Issuu on Google+

The Godfather ­ Review After a long battle of will I won’t I, I gave in. I bought The Godfather on DVD, after years of  listening to varied opinions on its greatness, I decided it was about time to find out if this was  really a true masterpiece. Thankfully, I wasn’t disappointed.   This movie since its release in 1972, is one of those few movies that has defined a genre. Its  treatment of its characters, and the portrayal of mobsters in more of a psychological manner  than just a violent one, is refreshing for this genre. Directed by Francis Ford Coppola, based  on the novel by Mario Puzo, this movie throws out strong performances, and great attention  to detail. From the major characters, right up to the minor ones, each character, no matter  how minor, plays their part with the passion and consistency it deserves.  The film opens in the study of Don Vito Corleone (played marvellously by Marlon Brando),  the Godfather, on the day of his daughter Connie’s wedding. On this day, no Sicilian can  refuse a request, and right from the beginning, clients arrive asking for various “jobs” to be  done. The whole family are around for the event, including the Don Vito’s youngest son  Michael (Al Pacino),  a second world war hero and the only son not to become involved in  the family business. It is not only the power of the script that gives Michael Corleone’s  character a notable performance, but the performance of Al Pacino alone. Also involved as  family members, include a cast of James Caan, John Cazale, and Robert Duvall.  As the movie roles on through the years, we can see that Don Vito is a complex character. He  is not a killer, and doesn’t allow to mix personal life with business. You get the feeling that  this movie pursues the power of family responsibility, a father’s legacy to hold tough, and the  influence of power. It’s easy to see why Marlon Brando would win an Oscar for Best Actor,  as well as a Best Picture, and Best Adapted Screenplay.   As an outsider I was uncertain in my expectations of this movie, but was quickly captivated  by its complicated, violent world. But I couldn’t forgive myself for not saying that as the  credits began to role, that something had been stolen from me, perhaps the knowledge that  this story only deepens further.  


The GodFather