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amandaingmire MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE 2013

UNIVERSITY OF OREGON


“A human being is part of the whole called by us the universe, a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings, as something separate from the rest, a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prision for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest to us. Our task must be to free ourselves by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty.� -Albert Einstein

I believe architecture can and should make the world a better place by improving our environments and empowering our communities. Natural, built, and social environments require balance and we, as makers of the built environment, have the exciting opportunity to propel architecture to play a vital role in this balance by understanding the immediate and far-reaching effects of our actions. We are part of a society which values the desires of the individual over the needs of the greater good, and so are charged with making a critical change in the way we approach the design of our environments, communities, and world. We must respect the existing, while taking advantage of latent opportunities to create places that empower all people, encourage community, and are not only ecologically and socially sensitive, but also ecologically and socially beneficial. With each project, I strive to uncover the unique opportunities that exist, not only in the basic programmatic problem, but also in the ability for each project to have a positive impact on a larger scale. My intent is that this body of work is representative of the values I posses; that it sufficiently expresses the great care I dedicate to each project to produce meaningful and beautiful works that are mindful of their larger impacts. I do realize that I am just at the beginning of my career and economic contraints can prohibit the idealistic dreams we develop in our academic careers; therefore, I hope to have the opportunity to work in a firm with which I share these values, a firm that despite economic limitations still strives to make the world a better place through the design of our environments. Amanda Ingmire


contents: 05 15 21 27 33

rePEaT

Contemporary PET plastic recycling facility and artisan textile production studios

SkyTrain

Preparing for transit growth in high-density urban areas

museum

Re-imagining the addition to the Mercer Museum

live/work

Cooperative live/work community

market

Year-round indoor/outdoor Boulder County Farmers’ Market

41 Passivhaus Design and detailing of a small passive house in Eugene, Oregon 45 working drawings Academic and professional working drawings 51 other creative works Hand drafting, marker rendering, travel sketches


rePEaT Contemporary PET plastic recycling facility and artisan textile production studios Portland, Oregon University of Oregon Professor: Howard Davis In Progress Studio Work (Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013)

“To be successful, cities of the twenty-first century will have to be inclusive and socially equitable, making it possible for people of different means and backgrounds to participate in the economy and benefits of urban life; they will have to regain the ability they once had to be site of production rather than only consumption; and they will have to do it all with innovative architecture that can elevate the human spirit.� - Howard Davis This studio began with a seminar to develop a personal thesis and program based on these ideas with a common framework that includes and builds upon three features: a contemporary production facility, a means to encourage participation of a diverse range of people, and a public component that makes the work of the building visible. My own program grew out of three additional guiding ideas. The first, to encourage a regenerative economy of production through the diversion of material from the waste stream so that it can be remanufactured into another useful material, ultimately to become part of a closed-loop system. The second requires a facility that builds upon the creative, artisan economy that already exists in Portland by creating a space where startup companies can locate, and have affordable access to training, equipment, and a collaborative community. The third guiding idea is based on enhancing the visibility of the facility. This guiding idea considers both the visibility of the building from surrounding neighborhoods, as well as the visibility of the process that is happening within the building. Ultimately, these parameters led to a program that unites a PET plastic recycling facility with artisan polyester textile production studios. The process of recycling PET plastic and remanufacturing it as recycled PET (rPET) polyester textile products directed the design of the rePEaT facility. Opposite page: View of rePEaT facility from Burnside, looking east toward downtown. Below: Early section sketch

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- 70 MTCE GHG

- 9 TRILLION BTUs

15%

CLOSING THE PORTLAND PLASTIC RECYCLING LOOP

UNITED STATES

OREGON

According to the State of Oregon, Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) 2050 Vision for Material Management in Oregon report, over 1.5 million tons of potentially recyclable materials were disposed in Oregon in 2009. Of these materials, plastics are one of the largest contributors to waste (approximately 235,000 tons) with only a 15% recycle rate. Another report published by the State of Oregon DEQ, Executive Summary: Potential for Additional Material Recovery, recycling plastic in Oregon can potentially reduce energy use by 9 trillion BTUs, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 70 MTCE. Currently, Oregon exports a significant percentage of its plastic collected for recycling to primarly Asian countries. Rather than shipping the problem abroad, the materials could be handled locally and remanufactured to produce a new product of value. These figures were a guiding factor in the decision to recycle and remanufacture PET plastic in my thesis studio production facility.

PORTLAND


TRANSPARENCY OF PROCESS & PUBLIC VISIBILITY Traditionally, plastic recycling is hidden behind closed doors. Transparency of this process is the essence of the rePEaT facility. It allows the entire plastic recycling and remanufacturing process and the production of new goods to be revealed to the public. This creates an opportunity for public education about not only plastic recycling, but the reduction of all waste.

100% RECYCLE RATE

To contribute to the sucess of the artisan textile entrepreneurs housed in the studios the facility must be highly visible. I selected this site because it enables the building to be visible from downtown, the I-405 corridor, and the uptown and west hills areas. The site also allows the opportunity for street room repair by beginning to infill what is currently a parking lot.

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THE rePEaT PROCESS

RECYCLING DROP-OFF

PRODUCTION BEGINS MODELNUMBER TRADENAME PRODUCT MATERIAL TRADENAME MODELNUMBER MATERIAL PRODUCT

FIFTH SORTING BY COLOR (WHITE, BLUE, GREEN, BLACK)

MODELNUMBER TRADENAME PRODUCT MATERIAL TRADENAME MODELNUMBER MATERIAL PRODUCT

CRUSHING & SHREDDING

FOURTH

CLEANING & DRYING

1 DAY

MODELNUMBER TRADENAME PRODUCT MATERIAL MATERIAL PRODUCT TRADENAME MODELNUMBER

THIRD

YARN PRODUCTION

2 DAYS

SECOND ARTISAN & MACHINE FABRIC WEAVING

1 WEEK

TEXTILE DESIGN & PRODUCTION

MAIN

2-6 WEEKS

BOAT SAILS

FASHION GARMENTS

UMBRELLAS

FLAGS & BANNERS

LOWER

FURTNITURE UPHOLSTRY

INTERIOR TEXTILES

FINISHED rPET PRODUCTS

HOT AIR BALLOONS

TRADENAME MODELNUMBER PRODUCT MATERIAL

MATERIAL TRADENAME PRODUCT MODELNUMBER

MELTING


SECTION THROUGH INDUSTRIAL BAR

SECTION THROUGH TEXTILE BAR

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KITCHEN

STORAGE

UP

TIPPING / SORTING / SHRED & CRUSH / CLEAN & DRY

DN UP

ENTRY / CAFE

MECHANICAL

UP

UP DN

LOWER PLAN

Site plan & main floor plan with lower and upper floor plans overlaid

MAIN PLAN


YARN MANUFACTURE

ADDITIONAL STORAGE

FABRIC MANUFACTURE

STUDIOS

STUDIOS

STUDIOS

DN

DN

DN

UP

UP

UP

DN

GALLERY OPEN TO BELOW

OPEN TO BELOW

UP

UP

DN

DN

SECOND PLAN

THIRD PLAN

DN

FOURTH PLAN

DN

FIFTH PLAN

ROOF PLAN

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Tipping Floor

Fabric Manufacturing Floor

Textile Studios

Gallery

West Elevation


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SkyTrain Preparing for transit growth in high-density urban areas Vancouver, British Columbia University of Oregon Professor: Donald Corner Fall 2012

In preparation for Expo 86, the city of Vancouver built the first phase of a citywide rapid transit system. Now with over 40 miles of track, the SkyTrain system is one of the most efficient and successful in the world. The ever-increasing number of daily riders has necessitated the upgrade and expansion of the SkyTrain system with one station being of the upmost priority. The Commercial/Broadway station sits at the intersection of the Expo and Millenium Lines and is a significant transfer point accomodating travelers commuting to downtown, East Vancouver, and the University of British Columbia. According to a 2010 passenger volume study of the Commercial/Broadway station conducted by TransLink, ridership is expected to more than double over the next thirty years. This design proposal aims to not only provide sufficient space to accomodate the growing ridership over the next few decades, but to create a place that enables commuters easy transition from one transit system to another and a safe, comfortable place to wait for the train. Additionally, the station sits above ground giving it the opportunity to respond and contribute to the local urban context and create a vital public space at the intersection of two neighborhoods.

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Fare-paid zone

Site and Ground Level Plan


Inbound

Oubound

Platform Plan

Roof Plan

Roof Structure (Exterior to Interior): -standing seam metal roof -plywood -tounge and groove wood -steel struts -gluelam beam with steel member notched in (right) OR steel I-beam (left)

Roof Structure Detail 17


Sketch ideas of station form and structure.


Textile Studios

Gallery 19


museum Re-Imagining the addition to the Mercer Museum Doylestown, Pennsylvania University of Oregon Professor: James Givens Winter 2012

Henry Chapman Mercer was an archaeologist, tile-maker, and architect. He designed and constructed three hand-poured concrete buildings that include: Fonthill (his home), the Moravian Pottery and Tile Works, and the Mercer Museum, which houses his own collection of early American tools. In response to the 2011 addition to the Mercer Museum, a new wing that is spatially and materially very different from the original museum and the architectural style of Mercer himself, this studio sought to explore how to approach the changing needs of buildings over time, especially when those buildings are historically significant structures. My design approach seeks to create a contemporary imitation of the spatial qualities that are so unique in Mercer’s own designs through materiality, lighting, ornament, and circulation patterns. The proposed addition also responds to its surrounding context. The new building uses a simple facade to frame and accentuate the Mercer Museum, while enhancing the strong street wall along the main civic corridor and becoming an element of site repair by balancing the forms of the structures that are a part of the Mercer Museum complex. Opposite page: Model of Mercer Museum and multiple existing addition, as well as proposed new addition. Below: Early project sketches.

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IVIC

C

R

IDO

RR

CO

PROPOSED NEW ENTRANCE

IVIC

DC

NE

E TH

NG

RE

ST

ALL TW

EE

R ST

ORIGINAL ENTRANCE

CURRENT ENTRANCE

Site diagram of primary guiding ideas

Distant view of the Mercer Museum at dusk. In this view the unique characteristics of the handpoured concrete is highlighted beautifullly.

The colors and the lighting used throughout the spaces designed by Mercer greatly influenced the ideas that inspired the proposed addition.


Opposite page: Diagram illustrating some of the major design moves in this project. Top left: Sketch rendering of the entry gallery. Top right: Sketch rendering of one of the new gallery spaces. Bottom left: Sketch rendering of the new Henry Chapman Mercer gallery. Bottom right: Sketch study of the integral ornament to be incorporated in the new addition. The ornament is a concrete pattern inspired by the tile works of Mercer.

The main atrium of the Mercer Museum acts as a central organizing space. The dense structure and display of the collection filter the natural light and create a cave-like experience inspired by Mercer’s travels as an anthropologist. The proposed addition is designed to mimic this experience in a contemporary way.

The strong street wall of the Mercer Museum along the main civic corridor. 23


SITE PLAN

ND

A HL

ET

RE

ST

AS

EE

TR

ES

PIN T

Existing structures Proposed addition

GR

Site Plan

EE

N

ST

RE

ET


D

U

D

Henry Chapman Mercer Gallery HENRY CHAPMAN MERCER MEMORIAL GALLERY

FOURTH FLOOR

Fourth Floor

U

D

U

D

New gallery space

THIRD FLOOR

Third Floor

D

U

U

D

New gallery space

SECOND FLOOR

Second Floor

Entry Gallery Foyer U

D

Store Cafe

U

D

MAIN FLOOR

Main Floor

Reception U

U

LOWER FLOOR

Lower Floor

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live/work Cooperative live/work community Eugene, Oregon University of Oregon Professor: Virginia Cartwright Fall 2011

Contemporary housing design must be diverse and adaptable to accommodate an everchanging concept of ‘family-living’. Through the design of a cooperative live/work community, this studio project explores what it means to design a home that can be used by one person or a family of four, young children or the elderly, can function solely as a home or also incorporate a working space. This design provides fifteen living units and eighteen work spaces allowing for additional rentable work spaces to contribute to the funds of the cooperative. All of the commercial units are located on the ground level creating a commercial street front and plaza that can function as public space without encroaching on private residential units. The residential units allow for a variety of living situations based on preference. Some units are located above the stores on the commercial street front, while the others step up the slope of Skinner’s Butte to create a quieter setting with private terraced gardens. Impact on the natural environment was also an important component of this design. The stepped units allow for minimal excavation of the hillside and less disturbance to the existing environment. Additionally, passive cooling and heating strategies were incorporated to allow the community to function sustainably. Opposite page: Section model of one ‘bar’ of the stacked commercial level and two housing units. Below: Early sketches investigating stepped housing and potential spatial organization.

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MODELNUMBER TRADENAME PRODUCT MATERIAL

MODELNUMBER TRADENAME PRODUCT MATERIAL

MODELNUMBER TRADENAME PRODUCT MATERIAL

MATERIAL PRODUCT TRADENAME MODELNUMBER

MATERIAL PRODUCT TRADENAME MODELNUMBER

MODELNUMBER TRADENAME PRODUCT MATERIAL

Rooftop Patio MODELNUMBER TRADENAME PRODUCT MATERIAL

MODELNUMBER TRADENAME PRODUCT MATERIAL

MODELNUMBER TRADENAME PRODUCT MATERIAL

MATERIAL PRODUCT TRADENAME MODELNUMBER

MATERIAL PRODUCT TRADENAME MODELNUMBER

MODELNUMBER TRADENAME PRODUCT MATERIAL

Commercial Unit Rooftop Patio

PASSIVE COOLING & HEATING This project is located in Eugene, Oregon on a steeply sloping, south-facing site, which allows it to take full advantage of southern sun exposure for passive heating, but can pose problems with passive cooling. The psychrometric chart indicates that high mass cooling and high mass cooling with night ventilation strategies are the most plausible for this climate. The amount of southern glazing was the biggest design change considered based on solar heat gain calculations (see elevations - next page). The ratio of south glass to solar heated floor area on the residential unit was decreased from 52.77% to 22%. The ratio of south glass to solar heated floor area on the commercial unit was decreased from 61.75% to 27%. The internal heat gain diagram indicates the largest contributors to internal heat gain within the units. The units have the potential for stack ventilation, cooltower, or night ventilation passive cooling methods. Due to the high thermal mass present in the unit, I chose to utilize night ventilation as the passive cooling strategy. The table above shows the calculations used to conduct a more complete analysis of this strategy.

Commercial Unit Roof

Commercial Unit: Estimated heat loss: 5.6 Btu/DD ft2; LCR: 20.7; SSF: .59; January clear day interior temrperatures: high: 84.7 ºF; low: 73.6 ºF.

MODELNUMBER TRADENAME PRODUCT MATERIAL

MODELNUMBER TRADENAME PRODUCT MATERIAL REBEMMUTLAN A CNLIUREED D EDTO AO ARM PT

Right: The unit plans show one bar of the complete site plan. Commerical units are located on the ground level. The private residences are on the second and third levels. The southern units are ‘living over the store’ units. The northern units are more secluded stepped housing that include private gardens.

REBEMMUTLAN CNLIUREED D AO PT A EDTO ARM

Residential Unit: Estimated heat loss: 5.6 Btu/DD ft2; LCR: 25.5; SSF: .53; January clear day interior temperatures: high: 81.0 ºF, low: 70.6 ºF.

MATERIAL PRODUCT TRADENAME MODELNUMBER

MODELNUMBER TRADENAME PRODUCT MATERIAL

Balcony

Ground Level

Second Level

Third Level


Site Plan

South Elevation

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Southern Glazing - new elevation

Southern Glazing - old elevation

Site Section

The design in section was very crucial in creating passively cooled and heated units. The southern facing slope of Skinner’s Butte provided a great site to take advantage of natural daylighting and passive heating, but had the potential to be problematic in the summer seasons when they units could overheat. This problem was solved by carefully balancing the amount of south facing glass with thermally massive opaque surfaces.


Sun path diagram during the summer solstice

Summer Solstice

LIVE/WORK EUGENE AMANDA INGMIRE

Summer Solstice

Sun path diagram during the fall and spring equinox

Spring and Fall Equinox

FIGURE/GROUND SITE CONTEXT

Sketch of the central plaza space

Spring and Fall Equinox

Sun path diagram during the winter solstice

Winter Solstice

31


market Year-round indoor/outdoor Boulder County Farmers’ Market Boulder, Colorado University of Colorado Professor: Marcel DeLange Fall 2010

The Boulder County Farmers’ Market began in 1987 and has since become an integral part of the community, running two days a week from April to November. The success of the market and an ever-increasing demand for fresh farm-to-table food options has led the county to explore the possibility of creating a permanent space to serve as a year-round indoor/outdoor market. This design proposal explores the potential of the market to act as a multi-functional event hub that links existing resources around the market site. The building stretches across 13th Street, creating an open and adaptable interior space that can expand into the new north and south piazzas and spill down the 13th Street corridor to accomodate larger summertime markets. ​ The roof is designed as an extension of the adjacent park, creating a gentle, grassy incline that provides a place to picnic with your market finds, take in breathtaking views of the Flat Iron mountains, and enjoy performances as you look over the historical band shell. The slope concludes at a rooftop terrace framed by a subdued facade that complements the surroundings, creating a place to take in the sights, sounds, and smells of the market below and serving as leasable restaurant space during summer months. Opposite page: Rendering of north approach and entrance to the market.

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Site Context

Boulder Creek is a 31.4 mile long creek that runs from the Rocky Mountains into the city of Boulder. It runs through downtown and the site of the Boulder County Farmers’ Market.


Early site observation and design sketches

The Boulder County Farmers’ Market currently turns 13th Street in downtown Boulder into a pedestrian only market two days a week.

The main prepared food cart area currently utilizes this plaza between the Boulder Building Services Center and the historically significant Dushanbe Teahouse. 35


Roof Plan

Main Floor Plan

Above: Proposed plans and east elevation for the new Boulder County Farmers’ Market building with a view of the Flatirons in the distance. Left: Rendering of the indoor market space on market day. Opposite Page: Night rendering of the rooftop restaurant space. Next Page: Model of the proposed Boulder County Farmers’ Market building and immediate context.

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10’ tall fir trees

Opposite: A THERM analysis confirmed that the connection detail between the wall assembly and roof assembly successfully creates a thermal break. The temperature of the inside wall remains at 69ºF, even when the external temperature is 22ºF. The U-factor of the wall assembly is 0.0179 Btu/h sf ºF, corresponding to an R-value of 55 h sf ºF/Btu. These values indicate an extremely insulated wall assembly. Below: The basic demanding requirements of a Passivhaus certified building are ‘excellent thermal performance’ and ‘exceptional airtightness’. This requires the specific space heat demand to be below 4.75 kBTU (ft3yr) and the air changes per hour to be below 0.60. The screenshot below shows the PHPP software calculations of this passive house.

Hatched area denotes setback 30’ tall fir trees Property line

Site Plan


Exterior siding Rainscreen Expanded polystyrene OSB Cellulose Plywood Kraft paper Interior gyp. board

Roof Eave Detail

Passivhaus Design and detailing of a small passive house Eugene, Oregon University of Oregon Professor: Matt Hogan Spring 2012

The Passivhaus concept is one of the most ambitious performance-based energy standard for buildings with demanding requirements including ‘excellent thermal performance’ and ‘exceptional airtightness’. On average, passive houses use 90% less energy for space conditioning than code-designed houses through the combination of building science and energy modeling. THERM Analysis - Color Infrared

This course focused on the design and detailing of a small passive house in Eugene, Oregon with a specific focus on building envelope and mechanical system design that covered topics of superinsulation, thermal bridge free detailing, moisture protection, airtight construction, and high performance building components. To measure and analyze our passive house design, we used cutting-edge analysis software: THERM, WUFI, and the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) software. This project was a team project that I worked on with Amy Pokora, LEED AP, M.Arch 2013. Our passive house design looked at a previous design project of a small house. Through our design, we made minor adjustments to the floor plan to accomodate demands of the mechanical system and redesigned the building envelope to allow for ‘excellent thermal performance’ and ‘exceptional airtightness’ as was judged using the THERM, WUFI, and PHPP softwares.

THERM Analysis - Isotherms

THERM Analysis - Flux Vectors

The primary goal of the mechanical system was to locate it in the most effective location to allow for short duct runs and highest efficient. The house runs off of an energy recovery ventilation system located in a run on the north side of the home. The ducts run through a dropped ceiling above the office, bedroom, and bathroom on the ground floor and up to the second floor spaces through the run. A mini split heat pump provides a back up heating system, which is centrally located in the great room.

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15 CFM

ERV

24 CFM

12 CFM 15 CFM

W

BEDROOM #1

BEDROOM #2

10 CFM

31 CFM

OFFICE ROOF TERRACE

35 CFM

CLOSET

KITCHEN ENTRY PORCH

MINI SPLIT HEAT PUMP

DINING

Ground Floor Plan

LIVING ROOM GREEN ROOF

Second Floor Plan

ERV

Longitudinal Section

East Elevation

Transverse Section

North Elevation


WUFI Analysis - Cellulose Insulation Water Content

WUFI Analysis - Total Building Evelope Water Content

WUFI Analysis - 3.64” Relative Humidity + Temperature (Cellulose)

WUFI Analysis - 11.36” Relative Humidity + Temperature (Plywood) Above and Left: A WUFI analysis illustrates the success of the above wall assembly in terms of water content. The overall assembly has a constant drying trend over a projected two year period. Additionally, the relative humidity of the wall stays below 80%, demonstrating that moisture is moving through the wall and not condensing. Although the relative humidity at times may rise above 80% in the cellulose, the cellulose insulation

WUFI Analysis - 12.79” Relative Humidity + Temperature (Interior)

West Elevation

South Elevation

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Rear Elevation

Deck & Landscape Plan


working drawings Academic and professional working drawings The professional work included in this section (pages 54-57, top of 58 and 59) is a residential outdoor living space addition and landscaping project from 2009. The project was designed by David Schwank, co-owner of Mosaic Outdoor Living and Colorado Custom Decks. My work on this project included drafting of the design plans for client meetings and development of framing plans and construction documents for contractors and permitting offices with the help of project managers, Roger Wood and Lester Bradshaw. The academic work included in this section (bottom of 58 and 59) is the design and detailing of a rainscreen building envelope on an addition to an existing building on the University of Oregon campus in 2011.

Custom Bracket Details

45


Deck Framing Plan

Outdoor Kitchen Elevation

Outdoor Kitchen / Restroom Elevation


Roof Framing Plan

Outdoor Kitchen / Restroom Elevation

47


Restroom Roof Framing Plan

Window Head at Brick Wall to Top of Parapet

Restroom Front Framing

Window Sill at Brick Wall


Restroom Side Framing

Restroom Rear Framing

AMANDA INGMIRE THURSDAY 18H

Window Wall and Roof

Window Wall Detail at Floor

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other creative works This section includes a variety of works that display my sketching, hand drafting, and marker rendering abilities.

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