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TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE HANDBOOK for

CANDIDATES AND SUPERVISORS

Fall 2013 Enable students.

Enact content.

Embody pedagogy.

Exemplify professionalism.


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Department of Teacher Education

“Our best chance for happiness is education.” Mark VanDorn

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Clinical Experience Handbook “It’s not what is poured into a student that counts, but what is planted.” Linda Conway

INTRODUCTION This handbook is intended to orient new teacher candidates and clinical supervisors to student teaching practices and policies developed by the Department of Teacher Education at York College of the City University of New York. While many questions concerning student teaching (also referred to as clinical practice) experiences are addressed within this handbook, it is not intended to replace personal contact between program partners. It was developed as a reference tool. York College Department of Teacher Education guidelines may change from time to time, so it is always good to pick up the telephone, send out a quick email, or to stop by our office to get the

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Department of Teacher Education

“Nine-tenths of education is encouragement.� Anatole France

WELCOME Dear Teacher Candidates: A successful experience in student teaching is crucial in the development of teaching professionals. Student teaching is the capstone experience that connects the foundational and pedagogical coursework candidates have completed with practical and constructive experiences inside classrooms on a regular basis. It provides an opportunity for teacher candidates to gain valuable experience working with children while being supported. It also enables professional educators involved to make a substantial contribution to the teaching profession. This becomes achievable through the cooperation and collaboration of all involved -the teacher candidate, the cooperating teacher, the school administrator, the practicum instructor and Field and Clinical Program Director, and the college supervisor. We look forward to working with all of you in creating the environment for nurturing and developing quality teachers. At York College we stand ready to assist in any way to ensure that the student teaching experience is a positive and productive one for all involved. Please come and see us in Room 1D12, call us at 718-262-2450, should there be questions, concerns, or compliments.

Sincerely,

Dr. Lindamichelle Baron, Chair, Department of Teacher Education

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Clinical Experience Handbook “Any genuine teaching will result, if successful, in someone’s knowing how to bring about a better condition of things than existed earlier.” John Dewey

TABLE OF CONTENTS Page

Teacher Education Conceptual Framework

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Field and Clinical Experience Quality Statement

2

Teacher Education Transition Points

3

Program Requirements

5

Clinical Experience Field Placement Guidelines

7

Clinical Experience Seminar Requirements

9

edTPA / Teacher Work Sample Assignment

10

Reflective Journal Assignment

11

Planning

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The Field Placement Triad

14

Student Teacher Responsibilities

15

Progression of Increasing Responsibilities of the Student Teacher

17

Suggested Student Teaching Weekly Timeline

18

Role and Responsibilities of the Clinical Supervisor

21

Role and Responsibilities of the Cooperating Teacher

22

Role and Responsibilities of School & Agency Administrators

23

Key Legal Matters Concerning Student Teachers in New York State

24

New York State Code of Ethics for Teachers

25

Certification Pathway for New York State Classroom Teachers

26

Recommended Job Search Activities

27 APPENDICES

Department of Teacher Education Faculty & Staff

A

Block Plan Template

B

Lesson Plan Planning Process

C

Lesson Plan Templates

D

Monthly Time Log

E

Weekly Time Log

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Department of Teacher Education

“I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand.� Chinese Proverb

York College Mission Statement York College enriches lives and enables students to grow as passionate, engaged learners with the confidence to realize their intellectual and human potential as individuals and global citizens.

CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK Teacher Education Unit Vision Statement The vision of the teacher education unit builds upon the vision and mission of York College. The unit’s vision is to develop a cadre of professional educators who, having been taught by models of good teaching, are prepared with an array of theories, tools, and skills necessary to create rich learning environments in which urban children and youth can strive for and reach success. Teacher Education Unit Mission Statement By providing our students with learning experiences that develop deep and broad content knowledge and life skills (G1), our teacher candidates become effective practitioners who will: Empower Learners to Achieve at the Highest Levels by being able to Understand the full range of student needs represented in an urban classroom (G5) Respond to the diversity of learners in the classroom when designing and implementing instruction (G7) Prepare students to be active and effective participants in a political and social democracy (G2) Collaborate with parents and leaders/agencies in the local community (G4) Embody Pedagogy by being able to Design and implement curriculum and instruction that represents broad and deep knowledge of pedagogy (G6) Assess students using a diversity of measures, analyze the results, and make instructional decisions to optimize teaching and maximize student performance (G8) Exhibit strong written, verbal, and non-verbal communication skills (G10) Embed technology into the learning experience (G11) Exemplify Professionalism by being able to Act as reflective practitioners with a strong conviction that learning is a lifelong process achievable by all (G9) Collaborate with the professional educational community (G12) Demonstrate a commitment to social justice and equity issues in multicultural, multilingual, urban schools (G3) Enact Knowledge by being able to Demonstrate a broad and deep knowledge of academic content (G13) Access and build content knowledge (G14) Examine the power and biases of knowledge and knowledge construction (G15) Evaluate emerging content knowledge using scholarly research based evidence (G16) Evaluate content knowledge for relevance to K-12 classroom (G17)

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Clinical Experience Handbook “I like a teacher who gives you something to take home to think about besides homework.”Lily Tomlin as “Edith Ann”

FIELD AND CLINICAL EXPERIENCE QUALITY STATEMENT To the extent possible, York College early field and practicum placements will: 1. Provide students with safe, comfortable, and welcoming placements with cooperating teachers who serve as a willing mentor/teachers and/or coaches. 2. Teach grade level content area instruction and practice in teacher candidates’ target certification area (e.g., special education, general science, mathematics, physics, etc.). 3. Provide proven models of effective and innovative instruction, active teaching and learning 4. Provide candidates with sufficient opportunities to apply what they have learned in their coursework, especially toward meeting the required performance standards. 5. Ensure that the student-teaching experience is carefully and continuously monitored and properly supported. 6. Provide a highly qualified college supervisor to support and guide student teacher’s practice. 7. Ensure placement at a school where the principal and staff will foster the professional development of new teachers. 8. Provide an intensive clinical experience with improved links between research and practice. 9. Provide the opportunity for student teachers to develop valuable collegial relationships and supports for learning. 10. Provide candidates with opportunities to practice in more than one school or classroom. 11. Provide students with a cohort of colleagues, with whom they can reflect, learning from their collective teaching experiences, both positive and negative. 12. Support improvement of neighborhood schools and local communities. 13. Provide opportunities for the candidate to significantly contribute to school or instructional improvement.

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Department of Teacher Education

“The true aim of everyone who aspires to be a teacher should be, not to impart his own opinions,

TRANSITION POINTS ADMISSION TO THE TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM  Complete the Application for Admission to the Teacher Education Program including the planning grid and documentation for taking or registering for the Language Arts and Science Test (LAST) & Assessment of Teaching Skills - Written (ATSW)  Declare an approved major  Earn a minimum overall 2.75 GPA in all courses taken at York College  (Transfer Students complete a minimum of 12 credits at York College)  Complete the Foundations courses EDUC 280 EDUC 283 and EDUC 284  Earn a minimum overall 2.75 GPA in Foundations courses AND a minimum grade of C in each Foundations course (Minimum grade of B in each Foundations course taken elsewhere) TRANSITION POINT 1 Admission to Curriculum & Methods Courses (EDUC 300 levels)  Earn a minimum overall 2.75 GPA in all courses taken at York College  Complete all Foundations courses for the program  Earn a minimum overall 2.75 GPA in Foundations courses AND a minimum grade of C in each Foundations course (Minimum grade of B in each Foundations course taken elsewhere) TRANSITION POINT 2 Admission to Student Teaching  Complete the application for Student Teaching AND update planning grid, including exam documentation and program completion plan  Earn a minimum overall 2.75 GPA on all courses taken at York College  Completed all Professional Education (300 level Curriculum and Methods) courses  Earn a minimum overall GPA of 2.75 in all Professional Education courses AND a minimum of C grade in each Professional Education course taken at York College (A minimum of B in each Professional Education course taken elsewhere)  Completed 2/3 of the courses required in the major TRANSITION POINT 3 Completion of the Teacher Education Program  Complete Student Teaching/Seminar I & Teaching/Seminar II with a minimum grade of C in each including the Dignity for All Students Act, Violence Prevention, AND Child Abuse and Neglect workshops  Earn a minimum overall 2.75 GPA on all courses taken at York College  Complete all course work required for the degree NEW YORK STATE INITIAL CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS in addition to COMPLETION OF THE TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM  Fulfill foreign language requirement  Complete a science course with a laboratory  Appropriate exams (exam requirements will change for all students graduating after 4/30/2014. Refer to the table below for testing requirements based on your graduation date)

Graduating on or before 4/30/2014   

Graduating on or after 5/1/2014    

Assessment of Teaching Skills—Written (ATS–W) Liberal Arts And Science Test (LAST) Content Specialty Test (CST)

edTPA Educating All Students Test (EAS) Academic Literacy Skills Test (ALST) Content Specialty Test (CST)

In consultation with their Teacher Education advisor, candidates should fulfill General Education requirements as early as possible in order to achieve success on the LAST exam and be prepared for upper division coursework and student teaching 3


Clinical Experience Handbook “A good teacher is a master of simplification and an enemy of simplism.” Louis A. Berman

Clinical Practice “Student Teaching”

Experiences in Teacher Education

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Department of Teacher Education

“I am indebted to my father for living, but to my teacher for living well.” Alexander of Macedon

GENERAL STUDENT TEACHING PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Teacher education candidates usually complete their student teaching during their last semester in their program. The following program requirements are for student teaching (Transition Point 2): TRANSITION POINT 2 Admission to Student Teaching  Complete the application for Student Teaching AND update planning grid, including exam documentation and program completion plan  Earn a minimum overall 2.75 GPA on all courses taken at York College  Completed all Professional Education (300 level Curriculum and Methods) courses  Earn a minimum overall GPA of 2.75 in all Professional Education courses AND a minimum of C grade in each Professional Education course taken at York College (A minimum of B in each Professional Education course taken elsewhere)  Completed 2/3 of the courses required in the major Student teaching requires a tremendous time commitment. Candidates are strongly encouraged NOT to take additional courses and NOT to work more than 15 hours per week during the student teaching semester. The Department of Teacher Education makes all student teaching placements.

Requirements Specific to the Childhood Education Program Teacher candidates in the Childhood Education Program are required to complete two student teaching placements at different developmental levels. Student Teaching can be completed full-time in one semester or part-time in two semesters. One Semester FULL TIME Program (two placements in one semester)  14 weeks – 400 total hours  2 7-week placements – 200 hours per placement  5 full workdays per week (e.g. 8:00 am-3:00 pm; times may vary slightly from school to school)  Candidates complete one 7-week placement in grades 1-3 and one in grades 4-6 Two Semesters PART TIME Program (one placement per semester)  14 weeks each semester (200 hours per semester)  3 mornings & 1 full day per week  Candidates complete one 14-week placement in grades 1-3 and one in grades 4-6

See “Additional Requirements for all Programs” on the following page for more information.

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Clinical Experience Handbook “Who dares to teach must never cease to learn.” John Cotton Dana

Requirements Specific to the Secondary Education Programs Teacher candidates in Secondary Education Programs are required to complete two student teaching placements at different developmental levels. The experience is completed full-time in one semester. Secondary Education MINIMUM Requirements (two placements in one semester)  14 weeks – 400 total hours  2 7-week placements – 200 hours per placement  Candidates complete one placement in grades 7-9 and one in grades 10-12  Secondary Education Programs are Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, Mathematics, & Spanish

Requirements Specific to the Health & Physical Education Programs Teacher candidates in Health and Physical Education Programs are required to complete two student teaching placements at different developmental levels. The experience is completed full-time in one semester. Health and Physical Education MINIMUM Requirements (two placements in one semester)  14 weeks – 400 total hours  2 7-week placements – 200 hours per placement  Candidates complete one placement in grades K-6 and one in grades 7-12.

Additional Requirements for all Programs Candidates must clock in and out at the beginning and end of each day. All clocked-in hours count toward the completion of required hours. Hours are recorded on the Weekly Time Log in terms of minutes “Observing,” “Assisting,” and “Teaching.” The minutes are totaled on the Monthly Time Log. In addition to all in-class hours, the following hours count toward completion of the minimum required number of hours:  Attendance at 1-2 professional conferences. Time is recorded as "Observing." Proof of attendance must be obtained and turned-in.  Attendance at 1 school related duty (e.g. parent-teacher night, Superintendent's Conference Day, faculty meeting). Time is recorded as "Observing."  Time assisting CT when students are not present (e.g. grading student work, putting up a bulletin board, curriculum development). Time is recorded as "Assisting."  Completion of duties assigned to the CT (e.g. lunch duty, bus duty). Time is as recorded as "Assisting." Although the minimum hours for each placement will not take 7 weeks of full time attendance to complete, it is highly recommended that candidates attend 5 full workdays per week (e.g. 8:00 am3:00 pm; times may vary slightly from school to school). It is understood that circumstances may not permit a student teacher to attend a full day every day; student teachers will be required to evaluate their responsibilities and commit to a teaching schedule at the beginning of the clinical experience semester. 6


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Department of Teacher Education

“One good teacher in a lifetime may sometimes change a delinquent into a solid citizen.” Philip Wylie

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE FIELD PLACEMENT GUIDELINES Attendance Teacher candidates must report to their placements at the time agreed upon with their clinical supervisor and cooperating teacher. The reporting time should allow for punching in and doing final preparations before instruction. Teacher candidates follow the calendar of the school in which he/she is placed even when it differs from the college calendar.  In the case of a necessary absence, the teacher candidate must notify the school office, the cooperating teacher and the college supervisor.  In the case of consecutive absences that exceed two days, the clinical supervisor AND the clinical professor must also be notified (the latter via email). Documentation supporting the prolonged absence should be submitted.  Three or more absences will result in an extension of the placement period.

Record Keeping Attendance is documented in 3 ways: the monthly time card, the Student Teaching Weekly Log, and the Monthly Time Log. Credit will be given only when the times documented on each form match and contain the appropriate signatures. All forms must be stapled together when submitted. These documents will be distributed in the Student Teaching Practicum Seminar course.  Monthly Time Card – Supplied by the host school; candidate should request a card from the office secretary and learn where to punch in and out. It serves as a second and mandatory record of attendance.  Student Teaching Weekly Log – Used to record basic information about each class and the number of hours of observing, assisting, and teaching each day.  Monthly Time Log – Used to record the total number of hours observing, assisting, and teaching during each month of student teaching.

Instructional Planning The student teacher is expected to prepare all lesson plans using the Backwards Design approach. Plans should be drafted in sufficient time to provide them to the observing party (the cooperating teacher and/or the college supervisor) to be reviewed, so that candidates can make refinements based upon feedback received. Formalized, detailed lesson plans following the Department of Teacher Education Lesson Plan Template must be submitted to both the cooperating teacher and the college supervisor prior to formal, scheduled observations. See the Student Teacher Responsibilities Section for detailed requirements.

Student Teacher / Cooperating Teacher Conferences: Student teachers and their cooperating teachers engage in ongoing conversations regarding plans for the coming week, review lessons observed, and discuss questions and concerns regarding the classroom during daily and weekly meetings. It is both the cooperating teacher and the student teacher’s responsibility to schedule these weekly meetings. York candidates are advised to be proactive. It is during these meetings that plans and ideas for future lessons are presented to the cooperating teacher for approval and feedback, and conversations about specific classroom concerns and opportunities to improve foster development of the student teacher’s abilities. The student teacher needs to come to these meetings prepared with questions, draft lesson plans, assessments and/or related resources. Student teachers should conference both daily and weekly with their respective cooperating teachers.

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Clinical Experience Handbook “Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement; nothing can be done without hope and confidence.” Helen Keller

Daily Conferences Daily meetings are generally quick and may occur during prep periods or in the minutes between classes as necessary and possible. Goals of daily conferences:  Discuss day-to-day logistics of planning and implementing lessons and units  Review lesson plans (Lesson plans should be reviewed 2-3 days before they are to be taught so there is ample time for revision as necessary.)  Ensure understanding of the immediate needs and interests of the children in the class(es)  Reflect on the day’s work  Provide feedback on any teaching events that may have occurred during the day

Weekly Conferences Meetings can take place before school or after school, during lunch, or during a prep period. It is important that a scheduled time be set aside for reasonable discussion. Goals of weekly conferences:  Guide the student teacher in a self-appraisal  Set weekly goals  Provide feedback regarding the student teacher’s professional skills and goals  Review Plan book for the following week  Schedule future teaching assignments If the cooperating teacher fails to make time for daily and weekly conferences, the student teacher must contact his/her college supervisor to set up a three-person meeting to review responsibilities.

Formal Lesson Observations Student teachers must complete 3 formally observed and evaluated lessons during each placement. Student teachers must provide a lesson plan to the college supervisor at least one week before each formal observation (two weeks preferred) in order to receive feedback for further refinement. Lesson plans are also to be discussed with and approved by the cooperating teacher prior to lesson delivery. A postobservation conference will take place after each formal observation with the clinical supervisor and the cooperating teacher.

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Department of Teacher Education

“A child miseducated is a child lost.” John F. Kennedy

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS Assessment of Student Teachers The cooperating teacher provides feedback (both formal and informal) to the student teacher throughout the placement; he/she electronically completes a weekly feedback form. Towards the end of the placement, the cooperating teacher completes a Student Teaching Final Evaluation Form. Ideally, these are submitted electronically but may also be given to the clinical supervisor or mailed directly to the clinical professor at York College. The Student Teaching Final Evaluation Form requires the student teacher’s signature. The cooperating teacher should have substantive discussion with the student teacher regarding the contents of the evaluation before sign-off occurs. These documents become part of the student teacher’s permanent record in the Department of Teacher Education. Cooperating and student teachers are encouraged to make a copy of each before the original is submitted to the Clinical Program Coordinator. The clinical supervisor completes a Student Teaching Observation Form for each formal observation conducted. The evaluation is shared with the student teacher and requires his or her signature before being copied and submitted to the clinical professor at York College, who will place it in the student teacher’s file. The college supervisor completes the Student Teaching Final Evaluation Form as well. The evaluation report also becomes part of the student teacher’s permanent record in the Department of Teacher Education. 1wdc The clinical supervisor reviews the student teacher’s reflective journal to The clinical professor is responsible for documenting course attendance, active-participation in the weekly seminar, and assignments, as well as for assessing the quality of work put into completing reflective journals and learning portfolios. The clinical professor reviews the weekly feedback form from the cooperating teacher and communicates with the clinical supervisor, student teacher, cooperating teacher as necessary to ensure a progression in the placement.

Clinical Experience Seminar and Student Teaching Grading Scheme The final course grade is a jointly determined by the clinical supervisor and the student teaching professor. It takes into account performance in the seminar, student teaching experience, the teacher work sample, and professional development requirements. The seminar professor will post the final grade. The grade is weighted as follows: Seminar 40% (400 pts.) Grade from Clinical Professor

Seminar attendance, participation, assignments, and professional development attendance Approval of Professional Conference Attendance at a pre-approved professional conference for PD Completion of “Violence in Education” PD Completion of “Child Abuse” PD Completion of “Dignity for All” PD Completion of Portfolio Requirements

Student Teaching 60% (600 pts.) Grade from Clinical Supervisor, Cooperating Teacher, and Clinical Professor

Completion of approved student teaching schedule including regular meetings with CT, planning, observing, assisting, and teaching that closely aligns with the “Recommended Schedule of Teaching Duties” Completion of 6 Observed Lessons with accompanying lesson plans; 4 final evaluations (2 from CS, 2 from CTs), grade recommendation from CT and CS Reflections During Each Placement – Daily during weeks 1 & 2, one theme during weeks 3, 5, and 7 Completion of edTPA / Teacher Work Sample: edTPA Task 1, Task 2, & Task 3 plus additional TWS Components 9


Clinical Experience Handbook “Good teaching is more a giving of right questions than a giving of right answers.” Josef Albers

edTPA / Teacher Work Sample The edTPA/Teacher Work Sample (TWS) is the capstone project of the Teacher Education program. It is a performance assessment through which a student teacher’s impact on learners at the P-12 site where he or she is placed for student teaching is measured. The sample consists of a learning segment, with three to five lessons, developed by candidates, through the use of a data-driven planning model. The edTPA/TWS contains 3 Tasks (Childhood Education version contains 4), each identified by research on best teaching practices effective in improving student learning. Each of the elements of the edTPA/TWS are interwoven, and contains a edTPA/TWS standard, related INTASC standards, a task, prompts, and a rubrics that define various levels of performance related to each element. Through this performance assessment, teacher candidates provide credible evidence of their ability to facilitate learning by meeting the following edTPA/TWS standards:  The teacher uses information about the learning-teaching context and student individual differences to set learning goal(s) and objectives, and to plan instruction and assessment.  The teacher sets significant, challenging, varied, and appropriate learning goal(s) and objectives based on state/district standards.  The teacher uses multiple assessment modes aligned with learning goal(s) and objectives to assess student learning before, during, and after instruction.  The teacher designs instruction for specific learning goal(s) and objectives, student characteristics and needs, and learning contexts.  The teacher uses regular and systematic evaluations of student learning to make instructional decisions.  The teacher uses assessment data to report student learning and communicate information about student progress and achievement.  The teacher reflects on his or her instruction and analyzes student learning in order to improve teaching practice. Student Teachers complete the edTPA/TWS over the course of the semester. Tasks 1 and 2 (and 4 for Childhood Education) are completed during candidates’ first seven-week clinical placement. To complete these tasks student teachers research, plan, and teach a learning segment. During the learning segment, the student teacher tracks the progress of 3 focus students, collects samples of students’ work, and videotapes one lesson for detailed analysis. Task 3 is completed during the second seven-week placement.

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Department of Teacher Education

“A good teacher is a master of simplification and an enemy of simplism.” Louis A. Berman

Reflective Journal Student teachers maintain reflective journals chronicling their student teaching experiences.

WEEK 1 – (Brief but complete Daily Entries. Submit each day or all at once. Clearly label each day.) Reflective Journals 1 – 5 & 11 – 15: During Week 1 of each placement, the majority of your time should be spent in observation, orientation, learning student names, getting acquainted with curriculum materials, learning the rules and procedures of the classroom and the school, helping students individually or in small groups, and possibly teaching short lessons or assuming opening activities. Take time at the end of each day to reflect upon any of the above experiences or other observations you make during your first week.

WEEK 2 – (Brief but complete Daily Entries. Submit each day or all at once. Clearly label each day.) Reflective Journals 6 – 10 & 11 – 20: During Week 2 of each placement, you are gradually assuming additional responsibilities for teaching, classroom management and teacher duties. Focus on these three areas in your entries this week. What are you noticing in this classroom about the above areas and about yourself as a future teacher?

WEEK 5 – (Choose One Theme; you will complete the remaining theme in your second placement.) Theme A: Communication Strategies/Community Relationships (InTASC #5 & #10) In preparation for completing your journal, discuss with your cooperating teacher the following areas of your use of communication strategies and development in fostering community relationships. Some critical areas to reflect upon include:

    

How have I clearly articulated directions and explanations to students? How have I provided opportunities for students to express their views and modeled for them? How have I provided opportunities for students to become risk-takers and problem-solvers? How have I fostered positive relationships with students, parents, school colleagues, and outside constituents? How have I promoted a productive and engaging learning environment?

OR Theme B: Knowledge of Content/Knowledge of Learners/Diverse Learners (InTASC #4, #1, & #2) In preparation for completing your journal, discuss with your cooperating teacher the areas of your knowledge of structures of your discipline, how you provide learning opportunities appropriate for the child’s development, and how you adapt your instructional opportunities for diverse learners. Some critical areas to reflect upon include:

     

How have I effectively used disciplinary concepts that capture key ideas and link them to students’ prior understanding? How have I made learning relevant to students? How have I gotten to know the students on an individual/group basis? How have I provided opportunities for active engagement through a variety of learning styles? How have I identified, planned, and designed appropriate instruction to students’ stages of development? How have I responded to students who have particular learning differences or needs?

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Clinical Experience Handbook “Nine-tenths of education is encouragement.” Anatole France

WEEK 6 – (Choose One Theme; you will complete the remaining theme in your second placement.) Theme C: Instructional Planning Strategies/Technology Integration (InTASC # 1& #7) In preparation for completing your journal, discuss with your cooperating teacher the areas of your knowledge of instructional strategies and technology integration that encourages students’ development. Some critical areas to reflect upon include:

    

How have I established and managed teaching and non-teaching routines and procedures for a smooth running classroom? How have I used my knowledge about student development in planning instruction to meet the needs of the learner? How have I created short-term and long-term plans that are linked to student needs and motivation? How have I incorporated technology and multimedia to enhance my teaching? How have I utilized appropriate resources and materials to enhance student performance?

OR Theme D: Classroom Management/Student Motivation (InTASC # 3) In preparation for completing your journal, discuss with your cooperating teacher the areas of your knowledge of individual and group motivation and behavior to create an effective learning environment. Some critical areas to reflect upon include:

   

How have I taken positive action toward providing an effective, fair, and consistent classroom environment? How have I kept students productively engaged at all times? How have I treated students in terms of respect and fairness and are expectations consistently applied? How have I maintained and elicited cooperation through the activities presented?

WEEK 7 – (Choose One Theme; you will complete the remaining theme in your second placement.) Theme E: Assessing/Diagnosing/Evaluating Strategies (InTASC # 6) In preparation for completing your journal, discuss with your cooperating teacher the areas of your knowledge of formal and informal assessment strategies and diagnosis of evaluation of student performance. Some critical areas to reflect upon include:

    

How have I used a variety of formal and informal assessment techniques to enhance my knowledge of learners? How have I monitored student progress and performance? How have I adjusted my instruction based on student progress and performance? How have I modified and adjusted my teaching based on learning strategies and knowledge of the learner? How have I collected and used information from outside sources to gain more knowledge of the learner?

OR Theme F: Reflective Practitioner/Reflective Professional (InTASC # 9) In preparation for completing your journal, discuss with your cooperating teacher your development as a professional and reflective practitioner. Some critical areas to reflect upon include:

     

How have I promoted feelings of worth in individuals and promoted positive interactions among learners? How have I infused multicultural/non-sexist content and strategies into my instruction and classroom? How have I modeled positive interactions and conveyed a concerning and accepting attitude toward others? How have I based my decisions on the highest professional standards and kept students’ dignity intact? How have I implemented and used research/outside resources to enhance my teaching? How have I been an actively engaged professional during this past student teaching placement?

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Department of Teacher Education

“A master can tell you what he expects of you. A teacher, though, awakens your own expectations.� Patricia Neal

Plan Book Student teachers maintain a plan book for each class they will be teaching [1 class a day during week 3, 2 classes a day during week 4, 3 classes a day during week 5, full schedule during weeks 6 and 7]. The plan book should be completed at least one week before the lessons are to be taught. After developing an outline in the plan book with the cooperating teacher, the student teacher will use the outline to create lesson plans for each class to be taught by the student teacher. The unit created for the Teacher Work Sample will be taught during the first student teaching placement, and must be planned into the student teacher’s teaching schedule.

Lesson Plans Lesson plans using the Understanding by Design planning strategy must be submitted for all formally observed lessons , for edTPA/TWS lessons, and for any lessons included in the portfolio. Lesson plans must be submitted to the clinical supervisor in the timeframe required by the supervisor. Daily lessons must be planned to the extent the cooperating teacher is comfortable. These lesson plans may be in UbD format or a format used by the cooperating teacher. All lessons should be reviewed with the cooperating teacher 1-2 days before the lesson is to be taught to allow time for revision as necessary. Note: When a lesson plan is essentially the same from day-to-day with the exception of a repetitive variation (i.e., weekly spelling words.), write one detailed lesson plan and attach a list of the variables by date.

Professional Conference Attendance Student teachers will be excused from one day of student teaching and a selected seminar date for attendance at a conference for growth within their curricula or in a more general area in education (e.g. common core standards, special education, curriculum mapping, classroom management, etc.) Student teachers are responsible for finding an appropriate conference to attend through internet searches and discussions with the college supervisor and cooperating teacher. After considering conference topics, location, date and time, fee, etc., student teachers will select a conference and submit the conference request for approval by the Clinical Professor. Student teachers must attend the conference as agreed upon with the Clinical Professor.

Attendance & Participation The student teaching seminar is an integral and required part of the student teaching experience. It is designed to provide an opportunity for candidates to share and to reflect upon the challenges and triumphs of student teaching. It also provides an opportunity for candidates to sharpen their teaching skills while they examine and discuss educational issues such as classroom management, curriculum, and assessment, and are able to clarify theoretical implications for their practice. Consistent, on-time attendance and participation are required.

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Clinical Experience Handbook “A good teacher must be able to put himself in the place of those who find learning hard.� Eliphas Levi

THE FIELD PLACEMENT TRIAD Roles and Responsibilities of Triad Members The Student Teaching Seminar professor provides needed support and scaffolding for the student teaching experience. The triad below builds upon this foundation and is comprised of the student teacher, the cooperating teacher and the clinical supervisor. The active, ongoing involvement, communication, and input of all members of the triad are necessary to ensure the most productive and successful experience. Each triad member brings his/her ideas, behaviors and practices to the experience, which enriches, broadens and deepens the learning environment for candidates. The roles and responsibilities of triad members are described on the following pages.

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Department of Teacher Education

“The roots of education are bitter, but the fruit is sweet.” Aristotle

STUDENT TEACHER RESPONSIBILITIES The student teaching experience provides the teacher-candidate with opportunities to plan, deliver, analyze, evaluate, and to modify his/her teaching in order to maximize professional growth. Student teachers are expected to:  Maintain integrity: avoid engaging in unethical or illegal activities during the internship. Activities of this nature include the following: forging signatures and authorizations, falsifying official academic records, including transcripts, grade reports, letters of permission, add-drop forms, ID cards of any type, student teaching time verification documents (i.e. Daily and monthly time cards, and the weekly time sheet), punching in or out on daily time cards for other candidates, etc. Violation of this nature can lead to a candidate being dismissed from the program on a permanent basis.  Establish and maintain on-going communications with the cooperating teachers, including arranging and participating in impromptu daily meetings, and a regularly scheduled weekly planning meeting.  Establish and maintain on-going communications with the college supervisors about learning needs, goals for student teaching, and the development of the work sample.  Address problems or concerns immediately through discussion with college supervisors and/or cooperating teachers.

Dress Code: Student teachers must maintain a neat and clean appearance befitting professionals working in the field of education. Always exhibit respect for the school/agency, cooperating teacher, P-12 students, colleagues, parents, and one’s self. Dress professionally when reporting for student teaching. In general, the following constitutes appropriate ‘casual professional’  Professional clothing appropriate for a classroom/employment setting  A minimum amount of discreet jewelry and a watch  Appropriate personal hygiene must be maintained daily, light-to moderate perfume In general, the following are NOT appropriate:  Caps, scarves and hats worn indoors, unless for religious reasons  Jeans, mini-skirts or dresses, and low-cut tops/dresses or tightly-fitting clothing  Revealing, faded, torn, wrinkled, ill fitting or soiled apparel of any kind  Tattoos and piercings that are offensive  Cell phones that are left on, texting while caring for students, or regularly using the school’s telephone  T-shirts, halters, tank tops, backless or sleeveless shirts or blouses, short skirts  Sweatshirts, jogging outfits, shirts or blouses with political or otherwise offensive slogans

Planning: Maintain a plan book, and develop lesson plans for each lesson taught. Conduct a minimum of three formal lessons for the clinical supervisor including pre-observation and post-observation conferences during each placement. Daily planning discussions with cooperating teacher are mandatory, as are postlesson conferences. Arrange and attend post-observation conferences with the cooperating teacher and supervisor.

First Placement Guidelines: Complete three classroom observations; 1 of the 3 via a recorded lesson from the edTPA learning segment following edTPA guidelines. The student teacher must prepare to record the lesson by sending permission slips home before the scheduled recording date. The student teacher will make the necessary arrangements to record the lesson and upload the lesson to Tk20 to be viewed by the college supervisor. Advising in areas of instructional planning and delivery on the part of the college supervisor should emphasize, and provide direction for integrating the edTPA/TWS process of on-going assessment and data-driven planning. The candidate will complete daily reflective journals during weeks 1 and 2 and a single reflective journal during weeks 5, 6, and 7, select and submit for approval a professional conference to attend, complete a weekly plan book and lesson plans for all lessons taught, and complete edTPA/TWS Tasks 1 and 2 (Childhood Ed. candidates must also complete edTPA Task 4). 15


Clinical Experience Handbook “Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn.” Benjamin Franklin

Second Placement Guidelines: There must be tree classroom observations. One of the observed lessons completed during this placement must include technology-supported instruction (The Teacher Education Resource Room has some technology resources if schools do not have them). The candidate will complete daily reflective journals during weeks 1 and 2, a single reflective journal of the opposite theme chosen in the first placement during weeks 5, 6, and 7, attend a pre-approved professional conference (if not attended during the first placement), complete a weekly plan book and lesson plans for all lessons taught, and complete edTPA/TWS Task 3.

Assume increasing responsibility for all aspects of classroom teaching, including planning and implementing instruction, classroom organization, assessment of student progress, and entering scores and grades. Students should assist the cooperating teacher instructionally when not teaching, begin teaching during the second week of the placement, assume full teaching responsibility for 1 class a day during the 3rd week, 2 classes a day during the 4th week, 3 classes a day during the 5th week, and a full teaching load during the 6th and 7th week of each placement.

Secure and follow the placement school’s calendar, daily schedule and curriculum guidelines including Common Core State Standards (CCSS), New York State standards, the NYCDOE Scope and Sequence, and New York State Core Standards.

Participate in at least one school related activity at each placement site with the cooperating teacher including faculty meetings, professional development opportunities, parent-teacher conferences, staff and interdisciplinary team meetings. In a reflective journal for the week of the event, include reflection about the experience and how it ties to classroom life, teaching, and raising student-achievement.

Punch in and out daily on the school time clock using a time card secured at the school. Keep accurate Student Teaching Weekly and Monthly Time Logs. Attain appropriate signatures on all time cards. Staple daily time cards to back of log sheets and monthly time cards before submitting to college supervisor. Hours that are spent interacting with students, NOT simply hours spent in the school building, are counted toward the total placement hours.

Be proactive! Take the initiative in becoming involved in the classroom. Ask for opportunities to assist. Don’t just sit or stand around waiting for the teacher to direct you.

Notify the school, cooperating teacher and the college supervisor when late or absent, preferably in advance. Three or more absences will result in an extended placement (two make up days required for each day missed). Supporting documentation for missed days is required. Candidates must strive to be present and on time always.

Develop a receptive and reflective attitude toward suggestions and critiques. Constructive feedback from the cooperating teacher and the college supervisor is essential for a student teacher’s professional growth.

Set goals for your student teaching, based upon what you feel are your strengths and weaknesses in the following key areas: Instructional Planning Lesson Delivery – General Lesson Delivery -- Differentiated Instruction (including ELLs and Special Learners) Classroom Management and Student Discipline Collaborating with Colleagues and Parents Technology-supported Instruction. Establish key objectives, benchmarks and indicators/outcomes for each goal. Share your plan with the Student Teaching Seminar professor, your cooperating teacher and your college-supervisor at the beginning of your placement, and use your plan to frame lesson planning, post-observation conference discussions, and personal reflections. 16


17

Department of Teacher Education

“The highest result of education is tolerance.” Helen Keller

PROGRESSION OF INCREASING RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE STUDENT TEACHER During the first week the student teacher is getting acquainted with the school setting, the classroom, its activities, and the students. The progression includes: 

Gain an understanding of the cooperating teacher’s goals and objectives for the class

Observe the cooperating teacher and students in the teaching/learning process

Assist in the classroom with such things as taking attendance, distributing materials, recording homework assignments, and administering and scoring assessments to measure student learning

Provide individual tutorial assistance in classroom instruction

Increase instructional responsibilities as quickly as possible. The rate at which added responsibilities are assumed is varied based on the individual student teacher. The progression involves: 

Teaching small groups as directed by the cooperative teacher

Planning, implementing, and assessing a lesson for a small group

Planning, implementing, and assessing a lesson for the full class

Planning an extended unit of instruction with appropriate assessment strategies to measure impact on student’s learning

Assuming responsibility for the planning and implementing of instruction over an extended time period

Student Teachers are strongly encouraged to participate as fully as possible in the following school activities: 

Parent-teacher conferences

Professional Development Sessions

Faculty department meetings

Field trips

Assemblies

17


Clinical Experience Handbook “The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you.” B.B. King

SUGGESTED STUDENT TEACHING WEEKLY TIMELINE Placement Weeks 1 & 2 – Getting Acquainted and Early Involvement 

Ensure your CT knows to complete the CT Information Form on Tk20.

Complete “Getting to Know Your School” form during week 1.

Enter your complete schedule on Tk20 by the end of week 1. Student teachers must: 

clear any changes in the schedule with the CT and the supervisor

notify both the CT and the University supervisor whenever they are going to be absent from the cooperating school due to illness

Complete “Getting to Know Your School” form. Complete TWS Part 1[Placement 1].

Formally check in and out with your school each day. Complete “Student Teaching Weekly Log” everyday. (This will help in completing your “Monthly Time Log.”)

Get acquainted with students in classes 

Begin learning student names

Study individual records for greater understanding of the physical, emotional, and intellectual aspects of each pupil

Learn as much as possible about your CTs classroom organization, routines, teaching strategies, methods, and techniques (i.e. seating charts, attendance procedures, procedures for distributing and collecting materials, beginning procedures, methods of involving the students)

Become familiar with the routines of the school

Begin discussions with CT regarding future teaching experiences 

What procedures will you take over during week 2?

What lessons / units are you likely to teach in the coming weeks?

Plan meeting times (short daily meeting times, regular weekly meeting time)

What unit will you teach for your edTPA/TWS learning segment during weeks 6 & 7?

Become familiar with the curriculum and materials that are available for use; begin collecting/ creating instructional materials to use when teaching

During week 1, complete Plan Book with CT for teaching 1 class each day during week 3.

Observe and assist with classroom activities 

Record attendance

Help individuals and small groups of students

Provide feedback on student work

Arrange bulletin board displays

Complete, then review lesson plan for 1st full lesson to be taught on first day of week 3.

Complete reflective journals each day during weeks 1 and 2.

During week 2, complete Plan Book with CT for teaching 2 classes each day during week 4. 18


19

Department of Teacher Education

“Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” Nelson Mandela

Placement Week 3 – Teaching Full Class Each Day – Assist in All Other Classes  Teach one full class each day; write a lesson plan for each lesson. Assist in all classes.  Review lesson plans with CT 2-3 days before they are scheduled to be taught to allow time for revision.  Continue planning and meeting with CT.  Complete “Student Teaching Weekly Log” each day.  Complete Plan Book with CT for teaching 3 classes each day during week 5.  [Placement 1] Complete edTPA Task 1, begin working on Task 2.  Select a class in which to record a lesson, and send “Videotaping Permission Slips” home with students.[Placement 1]

Placement Week 4 – Teach 2 Classes Each Day – Assist in All Other Classes  Teach two full classes each day; write a lesson plan for each lesson. Assist in all classes.  Review lesson plans with CT 2-3 days before they are scheduled to be taught to allow time for revision.  Continue planning and meeting with CT.  Complete “Student Teaching Weekly Log” each day.  Complete Plan Book with CT for teaching a full teaching load during week 6.  Continue working on edTPA Task 2. [Placement 1]  Collect “Videotaping Permission Slips” from students. [Placement 1]  Complete “Student Teacher Monthly Time Log.”

Placement Week 5 – Teach 3 Classes Each Day – Assist in All Other Classes  Teach three full classes each day; write a lesson plan for each lesson. Assist in all classes.  Review lesson plans with CT 2-3 days before they are scheduled to be taught to allow time for revision.  Continue planning and meeting with CT.  Collect data and analyze lessons.  Complete “Student Teaching Weekly Log” each day.  Complete Plan Book with CT for teaching a full teaching load during week 7.  Teach a lesson formally observed by your College Supervisor* (must complete 3 during placement; including Lesson Plan review before lesson and post lesson meeting)  Complete Reflective Journal Theme A or B. Complete the opposite theme in Placement 2.

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Clinical Experience Handbook “Education's purpose is to replace an empty mind with an open one.” Malcom Forbes

Placement Week 6 – Teach Full Teaching Load [P1 – Teach edTPA Learning Segment]  Teach full teaching load each day; write a lesson plan for each lesson (must teach edTPA Learning Segment during first placement)  Review lesson plans with CT 2-3 days before they are scheduled to be taught to allow time for revision.  Continue planning and meeting with CT.  Collect data and analyze lessons.  Teach a lesson formally observed by your College Supervisor* (must complete 3 during placement; including Lesson Plan review before lesson and post lesson meeting)  Complete “Student Teaching Weekly Log” each day.  Complete Reflective Journal Theme C or D. Complete the opposite theme in Placement 2. Placement Week 7 – Teach Full Teaching Load [P1 – Teach edTPA Learning Segment]  Teach full teaching load each day; write a lesson plan for each lesson (must teach edTPA Learning Segment during first placement.)  Review lesson plans with CT 2-3 days before they are scheduled to be taught to allow time for revision.  Continue planning and meeting with CT.  Collect data and analyze lessons.  Videotape 15-20 minutes of a lesson. Do not videotape students who did not obtain permission to be videotaped. Submit video to College Supervisor for review. [Placement 1]  Teach a lesson formally observed by your College Supervisor* (including Lesson Plan review before lesson and post lesson meeting) [Placement 2]  Complete “Student Teaching Weekly Log” each day. Complete “Monthly Time Log.”  Complete Reflective Journal Theme E or F. Complete the opposite theme in Placement 2. *Formal Lesson Observations by the College Supervisor do not have an assigned week of completion; dates are arranged by the Student Teacher, College Supervisor, and the Cooperating Teacher to be completed before the end of the placement, enable the student teacher to demonstrate growth over the placement, and showcase his/her teaching skills after ample practice.   

2 Formal Lesson Observations and 1 Lesson Observation based on a recorded, unedited video take place during the first placement. 3 Formal Lesson Observations take place during the second placement. One of the 6 College Supervisor Observed lessons must incorporate the use of technology to guide the lesson.

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21

Department of Teacher Education

“A teacher affects eternity: he can never tell where his influence stops.” Henry Adams

ROLE AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE CLINICAL SUPERVISOR The clinical supervisor serves as the liaison between the Clinical Program Coordinator at York College and the partnership school. The clinical supervisor aids the student teachers in developing their educational philosophies, work samples, and classroom practices through frequent personal contacts, classroom observations, and conferences. The clinical supervisor is expected to: 

Attend clinical meetings and functions related to student teaching throughout the semester.

Serve as an experienced professional and academic resource to the Student Teacher throughout the semester.

Support the Student Teacher in his or her understanding and practice of professional and ethical behavior.

Arrange to jointly meet with the Student Teacher and Cooperating Teacher early in 1 st placement to review requirements, expectations and the various evaluation protocols. Introduce yourself to School Administration and Staff.

Review Plan Books to ensure progress

Grade the student teacher’s weekly Reflective Journals to gain insight into the experience, growth, and any issues that may for the student teacher.  You may review the Reflective Journals on Tk20, or you may arrange for the ST to email the Reflective Journals directly to you. After reviewing and commenting (as you see necessary) on the journal entries, email the grade (out of 12, refer to the Reflective Journal Rubric) to the Clinical Professor.

Address problems with the Student Teacher, the Cooperating Teacher, School Administrators or Staff, and/or the Clinical Professor as soon as they arise. Email the problems and how they were ameliorated to the Clinical Professor.

Complete formal observations of 6 lessons taught by the student teacher. Conduct pre- and post-observation meetings, and complete a “Student Teacher Observation Form” for each observation. The Observation Form must include number ratings not check marks. 

Complete 3 observations during each placement. One observation must be of a technology-supported lesson, and one evaluation must be on a video of a lesson from the edTPA Learning Segment.

Share the completed Student Teacher Observation Form with the Student Teacher after each observation. Return the signed forms to the Clinical Professor either directly or through the student teacher.

Complete the Student Teaching Final Evaluation Form at the end of each seven-week placement.

Determine a Student Teaching final letter grade for the student teacher using the weighted grading formula provided by the Clinical Professor

Submit the Final Evaluation Form, signed by you and your student teacher, and final letter grade to the Clinical Professor by the date noted on the Clinical Experience Calendar.

Complete the EXIT Survey and return it to the Clinical Professor by the end of the semester. 21


Clinical Experience Handbook “Whenever the people are well-informed, they can be trusted with their own government.” Thomas Jefferson

ROLE AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE COOPERATING TEACHER The cooperating teacher plays a fundamental role in the clinical practice experience, for he/she is the one who works with the student teacher on a daily basis. Cooperating teachers can be positive role models and supporters of teacher candidates; when they are, they represent the teaching profession in a positive light, and promote high quality teacher performance. The cooperating teacher is expected to: 

Treat student teachers as new professionals and assist them with their induction into the teaching profession. Recognize that the pre-service candidates’ first teaching experience is taking place in your classroom, under your tutelage. We expect that you will provide them with on-going and open communication, encouragement, and support.

Review school and classroom policies and procedures, the curriculum, daily schedule, building administrators’ contact numbers, etc. with the student teacher.

Meet with the student teacher regularly. This includes impromptu daily meetings and a regularly scheduled weekly meeting to review lesson plans and instructional delivery.

Provide the student teacher with a class list, copies of texts (for reference/temporary use), curriculum guides, school calendar notes (i.e., parent conference and Open School nights, testing dates), teacher meeting times, professional development schedule, etc.

Provide adequate guidance and opportunity for the student teacher to gradually increase classroom responsibilities. Student teachers are required to spend at least 50% of their placement hours engaged in actual teaching of lessons they have developed. The candidate should begin teaching by the end of the 2nd week of the placement, and teach at least one class a day during the 3rd week, two classes a day during the 4th week, three classes a day during the 5th week, and a full schedule during the 6th and 7th weeks.

Provide on-going, honest, and constructive feedback regarding the student teacher’s professional growth to both the student teacher and the college supervisor. Efforts should be made when possible to participate in observation conferences with the student teacher and college supervisor.

Address concerns immediately through honest, open dialogue with the student teacher, college supervisor, or Clinical Program Professor.

Complete the “Cooperating Teacher Weekly Feedback Form” each week, and submit it to the college professor.

Complete the” Student Teaching Final Evaluation Form” towards the end of the placement. Share it with the student teacher, and submit it to the clinical professor. It is recommended that the cooperating teacher keep a written record of his/her observations (formal and informal) to aid in weekly conferences with the student teacher and also to facilitate completion of the Student Teaching Final Evaluation Form.

Provide information regarding local professional conferences to the student teacher to aid in selecting an appropriate conference to attend during the semester. (1st Placement CT)

Remuneration – For each student teacher supervised, the cooperating teacher is offered a tuition waiver of three credits that can be used at any CUNY campus. The waiver is processed once the Clinical Program Coordinator at York College has received a completed “Cooperating Teacher Information Form” and a completed “Student Teaching Final Evaluation Form”. 22


23

Department of Teacher Education

“Education is the mother of leadership.” Wendell L. Willkie

ROLE AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF SCHOOL & AGENCY ADMINISTRATORS The school leader/agency head and/or administrative team sets the tone for his or her staff, in terms of how they view the York College Teacher Education Program, York College student teachers assigned to their schools, York college supervisors, and other York College representatives who serve as liaisons to our partner institutions. They also ensure that program standards are maintained and that program guidelines are adhered to. Clinical practice programs depend as much on the quality of program provided in our partner schools, as it does the college’s curriculum. School and agency administrators play a critical role in creating a good balance of experiences. Any success achieved during field and clinical practice will be largely due to our partner administrators’ willingness to do the following: 

Promote a culture within the school and between organizations, that encourages positive relations, open communications, a sharing of key program resources, and a joint commitment to creating an enriching learning experience for teacher candidates.

Ensure that preparations for student teachers are made in advance by identifying exemplary teachers who are willing to work with student-teachers, informing them of student placement plans in advance of the student’s arrival, and reviewing expectations.

Provide student teachers with a proper orientation when they arrive at the site, which includes a school tour, a brief introduction to key staff, provision of the school/agency schedule, call-in/contact information, general school /agency rules, and P-12 student disciplinary guidelines.

Provide student teachers with a time card to punch in and out on during their tenure at the site.

Encourage positive opinions and support among school/agency staff for York field and clinical practice students, while placed at their sites

Maintain open and timely communications with York College Department of Teacher Education faculty and staff. This includes answering and returning telephone calls, letters and emails (preferably within a few hours, but at most within 24 hours), reporting (email or call) candidate misbehavior, and making recommendations for changes.

Collaborate with York College faculty in strategic program planning and evaluation, finalizing field placements, assigning cooperating teachers, and in admitting candidates to the Clinical Practice program.

Provide feedback and recommendations to Department of Teacher Education faculty regarding clinical program operations. Work toward the goal of mutual cooperation, seamless program operations and shared outcomes.

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Clinical Experience Handbook “If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.” Abraham Maslow

KEY LEGAL MATTERS CONCERNING STUDENT TEACHERS IN NEW YORK STATE

Section 3023 of the New York State Education Law protects Student Teaching Candidates. This section requires that each school district protect candidates from financial loss arising out of any claim, demand, suit or judgment by reason of alleged negligence or other act resulting in accidental bodily injury to any person. This protection applies only if the candidate was performing duties within the scope of the position of student teacher. Candidates are also encouraged, although not required, to obtain their own insurance, which is sometimes provided through the colleges they attend. Section 3001, Subsection 2 of the New York State Education Law. This section states that a student teacher is legally permitted to student teach without the presence of the certified teacher in the classroom if the classroom certified teacher is available at all times and retains supervision of the student teacher. Student teachers are not to be used as paid or unpaid substitute teachers. They may, however, do student teaching under the supervision of a certified substitute teacher. Sexual Harassment. Every person is entitled to a work in a learning environment free from the devastating effects of sexual harassment. If any candidate encounters sexual harassment or inappropriate attention during student teaching, he or she should report the situation to the clinical supervisor or to the clinical professor. The incident will be investigated and the candidate’s placement may be changed. Depending upon the circumstances, the candidate may also wish to report the incident to the Office of Student Affairs. Candidates need to keep complete, dated, contemporaneous notes on incidents of concern so that the College can take appropriate action to protect candidates’ right to learn and to student teach without harassment. Child Abuse. Candidates are mandated reporters of suspected child abuse. All candidates are to keep complete, dated, contemporaneous notes on incidents or observations that raise concern. The College expects that candidates will immediately report any concerns to the principal of the school involved. Making this report does not absolve a candidate of responsibility to file a Child Protective Services report, but it may bring about quicker action to protect the child. If the concern is about a school faculty member’s behavior, candidates may ask their clinical supervisor to accompany them to meet with the principal.

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25

Department of Teacher Education

“We cannot hold a torch to light another’s path without brightening our own.” Ben Sweetland

NEW YORK STATE CODE OF ETHICS FOR EDUCATORS Statement of Purpose The Code of Ethics is a public statement by educators that sets clear expectations and principles to guide practice and inspire professional excellence. Educators believe a commonly held set of principles can assist in the individual exercise of professional judgment. This Code speaks to the core values of the profession. "Educator" as used throughout means all educators serving New York schools in positions requiring a certificate, including classroom teachers, school leaders and pupil personnel service providers.

Principle 1: Educators nurture the intellectual, physical, emotional, social, and civic potential of each student. Educators promote growth in all students through the integration of intellectual, physical, emotional, social and civic learning. They respect the inherent dignity and worth of each individual. Educators help students to value their own identity, learn more about their cultural heritage, and practice social and civic responsibilities. They help students to reflect on their own learning and connect it to their life experience. They engage students in activities that encourage diverse approaches and solutions to issues, while providing a range of ways for students to demonstrate their abilities and learning. They foster the development of students who can analyze, synthesize, evaluate and communicate information effectively.

Principle 2: Educators create, support, and maintain challenging learning environments for all. Educators apply their professional knowledge to promote student learning. They know the curriculum and utilize a range of strategies and assessments to address differences. Educators develop and implement programs based upon a strong understanding of human development and learning theory. They support a challenging learning environment. They advocate for necessary resources to teach to higher levels of learning. They establish and maintain clear standards of behavior and civility. Educators are role models, displaying the habits of mind and work necessary to develop and apply knowledge while simultaneously displaying a curiosity and enthusiasm for learning. They invite students to become active, inquisitive, and discerning individuals who reflect upon and monitor their own learning.

Principle 3: Educators commit to their own learning in order to develop their practice. Educators recognize that professional knowledge and development are the foundations of their practice. They know their subject matter, and they understand how students learn. Educators respect the reciprocal nature of learning between educators and students. They engage in a variety of individual and collaborative learning experiences essential to develop professionally and to promote student learning. They draw on and contribute to various forms of educational research to improve their own practice.

Principle 4: Educators collaborate with colleagues and other professionals in the interest of student learning. Educators encourage and support their colleagues to build and maintain high standards. They participate in decisions regarding curriculum, instruction and assessment designs, and they share responsibility for the governance of schools. They cooperate with community agencies in using resources and building comprehensive services in support of students. Educators respect fellow professionals and believe that all have the right to teach and learn in a professional and supportive environment. They participate in the preparation and induction of new educators and in professional development for all staff.

Principle 5: Educators collaborate with parents and community, building trust and respecting confidentiality. Educators partner with parents and other members of the community to enhance school programs and to promote student learning. They also recognize how cultural and linguistic heritage, gender, family and community shape experience and learning. Educators respect the private nature of the special knowledge they have about students and their families and use that knowledge only in the students’ best interests. They advocate for fair opportunity for all children.

Principle 6: Educators advance the intellectual and ethical foundation of the learning community. Educators recognize the obligations of the trust placed in them. They share the responsibility for understanding what is known, pursuing further knowledge, contributing to the generation of knowledge, and translating knowledge into comprehensible forms. They help students understand that knowledge is often complex and sometimes paradoxical. Educators are confidantes, mentors and advocates for their students’ growth and development. As models for youth and the public, they embody intellectual honesty, diplomacy, tact and fairness 25


Clinical Experience Handbook “Children have never been very good at listening to their elders, but they have never failed to imitate them.” James Baldwin

CERTIFICATION PATHWAY FOR NEW YORK STATE CLASSROOM TEACHERS TRANSITION POINT 3 Completion of the Teacher Education Program Complete Student Teaching/Seminar I & Teaching/Seminar II with a minimum grade of C in each including the Violence Prevention AND Child Abuse and Neglect workshops Earn a minimum overall 2.75 GPA on all courses taken at York College Complete all course work required for the degree NEW YORK STATE INITIAL CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS in addition to COMPLETION OF THE TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM  Fulfill foreign language requirement  Complete a science course with a laboratory  Appropriate exams (exam requirements will change for all students graduating after 4/30/2014. Refer to the table below for testing requirements based on your graduation date)

Graduating on or before 4/30/2014 Assessment of Teaching Skills— Written (ATS–W)  Liberal Arts And Science Test (LAST)  Content Specialty Test (CST) 

Graduating on or after 5/1/2014 edTPA Educating All Students Test (EAS) Academic Literacy Skills Test (ALST)  Content Specialty Test (CST)   

After completing the requirements listed above and York College’s graduation requirements, the teacher candidate is eligible to be recommended for initial certification. The application process is online as follows: 

Study and know the pathway to teaching certification, related to one’s area of certification, which is outlined on the New York State Department of Education Website: http:// www.highered.nysed.gov/tcert/certificate/certprocess.html Complete required trainings: Dignity for All Students Act, Violence Prevention Workshop, and the Child Abuse and Neglect Workshop. These courses are provided by the Teacher Education Department at York College, and are offered as part of the student teaching seminar. Get fingerprinting and criminal background checks out the way no later than the beginning of the fall semester prior to the student teaching year. See the Manager of Teacher Education Services for required paperwork/letter to take to the New York City Board of Education in order to complete the process. Set up an account within the New York State Department of Education’s TEACH System as soon as possible, after taking your first teaching certification exam. This will be helpful in tracking teacher-certification processes at the state level. 26


27

Department of Teacher Education

“It is the supreme art of the teacher to awaken joy in creative expression and knowledge.” Albert Einstein

RECOMMENDED TEACHER CANDIDATE JOB SEARCH ACTIVITIES York College teacher candidates should begin to take the necessary steps during early field experiences and as they prepare to enter student teaching, in order to increase their chances for getting employed after they graduate college. The following is a list of activities that education candidates should engage in to enhance their chances of securing a job: SIGN UP with the York College Career Services Office. They will help with resume preparation, interviewing skills, and job-search leads. The Career Services Office is located AC/3M01. You can register for their services on-line at https://york-cunycsm.symplicity.com/students/?signin_tab=2. You can also contact them by telephone by calling (718) 262-2282. EXCEL when completing all Early Field and Clinical Experiences. Although you may not see the principals at the sites where you are placed, they often know who you are and they get multiple reports about candidates from people in the building. Many principals are looking for potential teachers all of the time. Be on time, be proactive, and attend special school meetings when possible for learning sake, but also to let others know that you are interested in being a part of their school community. Check out the schools when you are there to see if they are a good match for you professionally. Make a positive impression whether you like a school or not; it may be the only school with a job opening when you are looking for a job. Also, ask your cooperating teachers, college supervisors, and/or other professionals that you work with during your student teaching for letters of recommendation. BEGIN and COMPLETE as much of the New York City Board of Education online teaching application no later than June or December 1st prior to the student teaching term. This system closes periodically each year at various times without much notice. Candidates should check periodically when the system is closed to determine if it has reopened. Once it opens candidates should immediately input their information at www.teachnyc.net. REGISTER online at the Office for Student Teacher Initiatives, at the New York City Department of Education (NYCDOE), no later than June or December 1st, prior to the student teaching term. Create a user account to complete on-line registration at http:// nyc.teacherssupportnetwork.com. REGISTER at the NYCDOE’s Career Fair and Information Sessions and attend teacher jobfairs offered throughout the year. http://schools.nyc.gov/ChoicesEnrollment/AlternativesHS/ default.htm LOOK at Teachers of Tomorrow schools for information regarding new and small schools that have opened within the last three years by accessing the search engine at the following web address: http://schools.nyc.gov/TeachNYC/incentives/default.htm. JOIN New York City Department of Education’s social networking page that has helpful information: http://facebook.com/iteachnyc. LOOK for job listings posted on the New York City Department of Education and other area district and charter school web sites, the New York Times on-line, www.monster.com and www.idealist.com. CONSIDER uploading your resume on www.olasjobs.org for teaching opportunities in areas of New York outside of New York City (Long Island, Westchester, Upstate counties). 27


Clinical Experience Handbook “The secret in education lies in respecting the student.� Ralph Waldo Emerson

Appendices

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A

Department of Teacher Education

York College Department of Teacher Education Faculty & Staff Faculty Dr. Lindamichelle Baron – Assistant Professor, Department Chair Room 1D12E (718) 262-2938 lbaron@york.cuny.edu Dr. Dana Fusco – Professor Room 1D12C (718) 262-2698 dfusco@york.cuny.edu Dr. Xin Bai - Assistant Professor Room 4G03 (718) 262-2830 xbai@york.cuny.edu Dr. Linda Gerena – Associate Professor Room 1D12A (718) 262-2089 lgerena@york.cuny.edu Dr. Leslie Keiler – Associate Professor Room 1D12D (718) 262-2453 lkeiler@york.cuny.edu Dr. Jane Keleher – Assistant Professor Room 1D12C (718) 262-2820 jkeleher@york.cuny.edu Prof. Ann Marra – Substitute Field & Clinical Lecturer Room 1D06 amarra@york.cuny.edu

SUPPORT STAFF Regina Misir, Manager, Teacher Education Services Room 1D12B (718) 262-2530 rmisir@york.cuny.edu Jessica Roman, Office Assistant Room 1D12 (718) 262-2450 / 2451 jroman@york.cuny.edu

York College General Number (718) 262-2000

APPENDIX A


Clinical Experience Handbook

APPENDIX B


C

Department of Teacher Education

APPENDIX C


Clinical Experience Handbook

APPENDIX D


E

Department of Teacher Education

APPENDIX E


Clinical Experience Handbook

APPENDIX F


“What sculpture is to a block of marble education is to the human soul.” Joseph Addison


Fall 2013 York College Clinical Experience Handbook  
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