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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

2015

Facility Audit Report

PROVIDED BY: 1


Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

CONTENTS Introduction 5 CESA Background 7 CESA 10 Approach 9 Executive Summary 11 Detailed Analysis of Facilities 15 Individual School Reports 19 Mosinee High School 19 Mosinee Middle School 33 Mosinee Elementary School 43 Mosinee School District Office 49 Mosinee School District Outbuildings 52 Appendix: Project Prioritization Tool 55 Mosinee High School 73 Mosinee Middle School 77 Mosinee Elementary School 80 Mosinee School District Office 82

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

INTRODUCTION

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n 2014, the Mosinee School District Administration (“District”) and School Board (“Board”) underwent talks with CESA 10 Facilities Management Department regarding the current state of their facilities, and their desire to have additional information to assist in making important decisions regarding the future of the District. They decided as a group to contract with CESA 10 for the following Facility Audit Report. The purpose of this report is a facilities report and does not address the full range of educational concerns. Current condition of all facilities, systems, and structures are reviewed, and recommendations are given regarding the costs of moving forward in a variety of different ways, providing objective third party information to the District, the Board and the community. The purpose of the report is to assist all parties in utilizing limited District funds as effectively as possible. In late 2014, CESA10 performed investment grade audits on all facilities of the Mosinee School District. The audits consisted of facility-wide analyses that culminated in quantification of project costs, savings, and prioritization in an effort to provide value to the District, Board and community now and for years to come. Since the District has been discussing possible renovation projects, a flexible project prioritization tool has been created to allow for quick reconfiguring of project lists to aid the District and Board in choosing an array of possible facilities decisions. The report and tool also prioritize potential projects at each location so this tool will be of use to the Board and District over the next several years. Note: For this report, CESA 10 facilities experts focused on recommendations based on current facility needs and not based on future educational needs or detailed analysis of changes in enrollment. Recent and long-term trends in enrollment were reviewed and are provided for informational purposes.

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

CESA 10 BACKGROUND

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ooperative Educational Service Agency (CESA) 10 has a long history of partnering with and providing services to school districts throughout Wisconsin. CESAs were established in 1964 when the Wisconsin legislature recognized the need for a service unit between school districts and the state superintendent. CESA 10 is a nonprofit educational agency providing facilities management services to school districts and local government customers throughout the state. Our vision is simple: Efficient buildings, safe people, healthy environments, sustainable change. To that end, CESA 10 has been involved in providing facility-related services to schools since the mid 1990’s, managing Focus on Energy services to schools and government entities, and providing Environmental Health and Safety services since 1996. CESA 10’s facilities management services have continued to expand to meet needs identified by school customers. These include the creation of a “shared savings” performance-based Energy Management service, the creation of Behavior Based Energy Management, a large expansion of our Environmental Health and Safety program to provide services to over 25% of public school districts in the state, and full-service Owner’s Representative/Project Management and Performance Contracting Services. Staff members in our Facilities Management Department including civil, electrical, and mechanical engineers, project managers, Certified Energy Managers, Certified Energy Auditors, and environmental health and safety experts provide unbiased consultation on projects of all sizes and advocacy on behalf of our school customers. Primary staff members completing this report included:

Charlie Schneider, CEM, CIAQP, CBEP, CEA, PCF Director, CESA 10 Statewide Facilities Management

After a lengthy career with Xcel Energy (formerly Northern States Power), Charlie founded the CESA 10 Facilities Management Department as a department of one in June 2000, and grew the department to more than 40 staff while increasing the departmental budget from $143,000 in 2000 to over $11 million in 2015. Charlie has been the Sector Manager of Focus on Energy Schools and Government Sector since 2001 and consistently exceeded yearly goals while staying within budget. Charlie developed the Operations & Maintenance Manual and CD for Wisconsin schools and also managed processes to benchmark energy use on 1,262 of Wisconsin’s school facilities and 36 Wisconsin counties. Charlie has managed LEED Certification of three schools in the state and has earned the following certifications from the Association of Energy Engineers: Certified Energy Manager, Certified Indoor Air Quality Professional, Certified Business Energy Professional, Certified Carbon Reduction Manager, Certified Energy Auditor, Certified Performance Contracting and Funding Professional. Charlie holds an Associate Degree in Civil Structural Technology, as well as a Bachelor of Science Degree in Business Administration.

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

Tad Beeksma CEM, CEA, CMVP Project Manager

Melissa Rickert CEM, Energy Manager, Sustainability Specialist Energy Manager

Mark Ziemann Project Manager

Tad was the first Energy Manager at CESA 10 when he started the program in 2004 and has been instrumental in growing the performance-based Energy Management and Project Management services and staff. Tad has 12 years of extensive experience in engineering, energy auditing, and implementing energy management strategies in school districts around the state. Tad’s experience spans across schools, government, commercial, and industrial applications. Tad earned his Bachelor Degree from UW Eau Claire in Physics and is a Certified Energy Manager, Certified Measurement and Verification Professional and Certified Energy Auditor recognized by AEE.

Melissa has worked in the field of energy and environmental education for over 11 years, and joined the CESA 10 Team in 2010. Melissa works with schools and local governments on the behavioral component of energy conservation, as well as with CESA 10’s Sustainability Services. Melissa earned her Bachelor Degree in Civil Engineering with an emphasis in Construction Engineering from the UW Platteville and passed the Fundamentals of Engineering Exam (F.E./E.I.T.). She also earned a Master of Science Degree in Natural Resources, with an emphasis in Environmental Education/Environmental Interpretation from University of Wisconsin Stevens Point. Melissa was named Energy Educator of the Year in 2014 by Wisconsin’s Center for Energy Education.

Mark brings 15 years of facilities management experience to CESA 10. Prior to joining CESA 10, he was an Owner’s Representative for Miami University where he worked with the Engineering Department to create 10- and 20-year campus utility master plans. He was an HVAC Project Manager for Kilgust Mechanical working with ground and air source geothermal projects, and a Construction Project Manager for Iconica Design Build General Contractors. Mark’s experience spans across educational, pharmaceutical, government and commercial applications.

Additionally, CESA 10 Facilities Management Department has significant experience with technology infrastructure as it relates to controlling utility costs and has performed calculations and project planning for the evaluation and consultation of specific IT equipment / process upgrades. CESA 10 facilities and technology experts have been directly involved in suggesting and implementing projects including analog phone line reduction, and improvements on filing for transport to WiscNet. Both of these upgrades have an impact on the overall utility cost of the end user. CESA 10 has also been directly involved in providing the energy calculations for these technologies as well as equipment purchasing and operational strategies. CESA 10 has the in-house expertise to write detailed specifications for technology infrastructure and hardware, and the experience managing large technology-related projects. These subject matter experts were consulted for relevant parts of this report and can be of service in the future if technology projects move forward. 8


Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

CESA 10 APPROACH

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ESA 10 performed an investment grade audit of the Mosinee School District’s buildings. Investment grade audits consist of facility-wide analyses that culminate in quantification of project costs, savings, and prioritization. CESA 10’s specific approach included: interviewing school administrative and facilities staff to understand the history and limitations of the existing systems as well as District, Board and community priorities; reviewing design documents, studying the existing equipment and its current operating parameters; reviewing utility bills in detail, discussing improvement options with contractors, calculating paybacks and discussing the potential projects list with District administration. Steps included:

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Analyzing energy use and building characteristics and preliminary energy use analysis. This involved analysis of historic utility use and cost and development of the energy utilization index (EUI) of the building and compared the building’s EUI to similar buildings. Identifying possible Facility Improvement Measures (FIM)--Based on energy usage, plan review, maintenance logs, past projects.

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Detailed audit of facility--walkthrough analysis. This assessed each building’s current energy cost and efficiency by analyzing energy bills and surveying the building. The auditors were accompanied on visits by Steve Kaiser, Director of Buildings and Grounds and Brent Zimmerman, the district’s Business Manager. This analysis identified low-cost/no-cost measures and capital improvements that merit further consideration along with an initial estimate of costs and savings. Confirming FIMs using energy survey and analysis, efficiency and infrastructure and potential costs and savings. This included a more detailed building survey and energy analysis, including a breakdown of energy use in the building, a savings and cost analysis of all practical measures that meet the District’s constraints, and a discussion of any effect on operation and maintenance procedures. It also lists potential capital-intensive improvements that require more thorough data collection and analysis along with an initial judgment of potential costs and savings.

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Gathering any needed additional information from vendors or District including prioritizing and providing detailed analysis of capital-intensive modifications. This focused on potential capital-intensive projects identified earlier in the process and involved more detailed field data gathering and engineering analysis. It provides detailed project cost and savings information with a level of confidence high enough for major capital investment decisions.

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Creating Report. The initial report was shared with District leadership, and additional items were pointed out, highlighted, or removed based on additional information provided.

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Present Report to District and/or Board. In addition, during this process, the CESA 10 Certified Energy Auditor brought in subject matter experts (i.e. electrical, technology), provided extensive photographic documentation, and perhaps of most value, created a body of detailed recommendations in a flexible format that can pivot based on District, Board and community decisions regarding how to proceed. CESA 10 experts will avail themselves to the District for presentation of this report, and assistance with the Prioritization Matrix tool. 9


Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

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he Mosinee School District is comprised of three main educational facilities, one administrative support building, and several smaller outbuildings. The District facilities have some notable differences from the hundreds of school districts CESA 10 has consulted for across Wisconsin.

Mosinee’s facilities and the additions to the original structures are in a condition that is in line with their age. The facilities have been well maintained, but there is a desperate need for space in the high school/ middle school complex to meet building codes and provide adequate educational environments; as well as a need to replace equipment, fixtures, and materials that are past their expected useful life. Consequently, the main issue at hand is the possible demolition and new construction of parts of some facilities. Renovation of some specific areas is also recommended and discussed in this report, but a major construction project can eliminate the need for very expensive, short-term renovations of many of the systems and structures, especially in the older sections of the high school/middle school facility considering there is such a large amount of capital investment necessary at the high school/middle school complex. Big Picture Recommendations This report will give granularity to the needs of each building, but again the big picture for facilities planning needs to include a vision where spending on the order of several million dollars will need to take place to bring the District’s facilities up to a safe and effective long-term operating status. In order to properly prioritize each building system and component district-wide, an assessment tool based on four different criteria was created. The rationalization for each criterion is outlined below:

Criteria #1: Safety/Health/ Compliance Issues

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taff and student health and safety are critically important. Examples of building systems or components that received priority because of a safety, health, or compliance concerns include: lack of modern security cameras and secure entrances, cramped and aging electrical panels, a potential for indoor air quality issues in the older sections of the schools, and a few structural issues with the buildings that need to be addressed.

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

Balancing Security and Mobility

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he needs of today’s K-12 education spaces have changed, and balancing security needs and mobility needs is important. When unbalanced with mobility needs, a heightened attention to security and the desire to keep unauthorized people out can inhibit free movement within a school campus for students and staff. While there are many factors that contribute to a safe learning environment, appropriate access control is now becoming a fundamental requirement. Public schools use a variety of practices and procedures intended to promote the safety of students and staff. In the US Department of Education’s School Survey on Crime and Safety, public school principals were asked about their school's use of safety and security measures and procedures. Practices mentioned included locked or monitored doors or gates intended to limit or control access to school campuses, and others, such as metal detectors, security cameras, and limiting access to social networking websites, intended to monitor or restrict student and visitor behavior on campus. In the 2011–12 school year, 88 percent of public schools reported that they controlled access to school buildings by locking or monitoring doors during school hours. Other safety and security measures frequently reported by public schools included the use of security cameras to monitor the school (64 percent) and the enforcement of a strict dress code (49 percent). In addition, 44 percent of public schools reported that they controlled access to school grounds by locking or monitoring gates during school hours. As indicated above, a key component at schools is the increased use of security cameras as a tool to monitor and improve student safety. Images of students captured on security videotapes that are maintained by the school are not considered education records under Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). Accordingly, these videotapes may be shared with parents of students whose images are on the video and with outside law enforcement authorities, as appropriate. Another safety and security component is the increasing use of security badges to allow access and tracking of individuals within a campus setting. The benefits of prioritizing safety, health, and compliance issues as soon as possible are many and are a key consideration in the Prioritization Matrix Tool provided by CESA 10.

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015 Air Quality and Learning

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he results of poor indoor air quality in schools are documented on the EPA website: http://www.epa.gov/iaq/schools/benefits.html.

Excerpts from the EPA website:

Leaky roofs: Problems with heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems; insufficient cleaning or excessive use of toxic cleaning chemicals; and other environmental issues can lead to poor IAQ and trigger health problems like asthma and allergies.

Ability to Perform: Research shows that a school's physical environment can affect academic performance. Studies demonstrate a connection between IAQ improvements, such as increasing fresh air ventilation and removing the source pollutants, and improved academic performance. Controlled studies show that students perform school work faster as ventilation rates increase. The performance of teachers and staff also improves with higher ventilation rates.

Test Scores: Students in classrooms with higher fresh air ventilation rates tend to achieve higher scores on standardized tests in math and reading than students in poorly ventilated classrooms.

Air quality issues or situations that could lead to IAQ concerns are noted throughout the report.

Criteria #2: Equipment/ Materials in Critical Condition

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losely related to safety, health, and compliance, the next criterion used to prioritize facilities needs was equipment or materials in critical condition. Items with high probability of failure in the short-term can generate much higher expenses and a variety of other issues if they are not taken care of promptly. For instance, failure to replace an aging roofing system now could generate much higher costs due to mold and water damage in the future.

As aptly stated in Save a Penny, Lose a School:

Reduced funding affects the quality of maintenance in many ways. Schools may be reluctant to follow manufacturers’ recommendations if equipment seems to be functioning properly, but neglecting routine maintenance may reduce the life of the machinery and systems, increase the cost of operating them, and decrease their level of performance.

Proper maintenance is an important issue because deferring maintenance affects the health, safety, and morale of everyone who uses the facility, as well as the cost of operations. If the building requires extensive repairs, renovation, or replacement, deferred maintenance may even force its closure. 13


Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

Criteria #3: Projects with Long-Term Futures

Criteria #4: Projects with the Best Paybacks

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fter immediate needs and health/safety projects are completed, facilities with the highest probability of a longterm future building use should be invested in. This will most certainly include the newer portions of the high school, middle school and the elementary school.

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ong-term vision and energy efficiency were also factors for project prioritization. For instance, investment in a new heating system to replace a system that has been in place for decades may be a wise choice to avoid utility costs, maintenance costs, and the need for multiple upgrades to the system in a short period of time. Additionally, relatively low cost lighting projects can start saving energy immediately and have fairly short paybacks that generate long-term savings for the District.

The projects that have been prioritized by this study encompass many systems including each building’s exterior and structure, interior fixtures and materials, security, HVAC equipment, electrical and plumbing. The upgrades proposed in the following report will provide return on investment from reduced maintenance, lowered utility usage, lowered liability and training obligations, all while improving safety and occupant comfort and providing the best possible learning environment for students.

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

DETAILED ANALYSIS OF FACILITIES DISTRICT WIDE ANALYSIS

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nrollment: The Mosinee School District has an enrollment of 2,075 students, including 4K students that live in an uneven distribution within the 248 square miles and nine different municipalities (enrollment as of the third week of the 2014/15 school year). There is one high school, one middle school, and one elementary school located in the City of Mosinee. Note that the enrollment numbers below do not include 4K students.

2014 - 2015 Enrollment Data by School High School 663

Middle School 754

Elementary School 537

Corresponding Facility Floor Space in Square Feet 194,600

110,800

109,300

Based on data obtained from the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, enrollment numbers have remained steady for at least the past 10 years and are predicted to remain the same in the future.

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015 Note: The post 2008 portion of the graph below includes 4K students. The 4K students were first counted in the district enrollment in 2009.

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

DISTRICT ENERGY USE

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he District has made many investments in high efficiency equipment and systems such as LED lighting and high efficiency boilers, and the impact of these pieces of equipment shows up on the energy efficiencies for the some of the schools; however, there are other areas that need attention. The use of the geothermal HVAC system at the elementary school has drastically reduced the natural gas usage both at the elementary school and also for the District as a whole, but it has increased the electrical usage due at the elementary and district-wide due to the electrical usage of the geothermal equipment and its ability to displace the heating load from the natural gas boilers.

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

MOSINEE HIGH SCHOOL

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osinee High School is located at 1000 High Street and serves 663 students in grades 9-12. The multi-building school is in very good shape for its age and with its multiple additions over the years it has created a unique learning experience and extended its useful lifespan. This building had a pool and gym addition that created a major tie to the surrounding community. From an educational perspective, the Wisconsin Department of Instruction rates this school (2013-2014 data) as “Meets Expectations.� It has a score of 72.3% which is about average with the majority of high schools in the state. This school exceeds the state Priority Area standards in closing gaps. Please note that there are pressing building issues that may tie directly to the WI DPI scores that can be addressed for this school such as upgrading the science labs. This type of renovation could have a direct correlation to the Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Examination (WKCE) test scores for this school.

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

HIGH SCHOOL ENERGY USE

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nergy consumption at the high school is higher than an average high school in Wisconsin and there are a few reasons for this. The heating and electrical systems between the high school and the middle school are shared, but the heating systems do not match the floor space for the schools. Some of the heating equipment that is being used to provide heat for the middle school is actually on the meter that is designated as the high school meter. There is no way to sort out the exact usage per building at this time, so the numbers look better for the middle school and poorer for the high school; both schools are right around average regarding energy use.

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

PRIORITY FACILITIES PROJECTS AT THE HIGH SCHOOL

HS. 1 - Classroom Tables, Desks, Chairs, and Space Issues (Item No. 14)

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ost classroom furniture is in good to average condition. There are some areas that need immediate attention due to lack of space or tables that are in very poor condition.

Two areas with very poor tables are the chemistry and science rooms. Beginning with the 2014-15 school year the State of Wisconsin has required all students to take additional math and science credits. This requirement has caused the District to see an increase in the number of courses that are offered for science credit and causes the need additional space.

Current science lab stations lack adequate disposal for chemicals. The limestone acid pit is original (1960) along with acid waste piping and has severely deteriorated over time. Remodel/expansion of existing science rooms could better meet the District’s need to meet state graduation requirements and emphasize STEM education (see Appendix for additional information regarding STEM curriculum, related facilities needs, and cost projections for new construction).

Science Room Sink

Science Room Desk

Science Room Lab Stations

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015 The portable classroom building has a number of issues that need to be addressed. By nature, a portable classroom is a temporary solution to overcrowding in the main facility and is built with this in mind. The facility is a security risk, has inefficient electric heating, and has substandard fixtures and construction materials throughout. The exterior ramp poses a safety concern for students with disabilities during the winter months. Replacing the portable building with new classroom space that is a part of the main facility would alleviate the issues that exist. If the District decides to add a new science area to the existing high school facility, then the functions that are now being carried out in the portable classroom could be included in this plan.

Portable Classroom

SPACE AND FUNCTIONALITY ISSUES

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uggestion: Provide a new room or additional space for students with cognitive disabilities and severe physical disabilities by remodeling the existing room or rooms or adding space within the current building (see full project description in Appendix). Staff is unable to adequately support students who use the handicap bathroom facilities due to a lack of space. Portable lifts for students cannot be used properly in the bathroom and compromises the safety and health of the students and staff, remodeling the existing room(s) and/ CD Room or adding space could ameliorate this issue.

Handicap Bathroom

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CD Room Storage


Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

TECHNOLOGY SERVICES

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uggestion: Expand technology services office and storage area. Deploying additional computers to students and staff has caused a large increase in machines and has created a need for functional IT workspace. Expanding the technology services areas within the current building could be accomplished by utilizing old science lab/classroom space. Current space in room 401 is insufficient to house the ongoing upgrades of computer systems and Chromebook cart storage systems. With the availability of moving to various locations due to wireless port access, the IT department could utilize the old science labs after the lab tops have been removed. Asbestos floor abatement would be required in each room and new furniture would have to be installed to make these rooms functional for IT repair and service work. In addition, proper electrical systems would need to be installed.

Technology Services Space Issues

BAND ROOM

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uggestion: Increase storage space for band equipment. The following pictures show areas within the music department that exhibit band room storage issues:

Band Room Storage

Band Room Storage

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

WOODS AND METAL AREA

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igh school welding is a popular course that is currently housed in an area that is too small for the vast array of equipment that is available. This lack of space has created safety and health concerns due to crowded areas around lifts and inadequate welding space. Suggestion: Increase classroom and storage space for woods and metals equipment. Space needs to be provided for the woods and metals program to address shop crowding. Expanding the classroom space is needed. It was suggested that a second story could be added to the current metal shop; however, with ADA issues (elevator, etc.) the costs could be very high for this space to be expanded by adding an additional floor. This would also require a major mechanical retrofit to exhaust and building relief systems which are currently located throughout the ceiling space.

SPACE VS. EFFICIENCY

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uggestion: When expanding the space, consider the space of individual booths within the welding shop. There should be ample room for comfortable work and room for supervisors and others to pass through the area. The shop is currently undersized and there is no room to pass from work tables, to welding booths, to cutters, grinders, hydraulic presses and cooling tanks. If welders have to work in cramped quarters, occasional collisions between welders and/or equipment are inevitable. Applying ergonomic principles to welding reduces space and proximity issues while decreasing the likelihood of injury. A streamlined and comfortable environment leads to logical work flow and efficiency. Many experts recommend a booth size of 7x10 feet to accommodate workers and an occasional visitor or helper. The award winning Mosinee Manufacturing class would benefit from expanded facilities that would allow students to increase their productivity and better align their classroom work to industry requirements.

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

WEIGHT ROOM

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uggestion: Remodel the existing room or add space within the current building.

Current Issues: • Not ADA compliant • Too much exercise/weight lifting equipment is in place for size of room • Lacking ventilation

Current Weight Room

Typical Weight Room Requirements: • 1200 to 1600 square feet typical for high schools but depends on equipment owned or future needs • 40-48 inches wide doors for moving equipment (single or pair of doors) • Exhaust fans required • 68-72 degrees typical with additional circulation fans mounted to move air efficiently around the space • Minimum 10-12 feet height to the ceiling, 15 feet is best • Use 12-24 inches between pieces of equipment; however, this may infringe on ADA compliance

• When the weight room is in use, students—due to space issues—spill out into the hallway to use free weights, exercise and warm up • Compressed space around machines can lead to injuries

Students Spilling Into Hall

• Provide 3-4 feet of open space between stations for students to use as a walkway • Yearly upgrades to equipment will alleviate massive cost when pieces do finally wear out. Any broken equipment should be removed immediately to reduce liability to the District • Occupancy sensors on lights and HVAC to control exhaust air flow • An emergency communication system (phone or intercom) should be located in the room in order to allow for immediate communication with the main office in case of an emergency

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

SAMPLE LAYOUTS OF FUNCTIONAL WEIGHT ROOMS See sample layouts below.

Sample Weight Room Layout

Sample Weight Room Layout

Note: The middle school weight room has an adequate layout; however, the brick walls and foundation are deteriorating in the 1922 structure. The room is inadequately ventilated and lacks storage and racking opportunities for equipment. The floor in this room is an asbestos floor.

There were additional space issues for athletics within the District, but these are the major concerns that were noted during the audit. 26


Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

HS. 2 - Gymnasiums (Item No. 17)

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here are several projects in the gym areas that need to be addressed. The Creske Gymnasium does not have ADA compliant bleachers. The high school gym bleachers are over 50 years old and should be replaced. The high school gym floor is down to its last sanding and will need to be replaced soon. The equipment is a safety concern and is at the point of failure. These are good examples of materials and equipment that have reached the end of their useful life.

Gymnasium Issues: • Storage • ADA accessibility • Vandalism of equipment left out since space is lacking for storage • Blocking egress

• Current storage of equipment blocks electrical service equipment which requires 36 inch clearance • Multiple HVAC units

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

HS. 3 - HVAC Infrastructure Needs (Item No. 26, 28, 30, 34, and 43)

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here are several different components of the HVAC system that need to be upgraded or replaced. All of these projects have risen to top priorities in this facility because of their condition due to age. All of the equipment on this list has served its purpose for years beyond what is typical and should be replaced prior to failure.

BOILERS

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here are three boilers serving the older section of the high school. Two of the boilers are newer and do a good job of providing heat in an efficient manner. The third boiler dates back to 1960 and currently serves as a back-up if there is a problem with the other two newer boilers. The old boiler is 55 years old and has become undependable and unsafe even in its backup role and should be replaced. Asbestos will need to be abated as part of this project because all boilers that were manufactured and installed during the 1960s contained some amount of asbestos. It should be noted that the main hot water pipes and breaching do contain asbestos and should be removed during upgrades. Note: A replacement boiler should be a sealed combustion unit due to the fact that the combustion air damper was sealed up years ago. The 1996 H.S. C.C. Penthouse F mechanical room was designed with twelve (12) boilers with total input of 12,000,000 Btu’s/ hr, which have all failed and since been removed. Currently there are five (5) boilers providing a total of 8,000,000 Btu’s/hr and the District extended an additional 500,000 Btu’s/hr to the 1969 section of the middle school which was completed during the 2011 HVAC upgrades. This additional load was not included in the original design and needs to be addressed. The reduction of capacity places the community center and attached academic spaces at risk in the event of a boiler failure.

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

For several reasons, the pool heating system should be attached to the main heating plant system with the installation of two (2) heat exchangers. The Penthouse F system heating loop is maintained all year as it currently provides services to the pool air handler and the existing pool boilers which are located in the pump and filter room. This area is a high moisture latent and corrosive environment and deteriorates metal and electrical components which affects system reliability.

HVAC CONTROLS

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neumatic control valves and variable air volume (VAV) boxes located through out the facility should be replaced with electric actuators and then be connected to the direct digital controls (DDC) network. This will allow for more accurate climate control of the indoor environment and in turn will create opportunities for energy savings.

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

UNIT VENTILATORS

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ost of the spaces in the high school are served by unit ventilators. These units are less expensive during construction, but are difficult and costly to maintain as they get older. The units that are installed in the high school are quite old and many of them are not functioning properly. Although it was not measured during the audit, the ventilation rates these units are able to maintain are most likely under the current state code levels. The units should be slated for replacement.

Aging Unit Ventilator

HEATING PIPES

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ydronic piping for the 1960/65 sections of the school is located in exterior walls and is not insulated. This arrangement is not energy efficient and will cause major issues if the pipes, which are in the exterior walls without access, were to freeze or break. For this type of piping the expected life span is 50 years. This means that the piping that is buried in the outside walls of the high school will have a much higher probability of failure in the upcoming years and failure of heating pipes that are inaccessible would be catastrophic. Any type of piping has a limited length of time that it can be left in service without being a major concern. Replacement of the heating pipes is the recommended next step. The existing pipes can be abandoned in place so that the walls don’t need to be torn apart.

DOMESTIC HOT WATER (DHW)

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he domestic hot water storage tank in the mechanical room needs to be removed because the pipes serving the tank are failing. The tank is insulated with asbestos, so the cost to abate the asbestos will increase the project cost. The domestic water heater in the worst condition utilizes an obsolete exhaust stack design and is in very poor condition. This unit needs to be replaced with a sealed combustion unit because there are no combustion air dampers serving this space anymore.

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

PUMPS

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he pumps for the hot water heating system are past their expected useful life and should be scheduled for replacement before they fail. The accompanying switchover gear also needs to be replaced when this project is done. The gear is pneumatically actuated and has outlived its expected useful life. This is a relatively straightforward project that will have a good financial payback if premium efficiency motors are installed along with variable frequency drives to recover energy savings. It is also a project that could have a huge impact on the school if the existing equipment is run until failure occurs. When the pumps are not operating there will be no heat in the building and the facility will be at risk for additional system failures and damages.

HS. 4 - Service Entrance (Item No. 36)

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uch of the main electrical distribution equipment is original to the building. It was noted that due to a lack of storage space in the facility, the rooms containing electrical equipment were filled and in violation of electrical clearance minimums around the electrical panels. This needs to be addressed.

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

HS. 5 - Locker Room/Gymnasium Restroom Areas (Item No. 18)

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oth of the locker room areas off of the main gym in the high school have a variety of safety and functional issues. The most pressing issues that exist in the high school gym locker room areas are possible code issues including the lack of a second means of egress. If something were to happen in the gym area such as a fire or intruder, anyone in the locker room could be trapped.

Even though the areas have been well maintained over the years, eventually a capital investment is necessary to create a more functional space. A capital investment in the form of a complete renovation seems necessary to bring the locker room areas up to code and also to address the other shortcomings of these spaces. Issues that will need to be addressed during a renovation include creating a better floor plan to make-up for a lack of space, new lockers to replace poorly functioning lockers, and a replacement of bathroom facilities which need to be placed outside of the shower area.

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

MOSINEE MIDDLE SCHOOL

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osinee Middle School is located at 700 High Street and serves approximately 750+ students in grades 4 through 8. The multi-story/multi-building school is in below average shape mostly due to its age and lack of accessibility due to multiple levels. Much of the building has exceeded its useful lifespan. This building has had multiple additions added on to the original existing building to get to the current condition. At this time the original building is beginning to show more major issues that will cost excessive amounts of money to rectify. A layout of the building and the dates of each addition/remodel can be found in the Appendix of this report. From an educational perspective, the Wisconsin Department of Instruction rates this school (2013-2014 data) as “Exceeds Expectations.� It has a score of 76.2% which is higher than the vast majority of the middle schools in the state. This school exceeds the state Priority Area standards in student growth and closing gaps, yet there are pressing building issues that will need to be addressed for this school to continue in its present state.

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

MIDDLE SCHOOL ENERGY USE

E

nergy use at the middle school is much lower than the average middle school in Wisconsin. As was detailed for the high school, the heating/electrical systems between the high school and the middle school are shared, but the heating systems do not match the floor space for the schools. For this reason, the numbers are going to look good for the middle school and poor for the high school when really they are both right around average as a whole.

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

PRIORITY FACILITIES PROJECTS AT THE MIDDLE SCHOOL:

MS. 1 - Structural/ Code Issues (Item No. 2, 11, 20, 33, 34, and 37)

T

Brick Deterioration

he Middle School is comprised of multiple buildings acting as one continuous unit. Built originally in 1922, with additions constructed in 1939, 1969, 1984 and most recently 1996, this building is now showing complications of its past outlined below by section. 1922 two-story building issues: • Above grade brick is showing deterioration • Roof decking is wood, with minimal insulation • Sanitary system venting – minimal vent stacks with no easy fix to add more at this point • Multi-level hallways leading to issues with ADA compliance • Current ADA lift is problematic, needs replacement (replacement parts availability is virtually nonexistent) • Current elevator is in need of replacement or complete Multi-Level Issues renovation due to reliability issues that are typical of equipment of this age • HVAC system needs replacement due to below grade tunnel used for air delivery o Not currently a ductwork system o Issues with access to tunnels (OSHA confined space) o Microbial growth issues o Air quality issues o June-aire system is obsolete o Not a zoned controlled system o Need to upgrade to a direct digital type control system o Currently have code issue due to the open floor drains that are contained in the cement duct tunnel system Aging HVAC System

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015 1922 two-story building issues continued: • Structural issues with below grade brick rotting. This can be seen in fitness room; currently painted, but is beginning to crumble. It would be a major cost to remedy this issue occurring throughout the building. • Windows need replacement • Toilet rooms need replacement • Electrical service needs replacement • Electrical panels need replacement

Brick Rotting

1939 three-story building: • Above grade brick is showing deterioration • Roof decking is wood, with minimal insulation • Sanitary system venting – minimal vent stacks and there are no easy fixes to add more at this point • No custodial closets on 2nd or 3rd floors for staff to place mops, buckets and maintenance items away from students

RECOMMENDATION

Aging Electrical Service

We recommend replacement of the 1922 and 1939 additions with new construction. Option 1 would be to be construct behind the existing site. Demolition of the other existing buildings may occur after the new ones have been built to allow for students to continue utilizing the space. Option 2 would be to demolish and build a new addition in the current space and attempt to rent space from the community for classes. This would still leave issues of no outside green space for the children.

NEXT STEPS

P

roceeding will require approval from the District and the community. From that point, an architectural/engineering team would be assembled to begin the process of determining the best course of action. CESA 10 can be of further assistance with the process of selecting teams that can implement the selected projects.

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

MS. 2 - Security Systems (Item No. 21)

T

he security camera system that exists is in average condition and has some locations where additional cameras could be added. Entryways are uncontrolled and need to be redesigned for better security. In the 1922 and 1939 additions there are multiple staircases that cannot be monitored on a continual basis.

Where to spend limited funds in school districts is a never ending struggle between school facilities, other departments, and community and student needs. Technology changes and violence in schools have forced schools to reallocate monies to help bring their school security needs into the 21st century. Security at the Mosinee District could be improved to help avoid possible issues in the future. At present, the students, staff, and public access the building at various points. Creating vestibules that funnel visitors to the main office is a first-line defense strategy many schools are adopting. School safety issues have changed considerably over the past 10 to 20 years, and protecting the campus from unwanted visitors is one of the most important focus areas. No one should be allowed to enter a school campus without first interacting with a staff member to ensure they are authorized to be there and are complying with specific school check-in regulations. No one, other than students and staff, should be inside the school, unescorted, without a valid visitor badge; however, with the community pool within the high/middle school complex there could be an issue regarding how to secure this type of access.

Directive Signage

Clear Signage

Wayfinding on the site should be evident to visitors with good site signage and design elements that direct visitors to the main entrance thus making those intruders more visible when out of place. Site signage should also be designed to not allow hiding spaces and possibly be elevated to monitor possible hiding intruders. The location and layout of the main entrance to the building is a crucial consideration of school safety. The administrative suite should be located at the main entrance, and the office area should have a good, unobstructed view of the site to allow for passive supervision.

Once the school day starts, all entrances except the main entrance should be locked down. A security vestibule, which forces arriving visitors into the reception area of the main office, allows school staff to check-in visitors and understand who is in the building at all times.

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

“Panic” buttons at the reception area allow the reception staff to alert police and the rest of the staff in the case of an emergency. If there is a security emergency, pressing this button notifies the school staff of the need for a lock-down, and also calls 911 to alert the police. If there is no dedicated, full-time school resource officer on site, the main reception area is also where video surveillance of the school building and site can be monitored and recorded. Keypad access and automated door lock “buzzers” are a good way to control access. They can be installed at the outside door or at the door in the secure vestibule that leads to the reception area. In either case, this location should be monitored with a camera and provide two-way audio communication with a receptionist. See below an example of a secure entrance with a large exit path. Guests will enter through the secure office due to the interior doors being locked. This type of secured entrance was installed at the Mosinee Elementary School in 2007.

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

SECURITY AIDS Cameras

S

urveillance cameras can also provide "virtual window" sightlines in cases where schools have limited personnel. Cameras in high-risk areas, such as high school parking lots or low-traffic spaces behind outbuildings, can be useful when Districts don't have the security personnel to staff real-time video displays. Use of high resolution IP surveillance cameras along the school perimeter that are equipped with video analytics and programmed to detect motion and other abnormalities could send out alerts to office staff when someone is approaching the building during times when class is in session and traffic should be low, giving more time to react to suspicious characters.

Locks

T

he next layer of school security is at the entrances to the building. In general, the number of entrances should be limited to the minimum needed for operation of the building and life safety requirements. Fewer entrances result in fewer access points to monitor. Keeping track of keys to exterior doors is a constant problem for school leaders. Unauthorized access and use of keys to enter the building is a serious security concern. Many school systems are choosing to install magnetic locks with keypads or card readers on all exterior doors to solve this problem. These systems offer the ability to change access permissions, and monitor who is entering the building that a traditional key system cannot. Staff identification and security has come a long way in the past few years. Newer technology utilized in access cards has sped up the process of gaining access to building entrances. No longer does a person have to run the card through a reader like a credit card to ‘talk’ to the main computer. Proximity or “touch and go” cards utilize strips in the card itself to identify the card to the computer. Cards have been modernized to allow pictures and graphics to personalize the once bulky plastic cards. It is now commonplace to see staff with their cards hung around their neck along with visiting guests and others authorized to be within the space. 39


Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

PROPOSED SOLUTIONS High School and Middle School • Create secure entries at existing spaces o High School – already lends itself to creating a secure space. Will need some front office renovation as well as door and hardware upgrades to make this work efficiently. o Middle School – the way the 1939 addition is attached to the 1969 building creates an issue with the existing 2nd story stairs. A vestibule will need to be added with additional doors to keep visitors from going to the 2nd story without checking into the office first. Will need a remodel of front office to funnel guests into this space correctly. • New ID badges for staff • Install secure locks (magnetic or electric strikes) at all exterior doors • Eliminate the need for staff building entry keys • Provide doors with intelligent proxy card readers for staff to enter (based on parameters) • Add wayfinding signage for visitors to quickly know where and how to get to the front entrance for admission during daytime hours • Add movable gates to allow after-hours custodial staff to eliminate unauthorized personnel (students or public) from getting into areas they should not. Funnel the public from the pool/gym to the parking lot and not into the rest of the school

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• Install new IP cameras with recording capability o Entry o Playground o Hallways o Gym o Outside of locker rooms o Parking lots o Public areas o Pool


Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

MS. 3 - Space Issues (Item No. 17, 26, 34, and 37)

HEATING EQUIPMENT/AIR HANDLING EQUIPMENT

T

he picture included in this report shows one of the rooms that has air handling and heating equipment in the middle school. There is no storage space for janitorial supplies and so the mechanical room becomes a janitor’s closet. There are no facilities to empty the mop buckets into so this must be done in a separate room. Also, there isn’t any room to store the floor scrubber so that is parked in the hallway.

The lack of separate space for heating equipment and janitorial supplies and equipment isn’t safe, efficient, or conducive to maintenance. As with the high school side of the facility, the middle school side is in desperate need of storage space.

ELECTRICAL PANELS

Air Handling Equipment and Storage

E

lectrical panels need to have at least three feet of space around them and the rooms that they are located in should be clean and free of any stored items. Because there is a limited amount of storage space in the high/middle school facility, the rooms that house the electrical panels have a variety of items being stored in them. This raises the potential for code issues and makes maintenance difficult.

Electrical Crowding

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

GYM/CAFETERIA

T

he gym and cafeteria are in good condition, but they are very heavily utilized and there is a need for additional space for athletic practices and for lunch.

Gymnasium

Cafeteria Crowding

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Athletic practices are held at all times of the evening to accommodate the needs of the students. The cafeteria is used for five different lunches to accommodate grades 4-8. Each lunch hour runs approximately 16 minutes long because the District does not have space that is large enough to combine grades. The cafeteria is used for breakfast and throughout the day for study hall and for groups of students to gather. In addition, the cafeteria is home to many different after school activities and evening community activities. If the older sections of the middle school are razed and new facilities are constructed, additional space for athletics and cafeteria space should be a high priority.


Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

MOSINEE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

M

osinee Elementary School is located at 600 12th Street and serves approximately 600+ students in grades Pre-K through Third. The multi story school is in very good shape for its age with attention to ongoing maintenance details evident throughout the building campus.

From an educational perspective, the Wisconsin Department of Instruction rates this school (20132014 data) as “Exceeds Expectations.� It has a score of 77.9% which is higher than the majority of the elementary schools in the state. This school exceeds the state Priority Area standards in student achievement and growth. The fact that the facility has been well maintained to the present could be part of the reason for this achievement. There are pressing issues that will need to be addressed for this school to continue in its present state which are outlined in the following pages.

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ENERGY USE

T

he energy profile for the Mosinee Elementary School isn’t typical for schools around the state. The reason the energy profile looks so different is because the facility has a geothermal heating and cooling system installed. These types of systems greatly reduce the need for natural gas heating while increasing the facility’s electrical usage. The graph shows this with a very high natural gas ranking (lower usage) and a lower than average electric percentile (higher usage) compared to other elementary facilities. The overall energy use is something that’s more useful in comparing this building to others around the state, and it shows that the Mosinee Elementary School is more energy efficient than 88% of the elementary buildings in Wisconsin.

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

PRIORITY FACILITIES PROJECTS AT THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

ES. 1 - Security Systems (Item No. 21)

T

Security Camera

he cameras that are in place at the elementary school are not working. When the 2007 addition occurred the cameras were not upgraded and were not made functional. A complete upgrade of the facility's security system should be strongly considered with new IP cameras installed along with the necessary system components.

ES. 2 - 1975 Heating and Cooling Equipment (Item No. 26)

T

wo separate boiler plants exist at the elementary school. The 1993 addition boiler plant is in good condition. The 1975 section of the building has a boiler plant that should be replaced due to age and its low energy efficiency. This project would include replacement of the boiler, system pumps, and direct digital controls. The geothermal system that is in place is in good condition.

Aging Boiler

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

ES. 4 - Cooling Equipment (Item No. 27)

T

Aging Air Conditioning Unit

he old Trane DX air conditioning unit is near the end of its useful life and should be replaced due to the high probability of failure and because of its low efficiency. There is a complication in replacing this cooling unit because extensive work will need to be done to put a new evaporator coil in the air handling equipment due to lack of access. This could add significantly to the cost. Other cooling equipment is in average condition for its age.

ES. 5 - HVAC Pipe Insulation (Item No. 31)

T

Exposed Piping

he asbestos pipe insulation was removed in the elementary school but some piping is now exposed as a result. Having piping with no insulation causes issues with energy loss and the inability to control temperature in mechanical rooms. This project would typically be completed when the new boilers and pumps were installed. The existing pipes require modifications to incorporate the needed upgrades. Depending on the location and temperature of the water within the pipes, there is a risk that someone could be burned on the uninsulated pipes as well. Insulating the pipes is a relatively inexpensive project to undertake and the financial payback is usually short. For all of these reasons, the project involving insulating the piping was deemed to be a priority at the elementary school. 46


Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

ES. 6 - Air Handling Equipment (Item No. 34)

T

he 1975 section has comfort issues due to the age and design of the HVAC system. Many times in a school setting, the HVAC system was not the top priority when the facility was being constructed. If the construction budget needs to be cut, that usually means that the HVAC system will not be as robust as it could be. There are times when some simple retrofits can be done years down the line to correct for the compromises that were made during the construction process and sometimes it takes a complete overhaul of the system. Based on the age of the system and its condition, the HVAC system in the 1975 section of the elementary school should be redesigned to eliminate inefficiencies and comfort issues. The installation of a new system rather than a renovation of the old system can take new technologies into account for greater savings on maintenance and energy. Further engineering would be needed to describe all of the options.

Aging HVAC System

ES. 3 - Playground Area (Item No. 23)

W

Water Pooling on Playground

ater is currently pooling on the blacktop near the playground facility. This should be corrected to prevent safety concerns when the weather is cold and to prevent deterioration of the surface. All other parking lots are in good condition although a redesign is necessary. A major concern involving parking lots at the elementary school and the safety and effectiveness of the drop off/ pick up area should be considered. 47


Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

***ELEMENTARY PARKING LOT: PICK UP/DROP OFF

T

ransportation concerns exist with the layout of the elementary parking lot. There are currently only two lanes for drop off and pick up. This condensed area causes a high probability for accidents to occur. A new transportation layout could minimize the potential for accidents. A new configuration could be as simple as repainting the existing lots and reorienting the traffic flows, or it could require some paving and a creation of additional parking lots to better accommodate the high traffic flow and to meet safety needs of the students.

***This issue was brought to the attention of CESA 10 by the District and is not included in the Prioritization Matrix. If the issue is deemed a safety issue, it could be prioritized highly—especially if the cost/solution is not excessive.  

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

MOSINEE DISTRICT OFFICE

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

DS. 1 - Sanitary Sewer (Item No. 44)

PRIORITY FACILITIES PROJECTS AT THE DISTRICT OFFICE AND THE OUTBUILDINGS

T

he district office is actually a former educational building that has been re-purposed and converted into offices and conference rooms. Because of the long history of the facility, there are some issues that arise that aren’t normally seen in this type of facility. One such issue is the failure of a cistern at this site.

The failing cistern is below ground and poses risks to safety if it collapses. It also creates a functional issue. The cistern will need to be replaced due to its poor condition. This facility is on city water only and is not on city sewer. City sewer is not available at a reasonable length on the south side of Hwy 153 at this time. If the city does not expand sewer service past this location, then the district will need to fix the cistern issue without the aid of the city utilities.

DS. 2 - Walls (Item No. 2)

T

he chimney at the district office is deteriorating and is in need of repair. This is an easy fix for a mason and necessary to minimize future repairs. The sooner this can be done the better so that the brick does not continue to deteriorate. There is also an area on the east side of the building where the siding was damaged and should be repaired. This is purely an aesthetic issue, but since it is low cost, it can be done without much impact to the overall budget.

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

DS. 3, DS. 4 Heating & Cooling Equipment (Item No.26 & 27)

T

he heating and cooling equipment at the district office is comprised of several residential style furnaces each providing heat for a different zone within the building. There are corresponding residential condensers providing cooling for each zone as well. All of the heating and cooling equipment at the district office was installed at the same time and is requiring more and more service work to keep it running. This equipment should be replaced to improve efficiencies and also reduce maintenance costs. This facility does not have a floor mounted slop sink so staff are currently lifting buckets up into an elevated sink which is a safety concern.

Aging Residential Style Furnace

Elevated Sink

Elevated Sink

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

MOSINEE OUTBUILDINGS OB.1 - High School Facility (Item No. 12)

T

Uneven Floors

his building is located outside of the high school. The floor in the building is a combination of dirt, concrete and asphalt and is uneven. Because this building is used as a storage facility, people are often carrying or searching for items and are not concentrating on the uneven flooring creating a trip hazard. The floors are not the only thing that needs to be improved in the storage building. The doors are in need of replacement and the District is in dire need of a place to service maintenance equipment including snow removal equipment, district vehicles, lawn machinery, etc.

Damaged Doors

The best option is to tear down the existing structure and construct a new building that will accommodate the District’s current and future storage needs and year round machine repair.

Storage

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

OB.2 - Roof (Item No. 1)

T

he roof on the garage behind the district office has asphalt shingles that are cupped and in need of replacement. The steel roof on the white storage shed that is located to the north of the middle school is rusted. The shed roof could be replaced, but a replacement of the building should be considered as well.

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

SUMMARY:

I

n summary, the Mosinee School District has been well maintained and administered, but there are major facility needs primarily due to a lack of space and an aging infrastructure.

The most efficient path to a safer and more effective learning environment is to prioritize projects that need to occur and determine both a short and long term facility plan that aligns with the goals and budget of the Mosinee School District. *Estimated costs were provided to the District by CESA 10 and are taken into consideration in the Prioritization Matrix; however, costs are not included in this version of the report. **Photos of the Project Prioritization Matrix are included in the Appendix for discussion purposes. The tool will be delivered to and retained by the District in Excel format for maximum usability.

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

APPENDIX HS. 1 - Classroom tables, desks, and chairs (Item No. 14)

NEW SCIENCE ROOMS/LABS VS REMODELING

T

here are several issues with science labs causing the need to remodel or build new. With the increased emphasis on STEM education within the curriculum of Wisconsin schools, the current facilities are in need of updating to accomplish the goals.

What is STEM? “…an interdisciplinary approach to learning where rigorous academic concepts are coupled with real-world lessons as students apply science, technology, engineering, and mathematics in contexts that make connections between school, community, work, and the global enterprise enabling the development of STEM literacy and with it the ability to compete in the new economy” -- Tsupros, Kohler, & Hallinen, 2009 PER WI Department of Public Instruction “STEM-conversant graduates help states compete in the global economy. These "high-tech" fields are engines of economic development with the potential to lift standards of living and bolster economic security for generations of Wisconsinites. Experts believe STEM-related job openings in Wisconsin will more than double between 2008 and 2018, and that in the 21st Century all careers will require some facility with STEM.”

ISSUES WITH THE EXISTING HIGH SCHOOL FACILITIES • ADA accessibility – This is a federal requirement o No accessible workstation/approach o Aisle width is not compliant o Eyewash/shower height - ADA guidelines state that at least one out of five eyewash or shower stations in a specific lab area (e.g., Chemistry) must meet ADA requirements

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

• Lack of electrical power • Existing outlets not ground fault protected at sinks (GFCI) • Not compatible with new WI science curriculum standards • Existing wood casework is well past its expected useful lifespan (was already re-purposed once) • Need dedicated storage of chemicals with exhaust air • Need emergency master gas shut off switch • Existing lab tops most likely contain asbestos fibers – (this is standard for their age) limited application for future reuse as they cannot be modified (cut or machined). Dispose properly to remove them and get them off the building asbestos report.

• Flooring is 9x9 vinyl composition tile (VCT) that typically always contains asbestos fibers will need to be abated • Lacking vacuum breakers on water supply at wash stations/prep areas could cause contamination at other parts of school • Acid waste piping is minimal if not almost absent in existing rooms (leading to accelerated sanitary pipe decay and pipe collapse which has recently occurred at a District building) • All new equipment will be required, including fume hoods.

EXPECTED REMODELING COSTS - THE ISSUES Existing building does not have the capacity for the following utilities and equipment: • Sewer/water service • Electrical service • Heating load of the remodeled space due to exhaust air requirements • Ventilation needs of the remodeled space • Fresh air requirements not being met • No make-up air unit to replace air being removed currently • Exhausting of air (both fume hood and room exhaust)

Due to the location of these classrooms and the decisions made during design and construction of the 1996 addition, the current classrooms are served via an HVAC system that is too small for the current laboratory/science educational needs and can not handle any additional load. Adding to the load on these current utilities will not work. Electrical service is maxed out. HVAC can not support the additional loads that will occur in these rooms when they are brought up to code. Costs are estimated at about $350 per square feet to construct a new building or higher based on equipment. When adding on to the present school, it was assumed that a new multi-classroom science wing be placed on the north end of the school where the portable classroom currently sits. Expected costs to remodel the existing rooms to the new standards are typically estimated to be lower than constructing new rooms; however, as presented above the option to remodel these areas is not available. 56


Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

PROPOSED SOLUTION - ADD DEDICATED SCIENCE WING TO HIGH SCHOOL

W

ith today’s students being more mobile than previous generations, districts need to have facilities that not only meet the basic requirements but also allow for advanced placement courses within the framework of the curriculum. School districts that are willing to allow for advanced achievement are going to see an increase in students wanting to come to that district since the barriers of enrollment have been recently restructured (open enrollment). Adding a dedicated wing of classrooms would allow for the following: • Electrical – power as required for the class room experiments • HVAC – heating and cooling/air changes as required for experiments/chemical storage requirements all while not impacting the current school (allows for air conditioning of this addition which is recommended since you will be exhausting air year round due to chemical storage) • Exhaust – adding central high plume exhaust fan connected to all fume hoods in new wing. This would be tied in to the HVAC to supply make-up air without issues to existing building. Dedicated chemical exhaust system.

• Plumbing – new sanitary lateral for service to the labs not adding to the existing capacity within the buildings. Reduce chances of sanitary lateral failure. • Sprinkler system – add piping required for the new addition only keeping costs down reduces insurance costs • Updates to security (cameras and occupancy sensors since this will be a high value area now) • Area lighting– LED’s tied to motion detectors to reduce load • Allow for online courses with interactive classrooms and Smartboards Estimated New Building Costs Chemistry Lab 1440 sq ft +200 chemical storage

$574,000

Biology Lab 1440 sq ft +400 sq ft prep room

$644,000

Physics Lab 1440 sq ft

$504,000

FAB Lab 1440 sq ft

$400,000 - $500,000

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

Many high schools still plan their lab/classrooms for specific scientific disciplines: Physics, Chemistry, Biology and some sort of introductory science course. The specific requirements of each of these spaces can be different, but could, if desired, be accommodated in a common design. Investigations into which students work more independently are common and students are often required to design their own investigations to answer specific questions.

pendulums and other devices. Longer, wider tables (7x3 feet) are useful since the larger surface can easily support, say a 2-meter air track. The top material could be resin or wood butcher block (which lends itself more readily to C clamps).

High school science teaching spaces should be primarily a combination lab/classroom with an assortment of auxiliary spaces to supplement these basic building blocks. Perimeter counters, base cabinets and sinks, and wall cabinets are common; although, in some specific areas fixed islands may be desired. Per the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) a maximum of 24 students should be housed in a lab/classroom and a minimum of 60 square feet per student provided for a total room size of 1,440 square feet. A shape closer to square than long and narrow provides more opportunities for flexible furniture arrangements and is particularly appropriate for Physics. The classroom should contain multiple spaces that provide for long-term multidisciplinary projects, individual and small group learning, inquiry lessons, project-based learning, and problem solving. Flexibility in the arrangement of space, which includes movable workstations is highly recommended. Universal design allows students with disabilities to fully participate and have access to all facilities, technology, and safety equipment. Physics lab/classrooms generally require fewer sinks and much more flexible space. High ceilings of 10 feet or more are desirable. A suspension apparatus capable of supporting at least 300 pounds per linear foot should hang beneath the ceiling to provide for the suspension of

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Biology lab/classrooms require a minimum of one large sink for every four students with both hot and cold water. Tables for lecture and class discussion should be separate from tables for lab work so that students can easily move between each activity without disturbing set-ups on the lab tables. Fixed teacher demonstration tables waste floor space and create a very inflexible area at the “front� of the classroom; many new facilities are providing a rolling demonstration surface consisting of a 72x32 inch resin counter top with various base cabinets for storage beneath. The entire assembly is mounted on four to six heavy duty casters so that the finished height is 36 inches, flush with perimeter counter tops. When water or gas is needed for a demonstration, the unit can be wheeled to a perimeter sink or gas jet; otherwise, it may be located anywhere within the lab/classroom. The 32 inch dimension allows the unit to pass through a 36 inch wide door into a prep room.


Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

Chemistry is the one area in which the move to a totally flexible lab space may be more difficult. The chemistry faculty should evaluate their need for fixed lab stations with respect to the use of corrosive materials that would require corrosionresistant piping and an acid-dilution system and the need for a central gas system. Many chemistry programs are moving to a system in which the quantities of corrosive chemicals used by students are minimal and the student use of gas is also minimal. In these instances, a single teacher demonstration station with an under counter acid neutralization tank and gas jet could serve the needs of the entire class thereby allowing perimeter sinks and movable tables for the student lab stations. Central acid neutralization systems with corrosion-resistant glass or polypropylene piping are expensive; any aciddilution system requires periodic maintenance to replace the limestone chips within the dilution tank as they are consumed. Central gas systems

are also expensive requiring extensive piping and an emergency push-button shutoff system which interconnects with the electrical power system to immediately shut down the gas and power in a room. Using hot plates and/or butane cartridges for small burners eliminates this added expense and can increase safety within the chemistry lab/ classroom. Chemicals should not be stored within the lab/ classroom nor should they be stored within the prep room. A separate, lockable chemical storage room should be provided with its own ventilation system providing approximately ten air changes per hour. Vents at the floor and at the ceiling should be included along with a make-up air system that brings in fresh air to replace the air that the exhaust system removes.

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

DEVELOPMENT

A

dministrators and facility planners are often faced with the challenge of determining the quantity and types of spaces needed for their science programs. Science facilities pose a greater challenge because of the complexity of the spaces and the emerging pedagogies in the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) curriculum. The curriculum is influenced both by trends in science (external influences) and individual institutional goals (internal influences). External influences come from society at large: the academic institution has little or no control over them. Internal influences are those that the institution is able to control and change.

EXTERNAL INFLUENCES External influences include growth in the sciences, the needs of industry and employers for skilled and degreed professionals, and the evolving learning modalities of students. Let’s examine them in more detail. Growth in science enrollment: Institutions need to plan for growth in their STEM programs. Recognizing why enrollment is up provides insight regarding how much and what types of space will be needed in the near future. There are several reasons for growth. Hospitals and health-related employers need educated workers. Currently there is a deficit in the number of health science graduates vs. the demand and that trend will continue in the near future (World Health Organization, 2006). As a result, many community colleges and four-year undergraduate programs are experiencing an increase in enrollment in biologic and health-related sciences. Finally, there has been an increased interest in sustainability, climate, and energy issues, resulting in more undergraduate programs and an increase in the number of students taking biology and environmental science courses (Vincent, 2009).

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015 Industry and employer needs: A lack of supply of degreed professionals has prompted corporations to partner with higher education institutions, either directly or indirectly, to encourage degree programs that feed graduates into their industries. An example of this type of interaction is the Stoughton Area School District’s state-of-the-art digital fabrication laboratory FAB LAB. The FAB LAB idea and concept was brought to Stoughton by Cummins Filtration's Mike Connor after he visited the only other high school FAB LAB in the United States in Mahtomedi, MN. The school district worked with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to design the courses, while support from the community fully funded the FAB LAB project with donations from local foundations, Cummins Filtration, Nelson Global Products, and Universal Silencer (all local businesses with a need for well educated ‘STEM’ emphasis employees). Not only are companies interested in hiring STEM graduates but trained workers as well. The result of these partnerships is an increase in types of degree programs and numbers of graduates in specific science and engineering disciplines. Student learning modalities: How students learn has been the subject of research for decades. What we can determine with certainty is that our understanding of the ways students learn is evolving. There are several different learning modalities: audio (lecturing), visual, and tactile or kinesthetic. Studies have shown that retention increases more than 600% when a lecture is accompanied by visual or other type of interaction (U.S. Dept. of Labor, 1996). Interactive learning that incorporates all three learning modalities creates more engaged learners and successful educational experiences. As we learn more about what works, teaching facilities need to adapt to address the different ways students learn and accommodate effective instructional methods. Technology has also brought a new level of access by and expectation from students. The computer in students’ cell phones is “a million times cheaper, a thousand times more powerful and about a hundred times smaller than” the one computer available at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1965 (XPLANE/Economist, 2009). Handheld devices serve not only as computational and research tools but are also suppliers of specialized scientific and analytical applications. Today's learning environments must incorporate a wide range of learning modalities, encompassing visual, audio, and tactile senses, and create interactive learning environments that appropriately integrate technological tools. The better the institution understands the external influences on its curriculum the easier it will be for the institution to define its needs.

61


Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

INTERNAL INFLUENCES

I

nfluences that are under the educational institution's control are typically a matter of funding, policy, and/or preference. For our purposes, they are divided into categories: utilization, learning activities, operations, and safety. These can start to define solutions for planning for curriculum. Utilization: The utilization rate is defined as the number of hours a teaching space is occupied compared with the number of hours the room can reasonably be considered available. As a rule of thumb, the utilization rate of a lab should not exceed 65% if enrollment growth is expected. Once utilization reaches 85%, the lab is considered at its maximum capacity for scheduling, since class change-over and lab set-up need to be accommodated. Furthermore, utilization over 85% is discouraged, as back-to-back scheduling limits interaction and informal discussion between teachers and students.

One way to increase lab utilization is to consider sharing opportunities among courses. For example, some general biology and environmental courses have similar needs in terms of seating and equipment. Advanced courses in chemistry and environmental sciences can often share analytical instruments within a lab. Sharing lab space is certainly a viable option for many introductory courses.

62

Class size will also have an impact not only on the design of the lab space but the number of lab spaces as well. We often find that institutional standards assign the same amount of space per student to chemistry labs as to biology labs. This practice is not recommended as chemistry labs need to incorporate more safety equipment, i.e., fume hoods, than is required for general courses. Learning activities: The manner in which learning takes place depends on the philosophy and pedagogies of the department. This applies to activities both inside and outside the classroom. Most of today’s science programs recognize the importance of project-based learning and teaching scientific inquiry. Organizations such as Project Kaleidoscope (PKAL) advocate planning spaces for active learning and student engagement. Rather than teaching a scientific exercise with specific outcomes, the approach focuses on inquiry and collaborative learning —posing questions that may incorporate different disciplines. Today’s learning environments need to accommodate multiple disciplines and collaborative group projects.


Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015 Hands-on activities such as those found in upperlevel biology often require a greater number of wet benches, examination areas, biosafety protection, and sensitive optical equipment. Environmental science studies can be enhanced by incorporating access to the outdoors and analytical equipment for environmental samples. Advanced chemistry labs require a greater number of fume hoods than introductory courses. The pedagogies and their corresponding activities should drive the design. Finally, extending the learning environment outside the classroom increases opportunities to reach more students. The institution can put "science on display" similar to a science museum, encouraging learning outside the lab via interactive displays and exhibits, prominent collections in public areas, and even views of active labs. This approach has several benefits: it creates casual learning in public spaces, attracts non-science majors, and fosters scientific dialogue. Encouraging non-structured learning can help increase dialogue among various science disciplines and interest among all students. Operations: Every institution’s environmental health and safety (EHS) department should have input as to protocols, procedures, and restrictions. Some EHS departments are directly responsible for lab preparation and include full-time technicians who set up each lab between classes. Other institutions may require instructors to do their own prep work or supervise students in a controlled area. Each of these approaches suggests different arrangements of prep areas. Safety, safety, and safety: Much has been written about safe lab practices (DiBardnis, Baum, First, Gatwood, & Seth, 2001). There are a number of good practices when planning for safety, including visibility, zoning, and transparency. Labs should accommodate good visibility for both the student and the instructor, so that potentially hazardous activities can be monitored closely and effortlessly. Hazardous areas should be zoned so that they are segregated from high traffic. High traffic areas should be kept near the entry to the lab away from fume hoods which could become unsafe with high occupancies and increased traffic. These practices are especially important in an educational setting where students have not yet had rigorous training in protocols and procedures. 63


64 49'-6"

HC CLEAR AREAS (TYP.)

FIRE EXTINGUISHER MASTER GAS SHUTOFF

SAFETY SHOWER & EYEWASH W/ FD

(2) WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE TABLES @ 34" HIGH

WHEELCHAIR TURNING AND CLEAR SPACE

WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE COUNTER @ 34" HIGH W/ OPTIONAL BASE CABINETS

FRIDGE

OPTIONAL FUME HOOD/ BIOSAFETY CABINET

FRONT FACING / LARGE GROUP INSTRUCTION TEAMS OF 2 CONFIGURATION

TEACHING WALL

MOVEABLE DEMO TABLE

1,440 SF SCIENCE LAB

SCIENCE SINKS INCLUDE H&C WATER, GAS (OPTIONAL AIR OR VACUUM)

13'-4"

HC CLEAR AREAS (TYP.)

400 SF PREP ROOM

10'-4"

OPTIONAL FUME HOOD/ BIOSAFETY CABINET

FIRE EXTINGUISHER MASTER GAS SHUTOFF

SAFETY SHOWER & EYEWASH W/ FD

WHEELCHAIR TURNING AND CLEAR SPACE

(2) WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE TABLES @ 34" HIGH

WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE COUNTER @ 34" HIGH W/ OPTIONAL BASE CABINETS

SEE SHEET 2 OF 3 FOR ALTERNATE CASEWORK CONFIGURATION 4'

4'

INSTRUCTOR'S STATION

LAB CONFIGURATION

49'-6"

TEACHING WALL

MOVEABLE DEMO TABLE

2'

COUNTER @ 36" HIGH W/ OPTIONAL BASE CABINETS

1,440 SF SCIENCE LAB

SCIENCE SINKS INCLUDE H&C WATER, GAS (OPTIONAL AIR OR VACUUM)

FIRE EXTINGUISHER MASTER GAS SHUTOFF

1. STURDY, STANDING-HEIGHT TWO-STUDENT TABLES SHOULD MATCH THE HEIGHT OF PERIPHERAL COUNTER TOPS SO THAT STUDENTS PERFORM LAB WORK STANDING (PREFERABLE) AND "SEAT WORK" ON STOOLS. TWO-STUDENT TABLES (NOT LARGER) ARE RECOMMENDED SO THEY CAN BE MOVED INTO A VARIETY OF CONFIGURATIONS. ADJUSTABLE-HEIGHT TABLES ARE NOT RECOMMENDED. 2. STUB UTILITIES WHERE NEEDED FOR POTENTIAL FUTURE CONFIGURATIONS. 3. SINKS SHOULD BE WIDE AND DEEP ENOUGH TO ACCOMMODATE BUCKETS AND OTHER LARGE CONTAINERS. 4. OPTIONAL FUME HOODS AND BIOSAFETY CABINETS SHOULD BE ACCESSIBLE FROM BOTH THE PREP ROOM AND THE CLASSROOM. 5. PROVIDE FULL BLACK-OUT WINDOW TREATMENT IN LABS. 6. PROVIDE MOVEABLE TEACHER DEMONSTRATION TABLES (NOT FIXED). 7. EACH LAB PREP ROOM SHOULD INCLUDE ONE REFRIGERATOR AND ONE DISHWASHER. 8. AT LEAST TWO MEANS OF EGRESS FROM EACH LAB SHOULD BE PROVIDED (THE BUILDING CODE MAY REQUIRE THIS, DEPENDING ON AREA). 9. PROVIDE VISUAL ACCESS BETWEEN LABS AND PREP ROOMS / PREP ROOM DOORS. 10. SHARED SPACES CAN BE REDUCED IN AREA, WITH SAVED AREAS REALLOCATED ELSEWHERE AS NEEDED. 11. PREP ROOMS AND CHEMICAL STORAGE SHOULD BE KEYED IN SUCH A WAY TO PROVIDE LIMITED ACCESS, FOR REQUIRED PERSONNEL ONLY. 12. AT THE DISTRICTS DISCRETION, CHEMICAL STORAGE CAN BE DIVIDED INTO SATELLITE STORAGE ROOMS, BUT CHEMICAL STORAGE IN PREP ROOMS IS DISCOURAGED. 13. SAFETY EQUIPMENT AND INFORMATION SUCH AS FIRE BLANKETS, STERILE EYE-PROTECTION, AND MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS (MSDS) SHOULD BE LOCATED IN HIGHLY-VISIBLE AND EASILY-ACCESSED PLACES, PREFERABLY NEAR EXITS AND OTHER REQUIRED SAFETY EQUIPMENT. 14. RATHER THAN GREEN HOUSES, CONSIDER DESIGNS THAT ALLOW PLANTS TO BE PLACED ON SHELVES OR MOVEABLE RACKS WITH ACCESS TO LIGHT FROM CLASSROOM WINDOWS.

BEST PRACTICES:

5. NO FIXED CASEWORK IS PERMITTED IN THE CENTRAL FLOOR AREA.

revised 5.16.2011

30'

1 of 3

4. NO LAB RAISED UTILITIES, THAT MAY RESTRICT FLEXABILITY, ARE TO BE PROVIDED IN THE CENTRAL FLOOR AREA OF THE SCIENCE LABS. UTILITIES FROM A GRID SUSPENDED FROM THE CEILING MAY BE NEEDED FOR SOME DISCIPLINES, BUT ONLY IF THE PERIPHERAL UTILITIES CANNOT ACCOMMODATE MOST NEEDS.

3. BOTH LAB AND LECTURE CONFIGURATIONS MUST BE ACCOMMODATED IN EVERY DESIGNATED SCIENCE LAB ROOM. SEPARATE LABS AND LECTURE ROOMS ARE NOT PERMITTED.

2. THE DISTRICT AND DESIGN TEAM SHOULD PROVIDE FOR A SCIENCE LAB LAYOUT THAT ALLOWS AS MUCH FLEXIBILITY AND UNIVERSALITY AS PRACTICAL, GIVEN THE DISTRICTS SCIENCE DEPARTMENT EDUCATIONAL PLAN.

1. THE MSBA ALLOTMENT OF 1,440 NSF FOR EACH SCIENCE LAB IS BASED ON 60 NSF PER STUDENT (24 STUDENTS). SMALLER SCIENCE CLASSROOMS MAY BE CONSIDERED IF THE CLASS SIZE IS SMALLER, WITH A MINIMUM OF 60 NSF PER STUDENT.

REQUIREMENTS:

SAFETY GOGGLE STERILIZER UNIT

MOVEABLE TABLES @ 36" HIGH

1. THESE DIAGRAMS ARE EXAMPLES OF TABLE ARRANGEMENTS THAT CAN ACCOMMODATE A WIDE VARIETY OF ACTIVITIES, GROUPINGS, AND INSTRUCTIONAL CONFIGURATIONS THAT ARE TYPICAL OF LABORATORY WORK AND INSTRUCTION IN SMALL, MEDIUM, AND WHOLE-CLASS GROUPS. THE INTENT IS TO DESIGN SPACES WITH MAXIMUM FLEXIBILITY FOR VARIED USES WITHOUT EXTENSIVE RECONSTRUCTION. 2. THESE PLANS ARE TO BE CONSIDERED STANDARD TEMPLATE CONFIGURATIONS; SPECIFIC SCHOOL DESIGNS MAY VARY FROM THESE STANDARDS. 3. THE ITEMS DESCRIBED BELOW AS "REQUIREMENTS" ARE MANDATORY, OTHER ITEMS ARE MSBA RECOMMENDATIONS ARE TO BE CONSIDERED "BEST PRACTICES."

NOTES:

INSTRUCTOR'S STATION

FIRE EXTINGUISHER MASTER GAS SHUTOFF

SAFETY GOGGLE STERILIZER UNIT

MOVEABLE TABLES @ 36" HIGH

COUNTER @ 36" HIGH W/ OPTIONAL BASE CABINETS

HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE LAB PLAN A

POSSIBLE SCIENCE ROOM/LAB LAYOUTS

• Build a new Science Wing with enough science labs/spaces to meet the needs of current and future students (District recommends at least six).

PROPOSED SOLUTION: Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015


49'-6"

FIRE EXTINGUISHER MASTER GAS SHUTOFF

SAFETY SHOWER & EYEWASH W/ FD 4'

WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE COUNTER @ 34" HIGH W/ OPTIONAL BASE CABINETS

(2) WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE TABLES @ 34" HIGH

WHEELCHAIR TURNING AND CLEAR SPACE

RAMP / MOTION STUDIES CONFIGURATION

TEACHING WALL

MOVEABLE DEMO TABLE

1,440 SF SCIENCE LAB

CENTRAL OPEN DEMONSTRATION AREA

MOVEABLE TABLES @ 36" HIGH

SCIENCE SINKS INCLUDE H&C WATER, GAS (OPTIONAL AIR OR VACUUM)

FRIDGE

OPTIONAL FUME HOOD/ BIOSAFETY CABINET

13'-4"

HC CLEAR AREAS (TYP.)

400 SF PREP ROOM

10'-4"

OPTIONAL FUME HOOD/ BIOSAFETY CABINET

(2) WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE TABLES @ 34" HIGH

WHEELCHAIR TURNING AND CLEAR SPACE

FIRE EXTINGUISHER MASTER GAS SHUTOFF

SAFETY SHOWER & EYEWASH W/ FD

WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE COUNTER @ 34" HIGH W/ OPTIONAL BASE CABINETS

SEE SHEET 1 OF 3 FOR ALTERNATE CASEWORK CONFIGURATION

LAB CONFIGURATION

49'-6"

TEACHING WALL

2'

INSTRUCTOR'S STATION

1,440 SF SCIENCE LAB

4'

MOVEABLE DEMO TABLE

4'

SCIENCE SINKS INCLUDE H&C WATER, GAS (OPTIONAL AIR OR VACUUM)

FIRE EXTINGUISHER MASTER GAS SHUTOFF

1. STURDY, STANDING-HEIGHT TWO-STUDENT TABLES SHOULD MATCH THE HEIGHT OF PERIPHERAL COUNTER TOPS SO THAT STUDENTS PERFORM LAB WORK STANDING (PREFERABLE) AND "SEAT WORK" ON STOOLS. TWO-STUDENT TABLES (NOT LARGER) ARE RECOMMENDED SO THEY CAN BE MOVED INTO A VARIETY OF CONFIGURATIONS. ADJUSTABLE-HEIGHT TABLES ARE NOT RECOMMENDED. 2. STUB UTILITIES WHERE NEEDED FOR POTENTIAL FUTURE CONFIGURATIONS. 3. SINKS SHOULD BE WIDE AND DEEP ENOUGH TO ACCOMMODATE BUCKETS AND OTHER LARGE CONTAINERS. 4. OPTIONAL FUME HOODS AND BIOSAFETY CABINETS SHOULD BE ACCESSIBLE FROM BOTH THE PREP ROOM AND THE CLASSROOM. 5. PROVIDE FULL BLACK-OUT WINDOW TREATMENT IN LABS. 6. PROVIDE MOVEABLE TEACHER DEMONSTRATION TABLES (NOT FIXED). 7. EACH LAB PREP ROOM SHOULD INCLUDE ONE REFRIGERATOR AND ONE DISHWASHER. 8. AT LEAST TWO MEANS OF EGRESS FROM EACH LAB SHOULD BE PROVIDED (THE BUILDING CODE MAY REQUIRE THIS, DEPENDING ON AREA). 9. PROVIDE VISUAL ACCESS BETWEEN LABS AND PREP ROOMS / PREP ROOM DOORS. 10. SHARED SPACES CAN BE REDUCED IN AREA, WITH SAVED AREAS REALLOCATED ELSEWHERE AS NEEDED. 11. PREP ROOMS AND CHEMICAL STORAGE SHOULD BE KEYED IN SUCH A WAY TO PROVIDE LIMITED ACCESS, FOR REQUIRED PERSONNEL ONLY. 12. AT THE DISTRICTS DISCRETION, CHEMICAL STORAGE CAN BE DIVIDED INTO SATELLITE STORAGE ROOMS, BUT CHEMICAL STORAGE IN PREP ROOMS IS DISCOURAGED. 13. SAFETY EQUIPMENT AND INFORMATION SUCH AS FIRE BLANKETS, STERILE EYE-PROTECTION, AND MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS (MSDS) SHOULD BE LOCATED IN HIGHLY-VISIBLE AND EASILY-ACCESSED PLACES, PREFERABLY NEAR EXITS AND OTHER REQUIRED SAFETY EQUIPMENT. 14. RATHER THAN GREEN HOUSES, CONSIDER DESIGNS THAT ALLOW PLANTS TO BE PLACED ON SHELVES OR MOVEABLE RACKS WITH ACCESS TO LIGHT FROM CLASSROOM WINDOWS.

BEST PRACTICES:

5. NO FIXED CASEWORK IS PERMITTED IN THE CENTRAL FLOOR AREA.

revised 5.16.2011

30'

2 of 3

4. NO LAB UTILITIES, THAT MAY RESTRICT FLEXABILITY, ARE TO BE PROVIDED IN THE CENTRAL FLOOR AREA OF THE SCIENCE LABS. UTILITIES FROM A GRID SUSPENDED FROM THE CEILING MAY BE NEEDED FOR SOME DISCIPLINES, BUT ONLY IF THE PERIPHERAL UTILITIES CANNOT ACCOMMODATE MOST NEEDS.

3. BOTH LAB AND LECTURE CONFIGURATIONS MUST BE ACCOMMODATED IN EVERY DESIGNATED SCIENCE LAB ROOM. SEPARATE LABS AND LECTURE ROOMS ARE NOT PERMITTED.

2. THE DISTRICT AND DESIGN TEAM SHOULD PROVIDE FOR A SCIENCE LAB LAYOUT THAT ALLOWS AS MUCH FLEXIBILITY AND UNIVERSALITY AS PRACTICAL, GIVEN THE DISTRICTS SCIENCE DEPARTMENT EDUCATIONAL PLAN.

1. THE MSBA ALLOTMENT OF 1,440 NSF FOR EACH SCIENCE LAB IS BASED ON 60 NSF PER STUDENT (24 STUDENTS). SMALLER SCIENCE CLASSROOMS MAY BE CONSIDERED IF THE CLASS SIZE IS SMALLER, WITH A MINIMUM OF 60 NSF PER STUDENT.

REQUIREMENTS:

SAFETY GOGGLE STERILIZER UNIT

HC CLEAR AREAS (TYP.)

MOVEABLE TABLES @ 36" HIGH

COUNTER @ 36" HIGH W/ OPTIONAL BASE CABINETS

1. THESE DIAGRAMS ARE EXAMPLES OF TABLE ARRANGEMENTS THAT CAN ACCOMMODATE A WIDE VARIETY OF ACTIVITIES, GROUPINGS, AND INSTRUCTIONAL CONFIGURATIONS THAT ARE TYPICAL OF LABORATORY WORK AND INSTRUCTION IN SMALL, MEDIUM, AND WHOLE-CLASS GROUPS. THE INTENT IS TO DESIGN SPACES WITH MAXIMUM FLEXIBILITY FOR VARIED USES WITHOUT EXTENSIVE RECONSTRUCTION. 2. THESE PLANS ARE TO BE CONSIDERED STANDARD TEMPLATE CONFIGURATIONS; SPECIFIC SCHOOL DESIGNS MAY VARY FROM THESE STANDARDS. 3. THE ITEMS DESCRIBED BELOW AS "REQUIREMENTS" ARE MANDATORY, OTHER ITEMS ARE MSBA RECOMMENDATIONS ARE TO BE CONSIDERED "BEST PRACTICES."

NOTES:

FIRE EXTINGUISHER MASTER GAS SHUTOFF

INSTRUCTOR'S STATION

SAFETY GOGGLE STERILIZER UNIT

4'

COUNTER @ 36" HIGH W/ OPTIONAL BASE CABINETS

HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE LAB PLAN B

Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

65


66 49'-6"

TEACHING WALL

MOVEABLE DEMO TABLE

1,440 SF SCIENCE LAB

(2) WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE TABLES @ 34" HIGH

WHEELCHAIR TURNING AND CLEAR SPACE

FIRE EXTINGUISHER MASTER GAS SHUTOFF

SAFETY SHOWER & EYEWASH W/ FD

FRIDGE

OPTIONAL WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE FUME HOOD/ BIOSAFETY COUNTER @ 34" HIGH CABINET W/ OPTIONAL BASE CABINETS

MID-SIZE GROUP / ROBOTICS CONFIGURATION 1

INSTRUCTOR'S STATION

MOVEABLE TABLES @ 36" HIGH

SCIENCE SINKS INCLUDE H&C WATER, GAS (OPTIONAL AIR OR VACUUM)

HC CLEAR AREAS (TYP.)

400 SF PREP ROOM

6'-8"

20'-6"

SEPARATE VENTED METAL CABINETS FOR ORGANICS AND INORGANICS

200 SF CHEMICAL STORAGE

6'-8"

4'-2"

OPTIONAL FUME HOOD/ BIOSAFETY CABINET

FIRE EXTINGUISHER MASTER GAS SHUTOFF

4'

MOVEABLE DEMO TABLE

49'-6"

TEACHING WALL

(2) WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE TABLES @ 34" HIGH

1. STURDY, STANDING-HEIGHT TWO-STUDENT TABLES SHOULD MATCH THE HEIGHT OF PERIPHERAL COUNTER TOPS SO THAT STUDENTS PERFORM LAB WORK STANDING (PREFERABLE) AND "SEAT WORK" ON STOOLS. TWO-STUDENT TABLES (NOT LARGER) ARE RECOMMENDED SO THEY CAN BE MOVED INTO A VARIETY OF CONFIGURATIONS. ADJUSTABLE-HEIGHT TABLES ARE NOT RECOMMENDED. 2. STUB UTILITIES WHERE NEEDED FOR POTENTIAL FUTURE CONFIGURATIONS. 3. SINKS SHOULD BE WIDE AND DEEP ENOUGH TO ACCOMMODATE BUCKETS AND OTHER LARGE CONTAINERS. 4. OPTIONAL FUME HOODS AND BIOSAFETY CABINETS SHOULD BE ACCESSIBLE FROM BOTH THE PREP ROOM AND THE CLASSROOM. 5. PROVIDE FULL BLACK-OUT WINDOW TREATMENT IN LABS. 6. PROVIDE MOVEABLE TEACHER DEMONSTRATION TABLES (NOT FIXED). 7. EACH LAB PREP ROOM SHOULD INCLUDE ONE REFRIGERATOR AND ONE DISHWASHER. 8. AT LEAST TWO MEANS OF EGRESS FROM EACH LAB SHOULD BE PROVIDED (THE BUILDING CODE MAY REQUIRE THIS, DEPENDING ON AREA). 9. PROVIDE VISUAL ACCESS BETWEEN LABS AND PREP ROOMS / PREP ROOM DOORS. 10. SHARED SPACES CAN BE REDUCED IN AREA, WITH SAVED AREAS REALLOCATED ELSEWHERE AS NEEDED. 11. PREP ROOMS AND CHEMICAL STORAGE SHOULD BE KEYED IN SUCH A WAY TO PROVIDE LIMITED ACCESS, FOR REQUIRED PERSONNEL ONLY. 12. AT THE DISTRICTS DISCRETION, CHEMICAL STORAGE CAN BE DIVIDED INTO SATELLITE STORAGE ROOMS, BUT CHEMICAL STORAGE IN PREP ROOMS IS DISCOURAGED. 13. SAFETY EQUIPMENT AND INFORMATION SUCH AS FIRE BLANKETS, STERILE EYE-PROTECTION, AND MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS (MSDS) SHOULD BE LOCATED IN HIGHLY-VISIBLE AND EASILY-ACCESSED PLACES, PREFERABLY NEAR EXITS AND OTHER REQUIRED SAFETY EQUIPMENT. 14. RATHER THAN GREEN HOUSES, CONSIDER DESIGNS THAT ALLOW PLANTS TO BE PLACED ON SHELVES OR MOVEABLE RACKS WITH ACCESS TO LIGHT FROM CLASSROOM WINDOWS.

BEST PRACTICES:

5. NO FIXED CASEWORK IS PERMITTED IN THE CENTRAL FLOOR AREA.

SAFETY GOGGLE STERILIZER UNIT

MOVEABLE TABLES @ 36" HIGH

FIRE EXTINGUISHER MASTER GAS SHUTOFF

revised 5.16.2011

3 of 3

4. NO LAB UTILITIES, THAT MAY RESTRICT FLEXABILITY, ARE TO BE PROVIDED IN THE CENTRAL FLOOR AREA OF THE SCIENCE LABS. UTILITIES FROM A GRID SUSPENDED FROM THE CEILING MAY BE NEEDED FOR SOME DISCIPLINES, BUT ONLY IF THE PERIPHERAL UTILITIES CANNOT ACCOMMODATE MOST NEEDS.

3. BOTH LAB AND LECTURE CONFIGURATIONS MUST BE ACCOMMODATED IN EVERY DESIGNATED SCIENCE LAB ROOM. SEPARATE LABS AND LECTURE ROOMS ARE NOT PERMITTED.

2. THE DISTRICT AND DESIGN TEAM SHOULD PROVIDE FOR A SCIENCE LAB LAYOUT THAT ALLOWS AS MUCH FLEXIBILITY AND UNIVERSALITY AS PRACTICAL, GIVEN THE DISTRICTS SCIENCE DEPARTMENT EDUCATIONAL PLAN.

1. THE MSBA ALLOTMENT OF 1,440 NSF FOR EACH SCIENCE LAB IS BASED ON 60 NSF PER STUDENT (24 STUDENTS). SMALLER SCIENCE CLASSROOMS MAY BE CONSIDERED IF THE CLASS SIZE IS SMALLER, WITH A MINIMUM OF 60 NSF PER STUDENT.

REQUIREMENTS:

2'

1,440 SF SCIENCE LAB

INSTRUCTOR'S STATION

4'

COUNTER @ 36" HIGH W/ OPTIONAL BASE CABINETS

MID-SIZE GROUP / ROBOTICS CONFIGURATION 2

SAFETY SHOWER & EYEWASH W/ FD

WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE COUNTER @ 34" HIGH W/ OPTIONAL BASE CABINETS

WHEELCHAIR TURNING AND CLEAR SPACE

SCIENCE SINKS INCLUDE H&C WATER, GAS (OPTIONAL AIR OR VACUUM)

1. THESE DIAGRAMS ARE EXAMPLES OF TABLE ARRANGEMENTS THAT CAN ACCOMMODATE A WIDE VARIETY OF ACTIVITIES, GROUPINGS, AND INSTRUCTIONAL CONFIGURATIONS THAT ARE TYPICAL OF LABORATORY WORK AND INSTRUCTION IN SMALL, MEDIUM, AND WHOLE-CLASS GROUPS. THE INTENT IS TO DESIGN SPACES WITH MAXIMUM FLEXIBILITY FOR VARIED USES WITHOUT EXTENSIVE RECONSTRUCTION. 2. THESE PLANS ARE TO BE CONSIDERED STANDARD TEMPLATE CONFIGURATIONS; SPECIFIC SCHOOL DESIGNS MAY VARY FROM THESE STANDARDS. 3. THE ITEMS DESCRIBED BELOW AS "REQUIREMENTS" ARE MANDATORY, OTHER ITEMS ARE MSBA RECOMMENDATIONS ARE TO BE CONSIDERED "BEST PRACTICES."

NOTES:

FIRE EXTINGUISHER MASTER GAS SHUTOFF

SAFETY GOGGLE STERILIZER UNIT

COUNTER @ 36" HIGH W/ OPTIONAL BASE CABINETS

HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE LAB PLAN C (WITH SEPARATE CHEMISTRY STORAGE ROOM)

30'

Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015


Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

HS. 1 - Classroom tables, desks, and chairs (Item No. 14)

P

rovide a new room or additional space for Cognitive Disability Classroom (currently Sue Brandt's room) by remodeling the existing room or rooms or adding space within the current building.

Cognitive Disability is a term used when a person has certain limitations in mental functioning and in skills such as communicating, taking care of him or herself, and social skills. These limitations will cause a child to learn and develop more slowly than a typical child. Children with cognitive disabilities may take longer to learn to speak, walk, and take care of their personal needs such as dressing or eating. They are likely to have trouble learning in school. They will learn but it will take them longer. There may be some things they cannot learn. Children with intellectual disabilities need some additional support and modifications in the environment: Quiet Work Space Children with intellectual disabilities tend to get distracted more easily and often struggle with attention. Ensure that the child has a work/study space that is quiet and free from distractions. Using this space only for studying also will help the child get into a routine of studying and also understand that when he is sitting there, he is supposed to concentrate on the activity or task and not play. Functional Activities Children with intellectual disabilities learn better through functional day-to-day activities. Thus, instead of attempting to teach science theory or geography, it is better to teach practical things that will be useful such as how to boil an egg or how to find their way to their friend’s house.

67


Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015 Repetition of Concepts Over the Day Children with intellectual disabilities need to learn a concept in different ways and have the opportunity to practice it many times in order to learn and remember it. Allow time, as well as opportunities, to practice the skills that you have taught them. Teacher-Student Ratio One major modification that needs to be considered for children with intellectual disabilities is the studentteacher ratio. These children require additional support and guidance as they work on their activities. Ideally, there should be at least 1 teacher for every 3 children with intellectual disabilities. Hands on Learning Children with intellectual disabilities learn a lot through doing tasks rather than just listening. Using all the senses to learn also helps them learn and retain information better. Your classroom or teaching area must have space and resources to allow children with an intellectual impairment to do various activities that are functional as well as academic. Safety Measures Safety issues need to be considered while planning a teaching space for children with an intellectual impairment. Sharp scissors, knives, etc. must be kept out of reach. Harmful liquids like cleaning liquids must also be kept away. Medicines must be kept out of reach. In addition to this, make sure that none of the children can lock themselves up in any room. Small beads or other toy parts that the children could put in their mouth must be kept away if a child has a tendency to do that. If the child has seizures, you may need to look at padding the corners of furniture to avoid injury. Schedule Children with intellectual disabilities find it hard to sit in one place and do an activity for a long time. The schedule must have short activity times and must alternate between physical and sitting down activities. The schedule must also try and incorporate some aspects of self-care so that children start becoming more independent in putting on or taking off shoes, going to the toilet, or feeding themselves. 68


Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

ISSUES AT CURRENT CD CLASSROOM - NEED TO EXPAND ROOM Existing High School Facilities – RM 602 (390 square feet) • Issues with single room with attached toilet • No windows – the current interior space room is devoid of this sensory item that is linked to learning • Space is too small for the amount of students it serves, less than 400 square feet, including toilet room • Current staff have indicated that the Middle School CD space should be the model for the HS. Its design is well adapted for student needs not what is currently used at the high school. • One base cabinet and sink suffices for a “kitchen” • Lack of storage • Lack of computer space • Lacks Smartboard - per MS staff this is a huge learning tool they are utilizing currently

PROPOSED SOLUTION

I

f the science room addition previously described proceeds, a few rooms will open up that could be repurposed. The old science rooms could be remodeled and this space could be utilized.

REASONS • Rooms could be created with internal doors connecting each area o This would allow for educational services for students to be shared o Additional kitchen space and room to teach functional living skills should be designed so that students who need adaptations will still have the ability to learn daily living skills and function in an adaptable living environment. • Accessible to fire exit – New route allows for quicker exiting to door #3 than current room; allowing for staff to quickly respond to required drills is imperative.

• In everyday use, adaptive behavior generally implies the achievement of skills needed for successful performance in typical environments (Bruininks, Thurlow, and Gilman, 1987). These skills are encompassed within two broad domains. The first is personal skill development, which includes the skills needed for self-care, home living, work, and recreation. The second is social competence, which involves the behaviors needed to interact appropriately with others in the community.

69


Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

FACILITY FLOOR PLANS

70


Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

MOSINEE HIGH SCHOOL MAP

654

657

652

655

653

651 W M

Boys Locker Room

643

628 6

624

625

631

Girls Locker Room

661 High School Gym

635

637

660 Cafeteria

407

630 620

621

632

634

608

M W

606

602

W

4

M

615

613

611

609

603

]

605

601

3

174 172 170 168

1 CRESKE COMMUNITY CENTER

MOSINEE HIGH SCHOOL

274 272 270 268

166

MOSINEE MIDDLE SCHOOL MAP

266

M W

M W

12 176 178

177

164 179

181

278

163

180 16

276

Stage

165

159

160-162 Cafeteria

M

MOSINEE MIDDLE SCHOOL FIRST FLOOR

15

102 13

114

151 M.S. Office

264

279

263

262

111 14

EL

317

280

106 112 110 Sm. Gym

EL

W

265

281

157 155

277

315

115 M.S. Gym

109

105

101

441 Pool Area

413 Auditorium

YOU ARE HERE

11

Boys Girls Locker Locker

Phone

600 Office

2

M W

417

405

Phone 607

Boys Girls 432 Weight Locker Locker Room Room Room

] Walkers’ Wayside

415

636

604

434 Creske Center Gym

402

411

403 623

404

409

401

428

420 IMC

406

Kitchen

639

422

408

641

633

412

426

]

622

410

M W

626 627

10 424

650

5

629

9

8

7

261

258

259

256

257

M

313

M W

MOSINEE MIDDLE SCHOOL THIRD FLOOR

255 253 251

217

215 213

210 208

252

W

218 EL Library 216

212

214 206 211

MW

200

2 204 202 0 1

209 207 205 203

MOSINEE MIDDLE SCHOOL SECOND FLOOR

71


Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

Scale: 1" = 40'-0"

Scale: 1" = 40'-0"

Basement Floor Plan Scale: 1" = 40'-0"

Scale: 1" = 40'-0"

Scale: 1" = 40'-0"

Basement Floor Plan 002

002

212

First Floor Plan Second Floor Plan

001

001

211

210

209

003

003

212

Second Floor Plan

5

112 213

4

215 205

216

204

116219

BASEMENT BASEMENT

SECOND FLOOR

G

B

SECOND FLOOR

203 102

G

100D

107

204

103 202

B

1 135

136

120A

133

120C

122

101

B 134

129

126

131

132 123 130 120B

A131

B132

B140

A128

G

B139

A125

B143

B121

208

105

104

218 106

100C

3

B144

B130

B126

B102 A122

114 117

121

11

109

206 108A 108B 205 216

119

118

12 B128

110 207

209

100B

202

203

210

100A

218

219

214

206

SECOND FLOOR

217

111

215 113 217 115

208

207

214

213

BASEMENT

211

2

A134

B137

B134

G

B

B119

B118

B136

125

124

127 128

126A

10

A117

A114

A111

A104

A103

B105

A107

A102 A101

A108

B108

B115

B113

B104 B106 B111 B112 B146

MAIN ENTRANCE

9

A100

FIRST FLOOR

B103

B100

6

MOSINEE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL MAP

- - - - - - - HIGHWAY B - - - - - - -

BOULEVARD SCHOOL - UPPER LEVEL

ENTRANCE

ENTRANCE

107 106

109 110

105

103

111 112

100 102

101

ELEVATOR MAIN ENTRANCE

BOULEVARD SCHOOL - LOWER LEVEL

ENTRANCE 002 ELEV. EQUIP.

004

007 001

008

003

FURNACE 006

ELEVATOR MAIN ENTRANCE

72

009 010

005 BOYS

ENTRANCE

GIRLS


PROJECT PRIORITIZATION MATRIX MOSINEE HIGH SCHOOL

Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

73


Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

74


Classroom Floors

Playground

Interior Lighting

High School

High School

High School

12

25

38

Administrative Office

Phone

Classroom Cabenetry

Fire Alarm

High School High School

High School

High School

High School

20

42

15

22

5

Sealants

Fencing

High School

24

Security

InteriorEducational

Electrical

Exterior InteriorSupport

Electrical

Grounds

InteriorEducational

Grounds

5

5

6

7

6

6

6

6

6

6

Walls

High School

2

Exterior

7

Plumbing

46

6

Plumbing Fixtures

8

6

Electrical

System Type

Exterior

Panels

Inspection Item

Functional Condition

5

4

5

3

5

5

5

5

4

6

3

4

7

Safety/ Compliance Concern

0

2

0

2

0

0

0

0

4

0

3

3

0

Project Cost

<$10k=5 <$40k=2 >$40k=0

Scoring System High=10 Poor=10 Med=5 Ave=5 Good=0 Low=0

Exterior Doors

High School

Facility

Mosinee High School

High School High School

37

Item Number

Facility:

0

0

0

0

1

2

2

2

0

2

2

2

0

Annual Savings

>$5k=5 >$1k<$5k=2 <$1k=0

10

11

11

12

12

13

13

13

14

14

15

15

15

No pressing issues with the existing system.

Cabinetry is in average condition for its age but some areas are in need of extra storage space, so cabinetry would aid in addressing this need.

The push button phones are changed out with new phones once they fail. There is no rush to convert the system.

The administrative office facilities are outdated and a remodel should be considered.

Higher efficiency lighting technology including, T-8 and T-5 fluorescent fixtures as well as LED fixtures are installed throughout the building and appear to be in average condition. Any older style fixtures that exist should be replaced and brought in line with the newer, high efficiency light fixtures that exist in the rest of the building. For the most part, the exterior sealants were in good condition. The only issues that were noted were areas around the window lintels that were rusting due to water penetration.

The High School doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a playground, but it does have an outdoor pool. The pool and the associated equipment are deteriorating due to age. Also, the concrete around the pool has some areas that are heaving.

Fencing at the high school appeared to be in good to average condition with the exception of some sections have been damaged around the football field and the fencing around the outdoor pool is deteriorated. The pool fencing should be considered for replacement. There are some areas that have floor tiles that contain asbestos. The asbestos tile isn't a major concern since it's in fair condition, but it should be replaced as it begins to crack and deteriorate.

Some of the wall hung toilet carriers are failing. Also, flush valves for the toilet fixtures are in need of replacement in some areas. There are pre-cast wall panels on the Creske area of the building. Some of these panels are cracking and will need to be repaired. The rest of the building has a brick exterior. There are some areas where bricks are in need of tuckpointing and repair.

Several exterior metal doors are rusted at the bottom due to years of exposure to the salt that is used as icemelt and will need to be repaired or replaced. One specific set of doors were the gym doors near the Creske Center

The electrical panels are in average to good condition for their age. Some panels were noted to be full, so it should be noted that electrical work may be more expensive when projects are undertaken at this facility. Also, some of the breakers that are in the older panels can not be replaced due to obsolescence.

Total Points Description of Inspection Item and/or Defects

Project Recommendation Priority Order

Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

76


Handrails

HVAC Controls

Security Systems

Administrative Office

Panels

Walls

Student Restrooms

HVAC Fans

Staff Restrooms

Heating Equipment

Soffits

MMS

MMS

MMS

MMS

MMS

MMS

MMS

MMS

MMS

MMS

MMS

11

33

21

20

37

2

18

35

19

26

4

System Type

Exterior

HVAC

HVAC InteriorSupport

Exterior InteriorSupport

7

6

6

8

8

9

8

9

InteriorSupport

Electrical

6

8

9

8

Functional Condition

Poor=10 Ave=5 Good=0

Security

HVAC

InteriorEducational

Air Handling Equipment HVAC

Inspection Item

MMS

Facility

Mosinee Middle School

34

Item Number

Facility:

6

7

8

6

7

8

8

8

10

7

8

8

Safety/ Compliance Concern

High=10 Med=5 Low=0

3

0

2

2

2

0

2

0

2

0

0

0

Project Cost

<$10k=5 <$40k=2 >$40k=0

Scoring System

0

3

0

1

0

0

0

1

0

4

2

4

Annual Savings

>$5k=5 >$1k<$5k=2 <$1k=0

16

16

16

17

17

17

18

18

18

19

19

20

The staff restroom facilities are not ADA compliant. There are several different heating plants in the middle school. The furnaces and boilers are newer and in good working condition. The mechanical rooms are cramped and it is difiicult to perform maintenance. Some classroom areas are difficult to keep comfortable with the existing system. Soffits and overhang near the office entrance are pitched backwards so that water runs toward the building. This needs to be corrected.

There are a variety of ages and conditions of air handling fans in the middle school. Some are in good working order, but others are in dire need of replacement. The oldest fans are the ones that are in the worst condition. These are located in the 1922 and 1939 sections of the building.

The student restrooms are aging and in need of replacement. The carriers for the wall hung fixtures have deteriorated and can not be easily replaced. A full renovation is necessary.

There are areas showing signs of deterioration in the bricks due to age and exposure to moisture issues. A few of the issues in the newer parts of the building can be corrected by tuckpointing, but the 1922/39 section has below grade walls that are seriously degraded due to moisture issues. The degrading of the masonry can not be fixed or repaired without major construction.

Much of the electrical equipment in the middle school has far exceeded its predicted life. If this equipment were to trip due to an electrical surge, it may not be able to be reset and would require an emergency replacement. Conduit all needs to be surface mounted in the older sections of the school and some panels were noticed to be full. This electrical work will need to be addressed in the near future.

No issues noted with administrative office facilities, but there was a lift for chairlifts in the guidance counselors area. The lift is in poor condition due to age and should be relocated when it is replaced.

There are a few locations where cameras could be added, but the system that exists is in average condition. There is an uncontrolled entry that needs to be redesigned for better security.

Controls are obsolete and in poor condition in the older sections of the building. It would require a significant investment in hardware and softwareto generate energy savings and more importantly to resolve on-going comfort issues. There is no control of the temperature in each room because of the system design. There are several other infrastructure issues in the older sections of the building that will need to be addressed in the near future.

Handrails are in good condition, the elevator is in poor condition. Since there isn't a category for elevators, it will be noted here. Costly repairs and dependability issues are almost expected from the elevator in the middle school at this point. Renovation on a large scale is necessary.

Air handling equipment is good to poor condition depending on which part of the middle school the equipment is located in. The older sections of the building have very old ducting and tunnels that are confined spaces to work in and these ducts and tunnels could cause health issues through poor indoor air quality. There is no easy way to solve this issue due to the design of the building. This coupled with several other infrastructure issues need to be resolved.

Total Points Description of Inspection Item and/or Defects

Project Recommendation Priority Order

PROJECT PRIORITIZATION MATRIX MOSINEE MIDDLE SCHOOL Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

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PROJECT PRIORITIZATION MATRIX MOSINEE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

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82

District Office

District Office

District Office

District Office

District Office

District Office

District Office

District Office District Office

District Office

District Office

District Office

District Office District Office District Office District Office District Office District Office

District Office District Office District Office District Office District Office District Office District Office

2

5

26

27

3

23

33 6

19

20

10

12 38 8 11 42 37

41 43 45 46 22 39 4

Facility

44

Item Number

Facility:

Plumbing Exterior Exterior HVAC HVAC Exterior Grounds HVAC Exterior Interior-Support Interior-Support Interior-Educational Interior-Educational Electrical Interior-Educational Interior-Educational Electrical Electrical Electrical Plumbing Plumbing Plumbing Security Electrical Exterior

Walls

Sealants

Heating Equipment

Cooling Equipment

Windows

Parking Lot

HVAC Controls Exterior Doors

Staff Restrooms

Administrative Office

Corridor Floors

Classroom Floors Interior Lighting Interior Doors Handrails Phone Panels

Data Domestic Water Storm Water Plumbing Fixtures Fire Alarm Exterior Lighting Soffits

System Type

Sanitary Sewer

Inspection Item

District Office

5 5 5 5 2 2 5

5 5 5 3 3 5

5

5

3

5 5

7

8

7

7

8

7

8

Functional Condition

Poor=10 Ave=5 Good=0

3 3 3 3 5 5 2

4 3 2 5 5 3

4

5

7

3 3

5

7

5

5

3

5

8

Safety/ Compliance Concern

High=10 Med=5 Low=0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

1 0 2 0 0 0

1

0

0

5 3

2

0

3

3

5

5

2

Project Cost

<$10k=5 <$40k=2 >$40k=0

Scoring System

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 1 0 0 0 0

0

0

0

1 1

0

0

1

1

1

0

0

Annual Savings

>$5k=5 >$1k<$5k=2 <$1k=0

8 8 8 8 7 7 7

10 9 9 8 8 8

10

10

10

14 12

14

15

16

16

17

17

18

Soffits and fascia are in average condition.

Minimal exterior lighting. Wall pack is already LED

Fire alarm system will be updated soon

Fixtures are in average condition for their age

NA

No issues

No issues were noted with the electrical panels Data system is in good condition, but is located in an area that was never intended to house such equipment.

Phone system is in good condition

Handrails are in good condition

Interior doors were in average condition

T-8 technology, surface hung fixtures in most areas. Fixtures are in average condition.

The vinyl and carpet flooring is less than 10 years old and is in average condition for its age.

The vinyl and carpet flooring is less than 10 years old and is in average condition for its age.

The restrooms in the basement are not ADA compliant, but may not need to be updated due to building use and availability of other facilities. The building was not originally designed for offices, so there are issues with space and comfort.

Exterior doors are in average condition

Windows are aluminum frame, single pane construction and are very drafty and inefficient. The parking lot needs work in some areas, but should be coordinated with any sewer or other dirt work that may be occuring soon. There are digital thermostats that control the furnaces at this facility. They should be evaluated for replacement when the furnaces are replaced.

The residential styel condensing units should be replaced when the furnaces are replaced at the district office.

The residential style furnaces are approaching 30 years old and will need to be replaced soon.

There are areas where the caulking around the windows is peeling away and is in need of repair.

Chimney is deteriorating and is in need of repair. There is also an area on the east side of the building where the siding was damaged and should be repaired.

There is a cistern that needs to be replaced due to its poor condition.

Total Points Description of Inspection Item and/or Defects

Project Recommendation

PROJECT PRIORITIZATION MATRIX MOSINEE DISTRICT OFFICE Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015


Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

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PROJECT PRIORITIZATION MATRIX MOSINEE DISTRICT OFFICE

Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

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Mosinee School District Facility Audit Report - 2015

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Mosinee CESA 10 Final Facility Audit Report  
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