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october 2012

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A fresh approach page 66

Flights of fancy The ability to take to the skies has always fascinated us. Sure, we have made great strides since the Wright brothers took that first giant aviation leap, but I figure that most of us still get that same feeling of euphoria when we take off, just as Orville and Wilbur had more than a century ago. You see, travel by air is more than just a convenient method of reaching one’s destination. And let’s not forget, stats prove that it is still safer to travel by air than by road. Having the freedom of the skies is also aspirational. Staring out the window at cruising altitude makes you realise that anything is possible. A feeling of confidence takes over you as you realise that if you can dream it, you can do it. Man has been able to mimic nature and take to the skies thanks to those who dared to dream centuries ago. As you sit on board this flight, ask yourself what you have always aspired to be? What has been standing in your way of realising your dreams, no matter how farfetched they may be? Are you ready to cross your Rubicon? A brighter future awaits when you touch down. Enjoy your flight on Airlink. Gerard Peter Editor-in-Chief

PUBLISHER Urs Honegger EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Gerard Peter MANAGING EDITOR Kate Kennedy SENIOR SUB EDITOR Vanessa Koekemoer SUB EDITORS Brigitte Billings, Noleen Fourie EDITORIAL COORDINATOR Mariska Van Wyk DTP STUDIO MANAGER Paul Kotze DESIGNERS Cronje du Toit, Roelof Meintjes TRAFFIC & PRODUCTION MANAGER Celeste Scholes ADVERTISING sales@panorama.co.za +27 11 468 2090 GROUP ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Deborah Bishop-Williams SENIOR ADVERTISING SALES EXECUTIVE Arlene Sanford 083 473 5002 arlene@panorama.co.za ADVERTISING SALES EXECUTIVE Karen Roodt 076 318 1389 karen@panorama.co.za ADVERTISING SALES EXECUTIVE Tsibo Wasa 083 452 7722 tsibo@panorama.co.za ENGLAND/WALES/SCOTLAND: Interactive Airline Partnerships, James Rolls. 13 Brook Business Centre, Cowley Mill Road, Uxbridge UB8 2FX Tel: +44-1895-258008 Fax: +44-1895-258009 SWITZERLAND/GERMANY: Imm Inflight Media Marketing Marcel Wernli, Gellertstrasse 18, 4052 Basel Tel: +41-61-3199090 Fax: +41-61-3199095 SUBSCRIPTIONS subscriptions@panorama.co.za

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(Ario Town office) 00261-20 223 5990 (Airo Airport) 00261-20 224 5734 Beira 00258-2 330 1570 Bloemfontein 051-408 4848 Bulawayo 00263-971 337/8/9 East London 043-706 0211 George 044-801 8431 Harare (SAA Call Centre) 00263-4 794 511/2/3/4 Kimberley 053-838 3339 Lusaka (Call Centre) 002601-254 350 Manzini 00268-518 6155 Maputo 00258 214 65487 Maseru 00266-22-350 418/9 Maun 00267 686 5230 Mthatha 047-536 0024 Nampula 00258 262 16770 Nelspruit KMIA 013-750 2531/2/3/4 Ndola 00260-2612206 Pemba 00258-2722 1700 Phalaborwa 015-781 5823 Polokwane 015-288 0166 Port Elizabeth 041-507 7201 Pietermaritzburg 033-386 9286 Tete 00258-2522 0394 Upington 054-332 2161

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PRINTERS Ultra-Litho, Johannesburg DISTRIBUTION Republican News Agency ISSN 1025-2657

April-June 2012 17962 (total)

Skyways is printed on partially recycled paper

Skyways Magazine is published monthly and distributed via Airlink. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this magazine in whole or in part is prohibited without prior written permission of Panorama Publications (Pty) Ltd. Copyright © 1994-2012 Panorama Publications (Pty) Ltd. The views expressed in Skyways Magazine are not necessarily those of Panorama Publications or Airlink, and the acceptance and publication of editorial and advertising matterial in Skyways Magazine does not imply any endorsement or warranty in respect of goods or services therein described, whether by Skyways Magazine or the publishers. Skyways Magazine will not be held responsible for the safe return of unsolicited editorial contributions. The Editor reserves the right to edit material submitted and in appropriate cases to translate into another language. Skyways Magazine reserves the right to reject any advertising or editorial material, which may not suit the standard of the publication, without reason given. Skyways Magazine is published by Panorama Publications on behalf of Airlink. PUBLISHED BY Panorama Publications (Pty) Ltd. Private Bag X4, Kyalami, 1684, South Africa. 92 Campolino, Kyalami. Tel: 011 468 2090 Fax: 011 468 2091


contents contents

REGULARS 6 Incredible Ibo A unique and unforgettable experience 8 In brief News snippets from around the world 14 Be scene Events calendar 16 Panorama A picture tells a thousand words 58 Distinguished gentleman 84 Flight plan Your Airlink timetable 88 Gift of the gab Gems from George Burns 91 Inflight entertainment Sudoku and battleship puzzles 92 Tall story Amazing facts about the giraffe 94 Didya know? Are you a mastermind? 96 Talespin Cats, clutter and the kitchen counter

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MIND 22 Court is in session Understanding the letter of the law 24 If the shoe fits Making great strides towards success 34 Molly's world The daily lives of Africa's poorest 48 Committed to the cause Saving endangered animals 54 Greener pastures The increasing need to support small-scale farmers 62 Pride of Cape Town Support for the king of the jungle 66 Paradigm shift Businesses need a change in mindset 76 Clock watching The secret to effective time management

in brief

greener pastures

48 commited to the cause

8

54


game changer

38

BODY 42 Epicurean delights

Recipes from a top chef

46 Through the grapevine

A toast to our winemasters

SOUL 18 Tourist information Summer holiday destinations in the Airlink network 70 Take note

'Old Blue Eyes' does it his way

72 Leafing through

Book reviews

TRADE 28 Tech review 30 App your life 32 Gadgets 74 Property matters MOTORING 38 Game changer

Driven: VW Amarok

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56.32km

The length of a line a typical lead pencil can draw

1 out of 20 The average number of people born with an extra rib

Info

There is only one Ibo Island

For bookings and more info contact Ibo Island Lodge: Email reservations@iboisland.com Tel +27 21 785 5498 Website www.iboisland.com

Unique and unforgettable Ibo Island Lodge has fast made a name for itself as the only luxury lodge on the magical island of Ibo, Mozambique. Nominated for World Heritage status and steeped in history, this is the focal island in the renowned Quirimbas Archipelago offering authentic and rich Mozambican culture. When you add the sublime sandbank beach for snorkelling and sunbathing, professional guided tours revealing the island’s historical past and the unique culture of Ibo today, birding, mangrove forests, sea kayaking, massage, romance and tranquillity, then you have all the ingredients of a world class and unique island holiday.

So much to explore and enjoy

How to get there

Flight information and schedule on page 84 www.flyairlink.com

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To add even more appeal and diversity of activities on offer, the team behind Ibo Island Lodge recently launched a new and unique experience that is already proving popular. Appealing to those with a sense of an adventure, Ibo Island Lodge is the only operator to offer fully guided mobile islandhopping dhow and sea kayak safaris in the magnificent Quirimbas Archipelago. The safaris are designed for the discerning adventurer seeking a unique island experience beyond Ibo Island’s shores. The safaris are ideal for a group of friends, families, birders, sea kayakers, honeymooners, fishermen or photographers who are looking for a unique tropical island experience. Each safari is totally flexible and each day’s pace is at your discretion.

A typical seven-night dhow safari will have you sailing the Quirimbas from one tropical island to another. You’ll swap holiday crowds with sights and experiences few have seen. Exotic little island hideaways offer intimate bays to explore and sublime swimming and snorkelling off deserted white sandbanks into turquoise sea. Sail or sea kayak up wide coastal river mouths and mangrove forests teeming with red listed bird species.

Under African skies There is nothing quite like chilling under the expanse of Mozambique’s stars or waking to the sight of the sun slowly rising over the ocean. A mobile safari gives you the flexibility to experience the ‘real’ Mozambique. You will enjoy camps on pristine uninhabited islands, beaches and river mouths, as well as interacting with friendly rural communities. Camps are fully serviced which means there is a chef who will whip up the freshest of seafood for you to feast on under island stars, plus waiter and bar service and safari assistants leaving you free to relax, explore and contemplate the exotic atmosphere on your very own private island.

In capable hands The and and the

dhow safaris are led by pro guide Harris Mupedzi his team of safari crew. Highly competent, capable knowledgeable Mupedzi has lived and operated in Quirimbas for seven years and offers a passionate


300

The number of bones humans are born with

insight into the Quirimbas Archipelago. He is backed up by esteemed dhow captain Juma Chandre. Born and raised in Ibo, Chandre has been navigating these waters since he was a little boy; taught by his father and grandfather before that. All dhow safaris end with three nights of luxury and comfort at Ibo Island Lodge. Probably the most compelling attraction in the Quirimbas is Ibo’s 200-year-old ghost town and 16th century forts that make for a fascinating journey to an era long forgotten. Wander around the mysterious ruins among forts and ancient trade buildings, and partake in guided tours with many fascinating stories just waiting to be told. Ibo Island lodge has spectacular views over the waterfront and tidal bay and accommodates guests in beautifully simple yet elegant rooms. Historic mansions with high ceilings have been stylishly renovated offering various verandas, tropical gardens and a spectacular roof-top restaurant that provides the ideal venue to watch the sun go down. Mobile island-hopping dhow safaris with Ibo Island Lodge offer Mozambique at its best in one of the most undiscovered regions left in Africa. Text and Photography | Supplied

118.1 Decibels

The record for the loudest burp, held by Paul Dunn

Special reader’s offer MOBILE ISLAND-HOPPING SAFARI SPECIAL: Seven nights island hopping Adult cost: from R15,650 per person sharing Offer includes: • Return flights from Johannesburg to Pemba with Airlink (excluding taxes of approx. R2,750 pp). • Meet and greet in Pemba and road transfer to Mucojo. • Four nights pristine island-hopping by traditional dhow (motorised) – exploring and overnight island, mainland, beach and river camps. • Experienced English and Portuguese-speaking crew. • Non-participation mobile camp (crew assembles the camp and handles all camp duties allowing you to relax and enjoy). • All camping and catering equipment included for island camps. • All meals as stated in the itinerary. • Three nights at Ibo Island Lodge on full board basis (excluding drinks). • Guided tour of Ibo Island. • Light aircraft transfer from Ibo Island to Pemba.

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200 million The number of Monopoly games sold worldwide from 1935

9 million

The average number of people you share a birthday with

remains the historic winner with a 1967 value of $1.3 trillion, according to technology website Techcrunch.

SCIENCE

Gone today, hair tomorrow A cure for baldness may be available on the market sooner than previously thought after a breakthrough in negotiations between scientists and drug companies. Scientists at the University of Pennsylvania believe they have discovered the reason for baldness, an enzyme which shuts down hair follicles. Researcher Dr George Cotsarelis recently announced that he is in talks with several pharmaceutical companies about developing treatments which could be available in two years. Drugs that block the protein are already available on the market as they are used to treat asthma and allergies. Dr Cotsarelis and his dermatological team at the University of Pennsylvania, discovered that enzyme Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) prevented hair follicles from maturing. The link between genetics and baldness has long been common knowledge, but not the cause. About 40% of women suffer from some form of hair loss as a result of hormone changes during menopause. For men, this number is significantly higher according to Dr Cotsarelis. Source: Daily Mail

Source: Daily Mail

TECHNOLOGY

Apple is king of the world ‘Think different’ was the company slogan. Now Apple can emphatically show the value in doing so. Fuelled by the phenomenal success of the iPad and iPhone, the technology giant has officially become the most valuable company in the world. Shares in Apple, which is listed on New York’s Nasdaq stock exchange, rose past $660 in early August, taking its stock to a new height and its market capitalisation to more than $619bn. Apple is now worth around $200bn, more than the world’s second biggest company, Exxon Mobil. The oil major is worth $405bn. Apple’s market value does not account for inflation. With inflation in account, IBM

N AT U R E

Rhino horn, the new hangover cure in Vietnam A new breed of moneyed Vietnamese are fuelling the involvement of criminal networks to secure South African rhino horn. Traffic, a wildlife trade-monitoring network, has released a comprehensive report on SA’s rhino-poaching crisis. It points to an increased demand for horn in Vietnam, contributing to the deaths of almost two rhinos a day in South Africa. “Vietnam, since 2003, has rapidly grown to become the world’s largest recipient of both legal and illegal sources of horn from South Africa,” reads the report, entitled ‘The South Africa-Vietnam Rhino Horn Trade Nexus’. “Vietnam in the 1980s and 1990s was on no-one’s radar. Now, with double-digit economic growth, there is suddenly growth in the trade,” said Tom Milliken, one of the authors of the report. His report identifies four types of rhino horn consumers in the south-east Asian country. These include not only the terminally ill, but also users who take the horn as a detoxifying agent for alcohol and rich food. A third consumer group, according to the report, identifies mothers who keep horn to treat their children’s fevers. The fourth group uses the horn as an expensive gift to curry favour with high-ranking officials. The report calls for stronger political will to tackle rhino crime. Milliken said Vietnam needed to put in place a system by which it could track rhino horn hunted legally. Source: IOL

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6,900

11 years

The number of mirror squares used to create the world’s largest disco ball

The age of the youngest pope

SCIENCE

Bionic eye gives hope to the visually impaired

A radical new approach to ‘bionic eye’ implants holds out the hope of restoring near-normal sight to visually impaired persons, scientists claim. American Researchers have dramatically boosted the performance of retinal implants by cracking a ‘code’ that communicates visual signals to the brain. The code consists of specific patterns of electrical pulses. By incorporating it into their device, the scientists came close to restoring normal vision in totally blind mice lacking any lightsensitive cells. Tests showed that the animals were able to discern facial features and track images with their eyes. A reconstruction based on electrical signals from the implant showed recognisable features of a baby’s face. In contrast, a standard retinal implant without the new encoder produced a confused pattern of bright and dark spots. Scientists around the world are exploring the potential of retinal implants to help people with degenerative blinding diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa. Source: The Telegraph

HUMAN INTEREST

AUTO

Powerful punch is all in the brain, study finds

Self-driving cars to hit the roads before 2025

A recent study of karate experts has shown the make-up of the brain is the key to determining how much force is generated when sportsmen or women punch at close range.

It’s been more than half a century since some of the first concept cars boasting self-driving features were presented to the world, and they’re still not on the roads.

Scientists, who compared karate black belts trained to punch with physically fit members of the public, found the brain’s white matter – which acts as the connections between brain regions – correlated directly with punching ability. They concluded the power of a punch is not down to the strength of muscles but the timing, with synchronised movement between the wrist and shoulders essential. While it is not yet certain whether differences in white matter were the cause or effect of successful punching, scientists suspect the brains of those who can punch changed and developed as a result of training. The research was carried out by Imperial College London and University College London.

But many auto executives say the industry is on the cusp of welcoming vehicles that make the idea of keeping both hands on the wheel an anachronism. General Motors showed off ‘dream cars’ in the late 1950s – such as the Firebird II and Cadillac Cyclone – with features automakers are now starting to roll out in new models as the technology, based on sensors, lasers, radar systems, GPS, cameras and microchips, improves and becomes less costly. While most industry officials don’t envision a fully self-driving, or autonomous, vehicle before 2025, features such as adaptive cruise control or traffic jam assist that automatically slow or apply the brakes for a car in certain situations are already being introduced. And much as anti-lock brakes became the norm after initial resistance, these new technologies will prepare drivers for a future where they are needed less.

Source: The Telegraph

Can you push the pain envelope? Read Braintainment magazine. On sale now for knowledge

Source: IOL

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97 minutes

The time it takes for the Hubble telescope to complete an orbit of the Earth

39.91kg The amount of oxygen the adult human requires daily

Get the answer Just in case our puzzles are sending you around the bend, here are the solutions. Puzzles can be found on page 91.

Sudoku Easy

Challenging

Battleships Easy

Medium

TECHNOLOGY

The office chair that can make you happier A doctor has invented the ultimate office chair – which is not only good for your posture but is also thought to make you happier. The bizarre-looking creation, by Dr Patrik Kunzler and designer Ben Fluri, is a far cry from the standard design currently used by workers the world over. It doesn’t have a back or arm rests and the seat is made from two carbon shells, used in Formula One car production, which move with the user. The design, developed at top American university MIT, focuses on movements of the body and helps with posture as well as relaxation. And the user is supposed to feel a sense of weightlessness – which can have a positive effect on performance, creativity and also mood. The chair, called the LimbIC, costs an eyewatering R52,000 but Dr Kunzler’s Swiss company Inno-Motion has already been inundated with orders. Source: Daily Mail

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GENERAL

English has evolved over the centuries ‘Watergate’ and ‘chillax’ have emerged as two of the most important words in the history of English, according to an academic study. David Crystal, Honorary Professor of Linguistics at the University of Wales, Bangor, has picked out 100 words to illustrate the changing face of the language from medieval times. His choices reflect popular culture over the centuries and the development of the internet and text messaging in recent decades. For the Anglo Saxon period Prof Crystal included ‘mead’, ‘street’ and ‘lea’. For the medieval era he has opted for ‘pork’, ‘dame’ and ‘royal’. The words chosen for the period between

Shakespeare and the King James Bible – ‘alphabet’, ‘dialect’, ‘shibboleth’ and ‘potato’ will all be familiar to modern readers. But other words for more recent centuries will be a bit more challenging such as ‘fopdoodle’ – a term for an insignificant fool. The political history of the 1970s is reflected in the choice of ‘Watergate’, referring to the scandal which led to Richard Nixon being forced to surrender the US presidency. Other bits of slang have also been chosen, including ‘dude’, a word more commonly heard in the United States than in Britain. Recently technology is reflected with ‘LOL’, arguably the most commonly used text messaging abbreviation of all and ‘chillax’, a recent introduction combining ‘chill’ and ‘relax’. Source: Daily Mail


30 years The age a Tarantula can live up to

GENERAL

Farmer builds home-made Italian supercar Wang Jian, a 28-year-old mechanic and farmer from China’s Jiangsu province, has spent the last year building himself a home-made replica of the Lamborghini Reventon, one of the world’s most exclusive supercars. Wang developed a passion for cars at a very young age, and even worked at an auto shop for ten years before opening his own business. Although he had a chance to work on many different cars, he felt like something was missing from his life. It was his very own Reventon, a fighter jet-inspired car priced around R10 million. And as if the price wasn’t prohibitive enough, Wang Jian knew only a few of these gems had been produced by the Italian car manufacturer, and all of them were sold to wealthy buyers, most of whose names remain a mystery. But he wasn’t

going to let these kind of technicalities stand in the way of owning his own Reventon, so he decided that if he couldn’t buy one, he was going to build it. He set his plan in motion in May of last year, buying an old Volkswagen, and a small Reventon model car to use as reference. The 28-year-old car enthusiast worked hard on his project, re-welding the chassis of the secondhand Volkswagen, moving the engine from the front to the back and cutting pieces of scrap

6,800 The estimated number of languages in the world

metal to build the Reventon’s aerodynamic frame. It took him a whole year to finish this labour of love, but apart from ‘minor’ details like the lack of paint, a top speed that any bicycle could probably beat, and a Spartan interior, Wang Jian got his supercar, and it had only cost him R72,000. Sadly, the police won’t let him register his sports car, for safety reasons, so instead of driving it on the open road to impress his friends, the young farmer uses it to transport fertiliser.


15,250

22 knots

The number of times the average driver will honk in a lifetime

The speed at which the Titanic was going when it hit an iceberg

TECHNOLOGY

Teen floats cheap camera into space They look like they could be the latest images taken from a multimillion pound NASA satellite, but these stunning snaps were actually taken from a R350 camera bought off eBay by a teenager.

H E A LT H

Diabetics could soon say goodbye to needles

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SCIENCE

Re-runs are good for you

Pricking a finger is just part of everyday life for many diabetes patients. But now a non-invasive measurement approach could release them from the constant annoyance of pin pricks.

If you’ve ever settled down with a box set of your favourite TV show, then good news – scientists say it may have given you a mental boost. Researchers at the University of Buffalo, USA, found people had boosted willpower and selfcontrol after watching a favourite show.

Researchers for a firm called Fraunhofer have designed a chip that can be placed on a patient’s body, which can then measure glucose levels via fluids such as sweat, meaning diabetics could say goodbye to the prick and needle approach. For many diabetics, checking blood glucose is an everyday part of life, especially for patients with Type-1 diabetes, who always have to keep a close eye on their levels since their bodies are incapable of producing the insulin to break down the glucose in the blood. Several times a day, they have to place a tiny drop of blood on a test strip. It is the only way they can ascertain the blood glucose value, so they can inject the correct amount of insulin needed. And for pain-sensitive patients, the procedure is agony. The new procedure by Fraunhofer is a bio-sensor that is located on the patient’s body. It is also able to measure glucose levels continuously using tissue fluids other than blood, such as in sweat or tears.

They say people even performed better on puzzles after settling down in front of an episode they had seen several times before. “When you watch a favourite re-run, you typically don’t have to use any effort to control what you are thinking, saying or doing,” said Jaye Derrick at the University at Buffalo, who led the research. “You are not exerting the mental energy required for self-control or willpower. “At the same time, you are enjoying your ‘interaction’, with the TV show’s characters, and this activity restores your energy.” Derrick believes that watching a rerun of a favourite TV show may help restore the drive to get things done in people who have used up their reserves of willpower or self-control.

Source: Daily Mail

Source: Daily Mail

Adam Cudworth, 19, managed to capture these incredible views of the Earth from space using little more than a balloon and his second-hand camera. And while NASA spends hundreds of millions of rands each year on high tech satellites, Cudworth, whose scientific background consists of only a Physics A-Level, achieved his incredible feat on a shoestring budget. The student spent 40 hours working on a home-made device consisting of a box containing a GPS, radio and microprocessor – which soared to a height of 33,592m. After taking two-and-a-half hours to float up into the Earth's stratosphere, his contraption captured out-of-this-world images giving breathtaking views of our planet from space. Source: The Telegraph

A N D F I N A L LY

Amazon mix-up results in buyer receiving assault rifle It’s not yet clear how it happened, but a Washington DC musician who ordered a flat-screen TV through Amazon received a military-style assault rifle instead. Seth Horvitz ordered a 39-inch TV through one of Amazon’s third-party vendors. However, instead of receiving a television, inside Horvitz found a black, semiautomatic Sig Sauer SIG716, similar to the M16. The SIG716 is used by law enforcement and the military. Apparently, the box had two mailing labels: one with his name and address, the other for a Pennsylvania gun store that had ordered it from a supplier. Neither the gun store nor the supplier was identified. source: On deadline


606.74kg The weight of the biggest pumpkin in the world

eleven

The number of days the average person can live without water

CALENDAR GAUTENG

African Shebeen

African Shebeen Festival of Beer is a celebration of Africa's rich brewing history, hosted by experts of the brewing craft. More than 15 000 people per day are expected to attend the festival. Attractions include live performances from South Africa's top artists, dancers, face-painting and local cuisine, competitions, and a quiz. Tickets are R500 each with the first 1,000 tickets available at R280.  5-7 October 2012  Innesfree Park, Sandton i 011 467 0553 or Info@africanshebeen.co.za

CAPE TOWN

Cape Town International Boat Show Now in its 12th year, this year’s event will capture the imagination of the whole family from the showcasing of exotic boats, the best the boat building industry has on offer to the widest diversity of boating related products and technology available. Designed to attract both local and international visitors, exciting events, demonstrations and competitions with fabulous prizes are planned for both the CTICC and at the V&A Waterfront.  12-14 October 2012  Cape Town International Convention Centre and the V&A Waterfront i 021 788 1954

Sustain our Africa Summit The inaugural Sustain our Africa Summit will tackle, debate and find answers to the biggest question of all: Can Africa deliver enough for all, forever? The summit will bring together economists, environmentalists, scientists, maverick entrepreneurs, artists, inventors and social champions to share their wealth of knowledge and experience.

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 22-28 October  V&A Waterfront i www.sustainourafrica.org WESTERN CAPE

The FNB Whisky Festival This Festival showcases more than 180 local and international established whisky brands, new whiskies being launched into the South African market and an eclectic mix of whisky lifestyle premium products. Learn more about whisky while networking with like-minded whisky lovers, during a fun and interactive night out.  3-5 October 2012  Cape Town International Convention Centre i 012 460 7579

Jozi Book Fair The Jozi Book Fair is aimed at small progressive publishers, publishers of indigenous works, independent writers and publishers with a social justice agenda. It also aims to engage mainstream publishers and distributors of literature, in an effort to build and promote a culture of reading within the South African landscape.  27 October 2012  Museum Africa, Newtown, Johannesburg i Sekiwe on 084 377 3018


panorama

Lean on me A mother cheetah lies on a rock with her three cubs. There is growing concern over the survival of the uber-fast cats. Concern stems mainly from the fact that their natural African habitat is shrinking, therefore leaving them with very limited food resources.

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free | soul

sun factor The

Holiday destinations that are sure to beat the heat this summer

It stretches out white before you – the Makgadikgadi Pan in Botswana

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the mercury

is rising and it’s that time of the year when the southern hemisphere gets ready for summer vacations. If you are looking for a different holiday experience, why not try one of these unique destinations in the Airlink network?

Livingstone Livingstone, Zambia is the ideal place to explore the continent’s natural beauty. Livingstone is home to the well-known Victoria Falls situated on the Zambezi River, and there is plenty to entertain and amaze you. Get up close and personal with lions of the African Lion Rehabilitation and Release into the Wild Programme, as


they play and learn in preparation for their release. You can even volunteer in the programme, with placements available from a half day up to six weeks. If that isn’t enough, you can opt for an Elephant Back Safari where you can view nature from the back of one of these impressive animals. For the adrenaline junkies there are various water activities including white water rafting, a boat ride to Livingstone Island, kayaking, canoeing and, unique to Zambia, you can take the Under the Spray Tour. The latter involves going right under the cascades of the Victoria Falls where you can experience its beauty from below. For those who just can’t get enough high-speed thrills, try a 111-metre bungee jump off the Victoria Falls Bridge.

Madagascar Madagascar, an island country in the Indian Ocean off the south-eastern coast of Africa, is the world’s fourthlargest island and it contains an immense diversity flora and fauna. Of the 12,000 plant species identified here, 10,000 are endemic to the island. Madagascar may not be considered a traditional holiday destination, but it’s still a destination that offers some interesting possibilities. Considering that Madagascar is separated from Africa by many kilometres of sea and 165 million years of evolution, it is not surprising that it is home to some of the weirdest animal and plant life on the

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free | soul

Victoria Falls in Zimbabwe will mesmerise you

planet. Here you can see some truly unique species, including over 70 varieties of lemur, the world’s largest and smallest chameleons, so-called Dracula ants and the Giraffe-necked weevil. You can also go out to sea on board luxury catamarans or with the local sailing boats, as well as indulge in kite surfing, quad riding, hiking, fishing and bird watching on this one-of-a-kind island.

Swaziland

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Make your summer holiday a culture-orientated experience in Swaziland. The Mantenga Cultural Village is located in the Mantenga Nature Reserve, and is a living museum of the classical Swazi lifestyle during the 1850s. The village comprises 16 huts made from traditional building materials such as poles, grass, reeds, leather stripes, earth and cow dung. The purpose of the cultural village is to facilitate visitors to maintain a positive interest in the Swazi cultural heritage, including

language, customs, rituals, dance, music, folklore, and arts and crafts. The tour of the village includes activities that are found in a typical Swazi village, such as a consultation with a traditional healer, and you will be treated to traditional dancing. There is also a restaurant that offers both traditional and western dishes. Don’t miss a visit to the King Sobhuza II Memorial Park. This park was created as a tribute to King Sobhuza II, who led the Swazi nation to independence from the British in 1968. It is located at Lobamba, adjacent to the Houses of Parliament, Somhlolo Stadium and the National Museum. The park features a Royal Entrance through which only the king, the Queen Mother, heads of states and heads of foreign missions may enter. The Mausoleum is considered the most sacred part of the park and stands on the spot where King Sobhuza’s body was laid during the state funeral, which took place on 3 September 1982.


a 90-minute boat trip to observe dolphins, reefs, whale sharks and whales.

Botswana

Madagascar is home to some unique flora and fauna

One of Botswana’s main attractions is the Kalahari Desert, which covers about 70% of the country. In the middle of the dry savanna of north-eastern Botswana you will also find the Makgadikgadi Pan, one of the largest salt pans in the world. The pan is what is left over from Lake Makgadikgadi, a huge lake that dried up. This area offers exciting activities such as game drives, star-gazing experiences, and you can even go on a quad-biking expedition where you speed across the salt crust of the pans – definitely not something you get to do every day. Furthermore, Botswana is home to the Okavango Delta, a large inland delta. There’s no shortage of quality accommodation in the Okavango Delta where the wide variety of wildlife is a popular tourist attraction. Species include the African Bush elephant, African buffalo, hippo, lechwe, tsessebe, sitatunga, Blue wildebeest, giraffe, Nile crocodile, lion, cheetah, Sable antelope, black and white rhino and the Chacma baboon. The delta also has more than 400 species of birds, including the African Fish Eagle, Pel’s Fishing Owl, Crested Crane, Lilac-breasted Roller, Hammerkop, ostrich and Sacred Ibis.

Lesotho

Mozambique With its rugged coastline, Mozambique offers many activities for lovers of the ocean. Ponta du Ouro is one of the world’s best locations for scuba diving with its colourful variety of marine life. The beaches of Macaneta and Inhaca Island are more popular spots for diving and snorkelling. You can also relax while enjoying activities such as deep-sea fishing, fly fishing, sunset cruises, sailing and island trips. Want to swim with the dolphins? In Ponta du Ouro, on the southern shores of the country, you can visit Dolphin Encountours who offer educational and ethical wild dolphin swims. All dolphin encounters follow the specially developed DolphinCareAfrica code of conduct, making sure that the viewing is not intrusive to the dolphins. No feeding or coaxing is allowed. If swimming isn’t your strong point however, you can choose to go on a ‘Surfari’,

Also known as the ‘Kingdom in the Sky’ because of its setting in the Drakensberg and Maluti Range, Lesotho is a great sightseeing destination, and its magnificent mountains offer plenty of opportunities to go hiking, trekking and mountaineering. One of the best ways to explore Lesotho is by undertaking a pony trek from village to village. The locals actually prefer ponies as they are well adapted to the rugged terrain. In the lowland areas you can go craft shopping, while the highlands in the northeast and centre feature towering peaks of over 3,000m and breathtaking green valleys. Another interesting thing to explore is the dinosaur trails. The existence of life in Lesotho dates back 200 million years, as seen in the fossilised dinosaur footprints that have been uncovered in the country. There is even a dinosaur named after the country – the Lesothosaurus is a metre-long herbivorous lizard. There are many dinosaur footprint locations to investigate, with sites in the Quthing District at Ellenberger’s Cave House and just outside the town of Quthing. Another place to go is just outside of Leribe in the north and Morija in the southwest. Text | Noleen Fourie Photography | Shutterstock

How to get there

Airlink flies to more than 30 destinations throughout the region. See flight information and schedule on page 84 www.flyairlink.com

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First to the mark

Swift labour law solutions

Ivan Israelstam is Chief Executive of Labour Law Management Consulting. He may be contacted on 011 888 7944 or ivan@labourlawadvice. co.za. This article first appeared in The Star.

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labour

disputes don’t always have to be a long drawn-out process. The Labour Relations Act (LRA) provides for a ‘short-cut’ process called con-arb which stands for conciliation-arbitration. Conciliation is the process whereby a CCMA or bargaining council (BC) mediator tries to assist the employer and employee to reach an out-of-court agreement. It is an exercise that is intended to end in a settlement agreement and not in an award (judgement).

Arbitration, on the other hand, is a judicial-type process that usually occurs if a conciliated settlement is not achieved. It’s the next step in the process if conciliation fails to resolve the matter. At arbitration, the employer and employee do not negotiate an agreement. Instead, they bring and present evidence as in any court case. After hearing all the evidence, the arbitrator makes a finding as to which party was in the wrong. Normally, if the conciliation meeting fails to produce a settlement and the employee applies for arbitration, the arbitration hearing is scheduled for several weeks or months later.

Instant response Con-arb is when, instead of scheduling the arbitration for a later date, it is held on the same day. The employee is not required to apply for arbitration; it occurs automatically the very moment the conciliator declares that conciliation has failed. Thus, the parties have no time after the conciliation meeting to prepare their evidence and arguments for the arbitration. Con-arb is not mandatory for all types of dispute. It is compulsory when the dispute concerns the dismissal of an employee for any reason relating to probation. Furthermore, if neither party objects to con-arb then it can take place even if probation is not involved, provided that the dispute concerns:


• • •

• •

A non-strike dismissal for conduct or capacity; constructive dismissal; the employer’s failure to substantially preserve the employment conditions of employees when transferring them in terms of section 197 of the LRA; an employee who does not know the reason for the dismissal; and an unfair labour practice.

Forewarned is forearmed Therefore, on receiving any con-arb notice a party who does not want con-arb must lodge a formal objection at least seven days in advance of the set hearing date. However, such an objection will not be valid if the dispute concerns an unfair dismissal or unfair labour practice relating to probation. The purpose of con-arb is to cut down drastically the time period between conciliation and arbitration. It could also have the effect of forcing the parties to make every effort in trying to settle the matter at conciliation. This is because they are aware of the arbitration that will take place immediately if conciliation fails. This ‘pressure’ to settle only has an effect on an employer or employee who believes he/she could lose the case. That is, if you know your case is weak or if you are unsure whether you have prepared properly for the arbitration you will be under pressure to settle at conciliation. Such a situation of pressure could cost you a lot of money. Parties who have previously been through the conventional CCMA or bargaining council processes may fail to realise that a con-arb is very different to a conciliation meeting. Failing to prepare for this reason or for any other reason could be very costly. Preparations should include the preparation of witnesses, collecting and preparing documentary and other evidence, responses to anticipated evidence that the opposing party could bring as well as the preparation of case arguments and case law. Remember, preparation for arbitration in particular takes a great deal of time. Text | Ivan Israelstam Photography | Shutterstock


free | soul

Making great

strides A firm footing for a brighter future

At the Tsonga factory in Lidgetton in the KZN Midlands, local women are sustainably employed handcrafting world-class footwear

The upliftment of South Africa’s rural poor has been a hot discussion topic for years. In places where talk has been translated into action, it frequently takes the forms of basic housing and potable water from a stand pump. It’s a start but perhaps the biggest obstacle to a better life for rural communities is widespread unemployment. A grandparent’s pension or a child support grant is often the only income within extended families and there’s only so far those funds can stretch. If people are to be truly uplifted, it’s not just a handout they need, but a proper hand up. Few would argue that the most effective route to empowering people and creating sustainable employment is via education and training. But KwaZulu Natal businessman, Peter Maree is taking this further. Maree’s goal is to make it possible for rural people to own and operate small, viable businesses producing top quality goods destined for both the local and international markets. Already, big strides have been made in that direction.

A thread of hope

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Maree is the Director of Tsonga, a South African shoe manufacturing company that’s changing lives for the better. Located in the rural village of Lidgetton in the KwaZulu Natal Midlands, Tsonga was conceived in

the late 1990s when cheap imported footwear flooded the South African market, forcing many local shoe manufacturers out of business. Maree, who had over three decades of experience in the industry, rose to the challenge. He saw an opportunity for a niche market in high-quality footwear with a uniquely African style and the comfort that only hand-stitching can achieve. With a team of top designers and skilled technicians already in place, the next stage was to find people with handlacing skills and premises for a factory. Both were found in Lidgetton.


Henry Zuma – once a gardener, today part of Tsonga’s management team

“In that village, unemployment was rife, people were desperate for work, and a farm was for sale on their doorstep giving the accessibility that was fundamental to the plan. We wanted to take the work to the people, rather than expecting them to travel or relocate,” explained Maree. Within a few years, 160 people from Lidgetton were sustainably employed and Tsonga’s handmade shoes and handbags were making a name for themselves not just in ‘concept stores’ (selling only the Tsonga brand) throughout South Africa, but abroad too. Today, export

destinations include Australia, Canada, Europe, and the United States. And in that most fashion- and styleconscious of countries, France, three concept stores are flourishing, while another has recently opened in Byron Bay in Australia. Through it all runs the ‘Thread of Hope’, Tsonga’s trust that supplies school meals, a mobile clinic, ongoing training and education while also providing a solid foundation to enable ordinary people to take charge of their own lives and shape a better future for their children.

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Above: Top quality shoes for the modern world made the oldfashioned way – by hand and with care Right: Hand-stitching is the key to comfort

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The latter is the focus of the company’s newest project. “It was very fulfilling to have been able to create lasting employment, but we wanted to add more value to the Lidgetton community,” said Maree. “You can hand over a business to people but if they don’t have the knowhow or ability to run it, it’s not going to be sustainable. Rather link people to a successful company but let them retain their independence.” That is the basis of the Tslops Co-op Container project launched a year ago. Working out of shipping containers painted in eye-catching, quirky designs and conveniently positioned near their homes, groups of trained women run their own businesses handcrafting world-class flip-flops, famously known as Tslops. The co-ops have autonomy regarding working hours and productivity. When they deliver the shoes, they invoice Tsonga for the goods and are paid accordingly. It’s a sure way of people learning the value of effort. Twenty-six year old co-op member, Xolisile Majola said the project has made a world of difference to her family.“I am my own boss, I’ve been able to improve our living standards, and I can be at home with my children instead of having to live somewhere else to earn a wage.” And whereas emerging businesses might often flounder owing to poor or no meaningful support, Tslops is on a firm footing thanks to the infrastructure the parent company gives. Currently, two container factories are operating. Another two are waiting while people undergo training. “For now, all co-op members are drawn from Lidgetton as the women there are our priority for assistance,” explained Maree. “We envisage setting up enough containers over the next five years for 400 people to be employed year round in the village. The aim is for a million pairs of Tslops to be sold annually. Other products will be added and our ultimate dream is to roll this out to the whole of South Africa.” An ambitious goal, but given Peter and his team’s commitment and achievements already, it’s not pie in the sky. Much depends, of course, on growing demand. And while Tsonga’s products can hold their own anywhere, it helps when consumers recognise that by buying a certain brand they play a role in uplifting needy people. Recently, Tslops was launched at the Magic Fair in Las Vegas, USA, where international clothing and footwear companies showcased their goods ahead of the 2013 Spring season. That’s quite something to think about – flip-flops from a humble African village standing proudly alongside some of the world’s leading brands. No-one could have been prouder though than Majola who, in a sense, has become the face of Tslops. Where once her world view would have been defined by her

village, Majola now flies all over South Africa promoting the product she makes. More exciting though was her first trip ever overseas. As part of the Tsonga delegation to The Magic Fair, Majola showed visitors to the Tsonga stand how Tslops are made the old-fashioned way – by hand and with great care. As she demonstrated her craft, she chatted to her audience about life on the Thread of Hope Farm. For many, it’s a place where dreams are coming true. Take for example, Henry Zuma who attended school in the building that now houses the shop on the farm – the shop that Henry now manages. Previously employed as a gardener on the farm, Zuma, by dint of merit, is today part of Tsonga’s management team and he contributes to every new store that opens in the country. “I always dreamed of building my own house and giving my children a better life,”he says. A decade or so later, that’s what Henry has achieved thanks to a strong hand up. Text | Andrea Abbott Photography | Andrea Abbott and Supplied

Besides job creation, Tsonga also funds socio-economic programmes in the community

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free | trade

Qixin Chen Improving demand forecasting for electric power to save fuel and reduce emissions

Power plants like the one behind Chen will be made more efficient by his software

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PROBLEM: Many power plants connected to the grid operate well below their full capacity, wasting fuel. If we have no means to store large amounts of electricity or reliably predict power demand, however, maintaining idle capacity is the only way to respond quickly to surges in demand. The problem is particularly challenging in China, a huge consumer of electricity. Its push to add thousands of wind turbines, with their variable, difficult-to-predict output, will make it even harder to efficiently balance supply and demand. SOLUTION: Software from electrical engineer Qixin Chen of Tsinghua University in China accurately forecasts power demand and helps utilities coordinate

power plants. His software is already in use in nearly 200 cities and 10 provinces in China. One province, he says, reported saving $30 million and 240,000 tons of coal in a single year. Chen found two ways to improve on existing demand-forecasting software. First, he designed the system to better choose the right forecasting approach for particular areas; differences in demand and weather patterns mean that some techniques are much better suited to some locations than others. Then he enabled his system to analyse its own previous prediction errors and adjust its formulas so as to minimise the errors the next time similar conditions occur. The result is demand forecasts that are accurate as much as a month ahead.


Juan Sebastián Osorio Monitors specially designed for premature infants help detect breathing problems

Other forecasting systems, in contrast, aren’t accurate beyond a day or two, if that. The results are helping utilities dole out electricity more efficiently. Now Chen is working to adapt his forecasting software to predict the power output of wind turbines. His system would take into account wind data gathered for miles around the turbines, providing a sharper picture of which wind shifts are likely to affect them in the coming hours. That means utilities can know when to expect more power from the turbines so they can cut back on conventional power generation.

Nearly 85% of babies born before 34 weeks stop breathing for 20 seconds or more, often because their undeveloped nervous systems fail to signal their lungs. That can be fatal. The babies are typically hooked up to monitors, but sometimes the systems fail to sound the alarm – and Juan Sebastián Osorio discovered why. Osorio, then a biomedical engineering student with the Antioquia School of Engineering and CES University in Medellín, Colombia, realised that the sensors used on the infants were poorly adapted to their small size. Electrodes are placed on either side of the infant’s chest to watch for stoppages in motion. But the tiny chests move so little that the monitor can mistake heartbeats for breathing motions long after respiration has stopped. Osorio and colleagues came up with a prototype detector attuned to the rhythms of infant physiology. The monitor combines heart rate recordings, electrical signals from the diaphragm muscle, and blood oxygen measurements for a potentially more precise and reliable way to measure a baby’s breathing. Eventually the device could predict the risk of apnea by analysing the measurements along with information about the baby’s weight and gestational age. Osorio says that could help hospitals discharge low-risk babies earlier, saving costs and sparing the babies from extended ICU stays. Osorio is testing his system and seeking to license it commercially. He’s integrating it with a mobile-phone app he developed that helps parents recognise signs of risk for sudden infant death syndrome. Next he plans to couple his detector with a video camera to make it easier for parents to monitor babies at high risk for apnea. If a problem comes up, the system will connect to pediatricians remotely.

Text | Kevin Bullis Photography | Jeremy Wasserman

Text | Courtney Humphries Illustration | Michael Gillette

Skyways with MIT's Technology Review brings you the latest innovations in the tech field

Like this article? For more intelligent reads check out for knowledge

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App your life Make digital work for you. Apps is the new catchphrase. And while there are numerous apps that offer distracting games to stop you falling asleep during those certain presentations and meetings, there are also apps to let you make the most of those meetings and help ensure your valuable time is used efficiently. Time is money and sometimes it pays to spend a little money on an app that can save you both.

Pocket The usefulness of Pocket might be harmed by the features coming to iOS 6 later this year but for now it’s one of the best bookmarking services currently available. Originally called Read it Later, Pocket allows you to save webpages for reading later and allows you to collect all your ‘later’ reading from your computer and other compatible apps. This is the ideal app for bookmarking reading for commuter flights around SA. Pocket is available on Android and iOS.

Any.DO If you need a reminder app then Any.DO might

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fit your needs. With Any.DO you can create a list of all your to-do items and share them across all your devices so you will never miss a deadline again. Completed tasks can be removed by simply swiping them off the screen and tasks can also be shared with friends, family and colleagues. It’s the perfect app for husbands who need the latest version of the shopping list while running errands.

Pintrest for iPad Pintrest is the easiest way to chew through data and waste hours looking at pictures. Pintrest is similar to Twitter but revolves around images. Images are put into categories

and there are many people showcasing images of fashion, cars, animals or just funny pictures. The iPad app is clean and simple with an interface that makes finding images easy. The built-in browser is a bit limited but that hardly detracts from a very interesting community-driven experience.

Teamviewer for iPad For those who like to have remote access to their home or office PCs Teamviewer is a must. The free version gives you unlimited control and there are apps for iOS and Android. The iPad version of Teamviewer allows full access to all the machines you have connected to your free


account and even allows access to new PCs. The screen gets split in two with the bottom half acting as a touch pad to control the mouse. This app is a must for any admin that doesn’t want to carry his laptop with him all the time.

NASA App HD NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory sends out regular emails that contain links to all the amazing

things that NASA discovers on a day-today level. But most of these images are in black and white and lack the exciting visual elements that people expect to see when looking at images of planets and stars. NASA’s App HD contains all the splendour that one expects to see when exploring the universe and on the retina display it's breathtaking. Text: Michael Reed, Hardware writer, PCFormat


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Stats Epson WorkForce Pro Price R3,400 Manufacturer Epson Printer type Inkjet Print speed 26ppm (black), 38ppm (colour) Connectivity USB, Bluetooth, Ethernet, Epson Connect

Stats Epson TW9000 Price R35,000 Manufacturer Epson Native resolution 1920x1080 3D Support Yes Weight 8.15 kg

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Featherlight Cost-effective printing solution Epson’s latest range of all-in-one WorkForce Pros are designed to offer a cheaper, faster and more efficient alternative to laser, but somehow based on inkjet technology. With no warm-up, the new Epsons will outpace other MFCs every time on small print jobs, with an output of 14.6 and 8ppm for mono and colour prints respectively. Lasers do overtake on bigger jobs but Epson still has a long-awaited trump-card up its sleeve: reasonably priced ink. Standard cartridges for the WF Pro cost R250 and yield 1,200 pages of black, 800 colour; XL will set you back R400 and churn out 2,400 and 2,000, while XXL costs R628 and is capable of a whopping 3,400 and 3,000. That means pages

will cost 16c for mono and 20c for colour. Bearing in mind laser costs roughly 50c per page for mono and R2 for colour, not to mention the difference in power consumption, the cost benefits are significant. Beyond speed and running costs, the rest of the package is well fleshed out with features. Scanning via ADF works like a charm and the network capabilities extend to remote, WiFi and even cloud capabilities. It is overall a very competent corporate affair.

Score: ★ ★ ★ Text | Michael Reed

Projecting the future Beam me up If there’s anything on the wish list for a projector, the TW9000 will have it. It’s bedecked with 1,080p, full 3D (active shutter), 480Hz make-everything-look-like-a-home-video mode, 200,000:1 contrast with 2,400 lumens and a host of other top-end specs. It slices through movies, blasts through games and turns any surface into a piece of HD art. It even has a proprietary HDMI to wireless module so you won’t need to chase cables to get your content to the back of your room. The magic is more sublime than a spec sheet; image quality is not a value but a simple yes. The picture is perfect in the dark, exceptional otherwise and at six metres it’s guaranteed to wow even the staunchest of LCD pundits. This

is a projector born and bred to murder cinemas and define home theatres. Be warned, the TW9000H is a large projector and is intended to be roosted permanently. It does generate significant heat and while quieter than most at 22db in eco mode, it can be heard if it’s not housed properly. This is no jack-of-all-trades; this is the projector to own for the topend home cinema which makes the price easily forgivable considering the competition.

Score: ★ ★ ★ Text | Nicholas Boerma


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MOLLY’S WORLD Equipped with a video camera, one girl provides insight into the daily lives of Africa’s poor Molly’s documentary offers a rare glimpse into the life of Africa’s less fortunate

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This is the story of Molly Achieng, a 13-year-old schoolgirl from the slums of Nairobi, Kenya. Members of the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) first got to know her when she agreed to take part in a filming project designed to give viewers an insight into the life of a teenager in Mathare, one of the capital’s largest shanty towns. The idea was that Molly would take a small video camera around with her and shoot whatever she liked: her classmates, her home, the place where she lives. In Mathare where Molly lives, life is difficult. Most houses are made of old iron sheets or wooden boards on earthen floors. Sanitation is rudimentary with as many as ten shacks sharing a bathroom and latrine. There is

no running water in the houses and people have to fetch water from communal taps serving hundreds of people. Getting food is a challenge for most of the people and many children, especially girls, have to work to help put a meal on the family table. The school Molly attends is part of the school meals programme run jointly by WFP and the Government of Kenya. Under this initiative, daily hot meals are served to some 1.3 million children in Nairobi’s slums and in the arid- and semi-arid areas of Kenya. School meals provide an important safety net for vulnerable children in food-insecure environments. For many of them, the school lunch is the only meal they can count on during the day. Typically, it will consist of beans and maize or split peas and bulgur wheat. Not only does it fill their stomachs, it also helps ensure that children attend school and can concentrate in class.

A star in the making Last year, a team from WFP went along to Molly’s school, Valley View Academy, and met teacher Leonard Wawire.


They showed him a Flipcam, a small video camera designed by Cisco Systems, an American multinational that manufactures and sells networking equipment. How about getting one of the schoolchildren to take the camera and document their lives with it? The teacher was captivated. He thought a while and disappeared down the corridor. Shortly afterwards, he came back with three students – three girls. All three seemed bright and eager but there was something about Molly that said she would be the ideal candidate. After getting some basic instruction on how to use the camera, the team disappeared, leaving the schoolgirl to get on with the job. Over the course of the next few months, Molly filmed her life: the sofa where she did her homework and slept at night; her journey home from school; her trip to fetch water; a piece of open ground where people dumped garbage; old torn shoes that she could not afford to throw away because they were her only pair; and a boy from the neighbourhood, a big Michael Jackson fan. The footage was edited together at WFP’s

headquarters in Rome to produce the first episode of Molly’s World. A further five episodes followed and all were uploaded to YouTube. Since then, they have been viewed by many more people than was initially envisaged. It is difficult to pinpoint what makes her films so engaging. They offer a rare glimpse into a world that many viewers would never otherwise see and Molly’s curiosity about the world, her sense of fun, and above all her warmth and humanity have won the hearts of many people around the world. Molly is an orphan who lives with her uncle and his family. Molly’s uncle brought her to Nairobi from her rural home after her father died. Initially he paid her school fees but then he lost his job and Molly had to drop out of school for some time in 2008 when she was nine. Later that same year, teacher Leonard Wawire met Molly at an art exhibition for children in the Mathare slums. He was impressed by her drawing of three flowers which, she explained, depicted three stages of life: childhood, adulthood and old age. He learned that Molly no longer went to school and

The feeding scheme is also an incentive for children to stay in school

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Above: About 1.3 million children receive daily hot meals in Kenya Top right: The feeding scheme is a joint initiative of the WFP and the Kenyan government Right: Thanks to a generous sponsor in the USA, Molly has been able to stay in school and work towards a better future

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that she missed it immensely. He visited her guardians and asked them to enrol her at Valley View Academy, an informal school in Mathare. Informal schools are community- and sometimes church-run institutions for children who cannot be accommodated in the few public schools in the slums. “The food I get in school helps me to concentrate in class as my stomach is not always rumbling from hunger,” says Molly, who regularly comes top of her class.“We don’t always have food at home so I am happy to be in school where I can get lunch.” Life in the slums is particularly difficult for girls. Many drop out of school after primary school due to lack of money to pay the fees. Luckily for Molly, a sponsor in the United States is covering her education costs and will hopefully continue to do so when she starts high school in 2014. Molly’s idol is Mother Teresa of Calcutta who, for more than four decades, ministered to the poor in India. “I know that by working hard in school, I will attain my dream of becoming a nurse and a nun,” she says.

Earlier this year, Molly and some classmates went to Cisco’s studios in Nairobi for a live video up-link with children from Ambrit International School in Rome. The Ambrit students had watched Molly’s videos and had then made their own video clip which they wanted to show Molly and her classmates. After overcoming initial shyness, the children ended up showing each other dance moves, discussing their favourite foods and telling anecdotes about their lives. If ever there were an example of the potential in children from poor backgrounds and the need to nurture it, Molly is it. Text | Rose Ogola Photography | Supplied


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of thought New school

Does the VW Amarok have what it takes to be a contender?

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vw recently

released a version of its 2.0 BiTurbo 4Motion Amarok that boasts 132 kW of power. Since we’ve not published an ‘official’ off-road test on the Amarok, we used the opportunity to test this slightly more powerful bakkie’s abilities off the beaten path. “I take off on my right, or outside, foot rather than my left foot. Then I turn my back to the bar, arch my back over the bar, and then kick my legs out to clear the bar.” This was how Dick Fosbury described his unique style of high jumping, which soon became known as the Fosbury Flop. The style was weird, absurd even. But it worked. And when Fosbury took home a gold medal at the 1968 Olympics, the world realised that old Dick was on to something. It might have flown in the face of conventional wisdom, but his awkward leap delivered the goods. Pretty soon everyone was Fosbury flopping their way over the bar. The weird way had become the established way. The VW Amarok is the vehicular equivalent of the Fosbury Flop. How so? Well, it goes about its business in a manner unlike that of its competitors. Most high-end double cab bakkies are powered by a robust three-litre engine. The Amarok gets its power from a diminutive two-litre powerplant with two turbos. A lot of bakkie buyers are sceptical of this setup, believing that a two-litre mill with two turbos will be forced to work too hard when dealing with tough terrain. Moreover, with two turbochargers on board, there’s more that can go wrong. The question is: are the naysayers correct? Will the two-litre bi-turbo Amarok be remembered as a failed experiment, or as a revolutionary game-changer?

Features and equipment The 132kW Amarok has the same two-litre bi-turbo engine that powered the original 120kW version. Capacity is still pegged at 1,968cc and maximum torque remains the same. The oilburner generates peak torque of 400Nm from 1,500-2,250r/min. The only difference is that peak power of 132kW, instead of 120kW, is now generated at 4,000r/min. With a mere 12kW of extra oomph and a torque figure that is still the same, the change in power isn’t particularly noticeable. You certainly won’t be blown away by the difference. That said, we did find that this

Amarok offered a better drive than previous versions. Setting off and accelerating felt easier than before. While the added power might have had something to do with it, there were more noticeable changes. The clutch action on the bakkie that we tested was much better than on previous models. Controlling the clutch when starting off, and changing gears felt much easier. The gearbox also seemed smoother. The previous gearbox was a bit notchy. This one allowed us to swap cogs with ease. The clutch/gearbox combination is still a bit finicky, and it is still easier to stall the Amarok than just about any other bakkie, but there has been an improvement. The engine performed well during testing. Accelerating to overtake wasn’t difficult, though we found that we had to work the gear lever quite a bit, gearing back from sixth to fourth when we wanted to overtake quickly, especially on uphill sections. The fact is, a three-litre oilburner offers power and torque across a larger section of the rev counter. The Ranger, for example, delivers 147kW at 3,000r/min, and peak torque of 470Nm from 1,500-2,750r/min. The Hilux delivers a maximum of 120kW at 3,400r/min, and its maximum torque of 343Nm all the way from 1,4003,200r/min. The Amarok’s torque curve isn’t nearly as flat, forcing you to change gears on a regular basis. It isn’t all bad news, though. The Amarok can coast at 120km/h in sixth gear at less than 2,000r/min, providing excellent fuel consumption. During our test, which also included a fair amount of low-range work, the Amarok averaged 10,3l/100km. The Ford Ranger averaged 11,39l/100km on precisely the same route. If you travel largely on open roads, the Amarok’s fuel consumption will undoubtedly dip well below 10l/100km.

Leisure wheels is South Africa's foremost adventure motoring magazine. For this reason Skyways has chosen to work with Leisure wheels when it comes to providing you with motoring information. For more on the topic of adventure motoring, look out for the current issue of Leisure wheels, on sale now. www.leisurewheels.com

Accommodation Although the engine has been fiddled with, the interior of the Amarok has remained unchanged, but that’s not a bad thing. It still has one of the nicest cabins in the segment. It strikes a good balance between classy and practical – it isn’t particularly plush, but it still manages to look upmarket and SUV-like. Considering how nice the interior is, though, it is a shame that leather seats are an optional extra, even on the pricey Highline model. Fitting leather-clad seats will add R6,530 to the price tag. Park distance control – a very handy feature on a vehicle as large and unwieldy as the Amarok – is also an optional feature (R5,300). There is no shortage of 12V sockets (in the load area, centre console and dashboard), but the Amarok has no USB terminal or AUX jack (an optional radio with SD

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The interior of the Highline 4Motion Amarok is simple yet classy. Overall, it looks quite SUV-like. That said, items such as leather seats and a radio with a USB terminal are optional extras, which is a shame in a vehicle of this price

card, USB terminal and Bluetooth capability is available). It does, however, boast Bluetooth connectivity for phones, as well as controls on the steering wheel. The rear of the Amarok is comfortable and roomy, but as is the case with most bakkies, getting in and out is tough, since the wide front doors necessitate the use of smaller ones at the back. The only exception is the Ranger, which has smaller front doors on the double cab models to allow for more space at the rear. Still, the Amarok can easily transport four adults over long distances. Yes, its cabin lacks a few nice-to-haves, but it is wonderfully comfortable and quiet.

Gravel performance and handling

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When it came to dealing with gravel roads, the Amarok was in a class of its own. Firstly, the VW felt very composed on ugly dirt roads. As is the case with all bakkies that we test, its load area was empty, yet it very rarely seemed skittish. It did not boast the stability of an SUV such as the Touareg or Prado, but for a bakkie, it came unbelievably close. Secondly, the Amarok offered a comfortable ride on

dirt. It was incredibly SUV-like, managing to soak up road imperfections with ease and providing very low NVH levels. The Amarok’s ability to travel on gravel was its stand-out feature during our test. It offered stellar comfort, handling and stability on dirt. It is also worth noting that the Amarok has an electronic stability programme (ESP), as well as offroad ABS, which also adds to the feeling of confidence the driver has behind the steering wheel. If we had to travel long distances on bad gravel roads, this is undoubtedly the bakkie we would choose to do it in.

Trail capability We recently pitted the Amarok against the Ford Ranger. Somewhat to our surprise, the Amarok climbed the sharp hills with more ease than the Ranger did. We did not resort to using the rear diff lock as often as we did with the Ranger. Overall, though, the Amarok did not really perform better than the Ranger, due in large part to the fact that it was tough to navigate the bakkie along the narrow trails. Interestingly, the Amarok is slightly shorter than the Ranger and about the same width, yet it felt much larger on the tight trail. Despite


its size, the Ranger seemed smaller and more agile. The Amarok also lacks ground clearance. It is often stated that the bakkie has a ground clearance of around 250mm, but that is the figure you end up with when you measure clearance at a spot between the front and rear axle. The ground clearance directly under the front axle is 192mm. Like the Ranger, the Amarok’s ESP adjusts settings when you travel on 4x4 trails. The bakkie has an ‘Off Road Mode’ button that alters the electronics, subtly changing systems such as the ABS and ASR (anti-slip regulation) to improve performance. Overall, the Amarok performed admirably on the trail. It was a tougher trail than the vast majority of owners will ever tackle, and the Amarok completed it in standard guise without hassle. It is a competent off-roader, but its bulk makes it tough to manoeuvre on a 4x4 track. To be fair, though, one can’t single out the Amarok in this regard. Modern bakkies in general are too long and wide to perform well on trails. When it comes to trail capability, the Amarok is on par with vehicles such as the Ranger and Hilux.

The long-term reliability of the Amarok’s engine is something that only time can reveal. Meanwhile, there are a lot of satisfied Amarok owners out there who have not experienced a day’s hassle.

Overland suitability

Verdict

How suited is the Amarok to overland travel? This has been the subject of great debate since it was launched late in 2010. VW has been adamant from the start that it is suitable for overland travel, stating that the bakkie had been tested over millions of kilometres, and even used as a support vehicle during the Dakar Rally. To further prove its point, VW supplied Johan Badenhorst’s Voetspore team with a fleet of bakkies for an overland adventure. But one of the vehicles broke down, conveniently providing ammunition for the Amarok sceptics. The fact of the matter is that the Amarok has a lot going for it as an overland vehicle. The cabin is spacious and it has a large loading area. It is also supremely comfortable, offering a wonderful drive both on tar and gravel. Finally, the two-litre biturbo engine provides more than enough power, while also delivering great fuel economy. Still, one can’t simply dismiss concerns about its suitability for travel in Africa. The Amarok has a smallcapacity engine that sports two turbos and is mated to a rather finicky clutch/gearbox combination. Logic suggests that such a setup would take far more strain when having to power a heavily-loaded vehicle on tough 4x4 trails in scorching weather than a largercapacity engine that doesn’t need to work as hard.

The Amarok is a great all-round performer. It drives wonderfully, is comfortable and delivers great fuel economy. And with the introduction of the new 132 kW model, old niggles such as a notchy gearbox and tricky clutch have largely been addressed. For buyers looking for a practical leisure vehicle, the Amarok is a great choice. Some bakkie buyers will complain about the small engine, and admittedly, it probably wouldn’t be the best choice for someone looking for a plaasbakkie that can do merciless duty on a daily basis. But if you’re looking for a vehicle that boasts the comfort and refinement of an SUV and the practicality of a bakkie, the Amarok is definitely worth a look. And whether we want to admit it or not, smallcapacity engines with multiple turbos are the way of the future, largely because fuel efficiency is becoming increasingly important to buyers and manufacturers. Some performance vehicles are already sporting three turbos. It is very unlikely that the Amarok will be the last bakkie with a bi-turbo setup. In fact, it will probably go down in the history books as a trailblazer – just like Dick Fosbury. Text and photography | Jannie Herbst

There's no doubt that the Amarok is an attractive bakkie. It looks very solid and imposing

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free | cuisine Thirty-something-year-old Sanel Esterhuyse, the new executive chef at the superior deluxe African Pride 15 on Orange Hotel in Cape Town, had a dream when she was young to become an architect. However, she discovered her true calling in the kitchen, and since then Esterhuyse has worked in some of South Africa’s best kitchens, including the Arabella Sheraton Grand Hotel, the Cape Grace Hotel, One, Waterfront and Beluga. This month, she shares some of her favourite recipes.

Masterclass Recipes for a right royal treat

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Ingredients Smoked tomato chutney 100g onion 50ml oil 5g garlic 5g ginger 5g mustard seeds 10g sugar 10ml red wine vinegar 500g smoked plum tomatoes 10g tomato paste 5g turmeric 500g red peppers 5g chopped parsley Gorgonzola soufflé 15 egg whites 10 egg yolks 400ml milk 400g gorgonzola 200g Emmenthaler cheese 125g flour 125g butter

Double baked gorgonzola soufflé with smoked tomato chutney & balsamic reduction Parmesan wafer • •

Sprinkle grated parmesan cheese on silicon mat and bake till golden. Wafer must be thin.

Smoked tomato • • • • • •

Blanch and peel the cherry tomatoes. Sprinkle deep bain marie with oak shavings. Let it start to smoke. Place perforated tray over smoking chips and seal with tin foil. Take off heat and leave for 15-20 minutes. Marinade in olive oil, herbs, seasoning and a dash of sugar.

Smoked tomato chutney • • • • • •

Sauté onion, garlic and ginger in oil. Add whole grain mustard and turmeric. Add sugar and vinegar and cook out. Cut the tomato into concasse and add tomato paste and cook out. Add red pepper and cook till all liquid has evaporated. Once cool, finish with chopped parsley.

Gorgonzola soufflé • • • • • • • •

Cook out flour and butter. Warm milk and add to flour mixture – cook out. Stir in grated cheeses. Let cool and add egg yolks. Whisk whites and fold into mixture, once cooled. Grease ramekins well. Fill ¾ and bake in water bath. Bake at 160°C for 20 minutes.

Method • • • • •

Cover soufflé with cream and bake. Sauce with garlic cream. Warm chutney quenelle on the side. Smoked cherry tomato. Drizzle with balsamic vinegar reduction.

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Ingredients Biscuit base 8 digestive biscuits 50g butter, melted Filling 600g cream cheese 2 tablespoons butter, melted 600g cream cheese 2 tablespoons flour 175g caster sugar 1 vanilla pod, scraped 2 eggs, 1 egg yolk 145ml crème fraiche Chocolate sauce 300ml milk 100ml cream 500g sugar 120g chocolate 60g cocoa powder

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Baked Madagascan vanilla cheesecake with berry pearls and chocolate sauce Cheese Cake • • • • • • • •

Heat the oven to 180°C. Crush the biscuits in a food processor (or put in a plastic bag and bash with a rolling pin). Mix with the butter. Press into a 20cm spring form tin and bake for five minutes, then cool. Beat the cream cheese with the flour, sugar, a few drops of vanilla, eggs, the yolk and soured cream until light and fluffy. Pour into the tin. Bake for 40 minutes and then check; it should be set but slightly wobbly in the centre. Leave in the tin to cool.

Chocolate sauce • • • •

Mix 150ml milk with the sifted cocoa powder to form a smooth paste. Heat the remaining milk with the sugar and the cream and bring to a boil. Remove from the heat and whisk into cocoa milk mixture, add the chocolate and whisk until smooth. Strain and leave to cool.


Reg No. 1993/004149/30

WORKING WITH YOU TO KEEP YOUR LUGGAGE SAFE Airlines and airports all over the world are faced with the challenge of processing passenger luggage in a secure and efficient manner, and it is one that Airports Company South Africa and its airport stakeholders continually strive to improve. It is for this reason that Airports Company South Africa works closely with the South African Police Service and other security agencies, airlines and baggage handling companies to improve the general processing and security of luggage.

As a traveller, you can also contribute to reducing the number of mishandled bags by following a few simple tips:

Luggage that is delayed, lost, damaged or pilfered and recorded as such by the airline on behalf of the passenger, is then treated as a ‘mishandled luggage’ claim. The global average for mishandled bags is 12 per 1 000 processed and the International Air Transportation Association (IATA) has set a target for stakeholders worldwide to reduce this to four bags per 1 000.

Over the past few years, as a result of various Airports Company South Africa-led initiatives, there has been a marked decline in the number of mishandled bags. By way of example, O.R. Tambo International Airport processes about 23 000 outbound bags a day, and there has been a reduction in ‘mishandled luggage’ from 18 per 1 000 in January 2010 to 0,24 per 1 000 in January 2012. As a component of ‘mishandled luggage’ the current daily average of pilfered bags at O.R. Tambo International Airport is 3,7 bags out of the 23 000 processed. This improvement is significant and Airports Company South Africa and other role players are committed to reducing it even further.

• • •

Familiarise yourself with your airline’s luggage insurance policy, regarding the categories of items covered as well as its claim policy and procedures. As advised by airlines, don’t place small, high-value items, such as cell phones, laptops, cameras or jewellery in your checked-in luggage. Lock your luggage and secure it properly as loose straps may get caught in the conveyor belt. Remove old bar-coded luggage routing tags. Arrive in good time for an early check-in. It reduces the chances of your luggage being left behind. Report any damaged, lost or pilfered luggage to your airline prior to leaving the airport.

www.airports.co.za


free | soul

Through the

grapevine Top wine choices from the country’s finest winemakers

The fine wine people of the south will share the grapes and gourmet glamour of the Stellenbosch Wine Routes with Jozi socialites in Stellenbosch at Summer Place in November. For one night only, the finest winemakers and chefs from the country’s premium wine region team up for a sophisticated celebration of all things epicurean. For more information contact Elmarie Rabe, 021 886 8275

gunter

Schultz, a winemaker at Kleinood Farm – home of Tamboerskloof wines, is passionate about life and exceptionally so when it comes to the art of winemaking. He believes in a holistic approach and that a good wine is made in the vineyard. He communicates this belief and his passion for the wine to every member of his team through his technical expertise as well as his hands-on attitude in the vineyards, the orchards and the winery.

and old-style winemaking techniques take care of designing our unique hand-crafted wine. The wine was then fermented in 500-litre French oak barrels for 20 months prior to release and has a cellaring potential of six years. “I love this wine for its dark ruby plum colour and intense dark red berry flavours on the palate initially, followed by hints of pepper, chocolate, spice and florals,” explained Schultz. “It has an inviting, complex nose and shows rich full entry on the palate with heaps of berry fruit flavours.” The Tamboerskloof Syrah 2007 pairs very well with chicken livers, venison and wintery meat and roasted vegetable dishes.

Schultz’s three favourite wines all hail from the Stellenbosch area. His favourite red is the Tamboerskloof Syrah 2007 from Kleinood farm. The other two are both white wines – the Eleanor Chardonnay 2008 from Hartenberg estate and the Thelema Rhine Riesling.

The grapes for this particular Riesling were picked on 19 February 2010, de-stalked, crushed and allowed 12 hours of skin contact before being pressed, settled and fermented in stainless steel tanks. There was no wood maturation. Schultz added: “I particularly enjoy this Riesling, made in the German style for the fragrant, spicy nose, the low alcohol and the slightly sweeter than normal finish on the palate. The fact that 2010 was one of the more difficult vintages in recent years with warm spells of weather and random rainy periods during the ripening period could be the reason for the complexity and flavoursome nose and palate. I enjoy the Thelema Rhine Riesling with spicy curries, bobotie and chicken or duck salads.”

Tamboerskloof Syrah 2007 The Tamboerskloof 2007 contains 90% Shiraz, 7% Mouvèdre and 3% Viognier. The vines were six years old at the time of harvesting during March 2007. The hand-picked grapes were sorted three times before going into the stainless steel fermenters, where a combination of modern technology

Thelema Rhine Riesling 2010

Eleanor Chardonnay 2008 The Eleanor Chardonnay 2008, made by Carl Schultz, has hints of creamy citrus, nutty, mineral, elderflower and quince flavours. These create a wonderful depth of flavour, refreshing acidity and an enduring viscous finish. The Eleanor Chardonnay should be enjoyed with scallops, slow roasted pork belly or steamed West Coast crayfish with a lemon butter sauce.

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Text and Photography | Supplied


free | mind

For the

good of our

future

One organisation is making great strides to protect the continent’s predators

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The warning signs are there. Africa’s wildlife is under threat. Truth be told, conservationists have been telling us for years about the seriousness of the situation. Now, with an ever-growing human population, diminishing forests and a spike in poaching, it has become even more critical that we save our continent’s wildlife from extinction. Fortunately, there is hope thanks to organisations such as the African Predator Conservation Research Organisation (APCRO).

APCRO is a non-profit predator research organisation, founded by Dr Mike Briggs and Beth Ament, to consolidate the efforts of a group of researchers committed to the conservation and investigation of Africa’s most critically threatened and endangered predators. It focuses on predator research from a veterinary perspective, in particular lion, spotted hyena, cheetah, leopard, the highly endangered African wild dog as well as the two species of the ubiquitous jackal found in southern Africa. Research conducted by APCRO has a heavy slant towards results that can be used by conservation managers in the short- to medium-term to better manage these endangered predators that are becoming increasingly isolated. Initial work is concentrated in Botswana, specifically the Okavango Delta area, as these populations are still large enough to be self-sustaining. These results can then be compared with the isolated and smaller populations in other regions.

Dr Michael Briggs is the Principal Investigator and co-founder of APCRO and has been performing carnivore research projects in southern Africa since 1987. Briggs has been leading APCRO work in Botswana since 2004. He is based near Chicago and is a world specialist in dolphin medicine too. Beth Ament is the co-founder, executive administrator and veterinary technician for APCRO and has been doing carnivore research since 2004

Experts and experience APCRO’s research is veterinary-led and consequently focuses on the detection of potential pathogens and evaluating how the animals are coping with exposure to different diseases. It is interested in determining disease exposure as well as disease transmission to other carnivores. At the same time, APCRO also evaluates confounding factors such as inbreeding, stress and nutrition, which links closely with its second major focus which is the genetic analysis of the species.

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APCRO’s research provides conservation managers with valuable insight about Africa’s endangered predators

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Conservation managers wish to better understand the role of genetics in the big picture. In this context APCRO looks at the entire continent of Africa. It studies animals’ historic migration patterns, local and the broad-range genetic variability, potential unique sub-speciation and lineage. All of these factors must be understood to determine the current health status of the predators as well as planning future translocations and management movements of small groups to either repopulate or save a group of problem animals. Already APCRO’s findings have yielded some interesting discoveries about predator behaviour. Results from some genetic work done in collaboration with Namibian based researchers showed that more than 50% of lion cubs born into stable prides were not sired by the pride males. This result casts doubt about the old school of thought about lion prides. Questions can now be asked about the previously assumed reasons for these rigid pride structures and the genetic models used in isolated population management. Even the teaching of zoology needs to accommodate these results. This research is complex and multi-disciplinary and involves multiple scientists, researchers and conservationists from diverse backgrounds and specialties. Work with the animals includes field immobilisations followed by physical examinations, parasite evaluation, genetic analysis, reproductive potential analysis, pathological examinations when needed, as well as complete nutritional analysis of their blood. APCRO also incorporates the use of high-tech satellite collars to track movements of targeted group members, nomadic male lions and translocated individuals. It’s only when researchers look at all other carnivores in the same environment that they are able to make factual statements about the animal’s health, genetics and inter-species disease transmission. In August this year, the APCRO team visited Maun, Botswana with the generous support of Airlink. The team carried specialist equipment to undertake several weeks of crucial fieldwork. This work involved recovering several auto-release tracking collars from the remote Kwando and Selinda concessions, as well as taking additional samples from all predator species and then relocating 600km to the remote Tamafupa region adjacent to Zimbabwe. In the Tamafupa concession, adjacent to Hwange Park, the team aim to fit more satellite collars to the larger predators and collect more sample data from all predators. It is hoped that the results of the project will further help the fight to save endangered predators Learn more about APCRO’s work at www.apcro.org. Text and photography | Supplied


panorama

Standing the test of time

This lone structure is the Burana Tower, a large minaret in the Chuy Valley in northern Kyrgyzstan. The tower, along with grave markers, some earthworks and the remnants of a castle and three mausoleums, is all that remains of the ancient city of Balasagun, which was established by the Karakhanids at the end of the 9th century. It was originally 45m high. However, over the centuries a number of earthquakes caused significant damage to the structure, reducing it to its current height of 25m.

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pastures Agro-processing is key for small-scale farmers

why

is it that so-called ‘emerging farmers’ do not emerge? Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Tina Joemat-Pettersson, has said many times that previously disadvantaged farmers cannot keep on ‘emerging’ and so has changed the terminology in our policy debate to ‘resource-poor, small-scale farmers’. Irrespective of the name, the question is valid – why do we not see proper transformation of smaller-scale farmers into more commercially successful farmers? The answer to this question is neither simple nor onedimensional. It is also not unique to South Africa. Margin pressures are forcing farmers to maximise scale, so small-scale farming is under threat. But why do we see remarkable successes in small-scale farming in other countries, such as India? The market, driven by the retail sector in the form of large supermarket groups, is actually highly instrumental in facilitating dualism in the agricultural value chain. It is interesting that India only recently allowed larger global supermarket groups into its economy. The market is also not addressing the racially divided nature of the sector, which struggles to facilitate

real cooperation between small- and large-scale farmers. What’s more, government failure is also partially to blame. Although South Africa has some sophistication in its agricultural policy environment, we struggle to implement policies derived from world best practices to turn small-scale farmers into commercial farmers. We struggle to channel the assistance to where it is required. Case Studies of Emerging Farmers and Agribusinesses, a book edited by Edward Mabaya, Krisztina Tihanyi, Mohammed Karaan and Johan van Rooyen, makes it clear that the few successful case studies are not really driven by government policy; rather, they are driven by private sector initiatives. Various incentives and schemes struggle to sustainably facilitate transformation. Simply put, small-scale farmers need access to markets, skills and finance. In the decades before the 1990s, the agricultural cooperative, under a single marketing channel coupled with support from the Land Bank, made it possible for small-scale farmers to get this support. But since market liberalisation, the co-operative movement has struggled to give this comprehensive support to emerging farmers. Very few co-operatives are successful in this regard under the current deregulated market regime. The ownership structure of the corporatised agribusinesses also does not allow for interventions to support large-scale commercialisation.

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margins. It is therefore to the private sector’s benefit to increase volumes. However, to engage with small-scale farmers comes at a cost to agro-processors, so their natural inclination is rather to source from large suppliers or commodity exchanges. The question is, how can the government play a role in reducing the cost to processors so that they reach out to nearby farmers? Can the government pay for extension officers to provide access to skills? How can financial institutions utilise these institutions (processors) to facilitate credit (or typical voorskot en agterskot facilities)? Policy should not only focus on the internationalisation and competitiveness of the agro-processing sector; it also needs to pay attention to the creation of jobs and improved access for small and medium enterprises. Incentives should be developed to bring agro-processors into the push to commercialise small-scale farmers. Policy and incentives need to be focused on pro-poor and pro-rural agro-industrialisation.

Progress in motion

Small-scale farmers are an important spoke in South Africa’s agricultural sector

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A winning solution There is a school of thought that agro-processing has been neglected as a highly effective tool to facilitate transformation in agriculture. South Africa has about 7,000 agro-processing businesses. These are dominated by a few large, diversified majors and their profit margins are continuously under pressure, but they are distributed across the country and operate in specific commodity value chains. Most importantly, they source raw material – from farmers, commodity exchanges and imports – and they operate on commercially sustainable premises. Agro-processors are therefore in a unique position to help small-scale farmers become commercially successful. They can provide market access, extension support and can be a conduit for finance to these farmers. This is an institutional delivery mechanism for the government that can be to the mutual benefit of the government and the private sector agro-processor. Agro-industrialisation should be linked to resourcepoor small-scale farmers, to maximise its potential impact on rural South Africa. We need to have specific initiatives that will facilitate the linkage between agroprocessors and these farmers. Processing is often a volume game. South Africa’s abattoir sector is running significantly below optimal capacity and more livestock is required to improve

The Industrial Development Corporation’s R100-million Agro-Processing Linkage Scheme (APL) incentivises agro-processors to source raw material directly from resource-poor farmers. This creates direct linkages between agro-processors and resource-poor farmers through mechanisms such as contract farming. Recently, a sugar milling company was struggling with a reduced cane supply to the mill, as maintenance and replanting had decreased yields and some fields were being left fallow. Drought, urbanisation, low global sugar prices and a strong rand were also hurting the business. The company buys cane from both small-scale and commercial growers based on long-term supply agreements, as it does not own any farmland. The IDC approved a facility under the APL scheme for on-lending to growers to replant fallow cane fields. The facility will help over 30 growers replant almost 7,000 hectares of cane. It will also ensure that industrial capacity is maintained at the mill through the increased production of cane, improve the mill’s profitability and so provide dividend income to the grower shareholder base. As the planting and harvesting of cane is still primarily done by hand, an estimated 650 new permanent and annualised seasonal jobs will be created. By assisting agro-processors and incentivising them to play a bigger role in small-scale farmer procurement and support, the government and market failures associated with transforming ‘emerging’ farmers can be addressed. Text | Rian Coetzee Photography | Shutterstock


sky | boutique

Distinguished gentleman Display your reputation and status with cufflinks It’s been said that you can tell the style of a man by his apparel. And although somewhat understated, cufflinks are an ideal way to set you apart from the rest of the crowd.

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The cufflink has always been associated with the upper echelon of most societies. This sign of high fashion and power has decorated the pharaohs of Egypt, noblemen of Greece and the modern high powered executives of Wall Street.

The modern cufflink history starts with the 17th century monarch King Charles II, who had a flair for both form and function. In those days a highly fashionable man would wear shirts with lacy fronts and cuffs. A ribbon was used to tie the cuff closed around the wrist. But King Charles used an ornamental button to pin the cuff in his coat to show more of the lace in his shirt sleeve. Later on this method was modified and the ornamental buttons changed into modern cufflinks. Because the cufflink had to be made by hand by a jeweller, only men of wealth were able to afford them. With the Industrial Revolution, quantities of cufflinks


started to rise while the price began to fall. This allowed more men to begin purchasing mass produced cufflinks for a fraction of the cost. This new production method also brought us the fix back cufflink design. With the advent of buttoned shirts, cufflinks declined in popularity and today are mostly used for special occasions.

A man apart Today, cufflinks are available in various materials. There are gold cufflinks, silver cufflinks, platinum cufflinks, bronze cufflinks, and those made of wood, glass, plastic, and even bone. If budget is not a constraint, you can go for gold or silver cufflinks as these look rich and are suitable for all occasions. But if you don’t wish to spend much, cufflinks in simple metals, studded with semiprecious stones are also a good choice. With cufflinks available in a plethora of designs, deciding which would be the best cufflinks among all can be really difficult. Some of the popular designs and styles of cufflinks include square, rectangular, rhombus, circular, and hexagonal. These are the basic cufflink shapes and are suitable for all occasions. For those who prefer something unique, there are novelty cufflinks. If you are interested in novelty cufflinks, pick the ones that reflect your individuality or hobbies. For example, if you are an avid golfer, golf shaped cufflinks would be the best for you to tell the whole world your passion and love for the particular sport. In addition, one can have bespoke cufflinks made which send out a message of individuality. Quality should be an equally important concern if you wish to buy the best cufflinks. Whether you buy silver cufflinks, gold cufflinks, or simple metal cufflinks, they should be genuine and long lasting. The stones or gems that are studded on the cufflinks or the initials engraved on them should not come out. The best cufflinks are durable and last for several years.

Buyer’s guide The first step in choosing a cufflink is deciding on the colour. If you have shirts that are warmer as well as earthier in colour, then you should buy brown, burgundy or titanium cufflinks. On the other hand, if you are looking for cufflinks for darker shirts like greens and blue then silver cufflinks would be the best option. To complement the colour of the shirt you have choices such as silver cufflinks, onyx cufflinks, titanium cufflinks, vintage cufflinks, and so on. Cufflinks come in different sizes as well as shapes. Select the right size and shape to go with your shirt as well as the occasion to which you intend to wear the cufflinks. For example, Paua shell cufflinks are the best

Did you know? • • • •

The Tour a’ Guilloche machine was the first machine with the ability to mass produce cufflinks in the 18th century. In the 1920s enamel cufflinks were the most popular and are a highly valued and collectible item today. The world’s largest cufflink museum is in Conway, New Hampshire, displaying over 70,000 pairs of cufflinks. The most expensive pair of cufflinks ever sold was at a high profile antique auction. The cufflinks sold for approximately R5,2 million and once belonged to King Edward VIII.

option for French cuff shirts while novelty cufflinks are great conversation starters and bone cufflinks are perfect for parties. Match cufflinks with the tie that you have planned to wear on the occasion. The dominating colour of your tie should match with the colour of your cufflinks – that’s the general statute. If you are considering wearing gold or silver cufflinks, select a matching wristwatch also. History shows us how important men’s cufflinks were and their importance in our wardrobe is still valid today. Whether you are looking for custom cufflinks with your initials, your name, or your company’s logo, or a pair of fabulous and classic cufflinks, they should be an intricate part of any man’s wardrobe. Text | Arno Visagie Photography | Shutterstock

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panorama

Tuning in A young performer prepares for his part in the Oruro Carnival in Bolivia. The festival has been declared an UNESCO Cultural World Heritage event. Each year, thousands of participants put on a colourful spectacle that includes traditional music and dance.

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free | mind

Roaring

King for the

A call to action to save our noble beast

already

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named for royalty, Cape Town’s V&A Waterfront is soon to extend its regal connections when it hosts one of the greatest monarchs of all – the King of the Jungle. For eight weeks in summer, a pride of lions will inhabit the Waterfront. But these lions are a little different – they’ll be resplendent in all-new coats that speak of artistic skill and imagination, while their statuesque forms will be the sculptured fibre-glass likeness of the real thing. It promises to be a colourful and entertaining display but also one with a serious purpose. As the living king’s ambassadors, the Pride of Cape Town’s mission is to protect Panthera Leo in the wild. How incongruous to think that the formidable lion needs guarding. However, the fact is that, like the rhino, free-roaming lions throughout our continent are in serious trouble, their numbers estimated at just 20,000. And as with the rhino, extinction in the wild is looking increasingly likely.


“The rate of decline has been devastatingly quick,” says Virginia McKenna, OBE and founder of the Born Free Foundation, the wildlife charity that, along with the V&A Waterfront and Shamwari Game Reserve, is behind the Cape Town campaign. “Statistics indicate that wild lion numbers collapsed by nearly 50% between 1980 and 2002.” In contrast, human population increase seems to know no bounds and herein lies part of the problem. Our relentless demand on the planet’s natural resources is devastating fragile ecosystems, fragmenting remaining wildernesses, and annihilating wildlife habitat like never before. For lions, this means not only reduced home ranges but also huge declines in numbers of natural prey species. Compounding this are revenge attacks on lions by communities in retaliation for livestock predation, and the indiscriminate use of poisons against predators. Then there’s the toll exacted by human vanity as expressed in trophy hunting (about 600 predominantly male wild lions are shot for ‘sport’ each year) and, now that bones of the nearly wiped-out tiger are in such short supply, the growing trade in lion body parts for the manufacture of bogus sex potions in Asia. These abhorrent activities plus that of ‘canned lion hunting’ almost certainly promote the perception among some that lions are expendable; a commodity to be exploited for high gain. And so the promise of rich rewards will also increasingly fuel rampant poaching of yet another of Africa’s emblematic animals. It all adds up to the bleakest scenario: of the 27 lion range states in Africa, half have 200 or fewer lions, a notable example being Nigeria where it is thought just 40 animals remain in two populations. The way things are going, these big cats may well be extinct in those countries within the next ten years or less. How soon before reports from other regions – ours included – carry such bad news? And after that, how soon before the once seemingly invincible lion is tossed entirely onto the rubbish heap of extinction? If that’s never to happen, our great king needs visionary champions. The Born Free charity, inspired by the classic movie that starred Virginia and her late husband Bill Travers, is among those leading the way. Projects include funding an eminent lion conservation

biologist to help governments in West and Central Africa (where lion populations are the most fragile) to draw up and implement lion conservation strategies, while in the Eastern Cape, once-captive big cats have been rehomed in the open spaces of the Shamwari Game Reserve. It’s well-conceived programmes such as these that will benefit from the Pride of Cape Town campaign. The idea is that businesses and other groups sponsor the lion sculptures. Professional artists, coordinated by Justine Nurse of Laugh Out Loud, will then paint the lions, transforming them into unique works of art that celebrate the creativity of Cape Town while also highlighting environmental imperatives and the plight of wild lions. Being held during the high summer season, the campaign will draw the attention of visitors from all over the world and it will culminate in a charity auction of the statues in May 2013, the net proceeds going to Born Free. In March this year another champion of wild animals added to the royal tone of the campaign. Founder of the

One of the Pride that will go on display at the V&A Waterfront in Cape Town in March 2013

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free | mind 1

2

3

British animal charity, Save Me, the silver-maned king of guitar and member of one of the greatest rock bands ever, Queen, Brian May appealed on behalf of lions by performing a moving new version of the Born Free theme along with another star, West End singer, Kerry Ellis. Upstaging them both though were the lions in a video that played out on a giant screen behind the stage. There were scenes of Elsa, the lioness made famous in the Born Free movie, and footage of others rescued from captivity and released into Shamwari. The most noble of animals, safe and free at last thanks to those who care. And what a lion that will be. Enrobed with pictures, messages and the names of many, it will be a proud symbol of ordinary people standing up and roaring for the king. Text | Andrea Abbott Photography | Andrea Abbott and Born Free Foundation

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5

From top: 1. Queen guitarist, Brian May and singing star, Kerry Ellis perform a new version of the Born Free theme while a video plays out scenes from the movie 2. Founder of the Born Free charity, Virginia McKenna appeals on behalf of lions at the launch of The Pride of Cape Town Campaign 3 . The Redbush Tea Lion 4. Sinbad, rescued by Born Free from a life of captivity, takes his first cautious steps to freedom at Shamwari some years ago 5. Sinbad pictured recently, relaxed and content in the sanctuary of Shamwari

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free | mind

The new

[ab]normal What people expect from your business will never be the same again

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over

the past issues of Skyways, I’ve identified key forces that are changing the rules for success and failure in all industries, sectors and every aspect of our lives: technology, demographic shifts and environmental issues cannot be underestimated right now. These forces are causing two very distinct types of changes, and are impacting how we need to lead and engage with other people too. Almost every industry is in the midst of a period of disruptive change where the old rules for success don’t seem to hold true. This is because many industries are currently experiencing deep structural changes, including changes to the nature of relationships, the means of producing profit, how organisations are structured internally, their risk profiles, where and how capital can be accessed, the basis for success – and failure – and the structure of the industry itself. In other words, we’re experiencing change everywhere simultaneously. Management guru, Kenichi Ohmae highlighted this in his 2005 book The Next Global Stage: “Over the last two decades, the world has changed substantially. The economic, political, social, corporate, and personal rules that now apply bear scant relation to those applicable two decades ago. Different times require a different script.” (my emphasis) The key to understanding this disruptive trend is that we are finally being forced to deal with the implications

of the shift from the industrial to the digital age. We should not be surprised that it has taken nearly half a century for the implications of this shift to be fully felt. It took longer than that for the industrial revolution of the first motor vehicles and steam trains to convert into the consumer economy epitomised by Henry Ford’s assembly line. But now we need a different script. There are four levels at which institutional change is happening: 1. Regulations – there is almost no industry that isn’t currently anticipating some form of regulatory change in the next few years. 2. Industry standards and norms – this is inherited wisdom that everyone in an industry or sector accepts as gospel. It’s hardly ever questioned. As we emerge from this recession I am suggesting two things: (1) that the rules have changed – not all of them, but enough of them to make your industry feel like an unfamiliar place, and (2) that competitors will question the rules and make changes that would have been unheard of just a few years ago. It would be better for you to be ahead of this curve, rather than behind it. 3. Your organisational structures – this is ‘how things are done around here’. There are multiple forces changing the workplace at the moment, including technology and social values that are increasingly

Dr Graeme Codrington is the director of TomorrowToday, a strategic insights consultancy, and is an author, speaker and international expert on the future of work. For more information, contact marilyn@ uniquespeakerbureau.com

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values, their dreams and aspirations, their expectations of what a good life looks like, their desires for their lives, work, families and careers are all changing, too. Many companies are hoping that we will soon get ‘back to normal’, but it isn’t going to happen. The downturn has been more than economic – it has served to catalyse many social, political and values changes that had already been underway, and will now change the world forever. One of the sad implications of this is that many people will feel threatened, and we’re likely to see a decade of protests. TIME magazine already made ‘the protestor’ the person of the year for 2011 – the protestor is likely to be the ‘the person of the decade’ when we look back in 2020. The next few years are not going to be easy for any of us as society around us changes dramatically.

Facing the future

Companies need a change in mindset in order to reap rewards in the future

demanding things like virtual working, flexible conditions, work from home options and the like. 4. Changes to professions and jobs – where workers in the manufacturing, mining and farming sectors were affected by the machine age, now professionals and service staff are being threatened by the information age. Youth unemployment is not just a factor of the recession, it is a long-term societal issue right now. Each industry will be affected differently, but there is no doubt that institutional change requires new thinking from you and your team. Our default reaction to such seismic change is to protect ourselves. This will happen in your industry too. But now would be a good time to go against the flow, and question the assumptions that threaten to constrain you and your competitors.

New definitions of normal

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The final ‘tide’ of change is shifting social values. If the previous four trends are changing the world as I have suggested, then it should not be surprising that people’s

In times like these, we really do need leaders with vision and an ability to inspire people to positive action. We’re going to have to guide people through some difficult, emotional and fear-inducing changes in how they live their lives. But, leaders with big, unifying, inspiring visions seem to be missing in action at the moment. This is partly because many leaders feel just as lost as the rest of us in this rapidly changing world. It’s also partly because their values, their abilities and their power base is rooted in a world that is rapidly disappearing. We need to make some changes. It's not just the shortterm challenges of the recent economic difficulties, but over a period of time, competition, the speed of change, globalisation and the technology that we've implemented have simply made business – and government, and society – more complicated. One of the ways that organisations have responded is to reduce layers of management and bureaucracy, passing responsibility and authority further down into our structures. We thus expect people at all levels to act with the type of understanding, critical thinking, initiative, agility and responsibility that just a decade or so ago were largely reserved for people in the executive suite. To be successful in the coming decade of turbulence and opportunity will require the involvement and commitment of everyone throughout your organisation. Use this framework of the tides of change to guide your formal meetings and informal conversations, and help focus your team on the forces that will disrupt your industry and change your market considerably. Success is not guaranteed – but this is a great starting point for making the most of turbulent times. Text | Dr Graeme Codrington Photography | Shutterstock


free | soul

I’ve lived a life that’s full. I’ve travelled each and ev’ry highway; But more, much more than this, I did it my way. Regrets, I’ve had a few; But then again, too few to mention. I did what I had to do And saw it through without exemption.

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No regrets A timeless classic that is all about you

“I’m quitting the business. I’m sick of it; I’m getting the hell out.” Frank Sinatra nearly gave up on what would become one of the greatest musical careers of all time. Fortunately, Old Blue Eyes never acted upon these words.


free | range

Mention his name to any music lover and an immediate connection to the 1969 hit, My Way, is made. Originally written by Paul Anka, the song’s lyrics tell the story of a man who, having grown old, reflects on his life as death approaches. He is happy with his mortality, and takes responsibility for how he dealt with all the challenges of life while maintaining a respectable degree of integrity. Could it be the lyrics of this classic song that transcended it into popularity, or maybe there truly is a science behind creating a number one hit? “Not only does his music define the time and temper of the American decades in which it was made, but his singing moves those songs out of time into something indistinct, everlasting. In Sinatra’s music, there is no past tense.You could say he was the greatest, and that’s right,” added Anka after watching a performance of the song. Anka penned the song in the wee hours of the morning. He sat down at an old IBM electric typewriter and thought,“If Frank were writing this, what would he say?”Anka explained further: “I read a lot of periodicals, and I noticed everything was ‘my this’ and ‘my that’. We were in the ‘me generation’ and Frank became the guy for me to use to say that. I used words I would never use. But that’s the way he talked. I used to be around steam rooms with the Rat Pack guys – they liked to talk like Mob guys, even though they would have been scared

of their own shadows.” And so, Anka created a number one hit. Frank Sinatra recorded his version of My Way on 30 December 1968 and it was released the following year. It went on to reach No. 27 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, and No. 2 on the Easy Listening chart in the US. In the UK, the single achieved a still unmatched record of the recording with the most weeks spent in the Top 40, with 75 weeks from April 1969 to September 1971. No doubt that My Way triggered strong emotional reactions from listeners all over the world and that these emotions lead to the song’s rise in popularity and ultimately, success in the charts. But what exactly triggers an emotional reaction when listening to a song? Perhaps it is the song’s lyrics and the listener’s relation to them; the tempo and melody; duration; chord progression; sequence structure and subjective criteria such as ‘energy’ and ‘danceability’? Or perhaps a perfect combination of all of these key characteristics? This is a song of individuality and aspiration, so perhaps there could also be a scientific explanation for why it has triggered such strong emotional reactions despite the rather pedestrian lyrics and somewhat silly rhymes. The song starts with a rising sixth progression, which indicates striving. It builds in intensity and powers to a big finish, which Sinatra could really sell with his declaration, ‘I did it my way’. Whether it comes across as arrogant or inspirational, at the end of the day it was Anka’s musical genius and Sinatra’s talent that created a song that has stood the test of time. Text | Mariska van Wyk Photography | Shutterstock

My Way is one of the most requested funeral songs in the UK. It has a timeless appeal – the words sum up what so many people feel about their lives and how they would like their loved ones to remember them. The song is a popular karaoke song, but one you should probably avoid in the Philippines. As detailed in a 6 February 2010 article in the New York Times, many violent incidents have taken place following Karaoke performances of My Way. Some of the many artists to record this song include Aretha Franklin, Tom Jones, Dionne Warwick, and Andy Williams.

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free | soul

The Land Within By Alistair Morgan

Morgan’s second novel traces the deep connections between tragedy and love, regret and longing. After an unexpected request from his father, Henry Knott returns to the Karoo farm on which he spent a fractured childhood. Painful memories force him to revisit a tragedy in which he was fatefully implicated. Henry has to come to terms with how this event has shaped his adult life, his marriage and the conflicted emotions he feels towards the place of his birth.

✶✶✶✶✶

BOOKS

Redeeming the past By Father Michael Lapsley Redeeming the past is a fascinating and inspirational memoir about an antiapartheid activist who, in 1990, lost both his hands and an eye when a letter bomb addressed to him exploded. Lapsley’s intriguing personal life story of healing, forgiveness and reconciliation promises to inspire and encourage readers across all spectrums of life.

The Extraordinary Book of South African Golf By Michael Vlismas

This is a must-read for any golf fanatic. Drawing from years of experience as a sports and golf journalist, Michael Vlismas has put together a fascinating collection of trivia,

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In the book Lapsley recounts what led up to the horrendous event that changed his life forever and speaks passionately about the healing work he has been doing through the Institute for Healing of Memories in South Africa and in many other countries for almost two decades. The book includes a foreword by Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu and a score of endorsements from well-known public figures such as Nelson Mandela, Danny Glover and Nadine Gordimer.

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quotes, amazing scores, hilarious anecdotes and behind-the-scenes tales from South African golf. This extraordinary book of South African golf trivia contains captivating stories such as: the Vervet monkeys who hijacked the TV crew during a major tournament; the South African golf club that is famous for its snakes; Jaco van Zyl winning the SA PGA championship from a rose bed; and the holein-one prize that nobody wanted to win.

✶✶✶✶✶

The rough guide to surviving the end of the world By Paul Parsons This book is a light-hearted yet well-informed look at threats to the very existence of life on Earth, how we might be able to deal with them and – if things go truly, horribly wrong – how we might just be able to survive. Parsons examines scenarios ranging from megafloods to space radiation, super-volcanoes to bio-engineering and what you should do when the going gets tough. Along the way, we meet some of the less well-trodden paths to oblivion, including the possibility that the human race will be gripped by mass stupidity and the outrageous idea that life on Earth could all be one giant Matrix-style computer simulation – which one day its creators might decide to switch off.

✶✶✶✶✶


microlite


free | mind

Making your home

your business Your property could be your next meal ticket

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despite

reports of an increasingly stable economy, many South Africans continue to feel the pinch of the recent recession. While the road to full recovery is likely to be long, property owners have an opportunity to soften their financial burden by turning their homes into businesses. Running a bed & breakfast (B&B) can be both a rewarding and profitable endeavour, and, with the country’s tourism industry’s continued growth, could represent a pivotal financial lifeline for property owners looking to supplement their incomes. However, before you start renovating your unused garden flat or garage to make way for visitors, take a moment to consider what turning your home into a business actually entails.

Knowledge is power It’s not easy to cut it in the hospitality industry and venturing into it shouldn’t be a decision made without appropriate research and planning; the working hours and the reality of dealing with clients in your home on a consistent basis can be exhausting. In addition to this, it entails being a business owner and as such requires careful consideration regarding staffing, marketing and financial management. Get advice from the B&B industry, and ensure that you’ve thoroughly evaluated all the pros and cons of the lifestyle before embarking on your new business venture. Setting up a successful B&B isn’t something that can happen overnight. So before you start thinking about what colour to paint the walls, it’s important that you first assess the viability of your burgeoning business. Like all new ventures, your B&B will stand a far greater chance of success with a solid business plan in place. So take time to closely consider the financial implications of such a venture, taking into account all the expenses you might incur through renovations and furnishing, as well as general overheads and marketing costs which are ongoing and can be easily neglected in viability calculations. Depending on the number of guests you’re looking to accommodate, you’ll also need to make provisions for additional resources like cooking and cleaning staff. Unless you’re located in a very small town, it’s also likely that you’ll be competing against a number of wellestablished businesses for clientele. By conducting a thorough appraisal of other similar establishments in the area, you’ll not only get a better understanding of market rates, but will also be able to recognise ways in which you can differentiate your offering.

Invest in success While a B&B can be set up relatively inexpensively utilising existing space and resources, your chances of success will be far greater should you choose to invest additional capital in appropriate on-site facilities. Given the modest profit margins traditionally associated with this type of enterprise, many aspiring entrepreneurs tend to make the mistake of cutting corners, providing limited amenities and low-quality breakfasts in order to minimise overhead costs. It’s important to remember that you’ll be able to charge higher rates by providing an improved level of service, and while conveniences like en suite bathrooms and additional parking space might seem like unnecessary expenses, they could end up helping you to reap additional profit down the line. The most successful B&Bs are those that are able to capitalise on repeat visitors. By going the extra mile to provide a high-quality offering, you’ll be far more likely to ensure that your guests return time and again. Remember that your B&B is, first and foremost, a business operation, and as such, you’ll need to ensure that you’ve notified relevant authorities and filled in all necessary paperwork before opening your doors to the public. You’ll also be well-advised to check your local by-laws with respect to signage and permissible noise levels, so as to ensure you don’t run into any issues with local authorities. Make sure to have your plans approved by your local Town Planning Department before making any building alterations, and to register your business with the regional services council. Whether you choose to run your B&B as a company or simply as a sole proprietorship, there will be legal consequences, and you will need to make sure that you are registered with SARS and submit annual tax returns. Depending on your circumstances, if your annual turnover is less than R1,000,000, you should consider registering for Turnover Tax. However, if your turnover exceeds R1,000, 000, you will be required to register for VAT which will also mean that VAT amounts will have to be reflected on your guests’ bills and be paid to SARS. Setting up a B&B is not as easy an undertaking as many would have you believe, but with the appropriate planning, foresight and attitude, it can end up being a highly profitable and thoroughly rewarding exercise. In tough financial times, capitalising on your property investment in order to create an additional income stream is a savvy decision, and could reap significant dividends down the line. Text | JP Farinha, Property 24 Photography | Fred Johnson

Got a few spare rooms? Why not get into the hospitality industry?

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free | range

time A stitch in

A paradigm shift is needed to get the most out of your day

whether

you are a business owner, an employee or anything in between, at some time or another you have probably run across the following scenario. You start your day at 8am, and look at your to-do list. It seems about a hundred kilometres long, but you are confident, since you started the day early. Well, you know what they say about the early bird, right? So, you roll-up your proverbial sleeves, and get to work.

Next thing you know, it’s 5pm. You review your todo list and start checking off your completed tasks. You look with anticipation only to find that you completed a whopping two – count them – two tasks off of your hundred-plus task list. How on earth did that happen? Where did the day go? Perhaps you need better time management skills. The real question to ask is actually what did you do with your day? That’s the first thing we need to address here. Everyone on the planet has the same 24 hours in a day. No one can add or subtract even a second from that allotted amount of time. So talking about ‘time management’ is actually a misuse of the terms. There is no way to manage time. Time will always be the same:

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60 seconds in a minute, 60 minutes in a hour, 24 hours in a day, 365 days in a year. That will not change, no matter what you do.

It begins with you The real concept to work on, and the skill to develop, is how to manage yourself in time. In other words, how will you behave within the amount of time that you are given so that it is best utilised and your productivity increases? Therein lie the secrets to time management and that is what we will look at in the next few paragraphs. The first step is to review the idea of planning your day. You should at the very least have a to-do list that you create and check on a daily basis. Most people do that much. They sit down and jot down a quick list of the things they wish to accomplish that day. Well, that is not planning, that is just wishing. It is no different from a child’s letter to Santa Claus! Planning involves a set goal and clear priorities. In fact, you should plan differently for your business or work than you do for your family and personal goals. They should not be on the same to-do list. That being said, your first task is to sit down and determine what your goal for the month is. What do you see happening in your business within the next 30 days? Now, be aggressive, but also be realistic. After all, you are only human. Once that is established, break it down into specific, measurable tasks that need to be completed in order for that monthly goal to be achieved. Then, from that list of tasks create your weekly and daily lists of specific activities.


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How far in advance are you thinking when you plan your activities for the day? Do you plan your actions based on what will make you the happiest during that day, within the hour, or in the next five minutes? If you find yourself planning your work based on what will make you happy in this moment, or making no plan at all, you suffer from short-term perspective. Managing your time with shortterm perspective leaves you to be governed by whatever feels best at the moment.

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It’s all about priorities The next step is to reduce your to-do list to a manageable task check list. How? Look at your daily list with an honest and clear perspective and divide the tasks into four categories. First, figure out which things are not really all that important, or no longer relevant. Those you can just cross off. Next, decide which things you can delegate to others to do for you. Delegating is not only acceptable, but it is actually the mark of a true leader. Of course, make sure it’s a dependable person, and follow up to make sure the delegated tasks got completed. However, it is one less thing for you to have to worry about. Then come those things which will not make much of a difference if they are not done right away. This is not procrastination or putting things off, but there are some things you can honestly put back on the monthly to-do list without greatly affecting the end result. Whatever’s left should be relevant, do or die, result-driven tasks. This is your new checklist and it should really not have more than five or six items. Finally, remove all distractions and potential interruptions. If you are working from home, make sure your work area is clean and clutter-free before sitting

down to work. If you are at the office, clear the mail bin and your inbox first thing. Assign a set amount of time to deal with whatever seems to get in the way of you and your productivity. Once that time is over, don’t go back to it until your task list is completely checked off, or until the next day. If you are having a hard time identifying your distracters, take time to do an inventory of everything you do. Keep a list of the tasks you engage in, and an approximate amount of time you spend doing them. At the end, go back and look at what has been consuming your time. You might be shocked to see how many times you wandered off to the restroom, or how many times in a day you actually checked your inbox. Manage those distractions by scheduling them into your day. They will become a lot more manageable. Start implementing these actions and it is highly likely that the time it takes you to complete your tasks is significantly reduced. Make them a habit, so they become automatic. You will love all the ‘extra time’ you have at the end of the day. Text | Arno Visagie Photography | Shutterstock


the magazine that surprises...

Available in print, online, on mobile and iPad www.braintainment.co.za The latest issue of Braintainment magazine is available now on Zinio or at all good newsagents and supermarkets near you.


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sky | cafe

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REAL AFRICA REAL CLOSE TO CAPE TOWN

81 10 12


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Skyways - JBL2012-Oct 30 August 2012 10:26:12 AM

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82 10 12

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83

10 12


TIMETABLE effective 01 OCTOBER 2012

F L I G H T S – Domestic FLIGHT

ROUTE

DEPARTURE

ARRIVAL

FREQUENCY

AIRCRAFT

OPERATED BY

When planning your next flight, for business or pleasure, this flight schedule will come in handy. Take this FREE copy of Skyways with you.

Cape Town - George - Cape Town SA8621

Cape Town

-

George

07:15

08:05

1 2 3 4 5

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8625

Cape Town

-

George

09:30

10:20

6

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8639

Cape Town

-

George

13:30

14:20

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8635

Cape Town

-

George

16:45

17:40

1 2 3 4 5 7

AR8

Airlink

SA8622

George

-

Cape Town

08:30

09:20

1 2 3 4 5

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8630

George

-

Cape Town

10:45

11:35

6

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8638

George

-

Cape Town

14:45

15:35

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8636

George

-

Cape Town

18:10

19:05

1 2 3 4 5 7

AR8

Airlink

Cape Town - Kimberley - Cape Town SA8617

Cape Town

-

Kimberley

16:30

18:05

1 2 3 4 5 7

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8618

Kimberley

-

Cape Town

18:30

20:05

1 2 3 4 5 7

ERJ - 135

Airlink

Cape Town - Nelspruit - Cape Town SA8663

Cape Town

-

Nelspruit

10:00

12:35

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

AR8

Airlink

SA8664

Nelspruit

-

Cape Town

13:15

15:55

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

AR8

Airlink

Cape Town - Upington - Cape Town SA8645

Cape Town

-

Upington

09:45

11:05

1 2 3 4 5 7

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8646

Upington

-

Cape Town

11:30

12:50

1 2 3 4 5 7

ERJ - 135

Airlink

Durban - Bloemfontein - Durban SA8531

Durban

-

Bloemfontein

06:50

07:55

1 2 3 4 5

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8533

Durban

-

Bloemfontein

13:40

14:45

1 2 3 4 5

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8535

Durban

-

Bloemfontein

15:15

16:40

7

J41

Airlink

SA8537

Durban

-

Bloemfontein

16:30

17:35

1 2 3 4 5

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8532

Bloemfontein

-

Durban

08:15

09:15

1 2 3 4 5

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8534

Bloemfontein

-

Durban

15:05

16:05

1 2 3 4 5

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8536

Bloemfontein

-

Durban

17:30

18:35

7

J41

Airlink

SA8538

Bloemfontein

-

Durban

18:00

19:00

1 2 3 4 5

ERJ - 135

Airlink

Durban - George - Durban SA8515

Durban

-

George

09:40

11:30

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8514

George

-

Durban

11:50

13:15

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ERJ - 135

Airlink

Durban - Nelspruit - Durban SA8507

Durban

-

Nelspruit

06:45

08:05

1 2 3 4 5

J41

Airlink

SA8503

Durban

-

Nelspruit

13:45

15:05

1 2 3 4 5

J41

Airlink

SA8508

Nelspruit

-

Durban

08:25

09:45

1 2 3 4 5

J41

Airlink

SA8504

Nelspruit

-

Durban

15:25

16:45

1 2 3 4 5

J41

Airlink

SA8510

Nelspruit

-

Durban

17:35

18:35

7

J41

Airlink

Johannesburg - Nelspruit - Johannesburg SA8823

Johannesburg

-

Nelspruit

06:30

07:20

1 2 3 4 5

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8827

Johannesburg

-

Nelspruit

09:00

09:50

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8843

Johannesburg

-

Nelspruit

10:00

10:55

1 2 3 5 6

J41

Airlink

SA8841

Johannesburg

-

Nelspruit

11:10

11:55

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

AR8

Airlink

SA8845

Johannesburg

-

Nelspruit

15:30

16:15

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

AR8

Airlink

SA8829

Johannesburg

-

Nelspruit

16:25

17:15

7

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8849

Johannesburg

-

Nelspruit

17:30

18:20

1 2 3 4 5

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8824

Nelspruit

-

Johannesburg

07:50

08:45

1 2 3 4 5

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8828

Nelspruit

-

Johannesburg

10:10

11:05

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8842

Nelspruit

-

Johannesburg

13:35

14:25

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

AR8

Airlink

SA8830

Nelspruit

-

Johannesburg

15:05

16:00

7

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8846

Nelspruit

-

Johannesburg

16:40

17:30

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

AR8

Airlink

SA8844

Nelspruit

-

Johannesburg

17:30

18:35

1 2 3 5 6

J41

Airlink

SA8848

Nelspruit

-

Johannesburg

18:45

19:40

1 2 3 4 5

ERJ - 135

Airlink

Johannesburg - Phalaborwa - Johannesburg SA8851

Johannesburg

-

Phalaborwa

06:25

07:35

1 2 3 4

J41

Airlink

SA8853

Johannesburg

-

Phalaborwa

11:45

12:55

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

J41

Airlink

SA8857

Johannesburg

-

Phalaborwa

16:10

17:20

1 2 3 4 5 7

J41

Airlink

SA8852

Phalaborwa

-

Johannesburg

08:00

09:20

1 2 3 4

J41

Airlink

SA8854

Phalaborwa

-

Johannesburg

13:15

14:35

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

J41

Airlink

SA8858

Phalaborwa

-

Johannesburg

17:50

19:10

1 2 3 4 5 7

J41

Airlink

Golf Bags: 1 bag at 15kg free baggage allowance – golf bags must be pre booked with your booking agent.

84 10 12


TIMETABLE effective 01 OCTOBER 2012

F L I G H T S – Domestic FLIGHT

ROUTE

DEPARTURE

ARRIVAL

FREQUENCY

AIRCRAFT

OPERATED BY

SA8801

Johannesburg

-

Polokwane

06:35

07:25

1 2 3 4 5

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8809

Johannesburg

-

Polokwane

11:40

12:40

1 2 3 4 5 6

J41

Airlink

SA8809

Johannesburg

-

Polokwane

11:40

12:30

7

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8817

Johannesburg

-

Polokwane

13:15

14:05

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8815

Johannesburg

-

Polokwane

17:05

17:55

1 2 3 4 5 7 ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8802

Polokwane

-

Johannesburg

07:55

08:50

1 2 3 4 5

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8810

Polokwane

-

Johannesburg

13:00

14:05

1 2 3 4 5 6

J41

Airlink

SA8810

Polokwane

-

Johannesburg

13:00

13:55

7

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8818

Polokwane

-

Johannesburg

14:25

15:20

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8816

Polokwane

-

Johannesburg

18:15

19:10

1 2 3 4 5 7

ERJ - 135

Airlink

Johannesburg - Pietermaritzburg - Johannesburg SA8747

Johannesburg

-

Pietermaritzburg

07:00

08:00

1 2 3 4 5

AR8

Airlink

SA8735

Johannesburg

-

Pietermaritzburg

09:50

11:10

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

J41

Airlink

SA8741

Johannesburg

-

Pietermaritzburg

15:30

16:30

1 2 3 4 5 7

AR8

Airlink

SA8739

Johannesburg

-

Pietermaritzburg

18:00

19:00

1 2 3 4 5 7

AR8

Airlink

SA8730

Pietermaritzburg

-

Johannesburg

06:45

07:45

1 2 3 4 5

AR8

Airlink

SA8732

Pietermaritzburg

-

Johannesburg

08:30

09:30

1 2 3 4 5 6

AR8

Airlink

SA8738

Pietermaritzburg

-

Johannesburg

15:00

16:25

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

J41

Airlink

SA8742

Pietermaritzburg

-

Johannesburg

17:00

18:00

1 2 3 4 5 7

AR8

Airlink

Johannesburg - Upington - Johannesburg SA8767

Johannesburg

-

Upington

09:20

10:50

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8769

Johannesburg

-

Upington

15:45

17:15

1 2 3 4 5 7

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8768

Upington

-

Johannesburg

11:15

12:50

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8770

Upington

-

Johannesburg

17:35

19:10

1 2 3 4 5 7

ERJ - 135

Airlink

Port Elizabeth - East London - Port Elizabeth SA8480

Port Elizabeth

-

East London

07:00

07:45

1 2 3 4 5

J41

Airlink

SA8488

Port Elizabeth

-

East London

16:30

17:15

1 2 3 4 5

J41

Airlink

SA8481

East London

-

Port Elizabeth

08:05

08:55

1 2 3 4 5

J41

Airlink

SA8489

East London

-

Port Elizabeth

17:35

18:25

1 2 3 4 5

J41

Airlink

Port Elizabeth - Bloemfontein - Port Elizabeth SA8491

Port Elizabeth

-

Bloemfontein

09:15

10:45

1 4

J41

Airlink

SA8492

Bloemfontein

-

Port Elizabeth

12:10

13:45

1 4

J41

Airlink

Johannesburg - Mthatha - Johannesburg SA8751

Johannesburg

-

Mthatha

06:15

07:20

1 2 3 4 5

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8753

Johannesburg

-

Mthatha

08:20

09:25

6

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8755

Johannesburg

-

Mthatha

16:05

17:10

1 2 3 4 5 7

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8752

Mthatha

-

Johannesburg

07:45

09:00

1 2 3 4 5

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8754

Mthatha

-

Johannesburg

09:45

11:00

6

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8756

Mthatha

-

Johannesburg

17:30

18:45

1 2 3 4 5 7

ERJ - 135

Airlink

F L I G H T S – Regional FLIGHT

ROUTE

DEPARTURE

ARRIVAL

FREQUENCY

AIRCRAFT

OPERATED BY

Durban - Maputo - Durban SA8290

Durban

-

Maputo

10:10

11:25

1 2 3 4 5

7

J41

Airlink

SA8291

Maputo

-

Durban

11:45

13:05

1 2 3 4 5

7

J41

Airlink

Johannesburg - Antananarivo - Johannesburg SA8252

Johannesburg

-

Antananarivo

10:00

14:10

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

AR8

Airlink

SA8253

Antananarivo

-

Johannesburg

15:00

17:40

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

AR8

Airlink

When planning your next flight, for business or pleasure, this flight schedule will come in handy. Take this FREE copy of Skyways with you.

Johannesburg - Polokwane - Johannesburg

Johannesburg - Beira - Johannesburg SA8214

Johannesburg

-

Beira

11:30

13:10

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ERJ - 135

Airlink

SA8215

Beira

-

Johannesburg

13:30

15:20

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ERJ - 135

Airlink

Airlink's REGIONAL AND DOMESTIC flights check-in Terminal B counters B89 - B101 at OR Tambo International Airport.

85 10 12


TIMETABLE effective 01 OCTOBER 2012

F L I G H T S – Regional FLIGHT

ROUTE

DEPARTURE

ARRIVAL

FREQUENCY

AIRCRAFT

OPERATED BY

Johannesburg - Bulawayo - Johannesburg SA8110 SA8111

Johannesburg Bulawayo

- -

Bulawayo Johannesburg

10:40 12:50

12:05 14:25

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

AR8 AR8

Airlink Airlink

11:35 14:20

13:50 16:55

1 2 3 5 6 1 2 3 5 6

J41 J41

Airlink Airlink

06:35 15:45 09:00 18:20

08:30 17:40 11:05 20:25

1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 4 5 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 4 5 7

ERJ ERJ ERJ ERJ

-

135 135 135 135

Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink

06:30 16:15 16:15 08:50 18:45 18:45

08:20 18:05 18:05 10:35 20:30 20:30

1 2 3 4 5 1 3 4 5 2 7 1 2 3 4 5 1 3 4 5 2 7

ERJ AR8 ERJ ERJ AR8 ERJ -

135

135

Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink

06:50 10:05 12:40 16:00 17:00 19:00 08:05 08:05 08:05 11:10 13:50 17:05

07:40 10:50 13:25 16:45 17:45 19:45 09:00 09:00 09:00 12:05 14:45 18:00

1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 7 6 5 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 7

ERJ ERJ ERJ ERJ ERJ ERJ ERJ ERJ ERJ ERJ ERJ ERJ

-

135 135 135 135 135 135 135 135 135 135 135 135

Swaziland - Airlink Swaziland - Airlink Swaziland - Airlink Swaziland - Airlink Swaziland - Airlink Swaziland - Airlink Swaziland - Airlink Swaziland - Airlink Swaziland - Airlink Swaziland - Airlink Swaziland - Airlink Swaziland - Airlink

06:40 09:45 13:30 08:10 11:15 14:45

07:35 10:50 14:25 09:05 12:25 15:40

1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ERJ ERJ ERJ ERJ ERJ ERJ

-

135 135 135 135 135 135

Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink

11:45 14:00

13:15 15:40

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ERJ - 135 ERJ - 135

Airlink Airlink

11:05 14:10

13:35 16:45

1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5

ERJ - 135 ERJ - 135

Airlink Airlink

06:20 09:45 15:15 09:00 13:00 17:55

08:30 12:15 17:25 11:15 15:30 21:10

1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 5 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 5

ERJ - 135 AR8 ER3 ERJ - 135 AR8 ER3

Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink

11:30 14:55

14:20 17:50

1 3 5 6 1 3 5 6

ERJ- 135 ERJ- 135

Airlink Airlink

10:50 13:40

12:55 16:00

1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5

AR8 AR8

Airlink Airlink

Nelspruit - Livingstone - Nelspruit

When planning your next flight, for business or pleasure, this flight schedule will come in handy. Take this FREE copy of Skyways with you.

SA8870 SA8871

Nelspruit Livingstone

- -

Livingstone Nelspruit

Johannesburg - Lusaka - Johannesburg SA8160 SA8164 SA8161 SA8165

Johannesburg Johannesburg Lusaka Lusaka

-

Lusaka Lusaka Johannesburg Johannesburg

Johannesburg - Harare - Johannesburg SA8100 SA8102 SA8102 SA8101 SA8103 SA8103

Johannesburg Johannesburg Johannesburg Harare Harare Harare

-

Harare Harare Harare Johannesburg Johannesburg Johannesburg

135 135

Johannesburg - Manzini - Johannesburg SA8012 SA8992 SA8994 SA8014 SA8996 SA8998 SA8013 SA8991 SA8997 SA8993 SA8995 SA8015

Johannesburg Johannesburg Johannesburg Johannesburg Johannesburg Johannesburg Manzini Manzini Manzini Manzini Manzini Manzini

-

Manzini Manzini Manzini Manzini Manzini Manzini Johannesburg Johannesburg Johannesburg Johannesburg Johannesburg Johannesburg

Johannesburg - Maseru - Johannesburg SA8050 SA8052 SA8062 SA8051 SA8053 SA8063

Johannesburg Johannesburg Johannesburg Maseru Maseru Maseru

-

Maseru Maseru Maseru Johannesburg Johannesburg Johannesburg

Johannesburg - Maun - Johannesburg SA8300 SA8301

Johannesburg Maun

- -

(effective 15 June 2012)

Maun Johannesburg

Johannesburg - Nampula - Johannesburg SA8230 SA8231

Johannesburg Nampula

- -

Nampula Johannesburg

Johannesburg - Ndola - Johannesburg SA8158 SA8154 SA8156 SA8159 SA8155 SA8157

Johannesburg Johannesburg Johannesburg Ndola Ndola Ndola

-

Ndola Ndola Ndola Johannesburg Johannesburg Johannesburg

Johannesburg - Pemba - Johannesburg SA8204 SA8205

Johannesburg Pemba

- -

Pemba Johannesburg

Johannesburg - Tete - Johannesburg SA8220 SA8221

Johannesburg Tete

- -

Tete Johannesburg

Day 1 = Monday, Day 7 = Sunday For reservations visit www.flyairlink.com, your travel agent or SAA Central Reservations on +27 11-978 1111 • Flight schedules subject to change • Contact your booking agent for these conditions EXCESS BAGGAGE AND SPORTING EQUIPMENT: Refer to www.flyairlink.com Important information & Conditions of Carriage Clause 8 Baggage 8.3 Whilst every effort has been made to ensure accuracy of content of the published timetable, both operational and strategic issues cause timetable changes. Due to the forward lead time required for publication, these often cannot be duly reflected. Should this occur, Airlink and its agents are not responsible for any errors, omissions, losses or detriments arising from the publication.

86 10 12

MEMBER


Jetstream 4100 - Regional Turboprop Airliner 9 29 19.25m 18.29m 5.74m 2 600kg 25 000ft 500km/h

Number of aircraft Maximum Passengers Length Wing Span Height Fuel capacity Maximum Operating Altitude Cruising Speed

ERJ 135-LR - Regional Jet Airliner and Corporate Jet Number of aircraft Maximum Passengers Length Wing Span Height Fuel capacity Maximum Operating Altitude Cruising Speed

10 37 26.34m 20.04m 6.75m 5 000kg 37 000ft 800km/h

Avro RJ85 - Regional Jet Airliner 8 83 2 28.60m 26.21m 8.61m 9 362kg 35 000ft 780km/h

VOLCANO 27673

Number of aircraft Maximum Passengers Seating Classes Length Wing Span Height Fuel capacity Maximum Operating Altitude Maximum Cruising Speed


32

The number of brains a leech has

2 cents per acre The amount the USA paid Russia for Alaska

A barrel of laughs george burns was an American comedian and actor, popular in radio, film and television for over 70 years. He is remembered as always smoking a cigar and wearing big, round eyeglasses. He was especially known for being part of a comedy team with his wife, Gracie Allen. After Allen’s death in 1964, Burns made an unexpected comeback with a new persona as a wise, witty old man.

88 10 12


480 hours

The world record for rocking non-stop in a rocking chair, held by Dennis Easterling

2,475 litres the amount of fuel burned in one hour by the AVRO RJ85

BRAIN

Don’t stay in bed, unless you can make money in bed. You can’t help getting older, but you don’t have to get old. Be quick to learn and wise to know. How can I die? I’m booked. Look to the future, because that is where you’ll spend the rest of your life.

PAIN

At my age, flowers scare me.

Wrap your head around these brain teasers and see what you can make of them

You know you’re getting old when you stoop to tie your shoelaces and wonder what else you could do while you’re down there.

1: Country anagrams

Everything that goes up must come down. But there comes a time when not everything that’s down can come up. First you forget names, then you forget faces. Next, you forget to pull your zipper up and finally, you forget to pull it down. Happiness is having a large, loving, caring, close-knit family in another city. How beautifully leaves grow old. How full of light and colour are their last days. If you ask what is the single most important key to longevity, I would have to say it is avoiding worry, stress and tension. And if you didn’t ask me, I’d still have to say it. If you live to be one hundred, you’ve got it made. Very few people die past that age. It takes only one drink to get me drunk. The trouble is, I can’t remember if it’s the 13th or the 14th. I love to sing, and I love to drink scotch. Most people would rather hear me drink scotch. Smartness runs in my family. When I went to school I was so smart my teacher was in my class for five years. Text | Lida-Marie Saayman Photo | Shutterstock

The following are anagrams of countries. Can you decipher all of them? a. Glib Emu b. Neat Grain c. Age Lens d. Dark Men e. Serial

2: Quickly now

You'll have to move quickly to solve this riddle, Because then you'll understand me and not get in a fiddle, You will usually find me in something embedded, It might be in skin or an object instead, I am also a part of a popular sport, Where a double is needed for a round to abort, In a jungle setting, I might be spotted, To administer my poison so prey can be thwarted.

3: Words with OS

Five words that contain OS as a letter pair have had all of their other letters removed and placed into a pool. Put those letters back in their proper places. What are the words? ***OS, *OS***, **OS**, ***OS*, *OS**** Pool: A, C, E, E, E, F, H, I, L, M, N, P, Q, R, R, T, T, U, X, Y

Answers

Too bad all the people who know how to run this country are busy running taxicabs or cutting hair.

1: a. Belgium b. Argentina c. Senegal d. Denmark e. Israel 2: Dart 3: Chaos, Mosque, Frosty, Expose, Nostril

Acting is all about honesty. If you can fake that, you’ve got it made.

Burns once said he had a penchant for scotch whiskey

brought to you by

89 10 12


8 years, 7 months, 6 days The length of time you would have to yell to produce enough sound energy to heat one cup of coffee

battleship Each Battleship puzzle represents a section of ocean with a hidden fleet of one battleship, two cruisers and three submarines. The ships may be oriented horizontally or vertically within the grid such that no ship touches another, not even diagonally. Any remaining squares in the grid contain water segments, which are shown as a symbol of water or as an X. The numbers on the bottom and on the right of the grid show how many squares in the corresponding rows and columns are occupied by ships. The object is to discover where all six ships are located.

sudoku

Try the addictive game of Sudoku. The aim is to fill each block with a number from 1 to 9. Each number must not appear more than once in each row, column and square. If you can’t finish this puzzle during your flight, please take this free copy of Skyways with you. The cabin attendant will make sure that the next passengers get their own magazine, with a clean Sudoku for them to puzzle over! Puzzles taken from www.krazydad.com

1 x Battleship

Medium

challenging

Puzzles supplied by Conceptis, www.conceptispuzzles.com

Easy

easy

2 x Cruisers 3 x Submarines

Solutions can be found on page 10

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437

1 in 67 million The chances of making two holes-in-one in a round of golf

ten YOU DIDN’T THINGS

know about…

THE GIRAFFE

The average number of questions a 4-year-old child asks a day

1

A giraffe’s legs alone are about 1.8m long, allowing them to run as fast as 56km/h over short distances and cruise comfortably at 16km/h over long distances. Typically they roam the open grasslands in small groups of about half a dozen. Giraffe use their 18-20 inch (45-50 centimetre) long prehensile tongue and the roof of their mouths in order to feed on a range of different plants and shoots, most notably from Acacia species. The giraffe’s height helps it to keep a sharp lookout for predators across the wide expanse of the African savannah. The animal’s stature can be disadvantageous; it is difficult and dangerous for a giraffe to drink at a water hole. To do so they must spread their legs and bend down in an awkward position that makes them vulnerable to predators like wild cats. Giraffes only need to drink once every several days; they get most of their water from the luscious plants they eat. Giraffes prefer habitats where there is an abundance of acacia trees on which they feed. They have a preference for feeding on young leaves and shoots but will eat grasses and other plant matter.

2 3 4 5 6 7

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8

Giraffes have short horns on their heads also known as ossicones. These horns are formed from cartilage that has transformed into bone and remain covered by skin and fur. In 1938, a giraffe bull was filmed in Kenya that was almost entirely white except for its dark eyes. Since that time, a number of white giraffe bulls have been described – the most recent being spotted by Charles Foley of the Wildlife Conservation Society in 2005. A giraffe’s heart has special adaptations to enable it to pump blood up the animal’s long neck to its head.

9

10

Text | Lida-Marie Saayman Photography | Galyna Andrushko, orxy


11.26km/h

The speed at which the fastest moving land snake, the Black Mamba, moves

3 cents

The cost to make a $1 bill

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250 million

38 minutes

The number of Slinky toys sold since 1946

The duration of the shortest war in history, between Zanzibar and England in 1896

Didya know? 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Dr Doug Ross Three. George Washington, George HW Bush and George W Bush. Eric Arthur Blair Earth. The name George means ‘earth worker’. 45. He knocked out 26-year-old Michael Moorer with a right to the chin in the tenth round.

Fashion victims

George is a popular name amoung US presidents

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By George Questions 1. Where was St George born – England, Cappadocia, Assyria or Egypt? 2. Who did George Clooney play in ER? 3. By 2011, how many US presidents were named George? 4. What was the real name of author George Orwell? 5. What does the common root of the words George, Geology and Geode mean? 6. How old was George Foreman when he won his final heavyweight title – 39, 45 or 54? Answers 1. Cappadocia. The ancient country was in Asia Minor.

Questions 1. In which US city did Michael Jackson’s hair catch fire while he shot a Pepsi commercial? 2. What model-turned-activist lost her left leg below the knee after being struck by a police motorcycle? 3. According to author Nicolas Coleridge, what Italian designer coined the phrase ‘fashion victim’? 4. What does Scarlett use to make a new dress in Margaret Mitchell’s Gone With the Wind? 5. What animal is the most farmed for its fur worldwide? 6. What slang term describes someone who is addicted to tanning? Answers 1. Los Angeles 2. Heather Mills. She would marry Paul McCartney nine years later. 3. Oscar de la Renta 4. Curtains 5. Mink 6. Tanorexic.

Artistic impressions Questions 1. What was the name of Andy Warhol’s New York studio and hangout? 2. What artist collaborated with Disney on a part-live action, part-animated film called Destino? 3. In what country did South African photojournalist Kevin Carter shoot the iconic image of an


3:1

the rate at which men look for overweight women compared with underweight women in Web searches

88%

of the world’s population lives north of the Equator

Are you a slave to fashion?

emaciated young girl and a vulture? 4. According to Dan Brown’s The Da Vinci Code, who sits at the right hand of Jesus in The Last Supper? 5. What optical device modelled on the pinhole camera led to the development of modern photography? 6. What unusual object is William S Burroughs renowned for using in his artwork? Answers 1. The Factory

2. Salvador Dali. Abandoned by mutual agreement in 1947, the film was eventually released in 2003. 3. Sudan. It was the photo that epitomised Sudan’s famine at the time. 4. Mary Magdalene 5. Camera obscura 6. Shotgun. Text | Courtesy of Trivial Pursuit

Thanks to Trivial Pursuit for supplying the questions and answers. Get your own game from leading retailers countrywide

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talespin

curse of the cluttered counter The

once upon a time,

I cleaned the kitchen counter. I looked upon my accomplishment and was amazed at the size and usability of this essential household item. I had no idea that I could actually prepare meals on top of it. Imagine being able to chop vegetables and place pots and pans on it. I can use it when cooking dinner. Wow! Whoever thought of counters should get an award. It goes so well in the kitchen. It makes meal preparation so much easier. The only thing I would change, would be the magnetic feature of the counter top. Confused? You know what I mean. Whenever you clean it off, within two days you can’t put anything else on it. It magnetically draws all non-food items to it: mail, papers, magazines, wallets, even cats. It’s almost as if the counter acts as a clearing house for everything that enters the house. You know how in a store everything enters through the loading dock? Well, I think the counter acts as the loading dock for the house. The only problem is, nothing ever seems to leave it. We come home, put something on the counter and promptly forget about it.

Ever wonder where your screwdriver is, or that important document you need right now?You guessed it, it’s probably on the counter. Hiding from you. Mocking you. Laughing at you. Thinking of an excellent home improvement project? Want to make your family proud? How about strapping on your armour and attacking the counter. Show it who’s boss. You will be glad you did. After penning this, I took a picture of my nice, clean counter. Why? So I know what it looks like two days from now. Text | Lucille de Villiers

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+27 861 527 526

+27 11 911 1200 / WWW.RADO.COM


Skyways Magazine October 2012  

Skyways Magazine October 2012

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