approaches obsolescence, it gets re-identified as insurgent territory, which is then fed back into our parallel urban strategy. NEW URBANISM FLOWCHART


We see programme not as a singular, unyielding thing, but as a limitless list of possibilities. The program assets are distilled into a set of four overarching hierarchies: Infrastructural, Developer Ambitions, Cultural Hotspots and Community Initiatives.

Asset Code

Infrastructural / large city-scale moves primarily executed by the government Developer Ambitions / scale of architectural space that is ripe for development Cultural Hotspots / scale of the district; communal and cultural activities Community Initiatives / scale of the locals; crowd-sourced feeding of ideas and information

Name Chinese Pavilion

Infrastructural Developer Ambitions Cultural Hotspots Community Initiatives

Elevated Path

Roadway

Trees

Allotment Garden

Dim Sum Stall

Food Stall

Island

Drink Stand

Fishing Spot

Pedestrian Bridge Food Stall Boat Dock Trees

Furniture Store Apartment Complex

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Canal

Jogging Path

Toy Store Bike Station Car Park

Park Bench

Children’s Playground Police Stand

PROGRAMME ASSET MATRIX

OVERALL CONTEXT MASTERPLAN

McDonalds


The Tonghui Urban Design Kit contains the tools and assets necessary for engaging in our ‘new urbanism’ approach. Using individualized and labelled ‘assets’, the pieces can be applied directly to the accompanying table for the urban design process.

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35


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The model represents different phases in each site’s development over time. From the existing site, represented in the lightest grey to the furthest projected phase in black, the models are built to complement our narrative and strategy.

EXPLODED TIME-BASED MODELS


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SITE 1: FOOD EMPORIUM SCALE ‘S’

R

QINGFENG PARK

WATERFRONT QING FENG BAY

CREATIVE INDUSTRY CLUSTER

RAIL MANUFACTURING RAILYARD TRELLIS CONVERTED TRAIN SHED

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PERIME COMPUTER LITERACY CENTER

SITE 1: FOOD EMPORIUM In this insurgent district, the focus is on the “pinch” point in the existing rail tracks running through a majority of the extended Tonghui River site. The tracks are a major barrier between north and south, and even amongst extant building “islands” within the railyards. We imagine communities on both sides of the railway tracks coming together to improve north-south connectivity from the southern Shuanghuayuan residential community and the northern Chaoyang district, spurring the city planners and railway company to invest in the re-purposing and linkage of existing railyard buildings.


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DEVELOPMENT

DAYLIGHTING

EDUCATION CENTER 41


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SITE 2: EGG PLAZA & CIRCLE CAMPUS SCALE ‘M’

WATERFRONT

TONGHUI ST

EGG PLAZA MALL

DUCK POND

GATEWAY NORTH & SOUTH STATION & CAPSULE HOTEL QINGFENG PARK

RAILYARDS PARK MONORAIL

RAILWAY ARTPARK RAILYARDS PARK

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RAILWAY MUSEUM PERIMETER WALKWAY

PRIVATE APARTMENTS

RAILWAY EMPLOYEE HOUSING

SITE 2: CIRCLE CAMPUS & EGG PLAZA With the goal of revitalizing an under-utilized plot of land, “Egg Plaza” and its neighboring circular railway test track was imagined as a vibrant mixed-use campus intimately tied to its railyard heritage, which includes a collaboration between the extant Beijing Railway Museum and Urban Planning Museum. In this narrative, a temporary festival on an empty lot owned by the national railway company evolves into a formal amusement park over the span of a decade, its content and nomenclature assisted by crowd-sourced community initiatives. An industrial landscape, vacant and under-utilized, is transformed into a cultural destination.

SO


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FIRST STEPS

DEVELOPMENT PLAN

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RAILWAY MUSEUM

ART PARK

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DUCK POND


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CAPSULE HOTEL

EGG PLAZA REVITALIZED

THE TONGHUI RAIL EXPRESS

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SITE 3: KEEPER OF THE RING SCALE ‘L’

TONGHUI RING ROAD AND PARK

FURNITURE MARKET CRESCENT

TONGHUI ISLAND

FURNITURE MARKET

TONGHUI STATION & SOHO

TONGHUI GATE

MICRO BUSINESS HUB

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WATERFRONT HOUSING DEVELOPMENT

FOURTH RING ROAD ABOVE

SOUTH EXPANSION ZONE

SITE 3: KEEPER OF THE FOURTH RING In the largest urban experiment, we looked at the space underneath and surrounding the 4th Ring Road’s intersection with the Tonghui riverfront. The intersection’s most pressing problem was traffic congestion, and this served as the starting point for revitalizing the site. From there, the river is expanded into a bay with a “community island” for nearby residents. The island and its roadway, beginning as acts of intervention by the authorities, then act as a node and central hub for activity that spills over beyond the site’s extents, attracting new private development along the Ring Road, furniture market and open lots.


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TRAFFIC CONTROL

WALK IN THE PARK

KEEPER GATE

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EXPANSION

FURNITURE MARKET BARTER CRESCENT

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RESETTLEMENT


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a

A GUIDE TO THE PEOPLES-AMBITIOUS // COMIC AND EXPLANATION BOOK

YSOA 1106a / Year 3, Semester 1 Advanced Design Studio / 2015 Critic / Alan Plattus w/ Andrei Harwell Collaboration / Chengqi John Wan Nomination, H.I. Feldman Prize 2016, Exhibited in 2016 YSoA student year-end show, “Out with a BANG!” The book complements the project Tonghui River Urban Laboratory, introducing the underlying ambitions of the project through explanations, diagrams, drawings and narrative comics. Each site is covered, including both urban development to projected user appropriation and public participation in the project. Link to publication: https://issuu.com/annemony/docs/comicbook_reduce_forweb

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WASSERGEIST //

BRIDGEPORT SOUTH-END PROPOSAL YSOA 1022b / Year 2, Semester 2 Urban Architectural Studio / 2015 Critic / Alan Plattus Collaboration / Nicolas Kemper Published in Retrospecta 38/ 2014-2015 WASSERGEIST reclaims Bridgeport’s tradition of encouraging an intimate relationship with the water. We begin by identifying three types of water: Ocean, Rain and Sewage. As Bridgeport has adequate capacity in its two Activated Sludge Treatment Facilities to handle both its own sewage and that of 9,000 Trumbull households, we focus on the first two types. We address the threat of storm surges presented by the ocean by proposing a berm high enough (20 feet) to protect the South End from a 100 year flood surge. We then encourage activity on and along the ocean by punctuating the berm with three piers. The berms in turn wrap a series of bank side reservoirs – lakes elevated above ground level. These lakes mitigate and then capitalize upon Connecticut’s abundance of rain water.

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BLUE ROOF FILTRATION

CANAL

CONSTRUCTED WETLAND

ERM NB O I T

BOX BE R

M

BERM AL N CA

REC RE A

RAISED ROAD

LAKE

RAISED ROAD CANAL

CONSTRUCTED

Elevated road aquaduct system -Linden & Broad St.

Built in platforms and paths for recreational activity

New University building typology -- “disguised box”

INHABITABLE BERM

M

DOCK

LAK EB E

HOUSE BE R

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RM

THE SOUND WATER BREAK

New building typology over water break and coast

UNIVERSITY OF BRIDGEPORT NEW RAISED AXIS

Water on water dividing fresh water reservoir from Long Island Sound

BOARDWALK / PATH

LAKE


HOUSE BE R

INHABITABLE BERM

M

DOCK

WATER BREAK

New building typology over water break and coast

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RAISED ROAD

M

DOCK

LAK EB E

HOUSE BE R

INHABITABLE BERM BOARDWALK / PATH

RM

M L BER NA A C

CANAL

CONSTRUCTED WETLAND

LAKE

THE SOUND WATER BREAK

Water on water dividing fresh water reservoir from Long Island Sound

LAK EB E

RAISED ROAD

RM

BOARDWALK / PATH

BERM AL N CA

Elevated road aquaduct system -Linden & Broad St.

CANAL

CONSTRUCTED WETLAND

LAKE

REC RE A

New building typology over water break and coast

ERM NB O I T LAKE

CONSTRUCTED

THE SOUND

Water on water dividing fresh water reservoir from Long Island Sound

SOUTH-END MASTERPLAN

Elevated road aquaduct system -Linden & Broad St.

Built in platforms and paths for recreational activity


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AERIAL OVERVIEW OF MASTERPLAN


Depending on where it falls, we see different kinds of rain water: that of the mountains (clean, comes through rivers) and that of urban areas (dirty, comes through storm sewers). Using canals running down Broad and Park as well as pumps, we bring the different kinds of water into different lakes which in turn treat, clean and use the water (see chart for breakdown). The 220 million gallons of lakes do not just provide the water storage capacity the South End needs for flooding (such as the 19.5 million gallon sewer overflow it experienced in the aftermath of Sandy), but through different kinds of lakes treats, cleans, and ultimately celebrates this underappreciated resource of Bridgeport’s. Connecticut is an extraordinarily wet state. Aquarion produces 15-20% more water than its customers consume. Connecticut does not even drill its aquifers. WASSERGEIST celebrates this abundance, and then leverages it into a new kind of urban development.

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WATER SYSTEMS FLOWCHART


SITE BOUNDARIES

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FINGER RESIDENCE DETAIL SECTION

PARK VIEW FROM ELEVATED BERM

BOUNDARY OF HIGHER GROUND


11 1

22 2

33 3

TTO OW WEERR M TOWER MIIXX MI X

EE E --UUSS -US EEDD ED

Apartment Apartment Apartment student studentresidence, student residence, residence, dining dininghall hall dining and andhall student student and student community community community program programprogram

Double Doubleloaded Double loadedcorridor corridor loaded student corridor studentresidences student residences residences with with with thin thinprofile profile thintotoprofile accentuate accentuate to accentuate views views views

R TE WA ERR TE WAAT W

R GE FIN ERR N GGE FFIIN

RREE R E SSIIDD SID EENNCCEEENSSC E S

FFRR FR OONN O N TT CCOOTTTC OG TTAATGTEEA G E Live Liveand andLive work work and double double workstory story double typology typology story activating typology activating activating street streetline, line, street faculty faculty line,work/office work/office faculty work/office

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WATERFRONT COTTAGES


The Wasser Pier serves as a new destination for visitors and locals alike. Working with three immediate focal points; Battleship Museum as destination, a Water Research Center for education, and a Filtration and Distribution Center as economic resource. 66

THE WASSER PIER


NEW UNIVERSITY CORE

MASTERPLAN MODEL

Wassergiest addresses a few of Bridgeport’s main problems: Resiliency, Development and Identity. The idea of the lake berm creates a resilient Bridgeport, protecting the University and the rest of the city from flooding. The lake also serves as a resevoir for rainwater collection and storage as well as destination and recreation activities. The Wasser Pier seeks to revitalize the south-end into a new destination. Lastly, the redevelopment of University of Bridgeport introduces 67 new building typologies that have access to the elevated berm level and give the University and city a new identity.


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DETAIL MODEL OF UofB NEW AXIS AND WASSER DECK


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1/32” CONTEXT MODEL OVERVIEW


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FRACTURED GROUND // ELI WHITNEY MUSUEM

YSOA 1011a / Year 1, Semester 1 Architectural Design / 2013 Critic / Joyce Hsiang Exhibited at YSOA prospective student Open House and 2014 YSoA student year-end exhibition, “Outlook” A fractured information playground for visitors and learners. The project introduces two primary axes that cut the site, one servicing the educational attachment to the existing Eli Whitney Museum and new exhibition grounds, and the other providing a direct access to the waterfall and natural environment surrounding. Water tables are incorporated and scattered across the site to support the current water learning lab, and the fragmented nature of the educational strip is emulated in the outdoor exhibition space adjacent the sunken cafe with a ‘hidden’ entrance to the indoor exhibit. drawings hand-drawn on velum, compiled in pshop

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A B C D E F G H I J K

INFO PAVILION OUTDOOR EXHIBIT GROUNDS LOOKOUT OPEN ‘MEADOW’ EXHIBITION SCAPE SUNKEN CAFE PAVILION LOWERED LOOKOUT PLATFORM TERRACED LANDSCAPE GRAND EXHIBIT SERVERY WASHROOM

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GROUND FLOOR PLAN

VIEW OF EXHIBITION PAVILION


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LOWER LEVEL PLAN

ITERATIVE MODEL DEVELOPMENT

SECTIONAL VIEW OF EXHIBITION PAVILION


VISUAL

PHYSICAL

BR

ID

GE

M

US

EU

M

ZO

NE

C

-S

OF

ZO

T

NE

ED

B

GE

-B

UI

ZO

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LT

NE

A

ED

GE

-H

AR

D

ED

GE

TEMPORAL

SITE MEASURES & ANALYSIS

INFO PAVILION

The conceptual breakdown of the project stems from a site study documenting three distinct ‘boundaries’ on the site: Hard Edge, Built Edge and Soft Edge. Each zone has specific qualities based on visual boundaries, physical boundaries as well as temporal/natural boundaries. The project progressed through a manipulation of these edges, allowing them to filter into eachother. AXONOMETRIC BREAK DOWN


1

DEFINING PHYSICAL BOUNDARIES WATER LABS SHIFTED TO PHYSICAL BOUNDARY

2

REDEFINED BOUNDARY ACTIVITY STRIP PRIMARY AXIS DEFINED BY VISUAL BOUNDARY

3

ALIGNING ACTIVITY STRIP TO NEW AXIS SECONDARY AXIS DIRECT TO FALLS AND NEW ENTRY

CAFE PAVILION ROOF

EXHIBITION SCAPE

ACTIVITY STRIP

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LOWER LOOKOUT PLATFORM

4

ENTRY LOCATIONS OPENED UP ACTIVITY STRIP SHIFTED BY SECONDARY ENTRY

5

EXHIBITION AND CAFE PROGRAM DEFINED WATER LAB INTEGRATED INTO ACTIVITY STRIP FURTHER DIVISION OF SITE

6

ELEVATIONAL ADJUSTMENTS TO ACCOMODATE PROGRAM RAISED OUTDOOR EXHIBITION AREA SUNKEN CAFE AND HIDDEN EXHIBITION ENTRANCE

SUNKEN CAFE & GRAND EXHIBIT

CONCEPTUAL ITERATION DIAGRAMS


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WALNUT & S. 34th ST.


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THE GREAT WHITE WHALE // UPENN SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

YSOA 1021a / Year 2, Semester 1 Architectural Design / 2014 Critic / Martin Finio Exhibited at 2015 YSoA student year-end exhibition, “Edge of Tomorrow” The project focuses on a building wide gesture centred on ‘interchange’ at multiple scales: urbanistically, programmatically and internally. at the scale of the studio. Standing at the corner of Walnut and S. 34th St., the building also serves as a beacon and entrance throughway to the school’s campus. At this urban scale, the primary axis aligns with this existing flow of circulation while the footprint of the building counters this to emphasize a moment for interchange. Internally, the school of architecture functions as an organism, a programmatic system that is centred around the heart – studios. Branching from here are the arteries to supporting programs that enable this heart to function. A static core and central atrium ties the building together vertically, while all the parts of the organism plug in and are connected horizontally. The project’s interests lie in a cohesive internal organization and striking exterior image to complement its complexity in design, structure and innovation.

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SITE MASSING MODEL

78 BUILDING SHELL Horizontal louver facade Curtain Wall

STUDIO FLOORS Stacked programmatic oorplates

SUPPORT CORES Programmatic pods

PUBLIC CONNECTION Access from both sides, connection by observation walkways

WA S

st 34

LN

UT

BUILDING TAIL

BUILDING CONFIGURATION

Program extension to address street Student Bar & Lounge, Public Cafe, School Administration


URBAN SITE DEVELOPMENT

S 34th ST.

WALNUT

l transparen erna cy ext

CAMPUS ENTRY

SEMINAR

COLLAB ACTIVITY

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DIAGONAL SUPPORT

EXTERNAL

OBSERVATION WALKWAY

SMAL AUDITORIUM

rnal interchange inte STUDIO

2

COLLEGE GREEN

SERVICE

OUTDOOR SUNKEN PLAZA STUDIO

1

CAFE AWESOME

SUPPORT

INTERNAL

ite

ART

SERVICE ENTRANCE

ulat circ

fo

otp

rin t

prim ary

s

= interch ection ang ers e int ion axis

b uil

din

g

lision interchan -col ge non

city

URBAN

FISHER FINE ARTS

campus

GROUND FLOOR PLAN


ADDED PROGRAM NINTH 99560 SF SITE 60175 SF

PLACES OF INTERCHANGE 8300 SF

TYPICAL PROGRAM CLUSTER

SECURE

SUPPORT CLASSROOM SEMINAR FACULTY OFFICES MATERIAL FABRICATION LOUNGE TOILET

ADDED LAB

CLASSROOM COMPUTER LAB 1800 SF COMPUTER LAB 800 SF LOUNGE 600SF

STUDIO REVIEW

STUDIO ARCHITECTURE & LANDSCAPE YEAR 1 7670 SF 67SF x110

OUTDOOR SPACE TBD

ADDED LIBRARY

RESOURCE LIBRARY 2200 SF

EIGHTH

ADDED LAB ADDED LOUNGE

TOILETS 300SF

STUDIO ARCHITECTURE & LANDSCAPE YEAR 1 7670 SF 67SF x110

CENTRAL GATHERING SPACE TBD

STUDIO ARCHITECTURE & LANDSCAPE YEAR 2 7670 SF 67SF x110

AUDITORIUM LARGE 4600 SF

SUPPORT

REVIEW 600SF LOUNGE 600SF FACULTY OFFICE 660 SF (165SF x4) CLASSROOM LARGE 1800 SF

SEVENTH

AUDITORIUM SMALL 1200 SF CAFE 2000 SF

CLASSROOMS & SEMINARS 18600 SF

STUDIO ARCHITECTURE & LANDSCAPE YEAR 3 7670 SF 67SF x110

MATERIAL SHOP 500 SF CLASSROOM LARGE 1800 SF CLASSROOM LARGE 1800 SF

SUPPORT

CLASSROOM LARGE 1800 SF

WORKSHOPS & LABS 8000 SF

STUDIOS & REVIEW 41500 SF

CLASSROOM MEDIUM 1000 SF CLASSROOM MEDIUM 1000 SF CLASSROOM MEDIUM 1000 SF SEMINAR 600 SF SEMINAR 600 SF SEMINAR 600 SF SEMINAR 600 SF SEMINAR 600 SF DIGITAL MEDIA 1000 SF MATERIAL FABRICATION 1000 SF MATERIAL FABRICATION 1000 SF MATERIAL FABRICATION 1000 SF MATERIAL FABRICATION 1000 SF MATERIAL FABRICATION 1000 SF MATERIAL FABRICATION 1000 SF MATERIAL ASSEMBLAGE 1000 SF

SIXTH

STUDIO CITY PLANNING & HISTORIC PRESERVATION 8000 SF 45SF x175

STUDIO DESIGN & VISUAL STUDIES 2000 SF 40SF x50

SUPPORT

FIFTH

STUDIO UNDERGRADUATE 4000 SF 67SF x60

REVIEW 600SF REVIEW 600SF REVIEW 600SF LOUNGE 600SF CONFERENCE ROOM 300 SF RESEARCH CENTER OFFICES 600 SF (120SF x5) RESEARCH CENTER OFFICES 600 SF (120SF x5) STAFF WORKSTATION *DIGITAL DESIGN) 840 SF (70SF x12) STAFF WORKSTATION (BUILDING SIMULATION GROUP) PROJECT SPACE (DIGITAL DESIGN) 840 SF (70SF x12) 400 SF (200SF x2) PROJECT SPACE (BUILDING SIMULATION GROUP) 400 SF (200SF x2) FACULTY OFFICE 660 SF (165SF x4) FACULTY OFFICE 660 SF (165SF x4) FACULTY OFFICE 660 SF (165SF x4) FACULTY OFFICE 660 SF (165SF x4) FACULTY OFFICE 660 SF (165SF x4) FACULTY OFFICE 660 SF (165SF x4) FACULTY OFFICE 660 SF (165SF x4)

CLASSROOM LARGE 1800 SF

FOURTH

ADDED LOUNGE

SUPPORT

SUPPORT

REVIEW 600SF REVIEW 600SF REVIEW 600SF LOUNGE 600SF FACULTY OFFICE FACULTY OFFICE FACULTY OFFICE FACULTY OFFICE FACULTY OFFICE FACULTY OFFICE FACULTY OFFICE

OFFICES 200 SF

660 660 660 660 660 660 660

SF SF SF SF SF SF SF

(165SF (165SF (165SF (165SF (165SF (165SF (165SF

x4) x4) x4) x4) x4) x4) x4)

ADMIN STAFF & WAITING 960 SF (80SF x12) RECEPTION 300 SF TOILETS 600SF TOILETS 300SF TOILETS 300SF TOILETS 300SF TOILETS 300SF TOILETS 300SF TOILETS 300SF TOILETS 300SF

FACULTY OFFICE 660 SF (165SF x4) FACULTY OFFICE 660 SF (165SF x4) FACULTY OFFICE 660 SF (165SF x4) CONFERENCE ROOM 300 SF RESEARCH CENTER OFFICES 600 SF (120SF x5) RESEARCH CENTER OFFICES 600 SF (120SF x5) STAFF WORKSTATION *DIGITAL DESIGN) 840 SF (70SF x12) STAFF WORKSTATION (BUILDING SIMULATION GROUP) PROJECT SPACE (DIGITAL DESIGN) 840 SF (70SF x12) 400 SF (200SF x2) PROJECT SPACE (BUILDING SIMULATION GROUP) 400 SF (200SF x2)

STORAGE 1500 SF

ADDED LOUNGE

TOILETS 300SF

STUDIO DESIGN & VISUAL STUDIES 2000 SF 40SF x50

REVIEW 600SF FACULTY OFFICE 660 SF (165SF x4) FACULTY OFFICE 660 SF (165SF x4) SEMINAR 600 SF SEMINAR 600 SF CLASSROOM MEDIUM 1000 SF

ADDED REVIEW

TOILETS 300SF

STUDIO UNDERGRADUATE 4000 SF 67SF x60

FACULTY OFFICE 660 SF (165SF x4) FACULTY OFFICE 660 SF (165SF x4) SEMINAR 600 SF SEMINAR 600 SF DIGITAL MEDIA 1000 SF MATERIAL SHOP 500 SF CONFERENCE ROOM 300 SF RESEARCH CENTER OFFICES 600 SF (120SF x5) STAFF WORKSTATION *DIGITAL DESIGN) 840 SF (70SF x12)

PROJECT SPACE (DIGITAL DESIGN) 400 SF (200SF x2)

RESEARCH CENTER OFFICES 600 SF (120SF x5) STAFF WORKSTATION (BUILDING SIMULATION GROUP) 840 SF (70SF x12) PROJECT SPACE (BUILDING SIMULATION GROUP) 400 SF (200SF x2) FACULTY OFFICE 660 SF (165SF x4) CLASSROOM MEDIUM 1000 SF SEMINAR 600 SF CHAIRS, ASSOC. CHAIRS & DEPARTMENT COORD. 1200 SF (120SF x10) OFFICES 200 SF

STAFF, SUPPORT, ADMIN 600 SF

FIRST

CHAIRS, ASSOC. CHAIRS & DEPARTMENT COORD. 1200 SF (120SF x10) STAFF, SUPPORT, ADMIN 600 SF STAFF, SUPPORT, ADMIN 600 SF STAFF, SUPPORT, ADMIN 600 SF STAFF, SUPPORT, ADMIN 600 SF STAFF, SUPPORT, ADMIN 600 SF ADMIN SUPPORT 600 SF (120SF x5)

ADDED REVIEW

TOILETS 300SF

SECOND

DEAN 300 SF DEAN 300 SF DEAN 300 SF DEAN 300 SF CONFERENCE 300 SF MEETING RM 300 SF DIRECTOR 300 SF

STUDIO UNDERGRADUATE 4000 SF 67SF x60

REVIEW 600SF FACULTY OFFICE 660 SF (165SF x4) LOUNGE 600SF

STUDIO HISTORIC PRESERVATION 2000 SF 45SF x87

THIRD

CLASSROOM MEDIUM 1000 SF CLASSROOM MEDIUM 1000 SF CLASSROOM MEDIUM 1000 SF SEMINAR 600 SF SEMINAR 600 SF SEMINAR 600 SF SEMINAR 600 SF SEMINAR 600 SF DIGITAL MEDIA 1000 SF MATERIAL FABRICATION 1000 SF MATERIAL FABRICATION 1000 SF MATERIAL FABRICATION 1000 SF MATERIAL FABRICATION 1000 SF MATERIAL FABRICATION 1000 SF MATERIAL FABRICATION 1000 SF MATERIAL ASSEMBLAGE 1000 SF

STUDIO DESIGN & VISUAL STUDIES 2000 SF 40SF x50

CENTRAL GATHERING SPACE TBD

OBSERVATION WALKWAY

STUDENT BAR & LOUNGE 1000 SF

SITE SECTION TRANSVERSE DEAN 300 SF DEAN 300 SF DEAN 300 SF DEAN 300 SF CONFERENCE 300 SF MEETING RM 300 SF DIRECTOR 300 SF

1/32” = 1’-0”

STAFF, SUPPORT, ADMIN 600 SF STAFF, SUPPORT, ADMIN 600 SF STAFF, SUPPORT, ADMIN 600 SF STAFF, SUPPORT, ADMIN 600 SF ADMIN SUPPORT 600 SF (120SF x5)

16’

ADMIN STAFF & WAITING 960 SF (80SF x12)

4’GROUND

MATERIAL SHOP 500 SF AUDITORIUM SMALL 1200 SF

RECEPTION 300 SF TOILETS 300SF

AUDITORIUM SMALL 1200 SF CENTRAL GATHERING SPACE TBD CAFE 1000 SF STORAGE 1500 SF

AUDITORIUM LARGE 4600 SF

40’

OBSERVATION WALKWAY

SERVICE ENTRANCE

OUTDOOR SPACE TBD

PLAZA

CENTRAL GATHERING SPACE TBD

GALLERY/ACTIVITY SPACE

DEAN 300 SF DEAN 300 SF DEAN 300 SF DEAN 300 SF

ADMIN SUPPORT 600 SF (120SF x5) CONFERENCE 300 SF RECEPTION 300 SF MEETING RM 300 SF

CENTRAL GATHERING SPACE TBD

LOWER

CHAIRS, ASSOC. CHAIRS & DEPARTMENT COORD. 1200 SF (120SF x10) ADMIN STAFF & WAITING 960 SF (80SF x12) DIRECTOR 300 SF OFFICES 200 SF

SUPPORT SPACES 4300 SF

ADDED REVIEW

TOILETS 300SF

MATERIAL FABRICATION 1000 SF

SUPPORT

CLASSROOM LARGE 1800 SF

STUDIO CITY PLANNING & HISTORIC PRESERVATION 8000 SF 45SF x175

80

REVIEW 600SF REVIEW 600SF FACULTY OFFICE 660 SF (165SF x4) SEMINAR 600 SF SEMINAR 600 SF LOUNGE 600SF

CLASSROOM LARGE 1800 SF

CLASSROOM LARGE 1800 SF

ADMINISTRATION OFFICES 8080 SF

ADDED LOUNGE

TOILETS 300SF

STUDIO HISTORIC PRESERVATION 2000 SF 45SF x87

SUPPORT

FACULTY OFFICE 660 SF (165SF x4) FACULTY OFFICE 660 SF (165SF x4) FACULTY OFFICE 660 SF (165SF x4)

STUDIO ARCHITECTURE & LANDSCAPE YEAR 3 7670 SF 67SF x110

RESEARCH 4180 SF

FACULTY OFFICE 660 SF (165SF x4) MATERIAL FABRICATION 1000 SF SEMINAR 600 SF LOUNGE 600SF STUDIO ARCHITECTURE & LANDSCAPE YEAR 3 7670 SF 67SF x110

STUDIO ARCHITECTURE & LANDSCAPE YEAR 1 7670 SF 67SF x110

STUDIO ARCHITECTURE & LANDSCAPE YEAR 2 7670 SF 67SF x110

FACULTY OFFICES 6600 SF

TOILETS 300SF

STUDIO ARCHITECTURE & LANDSCAPE YEAR 2 7670 SF 67SF x110

SAFF, SUPPORT, ADMIN 600 SF SAFF, SUPPORT, ADMIN 600 SF SAFF, SUPPORT, ADMIN 600 SF SAFF, SUPPORT, ADMIN 600 SF SAFF, SUPPORT, ADMIN 600 SF

CAFE 2000 SF

TOILETS 2800 SF 600SF x1 330SF x7 STORAGE 1500 SF

OUTDOOR SPACE TBD

PUBLIC

GROUND LEVEL (observation) OUTDOOR SPACE CAFE CENTRAL GATHERING SPACE AUDITORIUM SMALL LOWER LEVEL (presentation) AUDITORIUM LARGE CENTRAL GATHERING SPACE WORKSHOPS & FABRICATION TOILET

URBAN PROGRAM CLUSTER

AUDITORIUM LARGE 4600 SF

MATERIAL 1000 SF MATERIAL 1000 SF MATERIAL 1000 SF MATERIAL 1000 SF MATERIAL 1000 SF

FABRICATION FABRICATION FABRICATION FABRICATION ASSEMBLAGE

TOILETS 600SF

PROGRAMMATIC ORGANIZATION AND DISTRIBUTION


S 34th ST.

Precedents: Radical Departures

Collaboration | Architecturally Integrated

TRANSVERSE SECTION

Precedents: Radical Departures

Precedents: Radical Departures

Presentation | Adaptable Devices

Collaboration| Fully Enclosed Object

large screen display

multiple

stationary

semi-private

multi-programmable

reconfigurable

transparent

81

1 or 2 PRECEDENT IMAGES IN COLOR HIGH RES

private workspace hiddenmultiple architectural integration

POCKET

technology centered group meetings

singular program

multiple

singular program

private

7’2”

BNP Paribas: Fokkema & Partners (Amsterdam)

optional work surface

Semi-Enclosed, A

5'

-6

"

Booth space built in to the overall mass of the building creates a semiprivate meeting nook within the scale and context of the architecture.

The mass of the build the openness creates greater architectural c

8’-0”

SMALL GROUP

10

’-0

16

'-5

"

9"

T-wall: Stanford Design Institute

collaborative

5'-

pin-up space group discussion shared desk space

workstation rolley chair

STUDIO

CORNELL

bench seating

Adaptable Devices

I T HAC A - NY

- OMA Flexible pin-up surfaces created by the 2010 SDI, T-walls innovate on more static presentation configurations, allowing for a number of compsitions to afford different types of exchanges and collaborations.

Adaptable presentation devices can shape the form and function of presentations and group interactions, as well as enabling more open floor plans. ’-0 20

cluster groups open/transparent personal space

re-configurable clusters

TR IG G E R S U N EX P E C TE D U S E

WORKSTATION

individual existing ysoa workstation

group collaboration space overlooking studio clusters

’-0 10

purchased external resources studio workstation variation

Fully Enclosed Object

Headquarters : Men in Black III This elevated office pod from Men In Black III acts as a symbol of hierarchy

pin board

within TAU B M A the N headquarters. The prominent object provides acoustic privacy A N N A RB O R - MI 1 9 7 4 - SW A N SO N ASSO C .

C OL L A B ORfor ATI ON meetings, but maintains visual connection with the larger room small

materials storage

so occupants can see and be seen by people below.

MR . T

TI TEY

workstation

workshop plotting digital fabrication library

RESOURCES

collective resources

MI G H T Y

storage

drafting/modeling surface

proposed new elements + alternate configuration studio clusters access resource clusters movable unit?

critique space assembly classroom/seminar pin-up stage multi-use

re-configurable program

PROGRAMMING AND CONNECTIONS

REVIEW

presentation

A fully enclosed yet transparent object placed becomes an easily identifiable place for small attracts the notice of others, but prevents their


5th

SEMINAR

4th

FLOOR

FACULTY

CLASSROOM MED.

STUDIO HISTORICAL PRESERVATION

STUDIO DESIGN & VISUAL STUDIES

MATERIAL FABRICATION

CLASSROOM LARGE

FLOOR

LOUNGE

FACULTY

STUDIO CITY PLANNING

SEMINAR

6th

FLOOR

LOUNGE

FACULTY

STUDIO ARCHITECTURE & LANDSACPE YEAR 3

SEMINAR

KITCHEN

7th

FLOOR

LOUNGE

FACULTY

STUDIO ARCHITECTURE & LANDSACPE YEAR 2

CLASSROOM LARGE

8th

FLOOR

LOUNGE

FACULTY

STUDIO ARCHITECTURE & LANDSACPE YEAR 1

COMPUTER LAB CLASSROOM

TERRACE

9th

FLOOR

SEMINAR

CLASSROOM

RESOURCE LIBRARY

Precedents: Radical Departures

Collaboration | Architecturally Integrated

losed Object reconfigurable

transparent

1 or 2 PRECEDENT IMAGES IN COLOR HIGH RES

singular program

multiple

semi-private

stationary

v

private workspace hiddenmultiple architectural integration

POCKET

singular program

private

stationary

transparent

7’2”

optional work surface Booth space built in to the overall mass of the building creates a semi-

Semi-Enclosed, Architecturally Integrated

BNP Paribas: Fokkema & Partners (Amsterdam)

The mass of the building provides privacy for the small group area, but the openness creates a dialogue the integrated seating area and the greater architectural context.

At the scale of each floor, a micro-organism for interchange is at play through the combination of studio program and supporting program. Supporting programs include faculty offices, classrooms of various sizes, seminar rooms and lounges. This allows for interactions and moments of interchange between these pockets of program as well as in the circulating area of the central core. private meeting nook within the scale and context of the architecture.

8’-0”

10

’-0

bench seating

workstation rolley chair

e the form and function of preas enabling more open floor

ISOMETRIC FLOOR PLANS AND PROGRAM BREAKDOWN ’-0 20

R S U N E X P E C T E D US E

existing ysoa workstation

82 ’-0 10

Fully Enclosed Object pin board materials storage

A fully enclosed yet transparent object placed within a larger space becomes an easily identifiable place for small group meetings that attracts the notice of others, but prevents their participation.

NG

ERI

TH

GA

workstation

E

AC

P RS

OO

TD

urces

OU

storage

WO

RY

S

LLE

GA

proposed new elements + alternate configuration

BLY

ING

TT

PLO

IAL

TER

MA

OP

SH

8’-7”

IT

CES

UR

O RES

SEM

AS

N

TIO

ICA

BR

FA

OP SH L) NA

TER

(EX

A

P HO

RK

drafting/modeling surface

RY

RA

LIB

GE

BLA

EM SS

N KU

8’-0”

DES

DIA

E LM

A IGIT

D

E

SCP

movable unit?

CH

AR E

6’-0”

RG

EST

GU

A ML

AU

VIS N&

ES

RIU

O DIT

ND &L

ST

CTY

UD

IEW

REV

8’-6”

IO L

UA

IVID

IND

6’-0”

T

CKE

CE

CUS

IS PD

&H

PO

N SIO

GR

L

AL

SM

-UP

PIN

ION

IG DES

AT

ST

RK

WO

P GR

PLN

PR IST

ED

AR

SH

6’-0”

P KS

DS

E

NG

LOU

B

LA

COL

WHAT IS THE SPACE OF THE ARCHITECTURE STUDENT?

TY

CUL

FA where are the boundaries of collaborative and individual production?

CLA

OM

RO

SS

MIN

AD

RCH

EA

RES

R INA

SEM

IGN

ES LD

ITA

DIG P

OU

ILD

BU

R NG

TIO

ULA

SIM ING


MATERIAL FABRICATION

MATERIAL ASSEMBLAGE

FLOOR

LOWER

GALLERY & ACTIVITY SPACE

AUDITORIUM LARGE

SERVICE/STORAGE

FLOOR

GROUND

CAFE AWESOME

AUDITORIUM SMALL

SEMINAR

OBSERVATION WALKWAY

BAR & LOUNGE

FLOOR

OBSERVATION WALKWAY

ADMIN OFFICES

SEMINAR

ADMIN OFFICES

1st

3rd

2nd

FLOOR

CLASSROOM MED.

FACULTY & LOUNGE

RESEARCH DIGITAL DESIGN & BUILDING SIMULATION GROUP

SEMINAR

FLOOR

FACULTY

MATERIAL SHOP

FACULTY & LOUNGE

DIGITAL MEDIA

STUDIO UNDERGRADUATE

At the scale of the student, interchange is introduced at the level of collaboration. Studios are organized into clusters per studio section with one to two clusters sharing a larger collaboration zone for pin-ups, group work and discussioins.

COLLAB

83 STUDIO CLUSTER

CLUSTER CONFIGURATION

MAIN REVIEW BELOW

PIN-UP RECONFIGURABLE CLUSTER COLLAB

PIN-UP

PIN-UP

COLLAB

ARCHITECTURE & LANDSCAPE 108 students FACULTY x1

STUDENTS x12

WORKSTATION (67sf x12) x9 COLLABORATION MEETING 250sf PIN-UP 300sf

COLLAB

COLLAB

PIN-UP

COLLAB

CITY PLANNING & HISTORIC PRESERVATION 170 students FACULTY x1

STUDENTS x10

WORKSTATION COLLABORATION MEETING/PIN-UP

(45sf x10) x9 (45sf x10) x8

PLOT

250sf

LOUNGE

PIN-UP COLLAB

COLLAB

PIN-UP

MATERIAL FABRICATION

PIN-UP

CLASSROOM

STORAGE DESIGN & VISUAL STUDIES 50 students FACULTY x1

STUDENTS x10

WORKSTATION

(40sf x10) x5

UNDERGRADUATE 60 students WORKSTATION

(40sf x10) x6

COLLABORATION MEETING/PIN-UP

140sf

7th FLOOR typ plan w/ 8th FLOOR var.


MASSING ITERATIONS

84

OBSERVATION WALKWAY

VIEW STRATEGY

STUDIO ATRIUM


STACKING STRATEGY

85

SECTION PERSPECTIVE THROUGH PUBLIC ATRIUM


86

SECTIONAL DRAWING MODEL


87


SECTIONAL MODEL CLOSE-UP

88

ISOMETRIC SECTION


b

PENN DESIGN ILLUSTRATION // YSOA 1211a / Year 2, Semester 1 Drawing and Architectural Form / 2014 Critic / Victor Agran Selected for YSOA exhibit for drawing classes, 2015 Using the UPenn School of Architecture Design as a foundation for exploring architectural drawing, this illustration brings together the core concepts of activity and program connections that are expressed in the design of the project. The premise of the building involves a series of interconnected spaces containing a multitude of activity. The drawing illustrates a narrative graphic in which the activities of the building can be understood but also ambiguously connected. hand drawn on velum, compiled in pshop

89


90

“

Each of us today possesses two bodies: the primitive body that a human being always possessed and the virtual body that has come into being with the spread of the media. The former seeks the beautiful light and fresh breeze found in nature. The other body which responds to the electronic environment, might be called a media-like body in search of information. The relationship between these two bodies is constantly shifting. We connect to architecture and the city through both of them. Architects must assist in their re-integration; buildings and cities must provide for both the virtual body and the primitive one. Toyo Ito

�

DIONYSUS TESTING THE RIFT


07

ARTIFICE // MACHO GAMES

YSOA 1299a / Independent Study / 2014 Collaboration / Dionysus Cho Supervisor / Mark Foster Gage Published in Retrospecta 38/ 2014-2015 This independent study focuses on a re-imagining of space and the experience of architecture in the virtual realm. Embracing the potency of the virtual as a new economic Zone at the larger scale, and an Electronic Tomato avatar of connectivity at the smaller, this study takes on the potential Eccentric qualities of space that the virtual provides. This is the intersection of architecture and virtual whereby the potentials of a virtual architecture is limitless; the language and the experiential understanding of architecture and the ability to generate this into accessible and manipulatable virtual worlds provides an experience of space that may be shared, explored, and created. video documentation: https://vimeo.com/machogames blog: http://artificegame.tumblr.com/

91


Excerpts from proposal: ARCHITECTURE / A SHIFT TO THE VIRTUAL Today, we are increasingly invested – both in time and money – into the virtual world, whether it be online, in a game, or on a film. Studies place today’s youth in front of any one of these media – computer, console, or television – at 7 hours and 38 minutes per day. That would be nearly one third of the whole day or half the waking hours. As a global population, figures for the amount of hours spent gaming alone reach 3 billion hours per week. Loosely interpreted, this would amount to an even division of one’s existence between the physical and virtual worlds. With spending, the investment in virtual assets are rocketing. The current spike in the interests in virtual cryptocurrencies – with bitcoin, litecoin, and dogecoin – mark a shift from extra territorial zones to extra physical zones as new markets shed even these loosened limits. Not only are experimental Zones bubbling up within countries, a market has already existed within the internet with currencies being generated. Lacking the regulations, taxation, and traceability of the dollar, these underground currencies allow for quick anonymous exchange regardless of local or legality. Interestingly enough, not only do these cryptocurrencies lack any sort of physicality, their value is ‘mined’ through digital computation – their existence is tied to equations and calculations. While this phenomenon could have once been attributed to a niche or subculture (much like the niches formed with Zones), the melting away of borders from territories to Zones leads inevitably to an even more ethereal virtual domain, a trend that is no longer science fiction, rather, a growing speculation.

GRANNY IS AMAZED

While Architecture can’t shed the physical entirely, it surely can begin to embrace it’s virtual half.

ELECTRONIC TOMATO / AN AUGMENTED REALITY While architects struggle to grasp or materialize this virtual zone, its success is spearheaded by other fields, notably the aforementioned gaming industries, with ties to networking and connectivity. This movement to bridge the virtual has, almost not surprisingly, been pushed 92 forward by social giants (the likes of Google and Facebook) rather than by designers. While Google pushes forth with Glass, Facebook has just recently invested $2 billion in the Oculus Rift virtual reality headset. The statement from Mark Zuckerberg (from his Facebook Page, 2014) on the Rift is eerily reminiscent of Archigram’s statement 45 years prior – perhaps an attempt to revive the dreams of the ELECTRONIC TOMATO today: This is just the start. After games, we’re going to make Oculus a platform for many other experiences. Imagine enjoying a court side seat at a game, studying in a classroom of students and teachers all over the world or consulting with a doctor face-to-face – just by putting on goggles in your home. This is really a new communication platform. By feeling truly present, you can share unbounded spaces and experiences with the people in your life.

ECCENTRIC ARCHITECTURE

Eccentric games employ spaciotemporal effects which give the player access to logics indigenous to digital environments. These logics often reference pop-physics theories and paradoxes such as those related to time travel, parallel realities, navigating multiple dimensions, folding time and space, quantum mechanics, probability engines, and the conflation of virtual and actual space. Patrick Lemieux, Eccentric Spaces and Filmic Traces

Over the last few years, architecture is progressively moving into the digital age, if not already fully immersed in it. Within the framework of this evolution, there is potential to further the experience of architecture in the digital environment in two separate streams. The first is a push towards hyper-realism in the form of photo-realistic render and walkthroughs or realistic role-playing experiences in gaming. The experience is grounded through the manipulation of realistic elements including physical material and texture emulation. The other rift in reality is a manipulation of not only the spatial qualities of architecture, but also dimensional physics by which architecture can be experienced – factors like time and gravity. This opens up the architectural experience to new possibilities, creating temporal, ephemeral or even psychological effects and experiences that are entirely not feasible in the real world. The virtual environment of gaming provides a very malleable foundation for which to develop this manipulation and create eccentric architectural experiences.

PRELIMINARY SKETCHS AND TESTS IN UNITY


SCREENSHOT FROM UNREAL

93

LEVEL TESTS IN UNREAL

REINHABITING THE PANTHEON


94

dwelling ‘keylock’ mechanism

DWELLING CODE COMPRESSED

Minimum Dwelling Code [v. compression] 3/4” = 1’-0” Organschi Studio/ Anne Ma


c

MONSTER DWELLING // MINIMUM DWELLING CODE

YSOA 1012b / Year 1, Semester 2 Architectural Design / 2014 Critic/ Alan Organschi Exhibited in 2014 YSoA student year-end exhibition, “Outlook” Derived from a clash between a full ‘working drawing’ analysis of the Corbu Mill Owners Stair and a Minimal Dwelling Code study, a ‘Monster’ was created. The project exists in two conditions: the packed and the exploded. While the elements of dwelling begin in a packed condition, the implication of occupancy expands these codes in order to accommodate. The result is a drawdel (drawing & model) that displays both conditions in their extreme cases. Interestingly enough, the ambiguity of reading the model in plan vs. section provides an additional layer to the work.

95


SITE STRATEGY SKETCH

96

ITERATIVE SKETCH MODELS

LOOKING NORTH FROM SCRANTON


08

JUNCTION // A NEW HAVEN TEST

YSOA 1012b / Year 1, Semester 2 Architectural Design / 2014 Critic / Alan Organschi The YSOA Building Project this year called for a minimal dwelling design, a housing concept that was adaptable, flexible, and able to be fabricated and relocated to different small lots around the New Haven Area. The requirements called for an 800 SF residential unit divided into two smaller units, 500 SF for the owner and 300 SF that can be accessed and rented by a tenant. The design accommodates these demands through a study of Flexibility, Division and Adaptability. A genotype unit was designed that incorporated a flexible linear core that houses support such as circulation, plumbing and gas. The flexibility of this core allows for a ‘Junction’ moment for reconfiguration of the typical genotype unit. A careful division of zoning allocates solitary and social space as well as division between the owner and tenant units. Finally, the base genotype unit can be reconfigured across different sites allowing for adaptability.

97


FLEXIBILITY: Junction moment as additional genotype unit DIVISION: Clear zoning division into solitary vs. social space ADAPTABILITY: Base unit can be re-configured along the same division principles ADAPTABILITY & SITE STRATEGIES

site division Solitary vs Social base configuration identical units extension of social zone

98

DWELLING CODE COMPRESSED

expanding front

expanding back

first shift and flip of base configuration

reappropriating solitary space parking and social junction


A B C D E F G H I J

SINGLE LEVEL TENANT UNIT IN BASE CONFIGURATION OPEN CORRIDOR SPACE BETWEEN UNITS COVERED OUTDOOR AREA RAISED UNIT AT JUNCTION WITH CONNECTIONS TO BOTH UNITS JUNCTURE POINT BETWEEN INTERSECTING DWELLING SPACES DOUBLE HEIGHT LIVING SPACE UPPER LOFT-ESQUE ADDITIONAL SPACE FOR FAMILY UNIT SINGLE HEIGHT LIVING SPACE POTENTIAL FLEXIBLE WALL UNIT TO FIT BED CRAWL SPACE BELOW FOR SERVICES

junction point flexible unit upper level program

D

E

F

G

fragmented access between zones

99

A

I

B

C

G

BUILDING ENVELOPE

H


100

BUILDING PLANS


101

TRANSVERSE SECTIONS


ADAPTABILITY OF THE BASE UNIT

WASTE COMPOST GARDEN

ELECTRICITY

TENANT UNIT

GAS SERVICE SHAFT

GUEST UNIT

FAMILY UNIT

NATURAL VENTILATION STACK EFFECT

102

BBQ PARKING

YARD

LIVING/BEDROOM

3/4 W/C

KITCHEN

WAHSER/ DRYER

HEATING (&COOLING) HEAT PUMP HEAT RECOVERY HEATED FLOORING

WATER SUPPLY RAIN WATER STORAGE HOT WATER STORAGE

ENTRY

ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS W/C DECK

PRELIMINARY STUDIES

BEDROOM

W/C

LIVING

BEDROOM

ENTRY WASHER/ DRYER

KITCHEN

FULL W/C

SOLA HOT ELEC


SOLAR PATH

AR COLLECTOR WATER CTRICITY

09 NATURAL HEAT GAIN APERATURE

PRISM FORMERLY KNOWN AS THE CUBE // YSOA FIRST YEAR BUILDING PROJECT 2014

YSOA 1012b / Year 1, Semester 2 Architectural Design / 2014 TEAM D / Anthony Gagliardi, Cynthia Hsu, Lila Jiang Chen, Charles Kane, Seokim Min, Madelynn Ringo, Caitlin Thissen Critics / Alan Organschi, Andrew Benner, Peter de Bretteville, Amy Lelyveld, Joeb Moore, Adam Hopfner, Herbert S. Newman Selected for the construction at 179 Scranton St., Exhibited at 2014 YSoA student year-end exhibition, “Outlook”

CITY GAS CITY WATER

The YSOA Building Project this year called for a minimal dwelling design, a housing concept that was adaptable, flexible, and able to be fabricated and relocated to different small lots around the New Haven Area. The requirements called for an 800 SF residential unit divided into two smaller units, 500 SF for the owner and 300 SF that can be accessed and rented by a tenant.

103


The faceted cube pushes the limits of residential convention by maximizing internal efficiency and compactness while allowing internal spatial constraints to find their release in the landscape. This allows the importance of landscape to come to the fore, lending a greener and lusher feel to the very dense housing stock of New Haven’s urbanscape. As proposed, the tenant occupies the 3rd floor, allowing the owner’s space on the first and second floor to spill out onto the land in the form of interior furnishings such as dining tables and pop-out window seats. These elements push and pull on the building’s envelope, establishing a unique dialogue between the interior and exterior. As a result, the site becomes an extension of the owner’s interior living room that can be visually enjoyed by neighboring sites.

UP

R

UP

Depending on the owner’s level of involvement in the up keep of his/ her land, landscape possibilities may vary. One can imagine it to be as simple as a flat landscape planted with tall, wild grasses to something more programed such as a planted vegetable garden, thriving because of its direct access to the southern sun.

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

104

LONGITUDINAL SECTION


UP

DN

DN

UP

DN

DN DN

W

DN

DN

D

W

D

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

W

D

W

D

THIRD FLOOR PLAN

105

SITE STRATEGY ITERATION MODELS


2

1 SITE CONSTRUCTION NOTES NO. DESCRIPTION

2 A401

5

5

NEW CURB CUT NEW GRAVEL PAVER - TYPE 1 NEW GRAVEL PAVER - TYPE 2 NEW ELM TREE NEW GRASS MEADOW (OPTIONAL GOATS) NEW EASTER RED CEDER TREE NEW NORWAY SPRUCE TREE NEW WOOD DECK NEW UNDERGROUND WATER STORAGE TANK NEW WOOD FENCE NEW CONCRETE PAVERS (TYP. EMBEDED IN GRAVEL AND/OR LAWN) NEW APPLE TREE

EXISTING FENCE

7

8

A 8

9

25' - 0"

1 2 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 13 14

4

3

3 A401

20' - 0"

B

15' - 9 3/4" 8' - 0"

10' - 0"

9' - 11"

A301 2

A

C

10

B 5 A401 23' - 0"

C

A302

1

2

A302

11

4 A401

D

D

4

1 A301

7

5 6

13

During the team development phase, in addition to contributions towards design work, I was responsible for producing the cumulated DD working drawing set for our proposal. This included a fully comprehensive set of drawings including plans, plan details, sections, elevations, interior elevations, custom millwork set, structural framing, mechanical and environmental systems, and applicable schedules.

7

A

5

B

3 17' - 0"

2

C

BITUMINOUS CONCRETE TO BE REMOVED

10' - 0"

EXISTING CHAIN LINK FENCE

1

SETBACK LINES

14

EXISTING CURB CUT TO BE REMOVED

CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENT SAMPLES

SCRANTON ST.

1

D

EXISTING CHAIN LINK FENCE TO BE REMOVED

SITE PLAN WITH CONTEXT 1/8" = 1'-0"

106

RAINWATER COLLEC RAIN

> SLOPED ROOF TOWAR > FILTERED AND STORED STORAGE TANK > WATER PRIMARILY USE

PRELIMINARY FILTERING & DRAINAGE

ELECTRICITY > ELECTRIC METER IN THE SOUTH WEST CORNER CONNECTS TO THE CITY GRID AND DISTRIBUTES TO THE ENTIRE HOUSE

HEATING (& COOLING)

INDOOR WALL UNIT

OUTDOOR CONDENSER

> WALL-MOUNTED DUCTLESS SPLIT SYSTEM PER UNIT > OUTDOOR CONDENSER BENEATH EXTERIOR STAIR

ELECTRICAL METER

MAIN FILTRATION SYSTE

UNDERCOUNTER TANKLESS WATER HEATER

PLUMBING > HOT & COLD WATER DISTRIBUTION VIA SERVICE WALL > UNDERCOUNTER TANKLESS WATER HEATER FOR HOT WATER

ELECTRIC WIRING TO LIVING SPACES

WASTE & STORAGE

CONNECTION TO CITY GAS CONNECTION TO CITY WATER

ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS

> STORAGE AND COLLECTION BROUGHT TO FRONT WALL > CAN OPEN OUT TO GARDEN SPACE

UNDERGROUND STORAG (BELOW DECK)


D PLAN - NORTH PATIO ENTRANCE "

3

1/4" = 1'-0"

6

9' - 0" 0' - 10" 28' - 0"

6" GWB BUILHEAD

7' - 6"

1' - 4"

LEVEL 2 9' - 2"

0' - 10"

1' - 4"

4 MW7 A701

MILLWORK DE FIRST FLO

0' - 6" 0' - 6"

4' - 0"

7' - 10" 0' - 6"

2' - 8"

LEVEL 1 0' - 6" 3' - 0"

1' - 8"

GWB

BEYOND

SLIDING 2" COUNTER

EQ

3' - 2"

2

CLIENT:

16' - 3"Serv Neighborhood Housing 333 Sherman Avenue, New Hav

MILLWORK FINISH TBD TYP. (PLYWOOD FINISH LOOK)

MW7

FOYER

Date Drawn by

GRADE 0' - 0"

EQ

4" BASEBOARD

1/4" = 1'-0"

179 SCRANTON ST NEW HAVEN, CT 0

5' - 3"

INTERIOR ELEVATION - SECOND FLOOR SOUTH SECTION A-A FRIDGE BUILT IN LOCATION FOR STOVE 1 1/4" = 1'-0"

MW5 - Kitchen through sink 3/4" = 1'-0"

8

2' - 11 1/4"

2' - 0"

UNDERCOUNTER TANKLESS WATER HEATER

GRADE 0' - 0"

GWB

LIVING/DINING

PLYWOOD DOOR

CLIENT:

MW5 - Kitchen through sliding counter ENLARGED PLAN - FIRST FLOOR SOUTH NOOK 1 9 3/4" = 1'-0" 1/2" = 1'-0"

2' - 10 1/2"

0' - 4"

PLYWOOD KICK

0' - 6" 1' - 4"

REVEAL (TYP.)

NeighborhoodFLOOR Housing Services Inc.1 INTERIOR ELEVATION - SECOND EAST 333 Sherman Avenue, New Haven, CT 06511 1/4" = 1'-0"

LEVEL 3 17' - 6"

1' - 7"

7' - 10"

7' - 6"

8' - 8"

7' - 6"

GRANITE COUNTERTOP ON PLYWOOD

Caitlin Thisse

GWB

7' - 3"

SINK MOUNTED IN COUNTERTOP

LEVEL STREET 1 179 SCRANTON 0' CT - 6" 06511 NEW HAVEN,

0' - 6"

EQ

7

2' - 10 1/2"

18' - 6"

A601

LIGHT

OPEN SHELF

TYP. DRAWERS

0' - 0"

NS

GRANITE MW9 COUNTERTOP ON PLYWOOD

BEDROOM

2' - 0 3/4"

LINE OF CERAMIC TILE BEYOND

2' - 6"

1' - 4"

P4

A601

ENLARGED PLAN - FIRST FLOOR BATHROOM 1/2" = 1'-0"

1' - 4" 1' - 4"

28' - 0"

8' - 4"

LEVEL 2 9'2'-- 4"2"

P1a

1/2" = 1'-0"

9

A601

0' - 4"

P1

10

8

0' - 0 1/2"

P2

MW3

INTERIOR ELEVATION - SECOND FLOOR EAST 2 SECTION B-B 1/4" = 1'-0"P1 2 2

1' - 8"

LIVING/DINING 0' - 6"

FOYER

MW8

ENLARGED PLAN - FIRST FLOOR KITCHEN 1/2" = 1'-0"

BUILDING PROJECT 2014

10' - 8 1/4"

SLIDING COUNTERTOP

LIVING/DINING

0' - 6"

0' - 6"

D

1

3/4" = 1'-0"

ALIGN UPPER WITH COUNTERTOP (2'-4" Depth)

1' - 0"

0' - 2"

11' - 1 1/4"

P1

8

CERAMIC TILE BEYOND

Y S O A

3 A701

LIGHT 2' - 4"

P2

D02

6

DGRADE

INTERIOR ELEVATION - SECOND FLOOR NORTH = 1'-0"

9 C-C SECTION 1/4" 3 1/4" = 1'-0"

LEVEL 3 17' - 6"

ALIGN UPPER WITH COUNTERTOP (2'-4" Depth)

1' - 0"

WC A4 49 SF

5

A601

MW4

LEVEL 1 0' - 6"

0' - 6"

BUILT IN FRIDGE

R

4" BASEBOARD (TYP.)

2" LAMINATED PLYWOOD TABLE

1' - 4"

7' - 6"

C

---

MW2 5' - 7"

11 A601

A601

LINE OF UPPERS ABOVE

7' - 6"

WC

LEVEL 2 9' - 2"

LINE OF STAIR ABOVE

3' - 0"

7' - 6"

0' - 10"

A601

2

4

-

BEDROOM

LOCATION FOR STOVE

4

A601

INTERIOR ELEVATION - SECOND FLOOR WE 1/4" = 1'-0"

4" KICK

MW5 - Kitchen Elevation 1/2" = 1'-0"

Scale

TEAM D

Y S O A

1 ---

7' - 4 1/4"

10' - 7 1/4"

3

D

3' - 0"

A401

D

P1

P4

5

P1

C

B

5' - 3"

4" KICK TYP.

WOOD DECKING 6" ABOVE GRADE

DUCTLESS SPLIT SYSTEM OUTDOOR CONDENSER

2

11

ELEV_west_1/4_FINAL 1/2" = 1'-0"

ENLARGED PLAN - PUNCHOUT WINDOW 1/2" = 1'-0"

ENLARGED PLAN - EXTERIOR & INTERIOR STAIR 1/2" = 1'-0"

5

ELEV_east_1/4_FINAL SECTION1 E-E 1/2" = 1'-0" 1/4" = 1'-0"

19' - 6"

14

ENLARGED PLAN - 2ND FLOOR OPENING 1/2" = 1'-0" 23' - 0"

D01

7' - 10"

8' - 8"

WC

ENLARGED PLANS & MILLWORK PLANS LEVEL 1 0' - 6"

0' - 6"

Date GRADE Drawn by 0' - 0"

LEVEL 1 0' - 6"

APRIL GRADE 0' - 0"

A201 Scale

EXTERIOR EAST

Date Drawn by

APRIL 24, 2014 AM

A3024 1/2" = Scale 1'-0"

FOYER

INTERIOR ELEVATION - FIRST FLOOR SOUTH 2 1/4" = 1'-0"

24, 2014 ELEVATIONS AM & WEST

SECTION D-D 1/4" = 1'-0"

MW5

GWB

LEVEL 2 9' - 2"

GWB

RIVER ROCK BED

0' - 6"

7' - 10 3/4"

3' - 6"

5

D

0' - 6"

0' - 6"

1' - 2 3/4"

8' - 8"

0' - 7"

2' - 0"

3' - 5 1/4"

OOR

INTERIOR ELEVATION FLOOR EAST KITCHEN - FIRST LIVING/DINING 1 1/4" = 1'-0"

BEDROOMGWB MW4 MW2

LEVEL 2 9' - 2"

ELECTRIC METER

INTERIOR ELEVATION - FIRST FLOOR NORTH 3 = 1'-0" 8 A603 1/4"

2 A702

MW3

CORRIDOR

LEVEL 3 17' - 6"

BUILDING SECT

D01

0' - 10"

14' - 0"

9' - 6" DOUBLE HEIGHT SPACE

2' - 0"

D04

TREATED EXTERIOR GRADE BIRCH PLYWOOD FINISH

1' - 6"

2' - 0"

MW2

LEVEL 2 9' - 2"

WINDOW CL

ALIGNED TO GRID@ 2'-0" TYP. 2x6 STUDS o.c.

8' - 11" TO EDGE MW14OF FLOOR ABOVE

7' - 10 3/4"

8' - 4"

28' - 0"

28' - 0" 5

3 A702

C

TEAM D Anthony Gagliardi Cynthia Hsu Lila Jiang Chen Charles Kane Anne Ma Seokim Min Madelynn Ringo Caitlin Thissen

LINE OF STAIR ABOVE

5' - 7"

GWB

GWB

GWB

7' - 6"

1' - 0"

DOUBLE HEIGHT 2x6 STUDS @ 1'-0" o.c.

0' - 9"

LEVEL 3 17' - 6"

16' - 3" 28' - 0"

REDWOOD SHINGLES CORRIDOR MW9

P2a

7' - 10"

C

MW1 8' - 4"

7' - 10"

5

MW6

10' - 6"

GWB

MW1

3' - 6"

LEVEL 3 17' - 6"

0' - 6"

16' - 2"

18' - 0"

LIVING/DINING

7' - 4"

1 A702

BELOW MW1

P1

6' - 9"

D05

CL OF STUDS ALIGNED TO REDWOOD SHINGLES "C" GRID @ 2'0" o.c. FROM THIS POINT

ENLARGED PLAN - NORTH WEST CORNER 1/2" = 1'-0"

3' - 0"

6

D06

GWB

ED PLANS - THIRD FLOOR KITCHEN 0"

4 A702

Neighborhood Housing Services Inc. 333 Sherman Avenue, New Haven, CT 06511

D03

Anthony Gagliardi Cynthia Hsu Lila Jiang Chen Charles Kane Anne Ma Seokim Min Madelynn Ringo Caitlin Thissen

28' - 0"

BEDROOM

OPEN TO

16' - 2"

ROOF 28' - 0"

179 SCRANTON STREET NEW HAVEN, CT 06511 CLIENT:

10' - 8 5/8"

STRUCTURAL SHEAR WALL

15' - 11"

1' - 11"

16' - 2" R

GWB

ROOF 28' - 0"

TEAM D

8' - 4"

DOUBLE HEIGHT CURTAIN WALL

EXTERIOR PLYWOOD STAIR, OPEN TREAD

1' - 7"

WC

MW14 14' - 0"

4' - 0"

P4 5

5' - 6"

B

8' - 4"

10' - 6"

1' - 11"

ROOF 28' - 0"

CL OF WINDOW ALIGNED TO GRID

8' - 8"

4' - 4 1/4"

4' - 6"

3' - 3"

P1

A603

Anthony Gagliardi Cynthia Hsu Lila Jiang Chen Charles Kane Anne Ma Seokim Min Madelynn Ringo Caitlin Thissen

A

1/4" / 12" 20' SLOPED - 0" FLAT ROOF

D07

GWB

B

MW11

4

5

0' - 6"

1/4" / 12" SLOPED FLAT ROOF

D06

9

4

D02

A

1' - 1"

A

B

3

23' - 0"

23' - 0"

A

2

10' - 6"

3

-

TREATED BAMBOO FLOORING FINISH C

B 3' - 8"

BUILDING PROJECT 1 2014

5 6' - 0"

1' - 6"

A

2

4 3' - 8 1/2"

9' - 0"

1

1

3 5' - 5"

0' - 10"

FLOOR

2 3' - 6"

7' - 10"

2' - 6"

Sim

---

P3

7' - 10"

2' - 0"

8

5' - 2"

GWB

10' - 9"

D05

3' - 2 1/4"

MW6

3

MW5 WINDOW EDGE OF ALIGNED TO EDGE OF MILLWORK

SHEAR WET GWBWALL OPEN TO BEYOND

2

0' - 6"

9

BACK FOYER

1

Sim

28' - 0"

CORRIDOR A601

STAIR SHAFT OPEN ABOVE

Sim

LEVEL 3 17' - 6" ---

2' - 8"

B

OPTIONAL TABLE

EXTENSION ENTER TENANT

SLIDING COUNTER BELOW

3

3/4" = 1'-0"

BEDROOM

EQ

2' - 4" 1' - 0"

BEDROOM

0' - 4"

2

LIVING/DINING

3' - 0"

4

7

---

MW3 - Bathroom Shelving Section 3/4" = 1'-0"

9' - 0"

LIVING/DINING

0' - 10"

OOR

10

9' - 0"

MW4 - Sink and Showe Detail 3/4" = 1'-0"

11

INTERIOR ELEVATION - FIRST FLOOR WEST 5 1/4" = 1'-0" LEVEL 1 0' - 6"

AP

Date Drawn by

A401

GRADE 0' - 0"

Scale

1/2" = 1'-0"

SECOND FLOOR ENLARGED PLANS

NS

107

CTION

RDS NORTH D IN UNDERGROUND

ED FOR GARDENING

G

PASSIVE VENTILATION > PUNCH WINDOWS ALLOW PASSIVE VENTILATION ACROSS THE HOUSE FOR BOTH UNITS

EM

GE TANK

FINAL HALF SCALE MODEL


108

EXPLODED ISOMETRIC


109

DOCUMENTATION PHOTOS OF BUILT HOUSE


110


111


112


d

YSOA BP 2014 WEBSITE DESIGN YSOA 1013c / Year 1, Semester 2 First Year Building Project / 2014 I designed, construction and managemed our class website to represent and showcase the 2014 Yale Jim Vlock Building Project. Built from scratch with HTML and CSS (using framework and javascript elements by Foundation (http://foundation.zurb.com/). The website documented the process from individual schematic designs, group design proposals, construction to the final constructed product. The management of the website included coordination of information, photographs, photos and design work from all the students and trouble shooting. I was responsible for both front and back end related issues with the website as well as the back end for our social media sites including Tumblr (http://ysoabp2014.tumblr.com/) I also took on the task of working with our client to video document the construction process through time-lapse recordings through extracting, compiling and updating videos weekly/bi-weekly. Final website: http://yalearchitecture.org/buildingproject/bp14/ Final video timelapses: https://vimeo.com/ysoabp2014

113


Education

Dedicated Space to Georgia Tech

The Varisity

114

AERIAL OVERVIEW

Office

Small Business Incubator Corporate Service Business Co-Working

Marketplace

Food Market Restaurants

Parking

Four levels below Blocks A,B,C,D

Conference Center

Residential

Retail

Shopping / Dining

Market Plaza Park


10

TERMINUS //

A NEW DEVELOPMENT FOR MIDTOWN ATLANTA ULI HINES COMPETITION / 2016 Collaboration / Nicolas Arruda, Adam Tobin, Xiao Wu, Anthony Yu Connecting Atlanta’s History with its People, Nature and Future Economic Prosperity The opportunity to develop a major city centre is rare. Atlanta presents the chance to blend the city’s historic innovative character with its future aspirations. Terminus fosters a vibrant mixed-use community geared towards inviting high-tech companies for economic growth and job-creation, and bringing together people from different neighborhoods, industries and social classes. Recognizing the presence of diverse residents, workers and visitors in the neighborhood, Terminus provides a public realm to service the unique needs which consists of the Varsity Market, green parks and retail. Although the buildings maximize available density and exterior public space, the design of the footprint at grade remains accessible and inviting to pedestrians. Terminus focuses on continuous interconnectivity between environmental, social and economic characteristics to further bolster PLAN 4040’s foundation goal: sustainability.

115


URBAN ANALYSIS OF MIDTOWN ATLANTA

PAR 27 K

.5

L TAI RE14.2%

6% Varsity Market South

Farmer’s Market

AIL ET2.3%

N

The Varsity Restaurant

O

Greenline South

PA

R 24 K .

P sqft MARTA North Ave. Station 1,554,740

10,162,443 sqft

11

AIL RET.9%

TOTAL

10,162,443 sqft

1,210,048 sqft

TOTAL

4,859,246 sqft

PA

R 24 K .

1,554,740 sqft

11

.

1

E FIC3%

1

HIGHLIGHT Build more places to live with value adds to the community. Includes affordable residental and retail above Marta Station.

AIL RET.9%

Varsity Market South Towers

RESID E 15.3 NTI % A

10,162,443 sqft

11

I

RESID E 15.3 NTI % A

PA

.5

PAR 30%KI

AIL ET2.3%

AIL RET.9%

G Towers Varsity MarketNNorth

R 24 K .

PAR 28. KI 5

3

AIL ET .5%

AIL ET2.3% Varsity Market North

2,502,410 Ksqft

E FIC OF58.3%

PAR 28. KI 5

PAR 27 K

L TAI RE14.2%

PAR 30%KI

I J

L

999,401 sqft 576,023ING 6% 2,502,410 sqft123,434 229,944

6%

TOTAL

Greenline North

R

3

H

R

AIL ET .5%

Millennium Towers - Student Residences

1

R .5

F

2,502,410 sqft

E FIC OF58.3%

R PAR 27 K

1

PAR 30%KI

Parking Garage

RESID E 15.3 NTI % A

Q

MARTA Plaza

R

MARTA Towers

4,859,246 sqft

E FIC OF58.3%

.

E FIC3%

AIL ET2.3%

E

G IN

L

L TAI RE14.2%

R Market Park

M

1

R

1,210,048 sqft

PHASING

D

L

COMMUNITY

NTIA SIDE% L RE 57.6

4

Pheonix Tower - GE Headquarters

1,210,048 sqft

3,553,161 sqft 2,072,109 505,392 4 975,660 COMMUNITY

TOTAL BUILDOUT Residential Retail Parking

2,502,410

L

4

C

G Supermarket COMMUNITY

HIGHLIGHT Introduce landmark Varsity Market mixed use development. Marketplace & plaza featuring shops, dining, vendors and food courts.

NG

COMMUNITY

NTIA SIDE% L RE 57.6

NG

4

1

NG

HIGHLIGHT Respond to immediate market demand for office and student housing. Residential block anchored by supermarket.

TOTAL BUILDOUT Office Retail Parking

MARKET

NTIA SIDE% L RE 57.6

58

MARKET

OFF.3IC%E

3

3

58

O

35 F

G IN%

MARKET

NG

1,210,04

4,309,881 sqft 978,717 1,523,137 581,222 3 1,226,806 OFF.3IC%E

ADDRESS

O

7

2

35 F

.

%

IAL NT%

RES I 22 DE

NG

TOTAL BUILDOUT Residential G IN% Office Retail Parking

BoA Plaza

58

FLIP

Bank of America Tower

B

OFF.3IC%E

2

HIGHLIGHT ADDRESS Quickly lease up Bank of America Tower and sell for equity injection.

A

NTIA SIDE% L RE 57.6

7

1

G IN%

PAR 30%KI

RES

I 1,300,000 sqft 22 DE . 1,300,000

TOTAL BUILDOUT NG % Office

IAL NT%

116

E FIC OF100%

4,859,246


E

H F

F G

C

J

I D

M O

117

Q

K L

P R N

B A

PA

R 24 K .

PAR 30%KI

AIL ET2.3%

AIL RET.9%

10,162,443 sqft

11

.5

1,554,740 sqft

1,210,048 sqft

E FIC OF58.3%

PAR 27 K

6%

RESID E 15.3 NTI % A

TOTAL

R

O

35 F

L TAI RE14.2%

2,502,410 sqft

1

MARKET

4 COMMUNITY

G IN

L

3

58

DDRESS

NG

OFF.3IC%E

2

G IN%

NTIA SIDE% L RE 57.6

7

.

IAL NT%

RES I 22 DE

4,859,246 sqft

.

E FIC3%


USER TYPES

c

rate corpo

e

mo ak bre

12

ye

ce 14

lu n c h

L es

n e ti

g

m

ce

Nic

gy

Meg han

pla y g ro u n d

ss

r ni

ng

cla

offi

offi

ast

An th

akf

read

bre

di

An n

e

a t e E m plo

al

Meghan and Adam are a young urban Atlanta family. Meghan is a stay-athome mother while Adam is in the early years of his design career. On a typical weekday, Meghan, Adam and their son will have a family breakfast in Varsity Market. Afterwards, Adam will go upstairs to his office to start his work day while Meghan will stroll through the market to the park, where she meets other young families for play time.

por

es

ng

offi

ti m

Anthony is an enthusiastic undergraduate student at the Georgia Institute of Technology. When not in class, Anthony and his friends frequent the Varisty restaurant because of its renowned food and social atmosphere. After lunch, the group attends a technology seminar in one of the coworking spaces conveniently located just above Varsity Market. Following his day of studies, Anthony clocks in as an employee at one of the retail stores.

s h o p pi

16

p art-

16

or

ate

ar 14

13

C

di

Annette, a recent Georgia Institute of Technology graduate has leased new incubator office space just above Varsity Market. This allows Annette to conveniently workout in the morning on the way to work and then grab breakfast and a coffee to start her day. This busy young professional frequently has lunch and dinner meetings in Varsity Market.

Yo u n g Fa m il y

s ola

17

por

min 15 se

13

nt

e

rs i t y S t u d e

18

cor

i ve

ho m

r

le s

p t- u

a

sta

Un

es

e ti n g

r

ti m

me

re p re n e u

l

12 p art-

Ent ch

11

s

10

dam &A

as

y on

gym

st a rt- u p of fi c e

14.5 lun

19

er

er

9

e ett

nn

nn

19

8 19

tc

9

9

igh

7 20

me

Nicolas is an associate engineer at GE’s new headquarters in Midtown Atlanta. Nicolas frequents coffee shops, restaurants and bars in Varsity Market for meetings with co-workers and clients alike. After a long work day, he de-stresses by swinging by the gym, which is also conveniently located in Market Hall.

Xaiver has s Market Hall. B Xaiver spends the park befo above the Ma location and a to meet friend within Atlanta the new educ Institute of Te

OFFICE TYPES

118

Small Incubator Office Start-up, Innovation, Tech 7-15F, Block B & D Features

Multi-height Green Terraces Open Concept Mid-rise Cross ventilation Punch windows to control light pollution

General Electric

Wework tenant

5-24F, Block C 4-6F, Block B & D Features

Open Office Plan Passive/Active Sun Sh Tall Ceiling Maximizin “Green Atrium” Interio

Features

Access to Green Roof Terrace Shared Equipment and Supplies Work and Lounge space

Small Office

Services: Lawyer, Designer, etc.

Retail

High-end Retail and Fine Dining

3F, Block B & D

1-4F, Block C

Features

Features

Connection to Market Below Signage Visible from Market

PROGRAMMATIC SECTION

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several part-time jobs in Between shifts and on break, s his time reading leisurely at ore heading home, located just arta station. The convenient access to transit allows Xaiver ds that live in various locations a and to attend classes at cational space of the Georgia echnology.

Aimee is a tourist from overseas. A graduate of a prominent American cooking school, she is drawn to Atlanta for its sites and activities. While taking a break from exploring the downtown core, she stops by Varsity Market to rest. The ambience and diversity of the marketplace makes her ponder whether Terminus may be the ideal location to bring together her heritage and passion for cooking and start her career as a chef.

The Varsity

Emory University Hospital Metro Atlanta Task Force for the Homeless

Georgia Aquarium

Piedmont Park World of Coca Cola

Existing/Underway Bike Facilities

New Bike Path

New Market Park

New Park Space (Blueprint) New Streetcar Path

Central Park Renaissance Park II

Office

Primary Tenant

hading ng Daylight or Green Wall

URBAN ANALYSIS OF MIDTOWN ATLANTA

119


120


ILLUSTRATION & OTHER

121

11 12 13 e 14 f g 15

> > > > > > > >

METROPOLIS ORNEMEKAMI GEHRY-GO-ROUND KITBASHING THE NYC FREE SPEECH KIT KUKY WORLD DRAWING & PHOTOGRAPHY BOTTA RECONSTRUCTED


122

MEGAOPOLIS AERIAL ILLUSTRATION


11

METROPOLIS //

TRAVEL ADVENTURES DOCUMENTATION Gertraud A. Wood Traveling Fellowship/ 2015 Exhibited in the YSoA Office gallery for the Travel Fellowship exhibit The documentation of this expedition stemmed from a growing interest in drawing dense megalopolises. The destinations vary in culture, daily pace, density and style but they also overlap in many areas such as density and city planning. Through an amalgamation of traditional photography and on-site hand sketching, I was interested not only in what I saw before me physically, but also the experience as I walked through each city center. The final result is a combination of photograph/drawing collage, and city perspectives in the form of a graphic narrative. The narrative enables me to recount and represents my personal experiences and thoughts during my travel. link to online publication: https://issuu.com/annemony/docs/annemony_metropolis_2015

123


124

SYDNEY & HONG KONG

DRAWING CLOSE-UPS


125

OSAKA & TOKYO


126

EXHIBITION PHOTOGRAPHS

TITLE PAGES FOR EACH CITY


127


128

SAMPLE PHOTOGRAPHS FROM PUBLICATION


129


130


12

ORNEMEKAMI //

ORNAMENT THEORY AND DESIGN Commission work for small Start-up company / 2015 The project was inspired by the ornament and character design of popular video game Okami, ornament of Savage Tribes as described in Owen Jones’ A Grammar of Ornament, and the famous plates of Louis Sullivan in A System of Architectural Ornament. The project begins in a two-dimensional exploration of these three inspirations and developing a new ornament design. Following this was an exploration in three-dimensions, using repetition and mirroring to create an architectural ‘capital’. The final exercise explored the idea of applying ornament to site; in a two-point-fivedimensional exercise in ornament relief. The site chosen was the original gothic windows of the Payne Whitney Gymnasium on Yale University’s campus. The work involves studying the geometry of the existing window, iterating from it and incorporating my own ornamental design.

131


132

ORNAMENTAL UNIT DEVELOPMENT


133


134

Sketch series studying and iterating on the original window geometry while intergrating my own design. 1. Original window design of the Payne Whitney Gymnasium 2. First pass at adding ‘ornemekami’ detail 3. First pass at introducing colour, as well as a simpler geometric form

1. Second colour study as well as dividing the main central window into fours. Starting to blur the lines in the three column window bays below the central window 2. Another study involving overlapping circles for the main window 3. Current iteration sketch used for the final drawing, involving ideas from all the previous studies SKETCH ITERATIVE SERIES


135


136

FINAL ILLUSTRATION OF THREE WINDOW BAYS


137


138

RIDE OF THE CENTURY


13

GEHRY-GO-ROUND //

INSTALLATION AT THE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE YSOA 1016b / Year 1, Semester 2 Visualization III / 2014 Collaboration / Hugo Fenaux, Kiana Hosseini, Lila Jiang Chen, Vittorio Lovato Critics / John Eberhart & Ben Pell The “Gehry-go-Round� was developed over a series of iterations that involved solutions to the relatively impractical Gehry designed furniture on the terrace roof of Paul Rudolph Hall. The 7th floor terrace is also a central gathering place for Friday evening get-togethers and small social meetings. We decided to work with the furniture in order to liven up the space while giving a new use for the furniture pieces. This can include turning the furniture into an attraction, or rotating it for re-purpose.

139


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EXIT

RIDE


142


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KITBASHING //

EXPERIMENTATION WITH 3D PRINTED ARTICULATION YSOA 1228b / Year 1, Semester 2 Disheveled Geometries / 2014 Collaboration / Dionysus Cho & Daniel Nguyen Critic / Mark Foster Gage published in Retrospecta 37/ 2013-2014 Taking precedent from the process of kitbashing (model trains, old sci-fi movie sets), we took existing 3D models that had their own level of detail and composed a new significant form from it. The class was funded by Autodesk and was heavily centered on process through finding the appropriate workflow to produce the work. Objects are juxtaposed with no correlation or significance to eachother, however exhibit a certain aesthetic quality. The seminar was a starting point for studies and theories on Object Oriented Ontology. The culmination of the seminar was a 3 dimensional room kitbashed with the techniques and work flow process we’ve developed over the course of the term. The final model was sent to 3D print at a large scale and is put on display at the school.

143


144 INDIVIDUAL PANEL PROCESS AND TEST PRINT

SURFACE MATERIAL RENDER TESTS


145


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I have a dream

Acknowledging the placeless, yet pervasive qualities of free speech, the proposed design is a Free Speech Kit that members of the public can locate, set up, and drop off. The items within the Kit enable the New York street to be activated – both as a place of ‘happening’, and more specifically, as a space for free speech. The Symbolic Speech Apparatus and the Symbolic Debate Apparatus are two inflatables which declare the latter. The objects bring to mind the ladder and podium, two objects long associated with informal speech and debate. Additionally, the inflatable recalls an entire lineage of civic activism. One object denotes the location where free speech is occurring, while the other expresses the two-way nature of free speech, thereby encouraging spectators to either rebutor simply speak up. Being inflatables, the Apparatuses cannot be stood on; function is detached from the image, distilling their symbolic importance. Finally, the Kit’s Free Speech Circle helps mark the location of these episodic civic events, raising awareness of free speech through an associational motif. The affiliation of these circles and knowledge of past occurrences to the streets of New York City layers the everyday spaces with meaning and memory. With the inflatables easily stowed away, the Free Speech Kit is lightweight and ergonomic. It moves with the public, accommodating their modern mobile lifestyles, while facilitating their freedom of speech.

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THE NYC FREE SPEECH KIT // Designing for Free Speech Competition / 2014 Collaboration / Cynthia Hsu, Lila Jiang Chen, Vittorio Lovato & Eugene Tan Finalist, selected to be exhibited at AIA New York’s Center for Architecture http://designingforfreespeech.org/gallery/the-ultimate-free-speech-kit/

5

SYMBOLIC SPEECH APARATUS

147

CH KIT

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FREE

Do you have something to say? Want others to listen up? Are you sick of being told where you can and can’t speak freely? Ever wanted to mark your own free-speech zone at your own time? Have you ever been judged or persecuted for speaking your mind? Did you grow up in Singapore? Have you coveted a ladder you can’t actually stand on? Then the Free Speech Kit is for you!

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148


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KUKY WORLD //

MASCOT DESIGN & ILLUSTRATIONS Commission work for small Start-up company / 2015 MASCOT DESIGN I was commissioned to design and create a mascot for an e-commerce startup founded by graduate students from the Yale School of Management. The mascot was to be representative of the company’s light and fun nature but not too cute that customers get the wrong idea about the products available. The mascot design incorporated the character, named ‘Kuky’, throughout the website including pages like “404 error” and “check out”. In addition I also provided special event versions of the mascot for holidays such as Christmas, Valentines, Halloween, etc. Key features of Kuky include his sticker highlights of letters that spell his name, just as stickers are used on packaging. His other main feature is his ‘tape hair’, which is represented like a piece of tape peeled up from the top of his head. ABOUT KUKY WORLD The company features unique, stylish and kooky items sourced directly from Asian sellers and designers as a way of connecting currently Asia-only products with America. Customers can purchase products directly from China with low shipping costs.

149


Early sketchbook concepts and ideas

150

Kuky mascot variation development PROCESS AND ITERATIONS

Sticker concept and packaging ideas


W O R L D w w w. k u k y wo r l d. co m

FIRST NAME LAST NAME W O R L D

G e n e ra l Po s i t i o n 姓名 po sitio n ( chi ne s e )

Te l: (1 2 3) 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 x 3 3 3 Fa x: (1 2 3 ) 4 5 6 7 8 9 0

n ame@kuk y world.com

BUSINESS CARD DESIGN In addition to the mascot appearing on the website, I was also asked to design character specific business cards for the main personnel of the company. The design was simple with subtle graphics and hints, including the tape that spans both the front and back, as well as icons that relate to the specific employee position. On the back there is also a spot for QR code scanning to links or wechat mobile. Additionally I designed a placeholder logo for the company that I felt embodied the spirit of the business.

CTO/IT

Travel

Board Member

Logistics

Sales/Marketing POSITION VARIATIONS

FIRST NAME LAST NAME

W O R L D

G e n e ra l Po s i t i o n 姓名 po sitio n ( chi ne s e )

1 2 3 地址地 址 地 址 地 址 地 址 1 2 3 Addre s s St re e t Cit y, State, 0 0 0 0 0 U SA Te l: (1 2 3 ) 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 x 3 3 3 Fa x: (1 2 3) 4 5 6 7 8 9 0

n ame@kuk y world.com

151


152

Drawing studies on shadow projection [above] and perspectival methods of Brook Taylor and Piero della Francesca [below]


g

DRAWING & PHOTOGRAPHY //

153

The Beinecke Library and courtyard presents itself as a simple framework that is seen as a homogenous grid system. However, when expressed as a series of highly articulated perspectival instances, the governing lattice grid breaks down exposing a multiplicity of experiences. published in Retrospecta 37/ 2013-2014 and selected for YSOA exhibit for drawing classes, 2014


154

Photograph, taken with Canon AE-1 manual film camera // f1.4 50mm prime lens


155


156

Singapore

Osaka, Japan Photography from ‘Metropolis’ Travel documentation. Sony nex-6, 12mm wide angle f2.0


157

Cake, watercolour mini series on instagram, 1� x 1�, 2014


158

Study series on Mario Botta’s Bianchi House in Riva San Vitale, Switzerland. The focus began with identifying the anchoring members of the building: the horizontal entry way and the vertical central stair. Both these elements exhibit a possible implied sense of infinity. The second focus came with a study of the cuts in the exterior walls, each of them, while seemingly symmetrical, are actually unique. The final two drawings created were a contrasting play between Reconstruction and Ruin. Reconstruction imagined the building in the eyes of a young boy, situated in the deep underwaters of Riva San Vitale. Ruin imagined the building at the end of its time, existing in multiple universes, both on its current sloped site in open air as well as deep at the bottom of the ocean. Development Collaboration / Vittorio Lovato & Eugene Tan Final drawings selected for YSOA exhibit for drawing classes, 2015


15

BOTTA RECONSTRUCTED //

159


160


161

PROFESSIONAL

16 > 17 > 18 >

DURHAM COLLEGE CENTRE FOR FOOD UTM INSTRUCTIONAL CENTRE HUMBER DESIGN CENTRE


COMPLETED BUILDING

162

CONCEPTUAL RENDERING EXTERIOR

INTERIOR MAIN ATRIUM SPACE

CONCEPTUAL RENDERING INTERIOR

SECOND FLOOR PLAN


16

DURHAM COLLEGE CENTRE FOR FOOD // Gow Hastings Architects / Completed 2014 Project Leads / Philip Hastings, Valerie Gow & Jim Burkit “The Centre for Food at Durham College will distinguish itself in the highly competitive field of culinary education by taking advantage of its rural setting on a large suburban campus in Whitby Ontario to narrate a story about the process of making a meal from “field to fork. Literally and figuratively merged with the landscape, the building will grow from its surroundings, with a ramp that will rise from the cropland to the linear building’s second storey. This and the surrounding fields will be planted with vegetables and herbs that will be used in the school’s culinary and hospitality programs, showcasing the school’s emphasis on regionalism, sustainability and wellness.”*

I was responsible for graphic representation of the building’s proposed finishes and updated designs. Primarily focusing on the 2nd floor teaching restaurant, I produced interior and exterior images for on-going meetings during the CD phase of the project. I was also tasked with compiling a presentation package to promote the firm’s use of Building Information Modeling for meetings and conventions. *excerpt taken from ghA website http://gowhastings.com/portfolio-item/durham-college-centre-for-food/

CONCEPTUAL RENDERING TEACHING RESTAURANT

163


GROUND FLOOR RCP

164

SCHEMATIC PHYSICAL MODEL

BREAKDOWN OF 3D MODEL

MAIN ENTRANCE


17

UTM

//

Perkins + Will / Completed 2011 Project Lead / Andrew Frontini

MAIN ATRIUM

Starting in May 2009, I was on the team for The University of Toronto Instructional Centre throughout schematic, conceptual design and design development. The 150,000 SF facility includes over 25 lecture halls and classrooms, multiple study lounges and work areas, and food servies dedicated the the University. My responsibilities ranged from physical 3D work to 2D drawings and renderings. I created massing and presentation models and drawings for weekly meetings. In addition, I was responsible for the digital 3D model representation of the building as the design progressed from simple massing to interior details and finishes. http://perkinswill.com/work/university-of-toronto-mississauga,-instructional-centre.html

SECTION THROUGH MAIN ATRIUM

165


FINAL COMPLETION PHOTOS

166

PRESENTATION PLAN

INTERIOR RENDERINGS


HUMBER DESIGN CENTRE //

18 36 A5.0N

37 A5.0N

PLAM1

3"

2' - 10" 2' - 10"

PLAM2 on doors

3' - 3"

COR2 3"

Gow Hastings Architects / Completed January 2012 Project Leads / Philip Hastings & Valerie Gow GOW HASTINGS ARCHITECTS INC 275 SPADINA ROAD TORONTO CANADA M5R 2V3

ALL DRAWINGS, SPECIFICATIONS, RELATED DOCUMENTS AND T 416 920 0031 DESIGN ARE THE COPYRIGHT PROPERTY OF THE ARCHITECT F 416 920 0288 UPON REQUEST. REPRODUCTION OF AND MUST BE RETURNED THE DRAWINGS, SPECIFICATIONS, RELATED DOCUMENTS AND GOWHASTINGS.COM DESIGN IN WHOLE OR IN PART IS TRICTLY FORBIDDEN WITHOUR THE ARCHITECT'S WRITTEN PERMISSION. THIS DRAWING SHALL NOT BE USED FOR CONSTRUCTION PURPOSES UNLESS COUNTERSIGNED.

“The Humber School of Applied Technology is comprised of the departments of Interior and Industrial ALL DRAWINGS, SPECIFICATIONS, RELATED DOCUMENTS AND DESIGN ARE THE COPYRIGHT PROPERTY OF THE ARCHITECT AND MUST BE RETURNED UPON REQUEST. REPRODUCTION OF THE DRAWINGS, SPECIFICATIONS, RELATED DOCUMENTS AND DESIGN IN WHOLE OR IN PART IS TRICTLY FORBIDDEN WITHOUR THE ARCHITECT'S WRITTEN PERMISSION. THIS DRAWING SHALL NOT BE USED FOR CONSTRUCTION PURPOSES UNLESS COUNTERSIGNED.

Materials Legend

design, Architectural Technology, Robotics and Electronics housed in three buildings at Humber’s north campus. This project’s objective was to consolidate the design and electronics departments into prominent clusters on the campus, increasing the profile and visibility of the school.”*

12' - 0 1/4" 5 EQ spcs

A5.0N cabinets

31

36 A5.0N

Elevation - MW8 Front 1/4" = 1'-0" Provide (2) 12" x 12" grilles in top 37 of AV cabinet A5.0N

ACT Acoustic Ceiling Tile BB/BB2 Bulletin Board CER Ceramic Tile COR1/COR2 Solid Polymer Fabrications CPT Carpet EPO Epoxy Paint EXIST Materials LegendExisting EXP Exposed F2/F3/F4/F5/F6 Glazing ACT AcousticSurface Ceiling Film Tile GWB Gypsum Wallboard BB/BB2 Bulletin Board MDF 6" paintedTile MDF Baseboard CER Ceramic MTL1 Sheet Metal Fabrications COR1/COR2 Solid Polymer PC Polished Concrete CPT Carpet PLAM1/PLAM2 Plastic Laminate EPO Epoxy Paint PT Paint Finish EXIST Existing RB Rubber EXP ExposedBase RES ResilientSurface Sheet Flooring F2/F3/F4/F5/F6 Glazing Film SS StainlessWallboard Steel GWB Gypsum TP Tectum Panel MDF 6" painted MDF Baseboard TGL Tempered Glass MTL1 Sheet Metal WB Dry EraseConcrete Whiteboard PC Polished WV Wood Veneer PLAM1/PLAM2 Plastic Laminate PT Paint Finish RB Rubber Base RES Resilient Sheet Flooring Note: SS Stainless Steel 1. All exposed edges of millwork to be TP Tectum Panel finished in plastic laminate unless TGL Tempered Glass otherwise noted WB Dry Erase Whiteboard WV Wood Veneer

36 A5.0N

38

Lower ng, lockable A5.0N cabinets eboards acks

COR2

2' - 11 3/4"

12' - 0 1/4" 5 EQ Spcs

2" 3" 1' - 0" 1"

Note: 1. All exposed edges of millwork to be finished in plastic laminate unless otherwise noted

PLAM1 reveal

*excerpt taken from ghA website http://gowhastings.com/humber-design-centre/

Hinge PLAM2 Doors/Panels

provide cross bracing to u/s strl slab as required

1/2" shadow gap

PLAM1 Plan detail- millwork door (typ.) 38 reveal 1 1/2" = 1'-0"

S1

1"

9' - 6"

Hinge

2"

PLAM1

4' - 4"

PLAM2 Doors/Panels

Gray toned areas indicate exist. assemblies (typ.)

2"

Elevation - MW8 Back 1 layer 5/8" GWB align to existing 1/4" = 1'-0" GWB above

11"

4' - 0"

38 COR2 PLAM1

3' - 2 1/4"

5' - 6"

F3

F4

Sillicone joint corner (typ.)

GWB bulkhead

Demolish existing ceiling

N006

2' - 6 1/4"

1' - 8"

These storefront to be rated as a guard. Provide structural engineered drawings

8' - 8"

Entrance

F2

F5

Storefront beyond door Sliding whiteboards Plan detailmillwork (typ.) on tracks see specs.

F4

2" 1 1/2" = 1'-0"

Existing curb

Capless vertical mullion (typ.)

21' - 0"

2"

4' - 4"3' - 0"

Open

Existing slab

11' - 0"

Elevation - MW8 Side 1/4" =Capless 1'-0" vertical mullion (typ.) COR2 3' - 0"

34 2' - 10 1/4"

COR2

3' - 0"

7"

Existing GWB

32

COR2

2' - 11 3/4"

3"

Elevation - MW8 Back 1/4" = 1'-0"

2" 3" 1' - 0"

3"

12' - 0 1/4" 5 EQ Spcs

COR2

Open

2"

7' - 4" 11"

11"

PLAM1 COR2

3' - 0"

7" PLAM2 on doors and panels

32 11"

I worked closely with the design principal from schematic to end of design development. I contributed design ideas and was responsible for the creation, management and production of a majority of drawings and models for the project including setting up the base BIM model. The Design Centre’s prime feature is flexibility and integration of multiple design studios at Humber College in Toronto. Featured items include the millwork display cases, movable partitions dividing each studio, millwork for storage and teacher whiteboards and a feature curtain wall with distinct signage and vibrant colours.

PLAM1

COR2

37 A5.0N

6' - 0" typ.

5' - 6" 4' - 0"

1' - 6"

35

whiteboards Section Detail - MW8 -Sliding Whiteboard Track on tracks see specs. S1

- 0" = 1'-0" 2" 12' 1/2"

line of ceiling in front

5' - 6" line of ceiling

2nd Floor 12' - 0"

4' - 4"

1' - 6"

5' - 4 3/4"

Line of ceiling

line of ceiling in front

Display boards beyond

Line of ceiling

Translucent film (typ.)

PLAM1

F1

F4

Display boards 1 beyond MW13

No.

F6

F2

Translucent film (typ.)

Tender

ISSUED/REVISED

F3

F2

4/18/2011 DATE

F5

F4

F3

F2

F5

F1

F4

F6

F2

GWB WV 9' - 2"

Section Detail F2 - MW8F4- Whiteboard TrackF2 F2 F5 F5 1 1/2" = 1'-0"

9' - 6"

35

8' - 8"

F6

9' - 6"

F4

F1

8' - 8"

Elevation - MW8 Side F2 F1 1/4" = 1'-0"

12' - 6"

2"

34

Cove in front

1' - 6"

F1

F3

Provide concealed steel reinforcement inside horizontal mullion if required

2' - 0"

4' - 2 1/4"

AM1 rior

PLAM2 on doors 36 panels and A5.0N

2"

7' - 4"

ng, lockable eboards 37 acks A5.0N

Provide (2) 12" x 12" grilles in top of AV cabinet

37 A5.0N 11"

36 A5.0N

8' - 6"

38 Lower A5.0N

D108A

3' - 2"

COR2

3" 3"

12' - 0 1/4" sliding panels on tracks 5 EQ spcs

7"

COR2

WB

PLAM2 on doors

3"

3' -37 3" A5.0N

2" 2' - 10" 3' - 0"

36 sliding panels A5.0N on tracks

3' - 2"

3"

WB COR2

2"

1' - 0" 5' - 11"

7' - 4"

3"31 Elevation - MW8 Front 1/4" = 1'-0" Open

1' - 0"

3' - 0"

3"

A5.0N

7"

Open

COR2

PLAM1

3"

3"

GOW HASTINGS ARCHITECTS INC 275 SPADINA ROAD TORONTO CANADA M5R 2V3 T 416 920 0031 F 416 920 0288 GOWHASTINGS.COM

WB

3"

2"

met

3' - 0"

3"

COR2

5' - 11"

7' - 4"

WB

2" 2' - 10" 3' - 0"

met

167

Display boards beyond MW13

Transluscent film (typ.)

MDF

open


168


THANKS FOR VIEWING!


ANNE MA 2016

Anne Ma // Portfolio 2016  

most recent graduate work at YSoA (extended version)

Anne Ma // Portfolio 2016  

most recent graduate work at YSoA (extended version)

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