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Anna K.M. Best Ecological Landscape Designer

M.A. Landscape Design and Planning Permaculture Design Certificate AnnaKMBest@gmail.com 12467 Ashland Vineyard Ln Ashland, VA 23005 804 698 9624


Contents

Design Ethics Selected Projects

Landscape Master Plan for a Quaker Retreat Center Seventeen acres in Deerfield, MA Residential Landscape Design Ten acres in Shelburne Falls, MA Management Plan for Conservation and Recreation Four hundred acres in Scituate, MA Planting Plan for Quilting Studio 2000 square feet in Ashland, VA

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Related Experience

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Graphic Samples

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Resume Career Development Timeline

Hand drawings CAD drawings


O b s e r v e a n d I n t e ra c t .

Design Ethics

C a t ch a n d S t o re E n e r g y. O b t a i n a Yi e l d . Apply Self Regulation. A c c e p t Fe e d b a c k . U s e a n d Va l u e R e n e w a b l e R e s o u r c e s . P r o d u c e N o Wa s t e . D e s i g n f ro m Pa t t e r n s t o D e t a i l s. I n t e g ra t e R a t h e r t h a n S e p a ra t e. Use Small and Slow Solutions. U s e a n d Va l u e D i v e r s i t y .

• Sustainable design addresses the needs of the land and the needs of the people. Humans are part of the ecosystem, yet we wield a disproportionate amount of power. A designer should use this power conscientiously. • Carefully selected and sited plants allow the land, its wildlife, and its people to thrive. • Native plants provide habitat for native wildlife and will help reduce our dependence on irrigation, fuel, and imported nutrients. • In addition to native plants, productive exotic plants are helping to improve the world. Properly harvested and processed, plants which produce food, fodder, medicine, fuel, and building materials contribute to a more sustainable lifestyle and local economy. • A community of plants and animals supporting one another will thrive and require less expensive maintenance than a monoculture. • If sustainable landscapes are beautiful, more people will choose to invest in them and their conservation.

U s e E d g e s a n d Va l u e t h e M a r g i n a l . Creativel y Respond to Chang e.

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Simplicity

Peace

Integrity

Community

Equality

Retreat Center Landscape Master Plan Woolman Hill Quaker Retreat Center Seventeen acres in Deerfield, Massachusetts The Conway School, Spring 2013 Team of Two View the complete project at

http://issuu.com/conwaydesign/docs/woolmanhillfinal13.6.28lowres

Landscape Master Plan

Goals

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Conference Center

Atop the Pocumtuck Ridge, Woolman Hill hosts retreats, weddings, and workshops. The planning committee desires to: • clarify the arrival experience • improve access and streamline circulation • strengthen a sense of place • site a guest house, a bath house, and a pavilion • evaluate the site’s potential for sustainable agriculture, wildlife habitat, and renewable energy production

Design Solutions • To clarify the arrival, Conference Center’s main door is relocated to be visible to guests as they arrive in their cars. • Pathways and vegetation guide walkers from the parking lot to the main door. • Siting a Guest House and Pavilion north and northeast of the Conference Center activates a green space in between. • Rooftop solar panels capture energy. Forest gardens and vegetable fields supply food. Meadows teem with wildlife.

Existing Conditions

Staff Home

Quaker Meetinghouse Retreat Center Core

Staff Home


Layering Analyses Reveals Relationships, Constraints, and Opportunities the buildable area, new service may be possible by tapping Simplicity

Observations •

Peace

The Core Area is buildable except for the property setback off of Keets Road.

There are three pockets within the fields that receive more than six hours of sun year-round. However, only two of them are on buildable areas because one is on a steep slope with a septic leach field.

into existing utility lines.

Community

None ofForest the Core Area or any part of the open area is suitable for buildings with basements. Soils for such structures are found only in forested areas.

Legend

Areas around staff housing needing privacy lie to the far

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Confusion Upon Arrival Buildable Area Overhead Electric Wires

Underground Electric Wires

De

Stream

Road

None of the Core Area or any part of the open area is suitable for buildings with basements. Soils for such structures are found only in forested areas.

Buildable Area

s Keet

Confusion Upon Arrival Overhead Electric Wires

Underground Water Pipes

Observed Wet Area Underground Water Tank for Fire Emergency

Septic Tank & Leach Chambers

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Outhouse

Conference Center

Underground Septic Pipe Soil Suitable for Buildings with Basements and Septic Leach Fields Areas that receive more than 6 hours of sun year-round Private Staff Areas

Core Area

Important Vantage Points Co

Best Building Sites

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the buildable area, new service may be possible by tapping into existing utility lines. Areas with good views could be good locations to create places for personal and group contemplation, or for outdoor events.

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Staff Home

• Three good sites north and southbuilding within the open area.were identified, shown at right in dashed, black circles. • Underground water and septic lines run north to south within • theThe middle buildable area. one has the best access, does not block views from important • There is a cluster of good vantage points in the Core Area. vantage points, and shows the • There is a good vantage point, full sun area, and buildable strongest potential to clarify guests’ area just south of the Brown House. confusion upon arrival. • Soils suitable for buildings with basements and septic • leach A building may also harvest fields are onlyhere found southeast of the open area, in the forest. In particular, there is an area along Cobbs Ferry sunlight, tie into underground utilities, Road that may be suitable for a building with a basement, although it is in thean forest. and frame outdoor gathering space. • Implications The main entrance should be visible from an arriving guest’s car before he/she parks. • The Guest House will be 1,800 square feet, the Bath House be 600 square feet. Therefrom is sufficient for • willAs guests arrive thebuildable north,area the both of these buildings within the 1.2 buildable acres in the main Core Area. entrance on the south side of the Conference Center is not visible. Thus, • The areas that receive more than six hours of sunlight yeararriving guests confused round and are buildable areare the best locations forabout siting a passive solar building. where to go and often drive to staff • Currently residents of both private areas have to drive homes. the Core Area in order to leave the property. There • through Relocating the tohomes the are also arriving guests whomain drive upentrance to the two staff when confused about where to go. north side of the Conference Center would make it visible upon arrival. • With water and septic lines running underground through •

Equality

places for personal and group contemplation, or for outdoor events.

Summary of Analyses •

• Areas with good views could be good locations to create Summary of Analyses

6.5 buildable acres run north and south through and

around the Core Applied skills in:Area. These areas are buildable based on soil suitability (for both buildings without basements and • InDesign • Hand drawing farmland), slope, buffers and setbacks, and existing leach • Photoshop • PowerPoint fields. • AutoCAD • Excel •

Integrity

Forest

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Main Entrance

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Staff Home

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the north.

Simplicity

Peace

Integrity

path directs guests to the main 8 Aentrance of the Center and Alternative 3: Gather on theConference Green: Buildings, Roads, and Land Use Sites, Recommended Building can be driven on by caterers making deliveries. Eight lights on main With the Guest House, Pavilion, and Conference Centershine located universally close together, guests can pathways enjoy retreatsand and other events inaccessible a central location. The buildings frame the viewareas to the by eastthe of a Conference wildflower parking Center meadow and create a cozy grass gathering space between the and Meeting House. Nelson buildings. The Bath House is centrally located between the four retreat

Roads,

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Not for construction. This drawing is part of a student project and is not based on a legal survey

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vey

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Brown House

Legend

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The Pavilion looks over the wildflower meadow to the east. Guests will feel surrounded by colorful vegetation and wildlife when looking out during events. For larger events, an additional tent can be set up in the lawn and festivities can spill into that area.

N.T.S.

New Building Renovated Building Proposed Trail

Barn

Proposed Sign Proposed Light Sustainable Vegetable Farming

Guest House

Bath House Red House

Reforest: Native Trees & Shrubs Coppice/Pollard Forestry

Pavilion

Office

Edible Forest Gardens

Conference Center

Wet Meadows

Gathering

Upland Meadows and Pasture

Meeting House Core Area

A Landscape Master Plan for

Cabin

Hill Quaker Retreat Center 3: Cabin Woolman Deerfield, Massachusetts can be driven on by caterers making deliveries. Eight lights shine on mainBuildings, Roads, Land Use Anna K. M. Best • Beth Schermerhorn pathways and universally accessible parking areas by the Conference Center and Meeting House.

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Barn

Cabin

“Gather on the Green”

With the Guest House, Pavilion, tent can be set up in the lawn and and Conference Center clustered A reinforced turf roadfestivities provides access can spill into that area. together, guests to the Nelson House, which is now can enjoy rented. retreats and other events in a The Blacksmith Shop is converted The Barncentral is located the east sideThese of 10 onlocation. buildings the Brown House driveway for tractor into a Bath House that and expanded frame theis close view to the east of a and vehicle access and to the is near the Core Area and centrally farm. wildflower meadow and shape located for guests staying in the private a grassy gathering A trail going through cabins. the edible forest space in the garden takes guests to the Sunrise middle. The Bath House (intended Cabin. A trail across the driveway from for 11 guests of starts the peripheral The main parking area is expanded to House and winds through the Meeting cabins) and to a small 50 spaces, increasingis theaccessible overall guest an edible forestto garden parking by 30 spaces to located accommodate centrally between the area for group or personal larger events. The wetgathering meadow to the refl ection. From herefrom there are views to retreat but away west infiltrates watercabins, coming from the driveway and parkingthe east ofarea the wildfl ower the mainlot.event north of meadow. A second,the smaller sign before the main Conference Center. Moving intersection indicates that main parking the driveway north of the Guest is to the right. preserves The new House guest house accommodatesthe main event up to 12 guests with the Conference area between the Conference Center and Pavilion close by. Covered Center and Guest House, and it porches overlook the wildflower meadow and edible forest garden to allows staff living in the Brown the north. House to drive by without A path directs guests to the main events. entrancedisturbing of the Conference Center and Design Alternative

Cabin

Green House

Preferred Design surrounded by colorful vegetation

and wildlife A new entrance sign informs guests when looking out during that they have arrivedevents. at Woolman ForHill larger events, an additional and that parking is ahead.

Equality

CabinUse Land

House

cabins, but away from the main event area, making the Bath House equally accessible to cabinThe guests. Moving the driveway the ower Pavilion looks overnorth the of wildfl Guest House allows staff living in the Brown House to enter and exit meadow to the east. Guests will feel without disturbing events.

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C o m mCore u n iArea ty •

The Conway School • Spring 2013 • www.csld.edu Green House

N.T.S.

Barn N.T.S. New Building


Simplicity

Peace

Integrity

Community

Equality

Gather on the Green arranges the Conference Center, Pavilion,

and Guest House around a common green, inspired by college campus quads. Edging the green with buildings creates a comfortable outdoor area for gatherings and play. A path sweeps from the parking lot to the main entry of the Conference Center, now on the north side. Edible trees and shrubs surround the Meeting House, creating two quiet outdoor worship spaces.

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3 Guest House

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The Green

6 Pavilion

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8 Bath House

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Conference Center

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Meeting House

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Doubled gravel parking lot has 44 spaces so programs may expand.

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A new Guest House has a porch offering a sheltered eastward view, and a southern arbor for summer shade and winter light.

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At the main arrival intersection, the main entrance into the Conference Center and the main parking are clearly visible so that guests know where to go. This southward view is illustrated below.

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A wide path sweeps from the main parking lot to the new main entrance on the north side of the Conference Center. It is a pedestrian path that is drivable for service vehicle access.

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Perched on the edge of the sloping meadow, a Pavilion offers sheltered outdoor event space. Its rooftop photovoltaic panels provide power.

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Guests can get a clear view as they arrive of the new main entry on the north side of the Conference Center. Guests rest on shady patios.

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The Bath House sits on a small, quiet green shaded by a saucer magnolia by the Office and Red House. It replaces the Blacksmith Shed.

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Southwest of the Conference Center, accessible parking is available near the south entrance to the building.

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An outdoor ring is a gathering space for worship just outside the Meeting House. Accessible parking adjacent to the Meeting House’s ramp is convenient for worshipers with limited mobility.

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A path across from the Meeting House leads through an edible forest garden to a smaller outdoor gathering space among fruiting shrubs.

At a new driveway intersection, the Conference Center’s main entrance is clearly visible ahead, while the Guest House is screened with evergreens.

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PARK

The main entrance is clear upon arrival.

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Habitat

Beauty

Place

Crittenden Hill: A Residential Landscape Design Land Management Plan and Garden Design Ten acres in Shelburne Falls, Massachusetts The Conway School, Fall 2012 View the complete project at

http://issuu.com/annakmbest/docs/residentiallandscapedesign_annabest

Residential Landscape Design

Goals

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The clients needed a land management plan for their tenacre property as well as a garden design to clarify the arrival experience and ground their home into its rural ridge-top context. The clients wished to • Improve the quality of wildlife habitat • Enhance the natural beauty of the land • Create special destinations to visit

Design Solutions The land management plan • broadens the transition from forest to meadow • expands the meadow and ceases mowing on steep slopes • reduces the mowed lawn The garden design • Clarifies a sense of arrival • Echoes the architecture, • Offers shady resting places with views and paths

“Anna is a gem. She is, first of all, intelligent, articulate, energetic and passionate about preserving and improving the environment. Additionally, she is wonderfully artistic and most resourceful.” - Linda Leighton, client


Habitat

Beauty

Place

Not for coNstructioN. this drawiNg is part of a studeNt project aNd is Not based oN a legal survey.

Applied skills in: • InDesign • Photoshop • Hand drawing

• Digital transit surveying • PowerPoint • Vectorworks

Summary of Analyses Summary of Analyses

A House

Watershed Boundary Lawn and Forest Challenges

Watershed Boundary Lawn and Forest

Ed and Linda must drive up a steep slope to access the Legally Protected house. To change the driveway Legally Protected would be expensive Wetlands and Buffer Wetlands and route Buffer and a viable alternative route has not been found. The only other access route to Meadow andthe Paths road runs through the Meadow and Paths Vernal wetland buffer and requires grading erosion-prone soils. Pool • A large area that is mowed regularly has steep slopes Primary Access Primary Access and soils prone to erosion. • Part of a wetland buffer is mowed regularly, and much it is mowed annually. Important Views Important ofViews • Part of the septic area is steep, but may not be planted with woody plants. Septic Leach Area Septic LeachBlueberry Area shrubs in the septic leach area may interfere with the septic system. • Some special destinations Alternative are accessible, while othersAlternative Access not. Ed and Linda to Road Access toareRoad only use one regularly.

A’

Wet Meadow

Legend

Assets • Slopes provide expansive Special Destinations Special Destinations views that highlight the lay of the land. • Primary access and outdoor living tend to occur on Steep, Mowed, Steep, Erodible Soil, relatively flat areas. Mowed and• Erodible Ed and Linda frequently useRegularly the southern patio, which has one of the best views of the site. Steep and Regularly Forest stabilizes many Steep and• Mowed Mowed steep slopes. • Water flows away from the house, maintaining a dry basement. Drainage Direction Drainage • Water flows south to recharge the wetlands.

Summary of Analyses Assets of the site include: • Slopes provide expansive views that highlight the lay of the land. • Clients primarily access relatively flat areas. • Clients frequently use the southern patio, which has one of the bestLegend views. • Forest stabilizes many steep slopes. Special Destinations • Water flows away from the house, maintaining a dry basement Steep, Mowed, and Erodible and recharging wetlands. Challenges of the site include: Steep and Mowed • A large area that is mowed regularly has Drainage steep slopes and soils prone to erosion. • Part of a wetland buffer isWatershed mowed regularly, Boundary and much of it is mowed annually. • Clients must drive up a steepLawn slope and Forest to access the house. Changing the Legally Protected driveway route is not viable. The Wetlands and Buffer only other access route to the road Paths runs through the wetland Meadow bufferandand requires grading erosion-prone soils. Primary Access • Part of the septic area is steep, but may not be planted with woody plants. Important Views Blueberry shrubs in the septic leach area may interfere with the septic system. Septic Leach Area • Some special destinations are Alternative accessible, while others are not. Access to Road Clients only use one regularly.

Legend

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Design Direction: Maintain existing driveway Plant steep slopes to minimize the need to mow them, especially on erosion-prone soils Eliminate mowing in

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Not for coNstructioN. this drawiNg is part of a studeNt project aNd is Not based oN a legal survey.

Master Plan

Habitat A Sense of Arrival

Entrance A fresh new entrance welcomes Ed and Linda home. A lone specimen tree with spectacular flower and autumn color stands as a focal point, distinctive from its forested surroundings. Three flowering shrubs echo the triangular entrance shape. A reinvigorated stone wall, backed with colorful native shrubs, announces a human touch and points up the driveway. Shrublands

Dry Meadow

House

A wide variety of native woody plants, from subshrubs to small trees, root deeply into all the steep slopes on the site. Broadening the forest edge, these soil holdfasts also invite birds, butterflies, small mammals, and large grazers into this blooming, fruiting oasis. Ed and Linda release the wetland vegetation into oldfields succession, welcoming wet-loving shrubs. Salamanders anchor their egg cases to woody stems, thus encouraging the security of their next generation. Wood frogs and fairy shrimp also benefit from the added overhead protection from predators. Gradual Forest Edge

Dry Meadow

Wet Shrubs

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House Gardens Linear perennial gardens on the north and south sides of the house echo the colonial architecture of the building. Gardens to the east and west echo the wildness of their meadow and forest edge surroundings.

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ANNA k. m. best The Conway School

Graduate Program in Sustainable Landscape Planning & Design

332 S. Deerfield Road | PO Box 179 | Conway, MA 01341

Norkus & LeightoN 44 Crittenden Hill Road Shelburne Falls, MA 01370

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Place

Land Management Plan Gradual Forest Edge

Small colorful shrubs rise out of the meadow. More shrubs rise taller and still taller, becoming Meadows While the southern meadow small trees and transitioning shrinks by half, a new meadow expands northward, wrappingto the mature forest edge. This around the house. It replaces gradual transition from meadow a significant portion of lawn while maintaining a sense to forest provides ample habitat of open expansiveness. Butterflies, bees, small for animals to hide, nest, and mammals, and ground-nesting birds find food and shelter feed in the foliage.

Paths

Wet Meadow

Beauty

The gravel driveway sweeps around, flanked by meadows with grasses shifting lazily in a soft breeze. The height of the meadow and the gradual forest edge beyond obscure the house until a visitor nearly crests the ridge. As the house rises from the meadow, framed by two stately trees, you know you have arrived.

in the waist-high grasses and forbs. Drifts of colorful wildflowers float beside frequently walked pathways through meadows.

Wet Shrubs

Small colorful shrubs rise out of the meadow. More shrubs rise taller and still taller, becoming small trees and transitioning to the mature forest edge. This gradual transition from meadow to forest provides ample habitat for animals to hide, nest, and feed in the foliage.

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Paths connect special destinations throughout the site. Some provide direct routes, others switch-back down steep slopes, and still others meander lazily from here to there. A forest path leads to the Great Oak.

Shrublands

A wide variety of native shrubs and small trees root deeply into all the steep slopes. Broadening the forest edge, these soil holdfasts also invite birds, Maintenance: butterflies, small mammals, and Mow lawn regularly as desired. Mow meadow once large grazers into this blooming, every two to three years, preferably when dry. Never fruiting oasis. Clients release mow shrublands because they are located on steep slopes the wetland vegetation into or protected wetlands. Cut unwanted plants manually. oldfields succession, welcoming Place woody debris in forest wet-loving shrubs. Salamanders to provide habitat and decompose, keeping nutrients onsite. When transplanting anchor their egg cases to woody plant material, Ed and Linda may want to invest in a long, stems, encouraging the security long hose to water plants as of their next generation. Wood they establish. frogs and fairy shrimp also benefit from the added overhead protection from predators.

fINaL dESIgN: maStEr pLaN 13/18

A Sense of Arrival The gravel driveway sweeps around, flanked by meadows with grasses shifting lazily in a soft breeze. The height of the meadow and the gradual forest edge beyond obscure the house until a visitor nearly crests the ridge. As the house rises from the meadow, framed by two stately trees, you know you have arrived. Meadows While the southern meadow shrinks by half, a new meadow expands northward, wrapping around the house. It replaces a significant portion of lawn while maintaining a sense of open expansiveness. Butterflies, bees, small mammals, and groundnesting birds find food and shelter in the waist-high grasses and forbs. Drifts of colorful wildflowers float beside frequently walked pathways through meadows.


Habitat

Beauty

Place

Garden Design 1

Two specimen trees, an apple and a redbud, frame the driveway at arrival to the house. Guest parking is available to the northeast of the apple tree. A right-angled, two-foot tall stone wall echoes the colonial architecture and pastoral history of the land. An arbor with climbing roses announces the path to the formal entrance. Two small flowering trees, shrubs, and an elegant vine frame the formal door.

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House

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To the west, a low wooden gate invites a transition into a meadow. Two paths diverge— one for quick access to the southern garden, and another that meanders through a blueberry patch and drifts of wildflowers. A subtle river of black-eyed Susans winds through the meadow to the west.

A tractor path accesses the driveway to the north. A winding path on 10% grade leads down to the southern meadow. A loop path sweeps through a meadow with drifts of wildflowers, up to the hilltop viewing area tucked into an evergreen windbreak. A forest edge and meadow garden on the east side of the house mirrors the habitat transitions created around the perimeter of the property.

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In the sunny southern yard, a table awaits a resting gardener beneath the sugar maple. Linear raised beds with culinary herbs and perennial flowers begin the southern garden. Terraced flower and shrub beds with low, stone retaining walls hug the contours as the hill slopes to the south. Ed and Linda eat breakfast on the stone patio under a wooden pergola with blooming vines. Stone steps lead eastward from the patio, where three paths diverge.

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Human Needs

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Ecosystem Needs

Conservation and Recreation Management Plan For 389 acres of open space in Scituate, Massachusetts The Conway School, Winter 2013 Team of Three. My Role: Leader in writing and public process. View the complete, 65 page-long plan at

Conservation and Recreation Plan

http://issuu.com/conwaydesign/docs/scituatewinter13

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Goals & Strategy

Recommendations for Ecosystem Health

Community Recreation & Resilience

The town of Scituate’s Conservation Commission wished to enhance the ecosystem biodiversity and resilience of its open spaces while also meeting the recreational and safety needs of the community. They requested recommendations for access, parking, trails, recreation, education, human safety, and management of habitat, deer, and ticks. This report used ecological and historical evidence to demonstrate that both the ecosystem and human community are dynamic, and to argue for the importance of an active management strategy with community involvement and periodic reevaluation. Even though these properties are under the protection of conservation restrictions, their future health and usability rely on the commitment of the community and continued land stewardship.

The focus area invites visitors into a diverse ecosystem. Unfortunately, the forest is seeing a lack of regeneration due to deer browse, some sensitive habitats need more protection, and some non-native communities provide little habitat.

The focus area offers a variety of trails and experiences for visitors, but some community members see problems. The land is under-used, access and parking are limited, way-finding can be confusing, and some visitors fear sharing the woods with hunters. The land could entice more visitors if the town provides a universally accessible trail, more designated access points and parking, improved maps and signs, civil communication between hunters and neighbors, education regarding the benefits of hunting deer, and a regional bike loop that connects the focus area to other open spaces and Boston. These sites offer more than just recreation; they can increase resilience. Sheltering these wetlands protects community drinking water down stream. An active farm provides healthy vegetables, dairy, and meat. Healthy forests provide habitat, sequester carbon, and produce resources for an uncertain future.

New infrastructure and management policies can create a healthier ecosystem and entice more visitors. To protect rare species, only hikers should use trails through NHESP Core Habitat. To reduce stream disturbance, bridges, boardwalks, and stepping-stones should provide dry passage over all water crossings. Hunting deer could reduce over-browsing and may help the forest regenerate. Removing nonnative tree plantations and the invasive plants infesting them should provide opportunities for early-successional habitats that support both agriculture and rare native species.


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FOCUS AREA OUTLINE

Human Needs

PROTECTED OPEN SPACE

STREAMS

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WATER BODIES

Ecosystem Needs

PUBLIC WATER SUPPLY

Context

Cohasset

How do we invite folks into a forest full of muddy trails, slippery rocks, hidden hunters, and hungry ticks... And help them

feel safe?

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How do we invite folks into a forest full of vernal pools, boulder streams, beech stands, and other places rich with educational opportunity...

sensitive habitats?

How do we actively manage a struggling forest in a community whose most powerful constituents disapprove of hunting deer and culling trees... And empower the community?

• Photoshop • PowerPoint • Excel

Scituate

Norwell

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TOWN BOUNDARY

FOCUS AREA OUTLINE STREAMS WATER BODIES

And protect these

Applied skills in: • Public process • InDesign • ArcGIS

Public meeting

PROTECTED OPEN SPACE Þ !

PUBLIC WATER SUPPLY

West End Culture is Shifting

The West End used to be the backwoods of Scituate, where coast-dwellers kept woodlots and where rural folks lived in historical homes. Today the West End’s population is growing faster than any area in Scituate. This quick development is making the protected open spaces all the more valuable to the West End community members who would like to preserve the quiet, rural character of the neighborhood. But there is also a cultural tension building between old and new residents over the use of public lands for forestry and hunting. Generally, many long-time West Enders prefer that town lands be working landscapes for forestry, agriculture, and hunting. Generally, many newcomers want town lands to remain as unaltered refuges for wildlife. Many moved to the West End for its rural feeling, but feel unsafe with hunters in the woods.

Public Process We, the planning team, met with members of the Conservation Commission to articulate goals for the project before meeting with the public. I led two public meetings. The first meeting introduced the community to the project, and gathered information on how people currently use the land and how they hope the land will be used in the future. At the midpoint of the project term, the second meeting’s presentation showed the analyses and the team’s preliminary recommendations for conservation and recreation. The team received and incorporated the community’s feedback before finalizing a phased plan.

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Human Needs

Ecosystem Needs

Summary of Human Patterns

Summary of Ecological Patterns

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NHESP Certified Vernal Pools

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Map co-created by N. Zimmerman, A. Best, E. Durost ndCommunitySystems vcpeatp1 Current Trails

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ertified Vernal Pools

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The project area protects a mix BG of upland forests interspersed Miles Miles Perennial Stream GRF by rural residential development. with wetlands. It is surrounded 0.5 0 0.25 Interm ittent 0.5Stream Miles SHF of Core Habitat (BioMap2) lie Three vernal 0 0.125 pools 0.25 and an area 0.5 STB within the project area. A rare stand of Atlantic White Cedars X remains to the southeast.k

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±

Coniferous Project Area Boundary Property Boundaries Mixed Deciduous/Coniferous

Miles Coniferous Coniferous: Likely farm Coniferous fields abandoned 100-150 years ago Coniferous PotentialVernalPools Miles

0.25

Miles 0.5

Deciduous

Coniferou

AT Mixed Coniferous & Deciduous BM2_CORE_HABIT Mixed Deciduous/Coniferous

Mixed Deciduous/Coniferous

Deciduous Deciduous: Likely clear-cut within last 50 years Coniferous Deciduous

Deciduous

Wetland Forestus Mixed Deciduous/Conifero Deciduous

0

0.25

Miles 0.5

±

Mixed De

Deciduou

Coniferous

Mixed Deciduous/

Coniferous Different landowners managed their properties differently, Deciduous WETLANDSDEP_P OLY Mixed Deciduous/Coniferous resulting in diverse forest types across the project area today. Deciduous Ten access points ringed the project area historically, but only two official access points remain today, reducing walkability. More trails traverse the project area today than did historically, but they include more wetland crossings.


Human Needs

ST HW

OO

D

ROD & GUN CLUB

RO

Recommendations for Phase I are: UT

E

3-

• • • • • • •

A

BE

EC

A

Slopes %

Current Trails

k

Certified Vernal Pools % A Slopes

Habitat FrequentCore Ponding

<20 k White Certified Atlantic CedarVernal Pools

10 - 20

Atlantic White Cedar

L %

<20

A Certified Vernal Pools

Wetland

L %

Potential Vernal Pools

Frequent Ponding

Core Habitat

Atlantic White Cedar

IN D IA N

k

ER

ST

Slopes %

P

0-5 5 - 10 Current Trail 10 - 20

Proposed Trail

te Cedar

0-5

COMMUNITY HALL

10 - 20

±

k

5 - 10

P

Certified Vernal Pools

Wetland 0.125 0

Potential Vernal Pools

Frequent Ponding

± A

Core Habitat Current Trail

5 - 10

Potential Vernal Pools

Frequent Ponding

10 - 20

Core Habitat (NHESP)

Atlantic White Cedar

<20

ernal Pools

Wet AreaFrequent Crossing

L %

Certified Vernal Pools

Wetland

Gravel Pit

0

Proposed Driveway 5 - 10 Proposed Universally Accessible Trail Accessible Trail10 - 20

Miles Atlantic White Cedar Current Trails 0.125 0.25 0.5

k

Access Point

Wet Area Crossing Teepee Rock

Current Trail Slopes % Proposed Trail0 - 5

Ponding

A

±

<20

Slopes %

0-5 5 - 10

P

Parking and Access

0.125

±

• To educate visitors on ecology and history • To expand educational opportunities on Slopes % Miles the farm 0-5

0.255 - 10

10 - 20

Teepee Rock Atlantic White Cedar

Miles Proposed Trail Gravel Pit 0.25 Proposed Driveway Proposed Universally Accessible Trail Slopes % FARM P Parking and Access 0-5

A

A

0

L %

A

Parking and Access

ls 10P - 20 Parking and Access 0-5 s- 10 Pools 5rnal <20 Wetland Access Point

s%

±

10 - 20

Current Trails

k Certified Vernal Pools Wetland Slopes % Proposed Universally Accessible Trail L %

Miles 0.25

0.125

Rock Access 0 PointTeepee 0.125 Gravel Pit <20 Current Trails Proposed Driveway Wet Area Crossing

onding

crossing more wetlands • To mitigate all existing wetland crossings • To connect universally accessible trails loop • To create more parking and access points

<20

RD

±

P

AP

MM

0.125

0

• To expand <20 the trail system without Atlantic White Cedar

5 - 10

CL

SU

Miles 0.25

0-5

Recommendations for Phase II are 5 - 10 and are: Frequent Pondingshown at left 10 - 20

Wetland

A

0-5

Slopes %

10 - 20

Potential Vernal Pools Slopes % Core Habitat

Current Trails

0

5 - 10

Current Trails Frequent Ponding

5 - 10

To mitigate high priority wet area crossings To create a universally accessible trail To provide better access and parking To display clearer, more informative signs To protect and enhance sensitive habitats To maintain visitor safety To encourage farming at Appleton Fields

0-5

Wetland

% L Potential Vernal Pools0 - 5 Wetland A W IN D D R

ools

at

Ecosystem Needs

Proposed Plan: Phase II of III

ols

<20

<20

Recommendations for Phase III are: • ToTeepee further Rockexpand the trail system, crossing wetlands responsibly Proposed Trail Gravel Pit Proposed Driveway • To continue developing universally Proposed Universally Accessible Trail accessible trails Miles • To provide easier access for the greater 0.25 region • To turn the farm into an agricultural and educational resource center Current Trail

±

Map co-created by N. Zimmerman, A. Best, E. Durost Current Trail

Teepee Rock

Proposed Trail

Gravel Pit

13


Color

Te x t u r e

Ease

Quilting Studio Garden Design and Installation 2000 sq. ft. garden with stone pathways Ashland, Virginia Summer 2012

Planting Plan for Quilting Studio

Goals

14

A quilter asked for a beautiful, low-maintenance garden along a pathway to her studio. The studio sits in the lawn apart from her home, at the eastern forest edge. The site includes shaded and sunny areas, compacted soil, an adjacent septic drain field, the studio itself, neighbors’ walking path into the forest, and a client whose interest in an attractive garden exceeds her willingness to weed and prune. The site began as bare grass.

Design Solutions Inspired by the quilter’s bold fabrics, the design emphasizes varying colors, textures, and blooming times. The path to the studio delivers a sense of arrival with symmetrical, compact Cryptomeria, followed by the bold colors of Vibernum, Vaccineum, Spirea, and Hydgrangea. The neighbors’ path exits the forest alongside evergreens (Danae racemosa, Aucuba japonica) and scented blooming shrubs (Sarcococca hookeriana, Daphne odora, Corylopsis pauciflora) to intersect the studio path.

“My yard was nothing but weedy grass until Anna Best transformed it. Now, the garden outside my quilting cottage has lush perennials and flowering shrubs, in a variety of shapes and colors.” -Dr. Barbara Myers, client


Color

Te x t u r e

Ease

15


Related Experience Education

MA Landscape Design and Planning (The Conway School 2013) • Goal articulation, site analysis, design • Team and individual work in a studio setting • Surveying, map making, hand drawing and CAD • Layout of deliverables with InDesign BA Geosciences (Earlham College 2007) • Landforms and how they change • How bedrock affects soils, landscapes, humans Certification in Permaculture Design (New Community Project 2011) Related Courses (J.S. Reynolds Community College 2011-12) • Landscape Plant Materials: woody plants and perennials • Drafting with AutoCAD • Greenhouse Crop Production

Professional Experience

Related Experience

16

Environmental Scientist at S&ME, Inc. (Richmond, VA) • Professional office setting with 40% field work • Sampled soil and water • Managed and analyzed data • Monitored remediation plans in action • Characterized subsurface • Modeled groundwater in AutoCAD

Hands-On Green Industry Work

Landscape Installation and Maintenance • Natural Progression Landscaping (Richmond, VA) • Gardens of Delight (Northampton, MA) • Meadowlark Landscape and Garden (Cummington, MA) • Hills Landscape and Design (Conway, MA) • Self-employed Intern at Dragonfly Farms (Beaverdam, VA) • Gardening, landscape care, livestock care Greenhouse Experience • Seedling manager for The Woolman Semester (Nevada City, CA) • Transplanter at Lavender Fields Herb Farm (Glen Allen, VA)


2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Landscape Design & Maintenance Self-Employed

Barnes & Noble

The Conway School Masters in Landscape Design and Planning

Landscaping Self-Employed

Dragonfly Farms Intern

Barnes & Noble

Permaculture Design Certification Gap for Travel

2006

Barnes & Noble

Gap for Travel

2005

Summer Internship at S&ME, Inc.

2004 Shiloh Quaker Camp Counselor

2003

S&ME, Inc. Environmental Scientist

Bike Tour Guide

Earlham College B.A. Geosciences

Patrick Henry High School

Bike Tour Guide

The Woolman Semester School Community Intern

Natural Progression Landscaping

Influence on Career Development

Career Development Timeline

2014

Personal Development Neutral Positive High

17


G ra p h i c S a m p l e s

Hand Graphic Samples

18

Clockwise from top left: • A conceptual design (colored pencil and marker, fall 2013) • Another conceptual design (colored pencil and marker, fall 2013) • A landscape illustration (pencil, fall 2013) • Section of existing landscape (ink, fall 2012) • Conceptual illustration (ink, fall 2012)


and other tools.

Legend: Drainage

The southern portion of the property was not surveyed. However, field observations and other topographic maps of the rolling terrain show that water drains south-southeast from the meadow and forest to affect the neighboring residential property.

Lawn

Surface Water Flow Direction

Grove

Computer Graphic Samples Roof Surface Flow

0 20 40

80 100

FEET

Slopes

The house sits on a ridge which runs northeast-southwest. Steep slopes of 15-30% or greater encircle the house on three sides. The house itself sits on slopes of 2-10%, and these relatively flat grades continue to the northeast forest edge.

(No Data)

Most of the driveway slopes 15%, but a few small areas slope up to 20%. The maximum slope for a driveway in this snowy region is 10% without—or 15% with—four-wheel drive. Access to the house from the road could prove difficult in winter.

Legend: Percent Grade 0-5 % Up to 10 %

Up to 15 % (No Data)

Up to 20 %

0 20 40

Greater than 20 %

80 100

FEET

away from house • Explore solutions to ice accumulation and roof runoff • Reduce water velocity on steep slopes

32'-10" 24'-5"

ANNA K. M. BEST

8'-5"

NORKUS & LEIGHTON

The Conway School

Graduate Program in Sustainable Landscape Planning & Design

332 S. Deerfield Road | PO Box 179 | Conway, MA 01341 413-369-4044, www.csld.edu Fall 2012

44 Crittenden Hill Road Shelburne Falls, MA 01370

SLOPES & DRAINAGE

1 2"

GRADE

1/18

1 IN. RIGID FOAM INSULATION

4 IN. SAND 8" CONCRETE BLOCK

9'-0"

4" Concrete Slab

BITUMINOUS JOINT 4 IN. CONCRETE

FINAL PROJECT

House

JULY 31, 2012

Clockwise from top left: • Slope analysis showing percent grade (Vectorworks over hand drawn map) If disturbed by excavation or vegetation removal, • these 3D steep Conceptual illustration slopes could erode under stormwater flow. Erosion could damage the (SketchUp) aesthetics of the land as well as the ecosystems of wetlands and • Base map of existing conditions waterways downstream. (AutoCAD) • A hypothetical footing section and Design Direction plan • Minimize slopefoundation disturbance • Stabilize steep slopes • Maintain positi(AutoCAD) ve drainage

1-1/2" HONEYCOMB FILTER MEDIA

18" Poured Concrete Footers

CONCRETE CANT

27'-0"

8" Concrete Block

18'-0"

4'-7" 5'-8"

GRAVEL AND DRAIN W/ 4" PIPE AT BOTTOM

10'-0"

FOUNDATION PLAN SCALE: 1/4" = 1'-0"

ANNA K.M. BEST

1'-8"

1" 22

2" Sink Drain

8'-11"

5'-5"

2" Tube Drain

1'-6"

FOOTING SECTION SCALE 1 1/2" = 1'-0"

j j

19 31 R '12

3'-6"

11 2" Vanity Drain 3" Toilet Drain

5"


l u t i o n s . • U s e a n d Va l u e D i v e r s i t y . • U s e E d g e s a n d Va l u e t h e M a r g i n a l . • C r e a t i v e l y R e s p o n d t o C h a n g e .

O b s e r v e a n d I n t e ra c t . • C a t ch a n d S t o re E n e r g y. • O b t a i n a Yi e l d . • A p p l y S e l f

Pa t t e r n s t o D e t a i l s. • I n t e g ra t e R a t h e r t h a n S e p a ra t e. • U s e S m a l l a n d S l ow S o

- R e g u l a t i o n . • A c c e p t F e e d b a c k . • U s e a n d Va l u e R e n e w a b l e R e s o u r c e s . • P r o d u c e N o Wa s t e . • D e s i g n f r o m


Portfolio for Anna Best, MALD