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VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS Anneliese Staubli 637487 Semester 1, 2013 Group 3


MODULE 1: IDEATION NATURALLY OCCURING PATTERN

Corn is a naturally occuring pattern. The pattern is the seeds or ‘kernels’ of the Maize plant. The reason of the kernels being so close together and in a repetitive nature which causes a natural pattern is because the kernels are seeds. The more seeds which are on the plant gives more chances of the plant being able to reproduce, therefore the Maize plant has lots of seeds to enable reproduction. The formation of corn is a simple interation of small particles that create a whole. The boundary conditions of the cob prevent the corn pattern from increasing beyond the cob. In this sense it is symmetry breaking because it is random and the full length of the corn is unknown, and it differs between each cob. The pattern is continuous and repetitive which shows the attraction between the individual pieces of corn. Corn is an aggregation because the individual pieces form a whole rather than singles. When the corn cob is developing, it is always formed but continuously grows bigger, therefore the pattern never changes so there is no specific moment that can help stimulate my form model. Although I could choose a specific size of the corn in the development process.

RECIPE

1) Draw an oval with a pointed top and curved bottom at the edge of your page/border. 2) Draw the same shape or similar/same size next the original oval, underlapping it. 3) Repeat step 2, until you have made a sufficient line. 4) Draw an oval with a pointed top underneith and inbetween the original oval and second one you drew. So that they interjoin. Repeat step 2. 5) Continue these steps until you desire.

Anneliese Staubli

637487 Semester 1/2013 Group 3


M1: ANALYTICAL DRAWINGS

SYMMETRY

As it is a natural pattern there are no perfect angles of symmetry. There are numerous point of symmetry. Each individual piece of corn has endless angles of symmetry. If the centre is the point of symmetry there is at least 4 lines of symmetry.

MOVEMENT

The base element is constantly repeated showing movement. On a slight reducing scale.

BALANCE

Dividing the page by 28 with checked pattern. Each piece corn is individual but there is a rule, if the top of the piece of corn is rounded then the bottom will have to be pointed and vice versa. The corn cob is made like this to allow the maximum amount of pieces of corn on the cob.

Anneliese Staubli

637487 Semester 1/2013 Group 3


M1: PAPER MODEL I began by cutting down an A4 white sheet of paper, to the width of a 30cm ruler. I cut 5 strips, then cut these in half. So I had 10 small strips. I then stuck each strip together individually in a cylinder shape, using glue stick. Then I would slightly press the walls of the cylinder together so that it would create more of an oval shape. I stuck 5 of the individual ovals together, side by side. I then repeated this step with the remaining 5. I now had two rows of identical ovals. I joined the two rows together using a triangular shape, as a rule of ‘corn’ is that if it has a pointed top it must have a curved bottom. It also abstracted a singular layer, which I liked as every piece of corn is different. Between a crease/slight seperation of ovals I would use a piece of paper folded in half, quarter of the size of the original and glue it in. I repeated this step for a whole row, then I began to join the two ends onto the second row. The ends of the triangle had to join with a oval on the diagonal. I followed this and my pattern was completed.

Anneliese Staubli

637487 Semester 1/2013 Group 3


M1: CLAY MODELS CHANGING PROCESS OF CLAY MOEL

FINAL DESIGN

The formation of my clay madel changed slightly, from the start I began b making a cone-like shape and taking divots out of it along the side. This relates to my paper model with the row of abstraction. I then simplified this model to my liking.

Anneliese Staubli

637487 Semester 1/2013 Group 3


M1: PRECEDENT EXAMPLES

THE COLOSSEUM 70AD

LEANING TOWER OF PISA 1173

These three buildings are all from different eras of architecture. Although the buildings were built over a 1900 year period, between 70AD and 2007, they have similar design characteristics. The Colesseum in relevant to my free form model as it has the repetition of the arches or in my models case circles. It also follows the same rule of having rows of these repeated shapes. The Leaning Tower of Pisa reminds me of a corn cob (my chosen pattern), I had never thought of it that way until I began researching buildings. It is similar in the overall shape and also the repetition of the arches (same as in the Colesseum). The Torre Agbar is very similar in overall design to the Leaning Tower of Pisa. Using the same arched/circular shapes repetitively over the building, which is seen in my 3D extrusion pattern.

TORRE AGBAR 2007

Anneliese Staubli

637487 Semester 1/2013 Group 3


M1: LIGHTING INSPIRATION LIGHTING INSPIRATION

PAPER LIGHTING EFFECTS This is the lighting effects made from the corn plant and in the Louvre hallway. Given my chosen pattern is corn, I decided to research into the lighting associated with the plant and I found this particular photo very interesting. I then researched buildings with plant like effects. I like the gutter and in the middle of the corn plant photo and how that is similar to my abstracted piece in my paper model and transformed into my clay model. I like the various effects the lighting in both photos made and I like how different effects would be made at different times of the day, depending where the sun was.

I made a small paper model using the shape from my recipe on the sides of the lantern.Using a small LED torch inside the paper model I created these lighting effects. I prefer the effect created on the right, this was made by holding the torch down at the base, which made the light travel through the whole model.

Anneliese Staubli

637487 Semester 1/2013 Group 3


MODULE 2: DESIGN

CLAY MODEL TO DIGITAL MODEL

These are my images of my clay model. I chose Method 3, producing contours by cutting and tracing sectional slices. I used a skewer to put a hole through the clay model so that I could line it up in rhino, I then cut the slices in 0.5cm parallel pieces. I followed the process into Rhino. I put my parallel sectional slices into rhino and followed the process of tracing curves, using points to centre each piece and moving each piece precisely above the original piece. Using my 1:5 scale I had to move each individual curve 5 cm above the previous one. I then used the loft command to create my final model.

Anneliese Staubli

637487 Semester 1/2013 Group 3


M2: FINAL RHINO MODEL

Rhino Model

This is my rhino model. I like the shapes and contours formed, although it isn’t identical to my model it is quite similar and I like how it isn’t symmetrical. Abstraction relates to Kadinsky’s rules of simplifying. I used absraction in the process of my model, originally it was complex and wouldn’ve been difficult to put into rhino. So I simplified the form without taking away from the aesthetic value.

Anneliese Staubli

637487 Semester 1/2013 Group 3


M2: 2D & 3D PANELLING TRIALS 2D & 3D PANELING PROCESS

These are my first 2D paneling trials, I had a lot of trial and error and in the end I increased my grid points from 10 to 15 to allow more paneling objects. The grid helped aad the effect I wanted as towards the bottom the points were closer together which is how a piece of corn works. My 3D paneling process took a lot of playing around with the program and watching tutorials to teach myself how to work it. As you can see some of my 3D paneling processes didn’t quite work. I ended up increasing and decreasing my grid points for particular shapes to create different effects. Using objects that I created was difficult and wouldn’t really work properly, but after the tutorial I learnt how to better make these. The effect I’m wanting to achieve is each individual shape has symmetry just like my corn, I want these shapes to reflect on my pattern but also create a desired lighting effect.

Anneliese Staubli

637487 Semester 1/2013 Group 3


M2: THREE TESTED PANELLING DESIGNS

PANELLING DESIGN 1

I used custom 3D panelling to create this effect. This paneling design uses repetition and symmetry similar to my chosen pattern. The holes throughout the panelling are a rectangular shape which is a similar shape to an individual piece of corn.The closer towards the base, the smaller the panels become, I was determined to use this effect as this is what happens on a corn cob.

PANELLING DESIGN 2

I like the effects of the panels at the base of this model, how they have length to them. This relates to my chosen pattern as it has similar movement, each panel follows the one before it creating an abstracted movement. Its interesting how some panels are concave and some are convex, this relates to my chosen pattern as not every piece of corn is perfect and they all have their individual faults.

PANELLING DESIGN 3

for this design I created my own 3D object which has a pentagon shape. The pentagon shape is similar to the shape in my recipe, as the shape in my recipe has a pointed top and curved bottom. The symmetry of each individual panel relates to my chosen pattern. I think the lighting effects would be great.

Anneliese Staubli

637487 Semester 1/2013 Group 3


M2: LIGHTING EFFECTS PANEL 1

PANEL 2

PANEL 3

I used the Unroll faces command in panelling tools to unroll the faces of my panels. I handmade my own tabs when I printed off my panelling design. The lighting effects in panel one are what I desired from this design. The final design will have symmetrical rows of these rectangular cut outs which create the lighting effect. The symmetry and repetition of this panelling effect reflects the symmetry and repetition of my chosen pattern. Depending which way the light is facing or the height of where it is in comparison to the holes makes an enormous difference. Angling the light or holding it further away from the hole creates a longer stream of light. Out of the three prototypes the outcome of panel 1 was definitely my favourite.

Anneliese Staubli

637487 Semester 1/2013 Group 3


MODULE 3: FABRICATION PANELLING EXPERIMENTS

I began experimenting with creating different models using different panels and then cutting them and putting them together. This was very tedious, but it worked out well. Here are some examples of using this method. I began with smaller panels at the bottom and then increased the size of the panels towards the top of the model. I started experimenting with different models to see whether the model I had created was the final model I wanted to stay with. I made three or four different models and then cut them and put them togeher to form one. I idid this a few times to see the different effects, I ended up going with this technique to make my final model. I made the cylinder model because it relates strongly back to the shape of my chosen pattern. Althought I liked the overall look and shape of this model, I had problems when trying to panel it and the grid wasn’t right. I then began playing around with 3D custom variable and playing around with the grid to see different effects I could make, which I wasn’t quite happy with in the end. . I also began using a surface to panel some sections of my model, but I did not like how this turned out. Experimenting with different panels and ideas helped me decide that I wanted a roof on my lantern, this will prevent light from escaping the top of the model.

Anneliese Staubli

637487 Semester 1/2013 Group 3


M3: FINAL PANELED MODEL This is my final paneled model. The process I used was making four different panelized models using different sized panels. To create my panels I used the Polygon Mesh Primitive 3-D face, using this allowed my panels to be unrolled with ease, as I had had some previous issues with unrolling panels. The grid followed 10x16 which relates to my chosen pattern because there is approximately 400 to 600 kernels on a corn cob, these kernels are arranged in 16 rows. I tried doing 16x16 but this grid made my panels too small so thats how I chose the 16x10 grid option. My four different panels were all rectangles with different sized openings. I follwed the idea that the closer to the bottom of the cob the smaller the corn is, so I did this with my panels. I had panels with small openings at the bottom and large openings towards the top. I then decided to add rows which did not have an opening to split up the lighting effects between the different sized openings. To create this final model I made four different models and cut them into sections, I then dragged the different sections until they met and joined them. I also poly surfaced the top of my model to create a lid. I then had to meshtoNURB before I was able to unroll the panels. These different views show which panels go where on the model. The ease of digital modeling is an enormous help in this project and especially with the card cutter and laser cutter. This helps in creating of model both digitally and physically. This model was then mirrored and I fabricated both the original model and the fabricated model.

Anneliese Staubli

637487 Semester 1/2013 Group 3


M3: UNROLLED MODEL I unrolled this by lengthwise sections. I card cut one piece but didn’t like the effect of the card cut, because it was hard to fold on the score lines. So I laser cut one on black paper and one on the ivory card. I also unrolled my model with horizontal strips, I only unrolled this on white card.

Anneliese Staubli

637487 Semester 1/2013 Group 3


M3: PROTOTYPES

PROBLEMS THAT OCCURED

The black paper wasn’t strong enough to hold my model in place and kept breaking. The laser cut white paper also split quite a bit on the score lines, but I liked the look of the laser cut card better so for my final model, I had to use some masking tape to hold it together. I used PVA glue to start with then moved to tarzan grip glue which was a lot better but still problems did occur, like my fingers getting stuck to the paper. Overall my prototyping gave me a good insight on the time it would take to make my final model and the difficulties and also the problems that may occur. After taking my model to the M3 presentation, the tutors and I decided it would look interesting if I mirrored my model and created another one on top.

Anneliese Staubli

637487 Semester 1/2013 Group 3


M3: FABRICATING PROCESS

Anneliese Staubli

637487 Semester 1/2013 Group 3


M3: FIRST FABRICATED MODEL & LIGHTING EFFECTS RELATION TO CHOSEN PATTERN

My natural pattern was corn. The strongest relation to my model is the symmetry of the corn cob and the repetition of similar shapes. Also the fact that the holes in my panels get smaller towards the end or thinner parts of my model. A corn cob is made up of 16 rows, I used a 16x10 grid to also use this method in my final model. Each corn cob is different and I wanted to emphasize that in my model, I didn’t want to just have small panels increasing to large panels. That’s why I did a few rows of panels without holes in them. This also added a nice aesthetic effect to the overall lighting.

FABRICATION PROCESS

To fabricate my model I followed the steps of cutting each paneled strip out of the card and then folding the different folds and gluing the tabs together using tarzan grip. I made all these strips and then glued all these strips together. So I had a paneled model with no roof, I then connected the roof on using glue. Some splits happened and a few mistakes, where unfortunately I had to use masking tape to help fabricate.

LIGHTING EFFECTS

I am happy with the lighting effects that have been created, I especially like how the light escapes out the sides and especially close to the hand.

Anneliese Staubli

637487 Semester 1/2013 Group 3


M3: FINAL MODEL To make sure the panels would meet up, I had to mirror my model. I then unrolled the new model horizontally rather than vertically so that the overall shape of the two models would be different and add a desired effect. During the fabrication of adding this additional model on top, problems occured such as difficulty with glueing etc. The horizontal panels were a lot harder to fabricate than the vertical panels. I included the flat roof in the middle of the lantern for the lighting to be able to connect to something. Having the model a completely different shape now enables different ways of holding the model. I decided to take a row out of the mirrored model when fabricating it as I thought it would add a different effect. Since the mirrored side was unrolled horizontally it could help the mirrored model form a different shape.

Anneliese Staubli

637487 Semester 1/2013 Group 3


MODULE 4: REFLECTION

Anneliese Staubli

637487 Semester 1/2013 Group 3


Anneliese Staubli

637487 Semester 1/2013 Group 3


M4: CRITICAL REFLECTION I picked corn as my naturally occurring pattern, I chose this because I liked the symmetry and repetition of a corn cob. Making the paper model was easy because I followed the pattern of the corn, but then I added a row of abstraction which helped inspire the idea of my clay model. The shape of my clay model is similar to that of a cylinder but I had three small divots taken out of the side to relate back to the abstraction of my paper model, this also relates to my chosen pattern as every row of corn is different. Creating my digital model in rhino was quite easy and turned out rather similar to my clay model but not identical. I liked that my rhino model wasn’t symmetrical. It was when I began panelling that problems occurred, this was when I changed the shapes of the panels from squares, pentagons and rectangles because they all relate back to my chosen model. I did some research on corn and found out that a corn cob has 16 rows of corn, so when I did my final panelling designs I did rows of 16x10. My panels relate back to my chosen pattern as the holes on my panels are smaller closer to the base and get bigger when they reach wider parts. I added rows with no opening to relate back to my paper and clay models; as these panels with no openings are my rows of abstraction. The Leaning Tower of Pisa and the arches throughout this building strongly influenced my design, I like how the Leaning Tower of Pisa isn’t perfect and neither is a corn cob. Although the tower wasn’t meant to be leaning, the effect has been a positive one and people from around the world come to see it; in my eyes this means that something that is different and not perfect can still have an amazing outcome; even in the built world. Having my materials laser cut add an organic look to my model which closely relates to my chosen pattern. The hardest part of this project was definitely the fabrication, the amount of times a tab tore or I glued my fingers together are countless but this is where and how you learn to do it better. After fully fabricating 4 models, I was finally happy with my final design. Having another model mirrored on top of my original really added a desired aesthetic effect and related strongly back to my chosen pattern. It has also changed the way my model can be held, it can now be held in different ways and I like this. The development of technology has aided human life in terms of production and made it efficient. With our models, technology has done the maths and virtually designed our model for us. The only process that still requires physical work is the sketches and fabrication of the model.

Anneliese Staubli

637487 Semester 1/2013 Group 3


Anneliese Staubli

637487 Semester 1/2013 Group 3


Anneliese Staubli

637487 Semester 1/2013 Group 3


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