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july 2016

insight for executives on the move

Putting for gold

Gary Player takes SA golf back to the Olympics

Corporate whistleblowing

Hide and seek in Chobe

The beauty of brandy

Fishing impossible


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insight for executives on the move

interact july 2016

Your free take-home copy - exclusive to Airlink passengers

TM

july 2016

insight for executives on the move

celebrating 20 years of publishing excellence

Putting for gold

Gary Player takes SA golf back to the Olympics

Corporate whistleblowing

75 x 213.indd 1

Hide and seek in Chobe

The beauty of brandy

Fishing impossible

2015/04/01 11:49 AM

Golf returns to the Olympics, pg 70

May you live in interesting times We live – often out of necessity – very regimented lives. You, for instance, had to be at the airport an hour before you boarded this plane, which meant you had to plan to set your alarm early and hustle through unfamiliar traffic patterns to get to the parking area you feel is safest and then get your carefully packed bag checked as hand luggage, as that’ll save you 15 minutes on arrival, which means you’ll beat the queue at the hire car outlet and make it to your meeting with five minutes to spare. Sheesh. Not everything is so predictable. Take the Olympics: once acknowledged as the apex of sporting achievement, they’re now, to some, little more than a hitch in a schedule. Spoiler alert – Gary Player is not happy. Read more on page 70. Then there are the arts. Everyone knows that if their beloved child expresses a desire to become an artist, financial wellbeing is impossible. So why does Rosemary Mangope, CEO of South Africa’s National Arts Council, completely disagree, postulating that arts are an important part of the solution to many of Africa’s ills, rather than just an attractive distraction? Read her views on page 22, and then meet artist Bev Butkow, who’s getting on with creating rather than politicking, on page 68. And black holes – still not doing what we thought they would, billions of years after they started messing with light and mathematics and decades after smart humans reckoned they’d figured out how everything works. Thanks to the Square Kilometre Array radio telescope, South Africans will be among the first to discover just how many poor assumptions we’ve made as new revelations are uncovered by ever more advanced technology. See page 46 for news of the latest discovery in this field. There’s a popular saying: “May you live in interesting times.” We don’t have a choice, really ... Bruce Dennill Editor

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PUBLISHER Urs Honegger EDITOR Bruce Dennill SENIOR SUB EDITOR Vanessa Koekemoer SUB EDITOR Nicolette Els OPERATIONS AND PRODUCTION MANAGER Paul Kotze STUDIO MANAGER Cronjé du Toit DESIGNER Perpetua Chigumira-Wenda TRAFFIC AND PRODUCTION Juanita Pattenden ADVERTISING sales@panorama.co.za +27 11 468 2090 SALES MANAGER Gillian Johnston SENIOR ADVERTISING SALES EXECUTIVE Arlene Sanford 083 473 5002 arlene@panorama.co.za ADVERTISING SALES EXECUTIVE Mosadi Teffo 083 584 6673 mosadi@panorama.co.za Ben Banda ben@panorama.co.za ENGLAND/WALES/SCOTLAND: Interactive Airline Partnerships, James Rolls. 13 Brook Business Centre, Cowley Mill Road, Uxbridge UB8 2FX Tel: +44-1895-258008 Fax: +44-1895-258009 SWITZERLAND/GERMANY: Imm Inflight Media Marketing Marcel Wernli, Gellertstrasse 18, 4052 Basel Tel: +41-61-3199090 Fax: +41-61-3199095 SUBSCRIPTIONS subscriptions@panorama.co.za Tel: 011 468 2090 Fax: 011 468 2091 COMMENTS AND SUGGESTIONS skyways@panorama.co.za We value reader feedback. Please get in touch. FINANCE accounts@panorama.co.za ISSN 1025-2657 PRINTERS

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PHALABORWA PIETERMARITZBURG POLOKWANE PRETORIA SIKHUPE SISHEN SKUKUZA TETE UPINGTON VILANKULOS WINDHOEK

KASANE KIMBERLEY LIVINGSTONE LUSAKA MABUTO MASERU MAUN MTHATHA NAMPULA NDOLA NELSPRUIT NOSY BE PEMBA

ANTANANARIVO BEIRA BLOEMFONTEIN BULAWAYO CAPETOWN DURBAN EAST LONDON GABARONE GEORGE HARARE JOHANNESBURG

contents contents

8

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SPOTLIGHT 22 Why art makes money Prioritise arts as part of economic growth and see results 36 A passion passed down Father and son unlock the Zambian wilderness for visitors 70 Putting for gold Exploring golf’s return to the Olympics with Gary Player

22

14 36

32

TAKE-OFF 12 To-do list Events calendar 14 News in brief Bite-size bulletin 73 Sky café Accommodation and services directory 85 Flight schedules Airlink lodge-hopping and regional timetables EXECUTIVE DECISION 18 Under the Panama hat South African whistleblowers can learn from the Mossack Fonseca leak

20 Old farts versus ankle-biters Bridging the generation gap in the office 26 The CEO A-B-C Q&A™ Getting to know Roberto Bottega of Idiom Wines GREAT ESCAPES 32 In spitting distance Adventures, wildlife and bushveld traditions in Chobe 42 Urban adventure Discovering a Sandton hotel named for a literary explorer 44 Cracking good show Activist art at the V&A Waterfront


TAG Heuer Boutiques; Sandton City & V&A Waterfront. Also at selected fine jewellers nationwide. For further information please call 011.669.0500. www.picotandmoss.co.za

TAG HEUER CARRERA CALIBRE HEUER 01 TAG Heuer is the Official Timekeeper and Team Performance Partner of Red Bull Racing. Two disruptive teams who #DontCrackUnderPressure both on and off the track.


PHALABORWA PIETERMARITZBURG POLOKWANE PRETORIA SIKHUPE SISHEN SKUKUZA TETE UPINGTON VILANKULOS WINDHOEK

KASANE KIMBERLEY LIVINGSTONE LUSAKA MABUTO MASERU MAUN MTHATHA NAMPULA NDOLA NELSPRUIT NOSY BE PEMBA

ANTANANARIVO BEIRA BLOEMFONTEIN BULAWAYO CAPETOWN DURBAN EAST LONDON GABARONE GEORGE HARARE JOHANNESBURG

contents contents

10 07 16

INNOVATION 46 Deep radio imaging is the new black South African team’s exciting deep space findings 48 Tech review Exclusive content from MIT: Drones on autopilot 52 Just be yourself A new app proves that you’re alive – existential crisis avoided

50 48

92

IN ACCORD 54 Buzz off, elephants Getting bees to keep pachyderms at bay 58 Fuelled for effectiveness Are you putting the right materials in for what you want to get out? TIME OUT 62 Going to pot, still Appreciating brandy via history, education and entertainment

66 The right side of the Wrong line Journalist Michela Wrong uses intimate knowledge of Africa in debut novel 92 Alternative angling Three friends, several crazy ideas about catching fish and the BBC’s budget 94 Media Books, DVDs and music 96 Talespin Meetings and mutual madness


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Lusaka, Zambia


take | off

4 million The number of cats eaten in China every year

1942

The year the Phantom Barber first emerged in Mississippi, USA – he broke into people’s houses and cut their hair

World of Dogs and Cats At this annual event, you’ll have an opportunity to find out what type of pet best suits your lifestyle, as well as learning more about horses and exotic pets, seeing champion dogs and cats in action, and picking up all the pet products you need to keep your companions in peak health.  15-17 July 2016  Gallagher Convention Centre i www.dogscats.co.za

GAUTENG

Gateway to Space The biggest part of this exhibition is the 15m life-size model of the core module of the Mir Space Station. This module served as the primary living space for the crew. Inside you’ll find the controls for the environmental systems, the station’s main engines and the altitude-control systems. Another highlight is an original Soviet

Sokol suit that went into space. It was first used in 1973, and is still worn on all launches to the International Space Station. Specific timeslots will be allocated for visitors to enter, so book to avoid disappointment. Tickets cost between R120 and R180.  Until 31 July 2016  S  andton Convention Centre, Johannesburg i g atewaytospace.co.za

Romeo and Juliet Joburg Ballet presents Romeo and Juliet, inspired by Shakespeare’s tragic story of a passionate feud between two families in Renaissance Italy, with its sweeping choreography set to a magnificent score by Sergei Prokofiev. Joburg Ballet artistic director Iain MacDonald says: “This year is the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, and many ballets inspired

by his plays will be staged around the world to celebrate his enduring legacy. Romeo and Juliet perfectly captures all the romance, drama and tragedy of Shakespeare’s tale of starcrossed love.”  15-24 July 2016  Joburg Theatre i www.joburgtheatre.com


Up to 100 The number of eyes scallops have

 28-31 July 2016  Boardwalk Exhibition Centre i www.homemakersonline.co.za

8 hours

The amount of time spent sitting on the loo that burns the same amount of calories as an hour’s jogging

K WA Z U L U - N ATA L

CAPE TOWN

EASTERN CAPE

Port Elizabeth Homemakers Expo The best in home improvement will come together to help inspire visitors hoping to update, improve or maintain their homes. All needs will be catered for, from fresh ideas to smart advice to serious research, product comparison and the opportunity to meet suppliers face to face. Tickets cost R40 at the door.

5 For Change Black Tie Charity Gala This is an evening that promises to be a memorable affair with the goal of raising awareness and funds for five selected 2016 beneficiaries: Bridging Abilities, Code4CT, iKasi Youth, Lumkani and Township Roots. Over the past five years, 5 For Change has grown and evolved into a premium event, without losing its core value of uplifting and enriching local communities. The five initiatives for 2016 are a blend of pioneering and resourceful organisations, founded by passionate people who are motivated to enrich the lives of others.  2 July 2016  Cape Town City Hall i www.5ForChange.co.za

KZN Travel & Adventure Show Eighty top exhibitors including destinations, venues, resorts and travel operators will offer specials, competitions, tips, information and an exciting array of things to do. There will also be daily promotions and activities and guest appearances by members of the Sharks rugby team. Come and explore holiday destinations, weekend activities and getaways, biking, boating, water sports, golfing, camping, cruises, escapes, expeditions,

hotels, resorts, restaurants and more.  8-10 July 2016  Durban Exhibition Centre i www.kzntraveland adventureshow.co.za 21st International AIDS Conference Young reporters from the Children’s Radio Foundation in South Africa, Zambia, Tanzania and the DRC will host a pop-up radio station at the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016). Today, nearly 16 million people are on HIV treatment worldwide. Stigma, LGBTI, treatment and services are just some of the topics these young reporters will be discussing with delegates and experts. Catch these inspiring youth voices online at www.childrensradiofoundation.org.  18-22 July 2016  D  urban International Convention Centre i www.aids2016.org


2015

The year more people died taking selfies than by shark attacks

Business as

(un)usual

Business travel is work, so let Liberty Midlands Mall take care of play. With over 165 stores to choose from, and a host of entertainment and restaurants on offer, you’ll be spoilt for choice!

TECHNOLOGY

Second ACSA solar power plant launched Airports Company South Africa (ACSA) recently launched its second solar power plant at Kimberley Airport in the Northern Cape. Kimberley’s is the second regional airport to be solar powered in South Africa, with opening of the plant in line with the government’s development of energy security. The solar farm is located on 0.7 hectares of land on the airport grounds and uses an 11kV substation as its main energy source. It is expected to deliver 500kWp of peak production per year. ACSA still plans to install solar farms at Port Elizabeth International Airport, East London Airport and Bram Fischer Airport in Bloemfontein.

(033) 341 9570 www.midlandsmall.co.za facebook.com/MidlandsMall twitter.com/LibMidlandsMall

Your shopping world in one

Source: Airports Company

SPORT

The lowest swim in the world South African non-profit organisation Madswimmer broke the world record for the highest altitude swim on Mount Tres Cruces in Chile in December 2015. In November 2016, the team aims to complete part two of this challenge by swimming across the Dead Sea, more than 500m below sea level, from Jordan to Israel. The 16km swim spans the widest points of the Dead Sea, with water temperatures of around 22°C and salt content 10 times that of a normal ocean.


500

The number of people trampled to death at Stalin’s funeral

The swim will raise awareness about the Dead Sea itself and money for Madswimmer’s work supporting underprivileged African children. Source: Madswimmer.com

ENVIRONMENT

Shamwari introduces K9 tracking Shamwari Game Reserve’s Rhino Protection Unit has recently been assisted by K9 tracking units as a result of the rise in rhino poaching. The Chipembere Rhino Foundation (CRF) trains dogs for rhino protection, and has facilitated and sponsored a dog for the reserve. Blade is an 18-month-old Belgian Shepherd, trained offsite before being introduced to his handler, Shamwari’s Cabous Pretorius, in April. “Blade will be a valuable asset in the fight against rhino poaching and will be utilised to locate and apprehend rhino poachers,” said Shamwari Group general manager, Joe Cloete. Source: Chipembere.org

BIZARRE

Bottled water intake on the rise Euromonitor has revealed that Americans are on the verge of consuming more bottled water than sugary soft drinks per

capita for the first time. This year, Americans are expected to drink approximately 102ℓ of bottled water as opposed to 98ℓ of soft drinks. This seems positive, but bottled water comes at a cost to the environment. A study conducted by the Pacific Institute in 2009 found that the long-distance transport of bottled water can lead to energy costs surpassing the energy required to produce the bottle. The combined cost is approximately 2,000 times more than it takes to produce tap water. Source: Huffington Post

E N T E R TA I N M E N T

Roots a global television event – again The 2016 remake of Roots premiered on South African television last month. The series features footage shot in KwaZuluNatal. The series is a remake of the original Roots, released in 1977, which remains the most watched TV drama in United States television history. The series is a dramatic, historical portrait of American slavery, and follows the journey of one family and their will to carry on their legacy. The eight-hour-long drama premiered on History (DStv channel 186) on 15 June and has four award-winning directors each directing one of the twohour episodes. Mtunzini’s Umlalazi River and the Dlinza Forest near Eshowe in KwaZuluNatal were used for filming, doubling for scripted areas in Gambia and along the Kambay Bolongo River. Source: A+E Networks (Jag Communications)


take | off

one

The number of rodent hairs the FDA allows per 100g of peanut butter

TECHNOLOGY

Ancient computer still used to control US missiles A United States Government Accounting Office (GAO) report has highlighted the dangerous state of Uncle Sam’s IT

infrastructure. The computer used to co-ordinate America’s nuclear forces is an IBM Series/1, which uses eight-inch floppy disks that are capable of storing approximately 80KB of data each. The Treasury Department has stated that

1905

The year an experiment was done on a criminal who was beheaded to see how long afterwards he stayed conscious. For 30 seconds afterwards, he opened and focused his eyes when people called his name it has no plans to update its systems. The report added that the federal government has spent billions of dollars on failed and poorly performing IT investments, which have suffered from ineffective management. The GAO also found several cases of other outdated hardware and software. The Department of Commerce weather alert systems use Windows Server 2003 as their core network, which is no longer supplied by Microsoft. The generation of programmers and IT gurus who keep some of those archaic systems running are dying out and no new programmers are learning those languages. Source: theregister.co.uk

BIZARRE

Teenager has unborn twin brother removed from his stomach A 15-year-old boy from Malaysia has undergone a surgery to remove a mass from his stomach, believed to be his unborn twin. Mohd Zul Shahril Saidin has been carrying the foetus since birth, a condition known as ‘foetus in foetu’. The rare condition is where the malformed foetus is found in the body of its twin. According to the medical reports, the foetus was found to have developed hair, legs, hands and genitals. The discovery was made when Mohd was admitted to hospital after complaining of pain for four months. The condition occurs in one in every


10 billion The number of bacteria that live inside your mouth

Over 24 hours

The amount of time a swarm of bees once spent chasing a car because their queen was trapped inside

500,000 births. If a woman is pregnant with twins, one of the babies can enter the other through the umbilical cord. From there it becomes a parasite, depending on the sibling’s body for survival. It does not survive after birth and the remaining baby’s life can be put at risk by its presence. Source: Daily Mail

H E A LT H

Is driving putting you at risk of cancer? Experts are warning that sun protection while outdoors is not the only thing you need to worry about. People who drive long distances are also at risk of harmful UV radiation when inside their cars. Windscreens typically score well on

sun safety tests, but side windows do not, usually scoring lower than SPF 20. Studies in the United States have shown that left-sided skin cancer

is more common in those who spend more time driving. Experts advise that the use of UVA-blocking films can enhance the amount of blockage from side windows. Road

users are advised to install window tinting, and to wear sunglasses and sunblock while driving. Source: Daily Mail

Losing revenue as a result of a power outage? Is your business, mine, factory or shop losing revenue as a result of a power outage? Contact us today and we will assess your needs and determine the optimum generator or Uninterrupted Power Supply (UPS) solution for your business, factory, mine or shop. Visit www.barloworldpower.com or contact 0860 898 000 and we will determine a generator solution for you.

© 2015 Caterpillar. All Rights Reserved. CAT, CATERPILLAR, BUILT FOR IT™, their respective logos, “Caterpillar Yellow,” the “Power Edge”trade dress as well as corporate and product identity used herein, are trademarks of Caterpillar and may not be used without permission.


executive | decision

ht rig he a g t as r kin es we Ma nois tleblo is wh

U Pa nde na r t ma he ha t

media

everywhere have been fascinated by the Panama Papers, a leak of over 11 million files from the database of one major offshore law firm, Mossack Fonseca. The records were obtained from an anonymous source by the German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung, who then shared them with the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ). The biggest leak in history has some lessons for the South African private sector

18 07 16

Local flavour The South African news is full of stories about corruption in the private and public sector. Recently, disclosures by political players including Vytjie Mentor exposed the Gupta family’s inappropriate levels of political influence.

South Africa understands the sensation behind the Panama Papers, because we understand corruption. On the 2015 Perceptions of Corruption Index we ranked a pitiful 61 out of 168 countries. Our neighbours do better – Namibia ranks almost 20 places above us; Botswana almost 40. Not only are we perceived as corrupt, we feel the costs of corruption too. While an accurate calculation is difficult to ascertain, the former Head of the Special Investigating Unit, Willie Hofmeyr, once reported to Parliament that an estimated R30 billion of the state’s annual procurement budget is lost to corruption, incompetence and negligence. We are sometimes guilty of certain blindspots in these discussions, however: we fail to address the faceless whistleblowers.


Quiet but effective

≠≠

Anonymous disclosures often create a large gap that goes some way to explaining why we don’t talk about the whistleblower. Why talk about someone who can’t be seen? Even in the Gupta story, the significant risk taken by whistleblowers such as Mentor didn’t hold our attention for long, given the political unravelling that followed their disclosures. This leaves these whistleblowers vulnerable, and is part of the reason why the Panama Papers leaker remains anonymous. The consequences that inevitably follow blowing the whistle are often not witnessed, even though the whistleblower is adversely affected. Those who perpetrate crimes of corruption are quicker to think about the whistleblower than we are. One of the first statements released by Mossack Fonseca was not to try and explain their role or accept responsibility. Instead, one of the founders came out to say: “This is a crime, a felony … [T]his is an attack on Panama …”. They directed ire at the whistleblower not only to divert attention from their own responsibility but, more worryingly, to direct political and prosecutorial energies at retribution against those who have performed a significant social good. The portrayal of the whistleblower as ‘criminal’ stands in contrast to the benefits derived from whistleblowing when it comes to effective running of organisations. There is a reason laws exist to protect and encourage whistleblowing by employees, such as South Africa’s Protected Disclosures Act. One of those reasons is to assist in mitigating against the financial costs that result from corruption and fraud. Those reporting from within their organisations may be privy to better quality information than that gathered by an external entity after an anonymous tip-off. Companies themselves have identified whistleblowing as the most effective tool for fraud detection.

Top 10 most corrupt countries in 2016

Space to talk A corporate culture of openness – including whistleblowing – is responsible for the detection of 23% of the most serious economic crimes, according to a Price Waterhouse Cooper study, and it also enhances the broader functioning of an organisation. Allowing for different voices to be heard encourages diverse thinking, even if these voices are ‘wrong’. Research done by the University of California’s Charlan Nemeth examining the role of minority influences on decision-making in organisations underlines how authentic dissent feeds innovation

• • • • •

Somalia (pictured) North Korea Myanmar Afghanistan Uzbekistan

• • • • •

Turkmenistan Sudan Iraq Haiti Venezuela

Source | forbes.com

and improvement. In a study of seven Fortune 500 companies’ top management teams, the most successful teams were found to be those encouraging authentic dissent in meetings. Organisations and departments benefit from allowing for dissent through properly implemented whistleblowing procedures. There is evidence to show that the powerful become singularly focused, whereas the powerless are forced to consider a multitude of information sources in order to move forward – giving them valuable perspectives. But we need specific policies to combat counter-productive urges to ignore dissenting voices. Creating a corporate culture of openness is critical. Yet the Protected Disclosures Act does not currently oblige organisations to have a policy in place, nor does it enforce investigations of complaints made. Encourage and facilitate whistleblowers, even if the law is short-sighted. Allowing for effective avenues to blow the whistle within organisations must be actively encouraged. Text | Gabriella Razzano Photography | Shutterstock

Gabriella Razzano is Head of Legal Research at the Open Democracy Advice Centre and the Chairperson of the African Platform on Access to Information

19 07 16


executive | decision

Old farts ankle-biters Bridging the generation gap in the office helps create a productive workspace

The environment in which we work is constantly evolving and more so as we find different generations operating in the same workplace, says Helene Vermaak, Director at The Human Edge. Conflict between older and younger employees is inevitable

20 07 16

The three-generational workplace is now the norm: Baby Boomers (49 to 67 years old), Gen Xers (34 to 48 years old) and Millennials (13 to 33 years old). The concern is that each of these generations has their own quirks and ways of communicating, so bridging the generation gaps is vital. Chronic, unaddressed conflict between colleagues from different generations can affect their output. A study conducted by ASTD Workforce Development Community and authors Joseph Grenny and David Maxfield, who wrote the  New York Times  bestseller  Crucial Accountability, showed that more than one in

three people waste five or more hours each week due to this type of conflict.

Simmering discontent The online survey of 1,350 subjects showed that the two generations who have the most difficult time working together are Baby Boomers and Millennials. The problems these two generations experience most often include: • dismissal of past experience. • lack of discipline and focus. • lack of respect. • resistance to change or unwillingness to innovate. However, conflict is not isolated to just Baby Boomers and Millennials. The study revealed the following: • Baby Boomers complain that Gen Xers and Millennials lack discipline, focus and are distracted. They also think Millennials lack commitment.


Agreeing to disagree Conflict is inevitable, but resentment is optional. “We often encounter conflict because our backgrounds, education and experiences differ so greatly. But how we choose to handle these conflicts can either lead to talking it out or acting it out,” Helene Vermaak says. By learning a few skills useful in speaking up to others – regardless of age or authority – people can respectfully resolve conflict and improve productivity in today’s multigenerational workplace. Below are four skills for getting started in bridging the generational gap. The premise for these skills is that all strategies employed will fail if your motive is not continually focused on finding a way to connect with the other person. It is an exercise in emotional maturity. • Make it safe. Begin by clarifying your respect as well as your intent to achieve a mutual goal. • Start with the facts. Describe your concerns. Don’t lead with judgements about others’ age or conclusions as to why they behaved the way they did. Start by describing in objective terms the behaviours that create problems. • Don’t pile on negativity. If your colleague becomes defensive, pause and reassure them of your positive intentions and allow them to express their concerns. • Invite dialogue. After sharing your concerns, encourage your colleague to share their perspective.

Gen Xers complain that Baby Boomers display dogmatic thinking and are sexist, defensive, incompetent, resistant to change and lacking in creativity. They believe that Millennials are arrogant. Millennials complain that Baby Boomers display resistant thinking, and are sexist, defensive, insensitive, slow to respond, resistant to change, incompetent, and lacking in creativity. They also believe Gen Xers have poor problem-solving skills and are slow to respond.

Stand and deliver According to Grenny and Maxfield, when people attribute their concerns to generational differences they give themselves an excuse to not confront the problem. Generational labels become self-fulfilling prophecies: people think bad behaviour is about age, so they don’t confront it, so things don’t change, which ‘proves’ the

behaviour is the result of age differences. “This is a classic case of the fundamental attribution error, or the tendency to attribute someone’s behaviour to stereotypes rather than more controllable factors,” says Grenny. “When we commit the fundamental attribution error, we feel justified in not confronting issues because we see our colleagues as ‘too old’ or ‘too young’ to solve problems or create a productive working environment.” In fact, the results indicate a surprising level of incompetence among all generations to quickly and effectively solve problems through accountability discussions and dialogue. One in four people admit to avoiding conflict with colleagues of a different age; or if they do speak up, to speaking in generalities and dancing around the real issues. Text | Supplied Photography | Shutterstock

Visit humanedge.co.za or contact Carina Serfontein on 012 345 6281 for more information about The Human Edge’s upcoming public training programmes, or impact your company culture positively by having The Human Edge create a programme tailor-made for your organisation

21 07 16


executive | decision

WHY ART MAKES MONE Y Art, when made accessible and located in the broader context of public culture, has the potential to stimulate broad growth

An integrated Africa, where there is a freer flow of ideas, information, knowledge, commerce and investment opportunities, will be the outcome of policy in which the arts are prioritised as part of economic growth

22 07 16


The common misconception around art is that its value is reserved entirely for the wealthy and the elite. This is because there has long been a strong emphasis on the intrinsic value of art that is consumed by few in private spaces, making it exclusive and out of reach for ordinary individuals to enjoy or even relate to. In a country such as South Africa, where there are many competing interests – whether social, political, economic or cultural – it is important to appreciate the instrumental role art can play in creating platforms for understanding and mutuality. The underlying value of art is its ability to educate and promote tolerance and innovation in the most profound ways. This role has to do with when art, with its intrinsic value, enters the public realm and opens channels of discourse for broader social benefit.

Multifaceted perspectives It is for this reason the National Arts Council (NAC) takes a view of the arts in a multifaceted way, where we recognise and support the arts in terms of disciplines ranging from craft, dance and literature to theatre, visual arts and music. We believe that in order for the arts to take their rightful place in stimulating socioeconomic development across the continent, their intrinsic and instrumental values must be articulated simultaneously, and supported and promoted effectively to realise their true potential to inspire innovation. Once this is achieved, we will notice the far-reaching implications for positive and sustainable growth. When we view culture as the bedrock of national economic development, we open a world of possibilities for identifying opportunities that could transcend national borders and allow us to fully capture the essence of what it means to be living in a 'global village'. This is vital for our youth – especially since Africa is seen as a 'young continent' with a growing population – in that recognising the importance of culture and locating artistic expression within it, not just for the sake of expression but for socioeconomic growth and development, would enable young people to think more acutely about leadership through creativity and innovation.

for critical thinking and interrogation provided by art encourages robust, considered and constructive responses to the challenges faced by leaders. In this sense, participants in the arts gain confidence to lead as they present their ideas and concepts for interrogation and constructive criticism, while tacitly agreeing to be active, engaged listeners. In this mix, participants in the arts learn the important lesson that achieving anything is only possible through working together and integrating thought and action for positive outcomes. Once art is understood as a means of enhancing value chains, not only economic but political, social and developmental, we’ll realise its potential to forge a platform for regional and global integration that leads to social cohesion and a deepened understanding of our shared needs and aspirations. Hence, the returns of supporting the arts are immeasurable, not only in terms of financial or economic gain, but in the intangible benefits for the present and the future.

Rosemary Mangope is the CEO of the South African National Arts Council

Future strength

Value in values

In practical and immediate terms, there is a need to diversify African economies through the continent’s vast pool of artistic and cultural talent. Multidisciplinary art festivals such as the NAC-supported National Arts Festival in Grahamstown provide platforms for artists to showcase their talent to broad audiences and engage in the crucial mix of art as a multidimensional enabler for growth in the economies of commerce, ideas and innovation. The NAC mandate and guiding principles include the creation of regional synergies and greater co-ordination between the creative and cultural sectors. An integrated Africa, where there is a freer flow of ideas, information, knowledge, commerce and attractive investment opportunities, will be the outcome of harmonised policy in which the arts are prioritised as part of economic growth.

Art promotes grit and perseverance, two key ingredients for effective leadership. In addition, the platform

Text | Rosemary Mangope, CEO, National Arts Council

23 07 16


executive | decision

Straighten up and fly right The common problems all good leaders face and how to overcome them

• •

overthinking without taking action. having too many ideas or activities running in your head at once. You could address these problems by: • steering conversations towards the next steps or actions. • cutting short people in meetings when they are on their pet subjects. • deciding to take small steps towards a goal, even if you are not yet sure of the final result. • taking a productive step and breaking the pattern when stuck thinking unproductive thoughts.

People problems In a study of 60 successful leaders from all walks of life and business, we identified two common challenges even the most skilled and successful leaders have to deal with – managing time and dealing with difficult behaviour. Karen Meager and John McLachlan are the authors of Real Leaders for the Real World, and founders of Monkey Puzzle Training and Consultancy (www. monkeypuzzletraining. co.uk)

Over 80% of participants identified issues around time management as a problem. Some of the key issues included achieving everything they wanted to do, getting distracted, competing priorities and organisational challenges. Despite an abundance of time management courses and books, a sheer lack of time plus competing priorities is a challenge. This is because how you use your time has much more to do with your attitude to your own time than the time itself. People spend time on the things that are important to them at some level. You therefore prioritise your time based on what you believe is most important. If working hard is important to you, you will spend time working hard even if some of that effort doesn’t take you anywhere. That can waste time. Think about the week that has just passed. What did you spend your time on? That will tell you what is important to you. Does what you are spending your time on get you the results you want? If not, what small changes could you make?

Clock culprits

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The most common time wasters are things you can easily address once you are aware of them. These are: • thinking or talking about things you have no influence or control over. • taking action without being completely clear on your outcome. • going over and over conversations or events that have already happened.

The leaders we interviewed commented that working with others and leading a successful team contributed to their enjoyment of their roles. When asked about the things they disliked, most highlighted undesirable behaviour in others that negatively impacted their enjoyment and success. Two key unlikeable behaviours identified were arrogance and bullying. Dealing with these behaviours requires a leader to look behind the behaviour and see what’s driving it. People who seem arrogant usually have confidence issues. As a leader, give them balanced


feedback, including what you think they do well, and help bring their behaviour in line. Bullying is designed to intimidate everyone, including you. You need to be able to control your emotion and stay level-headed when you take on a bully. Some strategies that work well are the following: • If they are standing, stand up as well to match their height and stature as far as possible. Ask them to tell you what the issue is, keeping your language impersonal and tone of voice measured, firm and clear. • Model the behaviour you want other people to practise. If you stand up to a bully, so will they. If you do nothing and then later go and make it up to the person who got attacked, you are just making things worse. By looking behind such behaviours you can become more creative and productive in dealing with people problems and avoid wasting your time. Deal with these problems early and be consistent and you will have much more time and energy to focus on what is important to your success. Text | Karen Meager and John McLachlan Photography | Shutterstock

Lusaka, Zambia

• Bed & Breakfast • Conferences • Wi-Fi • Cocktail Bar & Restaurant • 24hrs Security • Laundry • Car Hire • Airport pick ups and drop offs All these services are offered at very competitive and affordable rates P.O.Box 35788 Plot No. 9708 off Central Street Chudleigh / Plot No. 34474 off Alick Nkhata Road, Mass Media Lusaka Tel: +260 211 294324/27/29 / 258100-3 | Cell: 0955 958111/2 E-mail: info@nomadscourtzambia.com | www.nomadscourtzambia.com


executive | decision

The CEO ABC Q&A Roberto Bottega is the co-owner of Idiom Wines

A

Added value: What do you do for fun?

I’m fortunate that I’m passionate about the things I do, so although wine is work for me, it’s also fun. For recreation, I play a bit of five-a-side football and cycle with my family. When my schedule allows, I try to attend live international sports games. Last year, the Italian football team I’ve supported since birth, Juventus, played in the Champions League final in Berlin. Attendance was compulsory!

Aspirational brand: Who were your heroes or mentors coming up through the ranks? My father, Alberto. I’ve followed in his footsteps by first pursuing a career in finance – I worked for 12 years as a derivatives trader in London and Johannesburg – and then, when the call came, changing profession and relocating to the Cape to help run the family wine business. We make a good team. My passion for football also comes from him. For more information, go to idiom.co.za

C

Cafeteria: What is your favourite restaurant?

Mastrantonio in Illovo and now Il Leone in Cape Town are consistently good. For pushing the boundary in terms of flavours, I’d say Dario de Angeli’s Cube restaurant is right up there. I’m hoping that I’ll also enjoy eating at our new restaurant at Idiom.

Carbon credit: Which environmentally friendly practices do you personally endorse?

Literally or figuratively? My wife and my kids have been known to hide my passport when I tell them I’m going on another ‘business’ trip to Italy.

We’ve been busy with a project to clear alien vegetation on the mountainside above our vineyards so we can create fynbos walks. The flowers are spectacular.

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I’ve just bought a Coravin Model Two, a wine dispenser that uses a needle to extract a glass of wine without having to pull the cork. I still have to test it.

Auditor: Who keeps you grounded?

Bookkeeping: What are you reading?

I’m still addicted to following current affairs due to my training as a trader. But now that we’re opening a restaurant at Idiom in Somerset West, I’m reading Restaurant Man by Joe Bastianich and Never Trust a Skinny Italian Chef by Massimo Bottura for inspiration.

26

Buzzword: What is the latest fad, gadget or trend that you’re enjoying?

Consumer price index: What luxury items are worth spending money on?

Brain drain: What behaviours in others really annoy you?

If it is red and Italian, then it’s hard to resist. I bought a flashy red sports car with the first bit of money I made when I was 23 years old. My mother was furious, telling me that I should rather have bought a house as the car would depreciate and the house would appreciate. She was so right. I still have the car though, so the loss has not been realised yet.

Lack of passion and drive. Bad spelling and grammar. I’m a bit of a perfectionist.

Text | Bruce Dennill Photography | Supplied


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executive | decision

in today’s

world of rapid economic change, employers need to change the conditions of employment of employees frequently due to a variety of operational requirements.

lvan lsraelstam is the Chief Executive of Labour Law Management Consulting. He may be contacted on 011 888 7944 or via email at ivan@ labourlawadvice.co.za

However, many employers have no idea how to go about making the changes in a non-disruptive manner. Added to the practical challenges attached to change is the fact that labour law severely restricts the employer’s right to make changes to the working conditions of employees. For example: • It is not a disciplinary offence for an employee to disobey an unreasonable instruction. And it would not normally be unreasonable for an employee to refuse to work according to new terms and conditions unless this has been agreed to by the employee or his/her representative. • In a takeover of a going concern, the employer is compelled to retain the terms and conditions of employment of the employees concerned. • The Labour Relations Act (LRA) prohibits unfair acts on the part of the employer as regards to employee benefits. • Section 187(1)(c) prohibits the employer from firing employees who refuse to agree to changes in terms and conditions of employment.

Circumstances change If the employee then refuses to agree to the change and is consequently dismissed, this could be seen to be automatically unfair. However, what if the employer needs to change the work circumstances due to its operational requirements? That is, what if, for example, client work circumstances are such that a new shift system is required but the employees are not willing to agree to the change? Is the employer entitled to go into a retrenchment process with a view to hiring employees willing to accept the new terms and conditions of employment? In the case of CWIU and others vs Algorax (Pty) Ltd (2003 11 BLLR 1081) the employer needed to switch to a new shift system but the employees refused to accept this. The employer then retrenched its employees but consistently said that it would reemploy them if they would change their mind and agree to the new shift system. The Labour Appeal Court found that the dismissals did not constitute a genuine retrenchment but was instead a ploy to get the employees to agree to a change in their terms and conditions of employment. The dismissal was therefore automatically unfair in terms of section 187(1)(c). All the employees were to be re-employed with effect from the date of the court order.

Don’t be shifty In the case of Fry’s Metals (Pty) Ltd vs NUMSA and others (2003 2 BLLR 140) the employer also wanted

Forcing workplace change is risky

Both employees’ and employers’ rights must be considered when restructuring a company

28 07 16


to change its shift system. When the employees refused they were retrenched. In sharp contrast to the Algorax decision, the Labour Appeal Court found that the employer had been entitled to do this because the retrenchment had not been used to compel the employees to accede to its demands. Since the Fry’s Metals decision the law has been changed at the insistence of the trade unions. The effect of this is that employers are specifically prohibited from retrenching employees due to their refusal to change their conditions of employment. The above developments mean that, before risking the infringement of section 187(1)(c), employers need to have their specific cases analysed by a labour law expert so that an effective yet legally compliant solution can be devised. Text | Ivan Israelstam Photography | Shutterstock

Make the most of LinkedIn Keep your profile updated Don’t let your LinkedIn profile get dusty and out of date. Regularly update your experience, job titles and career activity so that a prospective recruiter can easily see what you’re up to. New info about your most recent achievements shows that you’re productive. Highlight your strongest selling points Your profile should be detailed, offering recruiters and business contacts an at-aglance view of your education, experience and achievement. Ensure that your most recent and important skills are easy to identify. Polish your summary so that it pops out and sells your strengths. And ensure that you use the right keywords in your summary and list of skills to make it easy for recruiters to find you. Connect with people in your industry Don’t be shy. When you seek to connect with someone, add a polite, personalised note asking them to accept your invitation and explaining what (or whom) you have in common. Text: Heidi Duvenage

29 07 16


executive | decision

Jet-set business travel in Africa International journeys on the continent can be made simpler through proper planning

Stringent, fast-changing visa requirements can impact on operational requirements and timelines for moving required skills across borders, adding a significant layer of cost and delay. Jerry Botha is the managing partner of Xpatweb. Marisa Jacobs heads up work permits, employee benefits and exchange control planning. For more information, go to www.workpermit southafrica.co.za

Luckily, there appears to be a realisation with governments that work and residency permits are important to attract foreign investment and promote international business. South African passport holders are considered visa exempt or can apply for a visa on arrival in 21 African countries, for instance. Going the other way, there are 78 countries whose citizens or passport holders are not required to hold a visa when travelling to South Africa for business. Of these 78 countries, 11 are African countries. There is a thin line between coming to South Africa for business and ‘conducting work’ in South Africa. The last mentioned is not allowed on visitor visas for business purposes and requires a more formalised authorisation to work. Without the correct paperwork, you risk arrest.

Letter of the law

30 07 16

The prudent and conservative approach when coming to ‘conduct work’ in SA is the ‘visitor visa’ under Section 11(2) of the Immigration Act of 2002, as amended. This offers work authorisation for employees seeking to complete short-term projects of up to three months. The applicant needs to apply for this visa in his or her home country before departure to South Africa, regardless of

being visa exempt. These visas can in some instances be extended for a further period of three months from within South Africa. These visas normally take between five and 10 business days to be obtained. The main work permit categories in South Africa for expatriates remain the Intra-Company Transfer Visa (easy to obtain, but you must be employed by the foreign employer for more than six months); the Critical Skills Work Visa (generally easy to obtain, provided your experience and application tick all the boxes); and the General Work Visa (more difficult to obtain). There are obviously other specialist visa categories and, among others, the retirement, business and permanent residency categories may present themselves as viable options. A word of caution is to always consider any adverse tax and exchange control considerations: while some categories may seem like a good idea from an entry perspective, they may prove to be more complicated from a holistic planning perspective.

The rest of Africa Many African locations are relaxing their visa restrictions. Ghana, from this month onwards, will grant all African visitors with a visa on arrival at their borders, furthering social and economic integration across Africa. Zimbabwe also recently relaxed its visa requirements by removing the need for visas for all nationals of SADC countries, including South Africa. On the other hand, countries such as Namibia have tightened their visa rules and South African passport holders will now need to apply for a visa at the consulate ahead of their business travel. Reasons given for this change have been credited to a sense that the visa openness has been abused by many users and the tightening of requirements is in an effort to better control travel to the country.

Visa openness According to the African Development Bank’s first Africa Visa Openness Index, African travellers are visa exempt to travel to 20% of other African countries, with 25% requiring visas on arrival. Thus 55% of African countries require visas for travellers from other African countries. The Index further reports that many of the continent’s regional and strategic hubs have the most restrictive visa policies. Africa’s upper middle income countries have eight out of nine low visa openness scores, whereas Africa’s small, landlocked and island states are more open, promoting trade links with their neighbours. Text | Jerry Botha and Marisa Jacobs Photography | Shutterstock


Funded by: RFSKYDDO2015


great | escapes

In spitting

distance When the stars of the show delay their entrance in Chobe, there are plenty of ways to fill your time

32 07 16


The dry little pellet skimmed over a clump of grass and landed in the sand, only a metre from where I was standing. Drat. I thought my spitting was much better than that. I gargled with some Chardonnay and tried again. Phhooff. This time the dry pip of rhebok pooh flew much further. Yes, I’d finally succumbed to the legendary game where safari guests see who can spit animal dung the furthest. There’s even a name for it in Afrikaans, bok-drol spoeg, which makes your mouth helpfully moist just trying to pronounce it. Strangely, and thankfully, the pooh doesn’t actually taste of anything – as long as you don’t chew.

Hide and seek We’d resorted to silly games after failing to spot a single elephant swinging through the world’s busiest ‘elephant corridor’ linking the famous Chobe in northeast Botswana and Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe. When the plains are dry, the watering hole at the luxurious Camp Kuzuma lodge attracts up to 140 elephants at a time, and its video camera is ranked in the world’s top 25 by EarthCam for its elephant and predator activities. But now water was shimmering throughout the grasslands, leaving the animals spread far and wide. One morning head ranger Gary Perryman leads me on a bush walk, and hundreds of bright yellow and green butterflies flutter up in unison as we pass. Perryman tells fabulous stories about the time he was charged by a black rhino, and the several times he’s faced down charging lions. He points out a trail of Matabele ants searching for a termite mound to raid and plunder. Then he tells me how to fix a missing button using an ant’s head. You hold the large ant up to your shirt, and once it bites the material you snap off its body, leaving its head in place as a button. I look at him askance, but he swears this bewildering tale of bush life is true.

Camp and cruise Camp Kuzuma is an hour’s drive from Kasane Airport with transfers, game drives and full board included in the cost. Go to www.campkuzuma. com for further info

Camp Kuzuma is a five-star lodge with only five suites, a swimming pool and a bush spa. Each morning the sun had me up by 6am, shining through the long meshed panels of my tented suite. Technically it’s a tent, but equipped with a sundeck, a massive bed, safari-style decor, a bath, his-‘n-hers showers and a deliciously naughty outdoor shower too.

33 07 16


great | escapes

How to get there

Airlink flies from Johannesburg to Kasane in Botswana. See page 87 for the flight schedule www.flyairlink.com

The flaps are zipped back every morning for a brilliant view, leaving nothing between you and the animals. One squirrel may now be the baffled owner of a toothbrush, since one went missing from another tent and camp manager Jaco Kok reckons squirrels are the prime suspects. The camp is eco-friendly, generating electricity from solar panels, drawing water from a borehole and pumping used water through a processing plant and into the waterhole. Elevated wooden walkways connect the main lodge to the suites and a guide with a torch escorts you home at night, in case a leopard is skulking on the boardwalks. We find the absent elephants a day later on a Chobe River cruise. After lunch at a floating restaurant appropriately called The Raft we putter downstream, pulling up close to crocodiles, a gaggle of pied hummingbirds nesting in

mud banks and hippos rising briefly to survey the view. Then the elephants come. First a mother and her young calf, clowning around in the mud beneath her belly. Then some youngsters, with one horny teenager trying to mate with another male. Another takes exception to a cheeky wading bird and repeatedly tries to charge it, flapping and trumpeting furiously. A herd of buffalo wanders down, and the elephants give them space. It’s magical, watching the action from our watery vantage point, and as our little boat nudges even closer I wonder if the testosterone-fuelled youngsters will take exception to our intrusion too. But they tramp off into the bush and seconds later they’re invisible. I suspect they were silently watching me spitting all along. Text | Lesley Stones Photography | Lesley Stones and Shutterstock

A manager worth meeting Botswana has rounded up its rhino into highly protected game reserves, so Camp Kuzuma isn’t in big five territory. But its flamboyant manager Jaco Kok is a sight worth seeing. With a flair for words, an extraordinary supply of anecdotes and a passion for cooking, it’s odd that he spent years in the mining industry before discovering his talent for hospitality.

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He was a contender for MasterChef South Africa but was dismissed because he didn’t have a ‘TV personality’. Are they kidding? He’d have stolen the show! He’s cooked with Madonna’s favourite chef Giorgio Locatelli, admits an addiction to wine gums, and proudly presents dishes like pancakes filled with artichoke hearts in oriental sauce and

liquorice-infused mascarpone, which wobbles like a boob implant. One evening after the staff has sung for us around the fire, Kok lyrically tells us that his camp offers the spiritual five: the hypnotic lull of the fire, the tranquillity of water, aromas of the bush, the sound of silence and the rhythm of Africa. Worth considering …


great | escapes

A passion passed down Father and son duo share more than 30 years of guiding experience in Zambian wilderness

36 07 16


“you could

blindfold me and I could still find my way around.” These are the words of Idos Mulenga, a guide in the Kafue National Park, who has worked in the area for over 23 years. Idos shares his passion for guiding with his son Newton. Inspired by his father, Newton began working in Kafue as a guide and like his father, decided to join Wilderness Safaris. It was after a visit in 2006 and seeing the magnificent Busanga Plains and its incredible wildlife that he decided to follow in his father’s footsteps and be a safari guide. Idos  I have worked here for 10 years, and I love working in Kafue. If you were to ask me why I would encourage someone to visit, I would say first and foremost, the strongest pull factor is Kafue’s remote location. It’s special. It’s not like the Serengeti, where you and 100 other cars are at a sighting. Here, it’s just you and the wilderness. Newton My dream for Kafue is that the area will one day be appreciated in the same way as the Okavango Delta. Like the Delta, it looks like heaven. When it comes to watching an animal hunting, Kafue’s open plains mean that you can watch the action from start to finish without trees or tall grass obscuring your view.

What is your most memorable sighting? Idos My most memorable sighting was when the Papyrus Pride killed a hippo. I was on a morning game drive when we came across two lionesses feeding on a hippo carcass – an animal who had died of natural causes. Then our attention was diverted by a screaming sound coming from the other side of the channel. When I looked through my binoculars I saw another lioness on another hippo! This hippo was very much alive and its screaming attracted the rest of the pride who enthusiastically joined in, helping the lioness to finish the battle. We left the sighting to quickly cross the Idos Bridge, and drove to get to the battlefield where we found the hippo still alive and fighting. We watched until the pride won the fight and began to enjoy their second feast of the day. Newton For me, watching two male cheetahs chase and

Idos Mulenga (top left) is based at Shumba Camp and Newton Mulenga (top right) works at Busanga Plains Camp

kill a puku right in front of our vehicle has to be one of my most memorable sightings.

Are there any special sightings that you like to look for when guiding in this area? Newton Leopard and cheetah are always special to find, but we often have great sightings of honey badgers, sable and Lichtenstein’s hartebeest. I have a soft spot for cheetah, so much so that I even named my game vehicle ‘Cheetah’. They are such beautiful cats, and their hunting skills always amaze me. Idos  When I am guiding I try my best to find wildlife that guests are hoping to see; of course nothing is guaranteed, but it’s always great to come across a hunt.

Rhino relocation In 2015, Wilderness Safaris, the Botswana, South African and Zimbabwean governments and a number of private partners collaborated in the largest ever cross-border translocation of Critically Endangered black rhino. The Botswana Defence Force upgraded its mission statement to declare the protection of the country’s wildlife as its “main mission”.

Do you have a favourite spot at Busanga or Shumba where you like to take your guests? Newton I like to take guests to the papyrus area in Busanga. This section of the park is so beautiful. You will often see thousands of red lechwe grazing and sometimes if you are lucky you may even see a lion in their midst. It’s green as far as the eye can see – my idea of heaven. Idos  I have three favourite spots where I like to take my guests: Hippo Pools for great sightings of hippos yawning at sunset; Fish Eagle’s nest for sunsets with lots of lechwe; and Paradise Area if I am on the lookout for cheetah. Text | Kate Collins Photography | Supplied and Shutterstock

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great | escapes

A land of letters

Soweto guesthouse is a great base from which to explore new literary horizons On a typical Soweto street with potholes and unfinished brickwork, an attractive structure stands out amid unplastered walls and mismatched doorframes. Flossie’s B&B catches your eye with its attractive design and finish. This guesthouse is located in Pimville, an area with a rich history, featuring prominently in South African literature. The famous poet Oswald Mtshali lives there. Sol Plaatje died there. Various South African authors have written about it. But a new story is unfolding – a beautiful and curious one about what it means to be a‘greentrepreneur’ in this culture. Florence Mondi is a wonderful raconteur and her guesthouse is a perfect setting for a vibrant short story of a new energy coming to life. The tale starts in 2006. Florence Mondi was tired of being an area manager for the Post Office. She heard that the World Cup was coming to South Africa and she wanted to invite foreign guests into her home. She talks about the early days when she had a three-roomed house and a big dream. “I’d never stayed in a B&B, but I’d imagined working in a hotel. I wanted to travel. I loved meeting new people from different countries. The strange journeys in life always lead us to where we belong,” she says, sounding like a character from a novel. “I didn’t have a clue how to get people coming through my door …”

Self-starter If the idea of being self-employed got her going, the notion of going green was the next. She began planting organic veggies in old tyres stacked in her tiny yard,

installed water-saving showerheads instead of bathtubs, and uses biodegradable cleaning products and laundry processes. Florence’s tenacity and attention to the details of running a home-from-home establishment ensure that regulars return. She knows the German Lufthansa pilot by name, and asks after his mother. She remembers that the Free State engineer likes his bacon extra crispy. She trains her staff to ensure that guests want for nothing while under her roof. Florence is a participant in Fetola’s #JustAddGreen incubator programme, funded by JP Morgan, and Flossie’s B&B was recently awarded a three-star rating. She’s committed to creating an environmental consciousness in the area, and enlists local youth to sort and sell the waste generated by her business. Text | Supplied Photography | Supplied and Shutterstock

For more information, call Florence Mondi on 011 933 2483, email flossiebnb@ telkomsa.net or visit www.flossiesbnb.com

In the area Looking for local attractions? Try a roller coaster at Gold Reef City, visit Mandela’s house in Orlando, or tour the Hector Pieterson Memorial. When you’re done bungee jumping from the Orlando Towers, check out the works of local authors at the Pimville library and then curl up with a book.

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great | escapes

Urban adventure Architecture and attitude give Sandton hotel a novel ambience

it’s fitting,

given that the place shares a name with H Rider Haggard’s swashbuckling action hero, that arriving at the Quatermain in Morningside, Johannesburg for the first time feels like discovering an ancient city that history has forgotten. Attractive hotel’s design blocks out both sight and sound of busy CBD

Within sight of Sandton’s shiny corporate headquarters, the hotel is built in such a way that the outside world – and, notably, the noise it creates – is shut out. A central quad and the narrow red-brick buildings (complete with tall chimneys) that surround it recall the atmosphere of an Oxbridge college, something that immediately sets the venue apart from the cookiecutter designs of some of its competitors.

The business of hospitality

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Given its location, it’s not surprising to discover that most of the Quatermain’s guests are business travellers, though manager Mark Wernich reveals that nearby Sandton City and its myriad retail outlets are a far bigger tourist drawcard than locals might believe, and that he often hosts guests who are simply in town to spend their money in those shops. A look around the restaurant over breakfast confirms that an international clientele has business to do in the

area with, at a glance, several African nations, China and a United Arab Emirate or two represented. That cosmopolitan feel is continued behind the scenes via Burundian chef Coco Reinarhz, whose honeyed accent makes women swoon (watch, if you meet him; their knees seem to collectively fail as he holds court). He runs the Sel et Poivre restaurant, which doubles as the hotel’s breakfast room, rather eroding the atmosphere if you ate a romantic meal there in the evening and then spent an hour alongside drowsy businessmen trying to get themselves up and going for the day.

Appetising opulence Having Reinarhz on hand, however, is supremely handy when there’s a bespoke event to cater for, and a recent Glenfiddich whisky tasting benefited no end from his expertise. Held in a cosy lounge, with a fireplace, bar, verandah and, for this event, a long, beautifully decorated dining table, the event was designed to celebrate the amber liquid, something which can’t responsibly be done on an empty stomach. Glenfiddich’s dapper, engaging National Brand Ambassador, Luthando ‘Jezz’ Tibini, presented his wares with infectious enthusiasm and a breadth of knowledge that included the once (still?) sacrilegious


likes of rubbing a couple of drops of whisky between your hands to burn off the alcohol and leave behind the true flavours in the residual bouquet. Reinarhz then complemented that with his ideas as to the tastes he encountered in the whisky and how he either enhanced or countered those in a menu including quail and foie gras on a bed of peach and cloves tatin, salmon with a fennel and green pea puree, duck breast with a marzipan and coffee jus on a French toast brioche and Belgian chocolate moelleux with caramelised pears.

Quiet character Needless to say, such a bounty requires some working off, and the Quatermain’s central garden is a beautiful spot for a short stroll or an even shorter swim – there’s a single lane lap pool set among the flowers, rockeries and koi ponds. City hotels often suffer from a chronic lack of personality, but this one does not, having sufficient superficial distinctions to make it look and feel different as you walk in, and the potential, as with the whisky event, to put a fresh, lavish spin on an

otherwise straightforward brief. Just don’t point out that the bloke in the poster behind the reception desk looks a lot more like Indiana Jones than Allan Quatermain ... Text | Bruce Dennill Photography | Supplied

For more information on the Quatermain Hotel, go to quatermain. co.za, or to learn more about Glenfiddich, visit glenfiddich.com/za/


great | escapes

Cracking good show A giant plastic Poodle ogles tourists walking around Cape Town’s Victoria & Alfred Waterfront. For passers-by, the artwork is a monument to kitsch, a counterpoint to the natural beauty of Table Mountain in the distance. But Belgian artist William Sweetlove is communicating more than that. The Poodle is made of a plastic produced via a thermo-chemical reaction in crude oil (a process known as ‘cracking’), and the fact that it has an exact twin displayed close by marks it as a clone. Both of these facets underscore Sweetlove’s drive to raise awareness around environmental concerns using aspects of surrealism and pop art.

44 07 16


tech | innovation

Deep radio imaging is the new black Astronomers in South Africa discover mysterious alignment of black holes

deep radio

imaging by researchers at the University of Cape Town and University of the Western Cape has revealed that supermassive black holes in a region of the distant universe are all spinning out radio jets in the same direction – most likely a result of primordial mass fluctuations in the early universe, according to a new paper published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (MNRAS). The new result is the discovery – for the first time – of an alignment of the jets of radio galaxies over a large volume of space, a finding made possible by a three-year deep radio imaging survey of the radio waves coming from a region called ELAIS-N1 using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). A glimpse of the early universe will be revealed when the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is operational

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In a spin The radio jets are produced by the supermassive black holes at the centres of these galaxies, and the only way for this alignment to exist is if supermassive black holes are all spinning in the same direction, says Prof Andrew Russ Taylor, joint UWC/UCT

SKA Chair, Director of the recently launched InterUniversity Institute for Data Intensive Astronomy and principal author of the MNRAS study. “Since these black holes don’t know about each other, or have any way of exchanging information or influencing each other directly over such vast


Filling in the spaces Radio astronomy: The study of astronomical objects and occurrences at radio frequencies – sources include stars, galaxies, radio galaxies and pulsars. Deep radio imaging constructs images of deep space based on these radio observations. Square Kilometre Array: A structure that will collect and process vast amounts of radio-astronomical data, and will stimulate cutting-edge advances in high-performance computing. Producing the thousands of dishes required for the SKA within the project’s time scales will also demand an entirely new way of building highly sophisticated and sensitive scientific instruments – which should lead to new innovations

in manufacturing and construction. South Africa’s MeerKAT telescope is an SKA precursor – a ‘pathfinder’ telescope. It consists of 64 dish-shaped antennas, and is temporarily the most powerful radio telescope in the southern hemisphere. MeerKAT (and Australia’s SKA Pathfinder, ASKAP) form part of SKA Phase 1. Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope: An array of radio telescopes at metre wavelengths. It is operated by the National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, part of the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Dubai. The world’s largest interferometric array at the time of its building in 1995, it is a very versatile instrument for investigating a range of radio astrophysical problems.

scales, this spin alignment must have occurred during the formation of the galaxies in the early universe,” he notes. This implies that there is a coherent spin in the structure of this volume of space that was formed from the primordial mass fluctuations that seeded the creation of the large scale structure of the universe. With study co-author – and UCT PhD student currently working at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, New Mexico, USA – Preshanth Jagannathan, the team discovered the alignment after the initial image had been made. Within the large-scale structure, there were regions where the spin axes of galaxies lined up.

The presence of alignments and certain preferred orientations can shed light on the orientation and evolution of the galaxies, relation to large scale structures and the motions in the primordial matter fluctuations that gave rise to the structure of the universe. UWC Prof Romeel Dave, SARChI Chair in Cosmology with Multi-Wavelength Data, who leads a team developing plans for universe simulations that could explore the growth of large scale structure from a theoretical perspective, agrees: “This is not obviously expected based on our current understanding of cosmology. It’s a bizarre finding.”

Bonus discovery

Such imaging projects are in the planning stages for the SKA and its precursor telescopes, the South African MeerKAT array and the Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP). “GMRT is one of the largest and most sensitive radio telescope arrays in the world,” notes Prof Taylor, “but we really need MeerKAT to make the very sensitive maps, over a very large area and with great detail, that will be necessary to differentiate between possible explanations. It opens up a whole new research area for these instruments, which will probe as deeply into the universe and as far back as we can go – it’s going to be an exciting time to be an astronomer.”

The finding wasn’t planned for: the initial investigation was to explore the faintest radio sources in the universe, using the best available telescopes – a first view into the kind of universe that will be revealed by the South African MeerKAT radio telescope and the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), the world’s most powerful radio telescope and one of the biggest scientific instruments ever devised. Earlier observational studies had previously detected deviations from isotropy in the orientation of galaxies. But these sensitive radio images offer a first opportunity to use radio jets to reveal alignments of radio galaxies on physical scales of up to 100Mpc (megaparsec – equal to a million parsecs, where one parsec is 3.26 million light years).

South Africa has a hugely important role to play in future exploration of the cosmos

International collaboration

Text | Supplied Photography | Supplied and Shutterstock

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tech | innovation

Daredevil drones

Startup Skydio has developed a more sophisticated autopilot for drones

On a recent bike ride through the woods near Menlo Park, California, Adam Bry, CEO of a company called Skydio, was joined by a small, nimble drone. As he rode along a dirt track, the drone followed close by, weaving expertly around tree trunks and branches in a series of deft manoeuvres.

Skyways, in association with MIT Technology Review, brings you the latest technological innovations

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What’s amazing is that the drone wasn’t piloted by a person but by Skydio’s technology. It lets an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) use several video cameras to avoid obstacles and to navigate at high speeds through busy airspace as capably as a human pilot. That kind of autonomy could transform the consumer drone market by making aircraft much harder to crash. It could also make it easier for drones to do tasks autonomously even in active settings. “The motivation for the company is giving the thing the agility, attention and awareness that an expert pilot has,” Bry said. He declined to say when Skydio’s first product would appear or how much it might cost. Flying autonomously is more difficult than driving because the hardware needs to be compact and light, and because even the slightest miscalculation can result in disaster. The drone developed by Skydio uses a camera together with vision-processing software that lets the aircraft determine where it is in space and identify and avoid obstacles. Bry developed the necessary algorithms with Abraham Bachrach, Skydio’s chief technology officer, while both were students at MIT. The techniques they came up with made it possible for drones to navigate through unfamiliar indoor spaces safely and for a plane with a two-foot wingspan to weave its way around a busy garage without crashing.

Nick Roy, a professor of robotics who advised Bry and Bachrach at MIT, expects aerial vehicles to become more common for surveillance and inspection tasks. But he adds that reliable autopilot, toward which Skydio has taken a significant step, is a key missing piece of that picture. “If we want these things to provide all the services people are hoping for in terms of infrastructure inspection, precision agriculture, filming in various ways – that’s going to require autonomy,” Roy said. Today, most drones are controlled remotely or are only capable of basic automation. A few drones are starting to come with more advanced obstacle identification and avoidance, but none is as sophisticated as Skydio’s prototype. The latest drone from Chinese company DJI, the Phantom 4, uses several cameras to spot impediments, and it will override the controller’s actions if it seems likely to run into something. It can also track moving objects using its vision system, but it doesn’t perform the kind of mapping and navigation that Skydio’s drone does. “Navigation is absolutely crucial, especially in flight,” said Lora Weiss, chief scientist of the Georgia Institute of Technology’s Institute for Intelligent Machines. Weiss is working on projects involving UAVs with even more advanced autonomy. Some of the systems she is developing are, for example, able to deviate from a given course if they spot something of interest, and then call for help from other aircraft. “The nimbleness in navigation is really going to be crucial for where these things are going,”Weiss said. Text | Will Knight Photography | Supplied and Shutterstock


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tech | innovation

Don’t cross this

RUBICON Amped-up Jeep delivers incredible off-road performance, but at a price

Hellboy, the comic book and big-screen hero: A fictional superhero with superhuman strength, endurance and some resistance to injury. Hellboy, the Jeep: A real super-4x4 with super off-road talent, overlanding ability and, well, a hefty fuel bill.

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Leisure wheels is South Africa's foremost adventure motoring magazine. For this reason Skyways has chosen to work with Leisure wheels when it comes to providing you with motoring information. For more on the topic of adventure motoring, look out for the current issue of Leisure wheels, on sale now. www.leisurewheels.com

Custom Jeep Wranglers are a dime a dozen. In fact, a stock Wrangler is as rare as a metro police officer who actually cares about road safety. But every so often there’s this one Jeep that makes you sit up and take notice. One that not only stops the traffic in the looks department, but that also has the ultimate ability to match the show. Muscle Trucks’ Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon is such a Jeep. They call it ‘Hellboy’. Featuring almost R500,000 worth of upgrades, Hellboy is an extremely capable off-roader that you can still live with on a daily basis. And, you can still use it for overlanding for a family of four.

All change! Built to showcase the company’s bigger-wheeled building prowess, Hellboy features run-of-the-mill upgrades as well as unique custom touches. Hansie Coetzee, owner of TJM Pretoria-East and Muscle Trucks, says that creating Hellboy presented unique challenges.

“There are many custom Jeep Wranglers out there, so to create something out of the ordinary, you need some deep pockets,”he says. But all the money in the world can’t necessarily buy the attention to detail found in this Jeep. The Hellboy story started with a stock Jeep Wrangler Unlimited 3.6 Rubicon AT that Coetzee bought specifically as a custom project base vehicle. The 3.6ℓ V6 engine produces 209kW of power and 347Nm of torque in stock trim, so the mill remains 100% stock.“I prefer a quiet, refined drive, and since the engine has plenty of horses on tap, we left it standard,”says Coetzee. He changed the ratios in the Dana front and rear differentials, swapping out for cogs that allow the Jeep to run on the much bigger wheels (38-inchers) with hassle. In fact, Coetzee reckons the bigger-wheeled Jeep drinks the same amount of petrol as a stock Rubicon V6, using, on average, around 17ℓ/100km. To fit those big Mickey Ts and custom rims (worth about R100,000), the car’s suspension had to be upgraded too. Cue the sound of the cash register again.


A Nielsen survey polling 1,222 respondents in the United States aged 16 and older shows that texts and calls from parents and family members asking the whereabouts of young drivers are one of the biggest distractions when they’re on the road, and that those calls come even after they’ve told their parents and family members where they’re going and that they’ll be behind the wheel.

Hellboy is fitted with an AEV 4.5-inch (115cm) suspension lift and Fox shocks all-round, as well as a Fox steering damper. This upgrade is worth almost R120,000. The specially reinforced differentials and modified ratios added R40,000. But this R160,000 has endowed Hellboy with super4x4 abilities. Add the custom differential ratios, the huge mud terrain tyres, acres of ground clearance and standard lockers for the front and rear diffs, and Hellboy truly is as unstoppable as you can wish for in a 4x4.

Feeling high Getting into this Jeep is the first surprise – the doorsill is about a metre off the ground! Hellboy looks like it could raise hell – but it’s a bit of an anticlimax when you fire up the 3.6ℓ V6. Instead of a horde of bloodthirsty wild hyenas howling and yelping and growling, it’s all very quiet, refined, and standard. And it’s not as if the stock V6 engine is lacking any get-upand-go – with that 209kW on call, and with the five-speed

automatic gearbox reasonably willing, Hellboy can cover ground briskly. On the open road, cruising at 120km/h, it easily maintains its momentum, the cabin (with its decent sound system) a cocoon of relative luxury. The Wolwekloof 4x4 trail boasts some tough obstacles that will give most 4x4s a workout. But with low range selected and the front sway bar disconnected, driving Hellboy here was a bit like going to target practice at the local small arms range – with an Elephant tank. With the lockers and with all the wheels that remain in contact with the ground in ridiculously tough situations, you can simply crawl in first gear up, over and through everything. This 4x4 is one of the most capable off-roaders we’ve ever experienced, and it strikes a great balance between realworld usability and extreme 4x4 talents. Text | Danie Botha Photography | Deon van der Walt and Henrie Snyman

For more information phone 4x4 Muscle Trucks on 012 809 0090 or go to www.tjmptaeast.co.za

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tech | innovation

KIT AND KABOODLE

Gadgets

New gadgets and updated apps to try out

Exercising the right to choose FitKey, which electronically pairs those wanting to exercise on the go with an exercise class in their area, has grown phenomenally since its inception in May 2015. With over 200 studios coming on board, FitKey plans to garner a portfolio of over 1,000 venues by next year, giving South Africans a world of choice. For a monthly fee of R495 (R250 trial), gym-goers can use FitKey’s mobile app to book classes by the location, time and type of fitness class they’re after. “I am so excited to see which new studios join,” says Lisa Raleigh, brand ambassador for FitKey. “Having access to so many exercise options benefits us two-fold – we stay motivated to keep fit because training is never boring, and our metabolisms stay fired up because our bodies are kept guessing with no opportunity to plateau.” The FitKey app is available from iTunes and Google Play.

Just be yourself

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The ThisIsMe app (available from iTunes and Google Play) conclusively proves that not only are you who you say you are, but you are still alive – assisting in preventing identity theft and other instances of fraud. Conceptualised in 2013 and formally established in 2014, ThisIsMe verifies an individual’s identity to other individuals, businesses, financial institutions and

Wooden performance Houdt has launched their 2016 MacBook cover range. Inspired by the functional beauty of nature, the MacBook cover range is designed to protect the top of your MacBook from everyday spills, bangs, bumps and scratches. The range is available in 11", 12", 13" and 15" with retina and non-retina displays. There are three nature-inspired wood variants; these include Bamboo, Cherrywood and Walnut. The covers are available from R449 at www.houdt.co.za or selected iFix stores. Harvesting returns 2016 is a challenging year for all producers in the agricultural sector, given currency instability and drought. Sound financial management and optimised farming are of prime importance. The key to accurate planning is knowledge and tracking of real-time data. Farmtrack is a GPS tracking system for all farm vehicles that tracks movement and driving habits. It is easily installed and auto-generates in-depth reports that allow farm managers to make money-saving changes to the farm’s way of working. Data is stored in a cloud account and can be accessed via the internet and protected with a password. Fitting a Farmtrack-device costs R4,950 with an annual service fee of R4,650. For more information, please visit www.farmtracksa.com. regulators. It does so using links to Home Affairs and major banks. “Currently, South Africans are using the ThisIsMe app for FICA purposes and to avoid the hassle of paperwork and duplicated effort in this regard. They are also actively verifying each other using the early releases of our mobile apps,” says CEO Mark Chirnside. Text and photography | Supplied


Premium Range. Premium Service. Woodford Car Hire offers a wide range of luxury vehicles with a tailored service to suit any occasion or need. Speak to Woodford Car Hire today for a premium experience.

031 207 8669 | woodford@woodford.co.za | www.woodford.co.za

South Africa’s largest independent car hire company.


in | accord

Buzz off, elephants Creative initiative seeks to protect iconic trees

scientists

working in Limpopo are using African honey bees as a natural control measure to prevent elephants from destroying marula trees, in a pioneering project that could help ease the human-elephant conflict. It’s bees versus behemoths as conservationists try to find a solution to an environmental challenge

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Despite their being the world’s largest land mammal, research has shown that elephants are afraid of bees, staying away from trees populated by the insects. At around 3cm thick, the elephants’ skin is of the thickest of any animal, but a rich supply of nerves makes it extremely sensitive, with the pachyderms feeling every fly that lands on their bodies. A bee sting then is a painful experience that most elephants try to avoid. Often regarded as gentle giants, elephants can wreak destruction on reserves, using their immense power

to knock down hundreds of trees. To prevent this, non-profit organisation Elephants Alive and master’s student Robin Cook have hung 115 beehives on the branches of marula trees in the Jejane Private Nature Reserve in Limpopo.

Natural solution “In South Africa, Protected Areas managers and tourists alike are concerned that our expanding elephant population will negatively affect the number and structure of iconic tree species such as the marula. Fruitbearing marulas have huge cultural significance and economic importance,” says Elephants Alive founder Dr Michelle Henley. In some areas, affection for marulas is so great that many people would rather see elephant numbers reduced than have the tree structures altered. Having


Hive mentality “During initial studies in Kenya we noticed that 94% of elephants moved away from the source of the bee sounds within 80 seconds. Alarmed elephants also engage in head-shaking and dusting behaviours as if they want to knock the insects out of the air. The evidence suggested that elephants can identify bees by sound alone,” says King. King says that beehive fences have reduced crop raids by around 80%, while also preventing the injury and death of elephants attacked by irate farmers. “Farms have also experienced higher productivity than those farm areas which are unprotected,” King says. The Elephants Alive team are using King’s findings to test whether hives could be equally effective at protecting trees in South Africa. The team worked during the night to set up the hives, as the bees are calmer when it’s dark. The ropes used to suspend the hives were covered in engine grease, to prevent ants from being attracted to the sweet honey and destroying the bees’ new homes. With the bees struggling with prevailing drought conditions, the team also created specially designed feeders filled with sugar water to keep the insects nourished. Each study tree is also surrounded by a control tree (with no hive) and another study tree with wire-net protection. Remarkably, not a single bee-protected tree has been impacted so far.

Elephants Alive staff place a hive in a marula tree

Green is for go

studied the impacts of elephants on large trees since 2004, Elephants Alive were approached by South African National Parks (SANParks) in 2012 to discuss ways of keeping elephants out of areas where tall trees need to be preserved as part of biodiversity objectives. “One method included using wire-net protection around the stem of a tree to prevent bark from being stripped. Over 3,000 of these trees are being monitored for elephant impact,” says Henley. In search of a more natural control measure, Elephants Alive drew on work done by Dr Lucy King, head of the Human-Elephant Co-Existence Programme at Save the Elephants. King has done extensive research on the use of beehive fences to prevent elephants from destroying crops in Kenya, Botswana, Mozambique, Tanzania, Uganda and Sri Lanka. Her results have been eye-opening.

The Sandton Convention Centre has been selected to host the Green Building Convention for the first time, putting the spotlight on Sandton and Gauteng as a hub of green building. Sandton is home to more than 20 projects certified by the Green Building Council South Africa (GBCSA). The Green Building Convention takes place from 26 to 28 July 2016. Go to www. gbcsaconvention.org.za for more information.

Busy bees Henley explains that the results of the study could yield greater benefits than simply protecting the marula trees, by creating jobs and increasing food security as beehive fences are constructed around farms. “Both farmers and managers need tools to protect their assets. Bees have the added benefit of providing honey and functioning as important pollinators. As local people are trained to manufacture beehives and develop beekeeping skills, studies such as these not only contribute towards science but also broaden local community skills. It could become a valuable case study for promoting job creation,” she says. Text | Dale Hes Photography | Supplied and Shutterstock

55 07 16


in | accord

Blueprints for green buildings Young architect focuses on environmental design elements Lomile Mokoko was just eight years old when she got the first inkling of how profoundly certain buildings affected her. Her family had moved from a Polokwane township into the suburbs where she was enrolled at the first private school in the area.

Designing healthy, sustainable and beautiful environments is a priority

“Our new swimming pool was thrilling, but it was set at the back of the house. When you wanted a snack, you had to run all the way round the property.” She soon realised she didn’t particularly like the fancy new house. “It was a long sprawling building, but it felt like living in a dormitory.” She proposed various changes to enhance the ambience of the house, improving the inside-outside flow, but although her mother liked the design suggestions, she was unready to take up her eightyear-old daughter’s recommendations. This experience informed Lomile’s career choice. She pored over interior design magazines and was good at sketching. She had won prizes for art, and set her heart on becoming an architect. During her studies she became aware of environmental design elements that reduced the carbon footprint of the building, such as the use of natural ventilation instead of air-conditioning. She thrived on lectures that focused on green construction. She welcomed learning how a building could regulate itself. For example, if a building is orientated correctly towards the sun, the requirements for light influence the placement of windows, which in turn affects the need for heating and cooling. All these considerations were further influenced by the aspect of the landscape and surrounding plant life, or absence thereof.

Building a career

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Lomile studied further, doing a master’s thesis on green design. She was nominated to represent Wits University at the third International Holcim Forum in Mexico in 2010, where exposure to environmentally conscious world leaders in the field focused her career plans.

“I saw and heard how traditional approaches to the design, fabrication, and use of built structures have to undergo significant changes in order to address the needs of future generations. It became clear that a radically integrated approach that encompasses the entire life cycle of a building would drive my way going forward.” In 2011, Lomile started working for WSP Green by Design as a sustainability consultant, guiding project teams in how to design environmentally sustainable buildings in accordance with the rating requirements of the Green Business Council of South Africa. Lomile started Seru Architects just two years after visiting Mexico. Her priority as an architect is to create healthy, sustainable and beautiful environments that are consistent with a green sensibility. “We aim to lessen the impact on our environment and make the Earth a safer place for future generations,” she says. Now a Green Star Accredited Professional with the Green Building Council of South Africa, Lomile aims to carve a place in what is traditionally a maledominated arena. As a girl, Lomile understood the impact of a building on one’s sense of self. As an adult, her world view now aims at influencing the environment in substantial and positive ways. Text and photography | Supplied


in | accord

Fuelled for effectiveness Take our quick test to see if your eating habits are helping you maintain the energy levels your work and lifestyle require

are you

rushing around with more things to get done than there are hours in a day? Family and work commitments, social pressures and the daily challenges of a full life tend to make health and nutrition less of a pressing concern. Fatigue can be the result of poor eating choices

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It is no wonder that we resort to using ready-made foods for refuelling. But this lifestyle increases stress levels, reduces energy levels, and leaves you feeling tired. There is no quick fix to boosting your energy, feeling balanced and improving your wellbeing. It starts with understanding the fundamentals needed in place before trying a gimmick or expensive regimen. Assessing how you fuel or feed yourself is a good place to start.

How well do you fuel?

In-flight assessment

3.

Which statements apply to you? Score one if the food or principle applies to you five or more than five days per week. (In other words do not select the statement if the principle applies to you four days a week or less.)

1.

2.

4.

I eat a balanced breakfast at least five days a week. A balanced breakfast includes fibre and protein and/or healthy fats. (So no points for a bowl of cornflakes). I eat regularly. I eat breakfast, lunch and supper at least five days a week. When I don’t have time for three meals a day, I eat small snacks throughout the day. I eat a minimum of two tennis-ball-sized portions of fresh fruit at least five days of the week. I eat at least three tennis-ball-sized portions of vegetables or salad at least five days of the week.


What’s your score? 8-10: This score indicates that good nutrition has become part of your lifestyle. Look at the habits you did not select and think about how you could shift just one of them today. 5-7: This score shows that your modern lifestyle (or lack of knowledge and/or motivation) may be interfering with your ability to put good nutrition principles into practice. Pick just one statement that you feel will be easy to do differently and immediately – today. 0-4: This score indicates that you may be lacking the knowledge or tools to properly implement good eating habits. Ask an expert to help you put together an eating programme. Although how much you exercise and how you manage your emotional wellbeing is also important for managing fatigue, ensuring that you have good fuelling fundamentals in place is essential. 5.

6.

7. 8.

9.

10.

On most days of the week I include a small serving of nuts, seeds, avocado, olives or nut butters as snacks, or I choose foods such as seeds and nuts in muesli, avocado on high-fibre bread, or olives in salad. I eat some omega-3-rich food at least five times a week – fresh or smoked salmon, pilchards, sardines, other fatty fish, omega-3-rich eggs, flaxseeds, linseeds, linseed oil, flax oil. When buying meals, snacks or beverages out of home, I choose the smallest portion 80% of the time. I make sure I drink enough water every day; that is my body weight in kilograms divided by 10 to give the number of glasses of water I should drink per day (one glass = 200mℓ minimum). I limit my daily caffeine intake to no more than 300mg, which is about the equivalent of four single espressos or eight cups of regular tea. I also limit caffeine-containing energy drinks or colatype drinks whether they contain sugar or not. I limit my alcohol intake to one or two units per day – one single tot, 125mℓ wine, 330mℓ beer (or none at all).

Text | Celynn Erasmus and Joni Peddie Photography | Shutterstock


panorama

Light work

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Many associate Las Vegas with tackiness, but artist Dale Chihuly’s sculpture, Fiori di Como, which combines steel and Viennese Murano glass, lifts the tone somewhat. The piece hangs from the ceiling in the lobby of the famous Bellagio hotel. It cost $10 million (R150 million) in 1998 and attracts between 15,000 and 20,000 tourists a day, some of whom lie on the floor beneath the piece, which covers 195m², in order to properly appreciate it. The sculpture comprises 2,000 handblown glass blossoms supported by a steel structure – all of this weighs around 23,000kg. A dedicated team of eight to 10 staff clean the piece daily between 2am and 5am.


s e t o N

sudoku

time | out

Try the addictive game of Sudoku. The aim is to fill each block with a number from 1 to 9. Each number must not appear more than once in each row, column and square. If you can’t finish this puzzle during your flight, please take this free copy of Skyways with you. The cabin attendant will make sure that the next passengers get their own magazine, with a clean Sudoku for them to puzzle over! Puzzles taken from www.krazydad.com

challenging

Puzzles supplied by Conceptis, www.conceptispuzzles.com

easy

Solutions can be found on page 95

battleship Each Battleship puzzle represents a section of ocean with a hidden fleet of one battleship, two cruisers and three submarines. The ships may be oriented horizontally or vertically within the grid so that no ship touches another, not even diagonally. Any remaining squares in the grid contain water segments, which are shown as a symbol of water or as an X. The numbers on the bottom and on the right of the grid show how many squares in the corresponding rows and columns are occupied by ships. The object is to discover where all six ships are located.

1 x Battleship 2 x Cruisers

Easy

3 x Submarines

Medium

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time | out

Going to pot (still) Appreciating brandy via history, education and entertainment

if you

take the wrong turn arriving at the Van Ryn distillery just outside Stellenbosch, you end up in a dead end with a few decrepit houses slowly rotting behind some long grass. So it can be with brandy – if you don’t understand what you’re looking for, the place you end up will leave a sour taste in your mouth. The distillery itself is a great destination, regardless of your views on brandewijn (burned wine), which is made from grapes but distilled rather than fermented. It’s a warm space in all senses of that description, with a wood-fuelled fire burning in the oven beneath an old-fashioned pot still at one end of a large, high-ceilinged hall and the walls on either side lined with tasteful display cabinets in which the products of the distillery’s collective labours are displayed. Thanks to some clever lighting, the bottles – some historic vintages scores or even hundreds of years old; some award-winning competition entries – all glow, exuding a vitality you wouldn’t expect from a bottle of old grape juice.

Barrel of laughs

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Brandy is aged in barrels, the manufacture of which plays a large role in the guided tour visitors can take of the facility. Watch as a cheerful cooper trots out elegantly scripted, charmingly delivered soundbites about his craft while quickly and accurately assembling a barrel from scratch. And then discard your phone, Fitbit, larney watch or anything else that might in some way generate an electric impulse before you go into the dark, caustic air of the storage room for the barrels. They’re stacked in rows and daubed with hieroglyphics to assist the winemaker in determining age and quality as she regularly tests and tastes each batch for quality. The sharp smell in the air is from the evaporated alcohol – the so-called ‘angels’ share’ from the barrels – which as well as making you slightly high if you spend long enough in the room, will also ignite if sparked, helping the warehouse to do an unintended and very expensive impression of the Hindenburg. Hence the caution regarding electronic devices.


Other than making brandy and providing a minor sales conduit for their wares, the Van Ryn distillery exists primarily to educate visitors in the finer point of appreciating the potent liquids they create. They have a fair old job to do too, as brandy is one of those spirits that polarise drinkers, enthusing those whose idea of heaven is a snifter of 20-year-old next to a log fire and bemusing those who wonder why it’s so much more expensive than meths when it tastes, to them, pretty much the same. The Cape Wine Academy offers a course that you can complete at the distillery, surrounded by all the clues to the questions in the exam at the end (remember to spit, not swallow, if you enjoy a tasting beforehand, otherwise you may not make it that far). It doesn’t seem logical that conceptual knowledge can affect the way your palate reacts, but it is very likely that once you’ve completed the course, your understanding of where brandy is designed to fit in the general drinking experience and where your own preferences lie within that niche will be more defined than they were when you entered the building.

You may discover that your taste buds are snobs and won’t settle for less than a 100% pot-still brandy and the kick it delivers to your wallet, but that will still ultimately save you money as you buy and savour a bottle of the good stuff rather than spending an accumulated fortune on a blend designed to be mixed that makes your gums numb every time you sip it. Text and photography | Bruce Dennill

Ever heard of orange wine?

Learn to tame the ‘fire water’ with an educated palate

Sommelier

Drink and deliberate

We have all been exposed to white, rosé and red wine. Orange wine is now known as the fourth colour in wine. This style of wine is not made from oranges or flavoured with orange. Orange wine was first produced thousands of years ago in Georgia and has made a comeback recently thanks to Italian winemaker Friulian Josko Gravener. Orange wine is white wine produced from any white varietal with extended skin contact with the juice for days – up to months in some cases. It is produced in the open air, which oxidises the wine, giving it an orange-amber colour. The wine can display fresh, complex and intense flavours and is sometimes cloudy, as it is made ‘the natural way’. Text | Michelle Michaels

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the new

Strolla restaurant on Beach Road in Sea Point, Cape Town is neither (as the publicity material suggests) “beachside” nor “on the promenade”. It does have a beach view, but only if you count Melkbosstrand, a dozen kilometres away across Table Bay, which can be seen through a gap in the buildings that populate the block between the venue and the promenade (which include a large bus-stop, so no excuses about not being able to find parking ...).

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However, what is immediately positive is that assistant manager Bongani Rapoo appears to understand the purpose of hospitality, which is to make guests feel valued. After assessing myself and my dining companion – we’d both done a fair bit of travelling that day – as both hungry and in no rush, he immediately pointed to a section of the menu and advised: “Don’t order that, that or that – the serving really isn’t very big.” (Note: he wasn’t just crossing off the cheaper dishes.) And if you do order something more substantial, like a Portuguese steak, it’s not just slapped on a plate. Presentation is paramount, from the crumbed poached egg on top of the steak to the plating and beyond, where a white, pink and green palette dominates. This colour scheme separates the establishment from the plain white and blue of the Peninsular Hotel, which it also serves (as the high-end restaurant and cocktail and coffee bar option for guests). Guests from upstairs wander down from the hotel’s main patio as often as foot traffic arrives from the street, making for a particularly cosmopolitan people-watching experience – indeed, you can play some sort of ‘place the accent’ game from the moment you arrive. Strolla is not cheap, but neither is it unnecessarily heavy-handed on the pricing, and the cocktail menu is particularly inviting, with the drinks beautifully mixed and never cloying or heavy. Also not heavy, notwithstanding its considerable bulk, is the huge serving of nougat cheesecake – two words that should appear in the same sentence far more often than they do – that arrives as dessert. Going away hungry would clearly constitute an insult to the Strolla staff, and

Above the boardwalk New Cape Town eatery lacks views, but excels in other areas

Going away hungry would clearly constitute an insult to the Strolla staff, and they’re making sure you have every opportunity to avoid causing offence


they’re making sure you have every opportunity to avoid causing offence. Being at one end of the Sea Point promenade (both Bantry Bay and the parking lot that marks the beginning of that popular seafront walk are short walks away), Strolla would make an excellent mid-walk stopover point for those who might have parked at Mouille Point and sauntered all the way down. Sit in the stylish indoor area if you need to get out of the sun for a while or, more likely, grab a spot outside, where you can choose from an array of cocktails, craft beers and cold drinks on one side of the patio or have your favourite caffeine-laced beverage from Bootlegger Coffee Company on the other. There are definitely more scenic spots in a city fringed by ocean and dominated by mountains, but good food, genuine warmth and efficient service underline that Strolla is doing all the basics very well.

Strolla: 309 Beach Road, Sea Point. To book, call 021 430 7778

Text | Bruce Dennill Photography | Supplied

Soup’s on Cheeky broccoli and cheese Broccoli and cheese are a heavenly match, and this is a good way to disguise healthy green vegetables if your family aren’t mad about them. Fry half an onion in a little oil until soft. Add two cups of broccoli, a litre of chicken or vegetable stock and a tin of evaporated milk. Boil until the broccoli is soft, then add a cup of grated cheddar cheese. Blend until smooth. Sweetcorn This soup is a great way to use up leftover roast chicken pieces. Fry two chopped potatoes and one onion in a little butter, then add a tin each of creamed sweetcorn and whole kernel corn (drained). Add a can of cream of chicken soup, a dash of milk and any leftover chicken, chopped into small pieces. Hearty veggie noodle If you have odds and ends of vegetables in your fridge, you can whip up this soup for almost nothing. Fry one onion in a little oil, then add chopped carrots, celery and courgettes. Add two tablespoons of tomato paste and two cups of vegetable stock to the mixture. Bring to the boil, then add two cups of short pasta (macaroni, penne, fusilli or shells) and cook until the pasta is al dente. Text | Courtesy of blueribbon.co.za

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The right side of the Wrong line

Experienced journalist uses intimate knowledge of Africa’s intrigues to inform debut novel

michela

Wrong is an experienced British news journalist who has been covering Africa for, among others, Reuters, the BBC and the Financial Times since the 1980s. She has published a number of non-fiction books. Michela Wrong’s debut novel Borderlines examines the problems caused by drawing a line on a map and creating a new country

Borderlines is published by HarperCollins

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You’re a journalist with wide experience and a reputation for integrity. Writing fiction means you have to imagine where your story will end and what path it will take to that point. How different is that discipline to your usual modus operandi? Finding that out is part of why I wanted to write a novel. I’m fortunate in that I already have a great audience of well-informed Africans, including a lot of diaspora diplomats, for my journalism work. It’s a lovely, intelligent readership, but it’s limited. I wanted to move beyond that niche. Borderlines is a thriller, but it’s also a romance based on a friend’s experience, which allowed me to have intimate knowledge of the love story arc. I had one eye on a possible film of the story when writing it. The courtroom – where much of it takes place – is about combat, and it’s possible to expand a perspective from there to colonial history and what makes people feel like they’re one nationality or another. I have an interest in those emotions, in human reactions to adversity, so it’s not a coincidence that the protagonist, Paula Shackleton, is a woman of a certain age and an expat professional working in Africa, with the capacity to occasionally misjudge situations. That was all familiar.

presenting a small detail that one team doesn’t realise is significant until later.

There’s a mix of tough African reality – refugee camps and dealing with colonial history – with Western influence that is both good (doctors trying to help) and bad (CIA influence, laws imposed by European courts). Is that a version of a day at the office for a foreign correspondent? The advantage of writing fiction is that you can explore a theme without having to prove it. The story here could be reality, with Western meddling in what should be a purely legal process, but readers can extrapolate that themselves. As a journalist, I followed a big International Criminal Court case in Kenya recently. Justice is a fluid concept. Politics is always involved. And you’ll never avoid or stop a war by going to court. Wars are ended by massive compromise – someone has to let someone else be seen as the ‘winner’.

Given the changing nature of news, are books the logical next step for serious writers on African themes? Journalists might see books as a way to share what they’ve learned, but that is often a mistake – it’s a long haul and you reach a smaller audience. There are other factors, though. Many news editors will rewrite a story to fit their sensibilities, so the writer may have to publish their story elsewhere in order to set the record straight. And in books you are perhaps more able to focus on a specific audience. Stereotypically speaking, women may prefer love stories, for example.

You would have had to reconfigure the knowledge you already had, presumably, to take what you know as fact and get it to fit the plot of the book?

Do fictional characters also allow for a chance to relieve a bit of pressure? If they rant on your behalf, you can’t get into trouble?

I did a lot of research, speaking to many lawyers. I felt that the legal side of the story would only work if lawyers who read it would be convinced. There are some heightened, Hollywood-style scenes, but they make sense. There were some constraints, though, as everything has to be revealed up front in a real court and you can’t do that in a thriller. I got around that by

I think there is a certain kind of woman who doesn’t get written about much, someone who is dedicated to their – often quite lonely – job and who finds herself in situations where being a woman is seen as an odd fit. I can relate to that. Text | Bruce Dennill Photography | Supplied and Shutterstock


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A new

perspexive Johannesburg artist Bev Butkow, a qualified chartered accountant, is a self-taught artist

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What sort of training have you received and how important do you think it is to seek training (in terms of learning first principles and refining technique)? I trained as an accountant, albeit 26 years ago, and maybe because of my lack of a formal art education, I think ongoing learning is an imperative. I surround myself with the best teachers and mentors I can find, people who can lead and guide me, sometimes nudging me gently and sometimes shoving me in the right direction. My mentors have always been the straight-talking, direct, no-nonsense types who are totally honest with me, good or bad. I thrive on this kind of feedback. I’ve now gone back to Wits to study for my honours in art history. I’m loving every second of the stimulation and the environment, knowing that I am contextualising my art-making within a greater discourse.

What is your principal medium, and why did you choose it? I love experimenting with a mix of media, trying to extend the boundaries of the use of each and then crosspollinating the lessons learned. I hover between paper, canvas, perspex and plastic and have recently begun using nail polish.

Describe the techniques you use most. How complicated are your methods, and why is each step necessary? My work results from a multi-layered translation and re-transposition of images. I draw, I break down, I recontextualise, I eliminate elements and add others, I reassemble – sometimes using a light box – I manipulate, I layer, I transpose, I redraw and break down again and so it continues. I’m very interested in process. I like to pull different threads out of my work to explore. The result of this is that my images reflect fragmentation and layering, a simultaneous breaking up and a holding together. I oscillate between abstract and representation.

What technological tools do you use in your work? I take my own photographs, so a camera. There are times when I use an overhead projector or light box. Otherwise, I only use old-fashioned tools like calligraphy pens, paint brushes and pencils. And my hands …

Who is the single other artist whose style you most admire, and why? I’m a bit schizophrenic and can’t possibly choose one artist. Lessons and inspiration come in many forms. Some of the artists I admire are Penny Siopis for her use of paint, William Kentridge for his dedication to his craft, Kara Walker for her courage in addressing race issues, and Julie Mehretu for the visual complexity of her images.

Henri Matisse: Rhythm and Meaning The Standard Bank Gallery will be hosting an exhibition of works by the French modern master, Henri Matisse (18691954), from 13 July to 17 September 2016. The exhibition will include a number of paintings, drawings, collages and prints covering all the dominant themes in the artist’s body of work, from his early Fauvist years, through his interest in exoticism and orientalism, to the paper cut-outs that he produced in the last years of his life.

The core work in the exhibition will be the full suite of 20 impressions for the prints in the artist’s book Jazz – some of the best known and most celebrated of the artist’s works. The works will be drawn primarily from the collection of the Musée Matisse – which was established by Matisse himself in 1952 – and will be augmented with works from private collectors, and the Johannesburg Art Gallery.

Galleries and other traditional means are only one way of marketing art. What do you believe are the most important other routes, and what is the most important insight you have gained in that area of your career?

For more information about Bev Butkow or her work, go to www. gunsandrain.com

My greatest insight is that art is a personal medium of communication, so sales are mostly based on one-onone discussions and relationships. People love meeting the artist, seeing their studio and getting to understand the background to the artwork. Coupled with this is the value of word-of-mouth references. I do use Facebook and Instagram, but they are a backup tool to me, not my main means of communicating. Across all communication channels, I’ve learnt that the regularity of communication is critical. The old saying ‘out of sight, out of mind’ is so apt.

Why do you create? What are your stated goals in producing art? I create because I can’t not. It’s in my blood, my hands, my mind – I constantly think of how to make things, how to say what I need to say, how to get the image that is perfectly formed in my head down onto paper, how to improve what I’ve done and how to extend my concept and use of medium. For me, art provides a methodology for searching for answers or understanding issues in increasing depth and complexity. It has exposed me to a broad range of different people and perspectives, all of which enrich my life and my understanding.  My stated goal is to create art that is intriguing and interesting enough to make people stop: to elicit a reaction; to make the viewer think; that starts conversations on the topics that I deal with. Text | Bruce Dennill Photography | Supplied

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Putting for gold

Golf is back at the Olympic Games for the first time in 112 years and Gary Player is captaining the South African team

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Rio de Janeiro’s Olympic golf course will host the world’s top golfers for the first time at the Games since St Louis did so in 1904. A total of 60 players qualify for the 72-hold stroke play event in both men and women’s events. The top 15 players as of the 11 July 2016 rankings for each gender qualify automatically for the Olympics, with a limit of four golfers per country. The remaining places are allocated to the highestranked players from countries that do not already have two golfers qualified. Originating in Scotland in the Middle Ages, golf was initially banned by King James II for interfering with archery practice. For the majority of the Olympics’ history, bows and arrows also enjoyed preference over golf. In fact, golf has even been played on the moon since it was last showcased at the Games. On 6 February 1971, American astronaut Alan Shepard exited Apollo 14 and hit a six-iron.

Faltering buy-in However, not everyone is feeling the excitement. South Africa’s Louis Oosthuizen followed fellow Major winners Charl Schwartzel, Adam Scott and Vijay Singh in announcing he will not compete in Rio. Oosthuizen cited family and scheduling issues, while Scott says his call is a result of “an extremely busy playing schedule around the time of the Olympics.” Unimpressed, Australia’s triple Olympic 100m freestyle gold medallist Dawn Fraser tweeted sarcastically: “Well done Adam great to put your country on hold so that you can fulfil your own schedule. [sic]” SA team captain Gary Player is saddened by the South African players’ absence, saying: “In terms of growing the sport 20 years from now, players withdrawing does not help. The key is getting the IOC [International Olympic Committee] to renew golf in the Olympics past 2020. The vote is in 2017. It’s very important to make a good impression to validate our inclusion. Those gentlemen are some of the finest players in the world. We want them to compete in Rio. Maybe they will reconsider. I realise everyone has their own personal conflicts, but the game is bigger than any one person.”

WIN a getaway at Selborne Golf Estate worth R4,000 Selborne Golf Estate, Hotel and Spa is the ideal location for an indulgent getaway on the KwaZulu-Natal South Coast. Tucked away outside the quaint town of Pennington, Selborne is a peaceful oasis in which to unwind in luxury, surrounded by spectacular scenery. The estate offers a range of superb accommodation including secluded suites with views of the golf course and manor rooms in the beautifully restored hotel. There are also quality restaurants and bars, as well as a wellness spa, swimming pool and sunbathing area, private beach access, extensive conferencing facilities and tennis courts. In addition to the hotel, there are fivestar villa rentals available as well. Selborne’s championship par 72, 18-hole golf course is currently in the

best condition in the estate’s history. Its manicured fairways are designed around privately owned coastal forest, promising golfers a challenging, rewarding round of golf with stunning sea views and sightings of indigenous wildlife. Recent course upgrades include the introduction of a par three course. One Skyways reader can win a two-night stay for two at Selborne Golf Estate, Hotel and Spa. The prize includes two rounds of golf (with a golf cart). The prize is valued at R4,000. The prize is valid for six months and is subject to availability. Terms and conditions apply. TO WIN, email skyways@panorama. co.za with the word ‘Selborne’ in the subject line, and include your name, surname, contact number and email address in the body of the mail. The competition closes on 31 July 2016.

Bigger prizes? With golf already having four Major tournaments annually, some argue an Olympic gold medal is not the sport’s pinnacle and therefore should not feature at the Games. Player disagrees, saying: “Golf’s inclusion is long overdue. Many of golf’s leaders fought extremely hard over several decades to get us back on sport’s biggest stage. It’s a game that a person can play all their lives. In my mind, it is the greatest sport in the world and should be showcased on the biggest stage in sports. More new people around the

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A number of top players, including Louis Oosthuizen, are skipping the Games, to the dismay of organisers and spectators

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world will see golf in the Olympics than any pro tour events currently do now.” Player is one of a select group of five players to have won all four Majors in his career. However, he never had the opportunity to tee off at the Olympics. He has no regrets, saying it would have been extraordinary to compete for a gold medal, but adds enthusiastically: “Right now, no living golfer has this claim to fame. The man and woman who win a gold medal in golf this year will have something no one else in the world has.” Of his captaincy duties in Rio, Player says: “Throughout my career, I made a point of travelling the world playing everywhere I could. Players will be just two weeks removed from the PGA Championship and just over a month away from the Tour Championship during the Olympics. My biggest role will be to keep them motivated and focused on our goal of winning a gold medal for South Africa.” The 80-year-old says he has been watching as much golf as he can to get a feel for how everyone is playing: “I phone the potential members of the South African

team as much as I can too. It also is very important for me to stay in shape so I will have a high energy level in the hot and humid conditions Rio will present. I can’t appear old or sluggish as a captain.” Reports of hundreds of daily push-ups and sit-ups should ensure that is highly unlikely.

Aiming to win The South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) is aiming for 10 medals in Rio. Player is confident golf can deliver one of those, saying: “Ten medals is an acceptable goal. I believe we had six last time (2012), so almost doubling our medal count is progress. But I think we can potentially do even better. South Africa is a small country, but we have great athletes. Golf is a sport we excel at, so I am confident our team can deliver.” No doubt the whole nation will be backing Player’s prediction that the country’s athletes will indeed perform above par. Text | Peter Stemmet Photography | Supplied and Shutterstock


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sky | boutique

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sky | boutique

An extrAordinAry South AfricAn holidAy experience

Experience a world of wilderness. Be one with africa’s animal kingdom out in the vast desert sands. celebrate, dance and feast with the first People. Gasp at the night-time skies and listen to ancient wisdoms around dancing fires. fall into step on the nama riel at the Williston Winter festival. sift through the shipwrecks on the diamond coast. dance with the daisies in the early spring. and people so real, you will feel the vibration of Mother nature when they shake your hand. this is the northern cape. now come and experience it for yourselves ... Five reasons why you should choose the Northern Cape to be your South African Winter Holiday Destination.. 1. Galactic EncountErs at suthErland and carnavon

Silver sands hiking trail, taking this guided, five-day, 55km hike along the wild coastline of Namaqualand is a wonderful way to appreciate the bizarre geology, marine life and spring flower displays in this inhospitable, remote section of corner of South Africa. Klipspringer Hiking Trail, named after the cute little antelope that’s often seen along the way, this rugged, three-day, 33km trail through the Northern Cape’s starkly beautiful Augrabies Falls National Park, reveals the dramatic landscapes and bizarre flora of this semidesert region in all its glory. 3. rivEr safaris

As a stargazing destination, the Northern Cape is unsurpassed as the size of the province and lack of pollution makes the skies come alive in a breath-taking galactic display. The Northern Cape is a truly remarkable holiday destination that allows visitors to relax and distress, while enjoying the company of loved ones. This is the Northern Cape and it is a very different place from the monochromatic desert that most first-time visitors expect. Even the most arid spaces will astound - if you take the time to look beyond the apparently minimalist tableau that greets you at first glance. Miniscule desert flowers and brightly coloured beetles glint like lost gems amidst the rocks and sand and at night a miasma of glowing stars shimmer within a psychedelic night sky. 2. hikinG hEavEn

4. WondErful WildlifE

The natural beauty of the province is only enhanced by its abundant wildlife. From the small five to the big five, watching wild animals at close range is something truly unforgettable. Add a walking, horseback, little five, 4x4 and other safaris to your itinerary to get up close and personal with the animals of Africa. 5. GrEat WEathEr

Take a walk on the wild side and go paddling on the Orange River. South Africa’s longest river presents a perfect playground for family paddlers, whether in a kayak, river raft or canoe. The river provides a sharp contrast against the surrounding arid landscape and you can spot an abundance of birdlife and even startle some antelope coming to drink. Spend star-lit nights in the open on the river bank before continuing your journey downstream. There are several river operators offering day trips and overnight river adventures along the Orange through the Richtersveld National Park.

Escape the Highveld and Cape winters! The mild temperatures of the months of April to July are perfect to visit the Northern Cape and enjoy the vast array of family outdoor experiences.

This is your complimentary copy of Skyways. Should you wish to hang on to any information, please take this copy of the magazine with you.

Winter purSuitS in the northern cApe

For more information do visit www.experiencenortherncape.com or email: marketing@experiencenortherncape.com

Northern Cape Tourism

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Palma

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The strength of Afrimat has now extended its reach to support Mozambique’s growing economy, establishing quarries in Pemba and Cuamba, with another quarry planned for Palma. Supporting the rapidly developing Mozambique region with high quality aggregate

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products for civil and mining projects, as well as drilling and blasting services. Serving projects of any scale from major infrastructure projects such as the Tete-Nacala Railway project and Palma LNG project, to smaller private sector contracts. Afrimat is a JSE-listed company and a 45-year leader in open-pit mining, specialising in aggregates, industrial minerals and concrete products, coupled with contracted services. Now, we are laying the foundations for new success by bringing world-class African products to more countries in Africa.

This is your complimentary copy of Skyways. Should you wish to hang on to any information, please take this copy of the magazine with you.

sky | industry

For more information contact Gerhard Hurst Cell +27 84 705 7039

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sky | industry

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AIRCRAFT

OPERATED BY

SA8621 Cape Town - George 7:15 8:05 1 2 3 4 5 AR8 SA8625 Cape Town - George 8:15 9:05 6 ER3 SA8631 Cape Town - George 11:45 12:35 1 2 3 4 5 ER3 SA8631 Cape Town - George 11:45 12:35 6 AR8 SA8639 Cape Town - George 14:15 15:05 1 2 3 4 5 ER3 SA8639 Cape Town - George 14:15 15:10 7 AR8 SA8635 Cape Town - George 16:45 17:40 1 2 3 4 5 7 ER3 SA8622 George - Cape Town 8:30 9:20 1 2 3 4 5 AR8 SA8630 George - Cape Town 9:25 10:15 6 ER3 SA8632 George - Cape Town 13:00 13:50 1 2 3 4 5 ER3 SA8632 George - Cape Town 13:00 13:50 6 AR8 SA8638 George - Cape Town 15:25 16:15 1 2 3 4 5 ER3 SA8638 George - Cape Town 15:40 16:35 7 AR8 SA8636 George - Cape Town 18:10 19:05 1 2 3 4 5 7 ER3

Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink

SA8611 Cape Town - Kimberley 6:15 7:50 1 2 3 4 5 ER3 SA8617 Cape Town - Kimberley 16:50 18:20 1 2 ER3 SA8617 Cape Town - Kimberley 16:50 18:25 3 4 5 7 AR8 SA8612 Kimberley - Cape Town 8:15 9:50 1 2 3 4 5 ER3 SA8618 Kimberley - Cape Town 18:50 20:25 1 2 ER3 SA8618 Kimberley - Cape Town 18:50 20:25 3 4 5 7 AR8

Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink

SA8663 Cape Town - Nelspruit 10:00 12:35 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 AR8 SA8664 Nelspruit - Cape Town 13:15 15:55 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 AR8 Cape Town - Skukuza - Cape Town SA8651 Cape Town - Skukuza 10:35 13:05 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ER3 SA8652 Skukuza - Cape Town 11:20 13:55 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ER3

Airlink Airlink

Cape Town - Kimberley - Cape Town

Cape Town - Nelspruit - Cape Town

Airlink Airlink

Cape Town - Upington - Cape Town

SA8645 Cape Town - Upington 7:10 8:30 1 2 3 4 5 SA8647 Cape Town - Upington 10:45 12:05 7 SA8646 Upington - Cape Town 8:50 10:10 1 2 3 4 5 SA8648 Upington - Cape Town 12:50 14:10 7 Cape Town - Pretoria - Cape Town SA8678 Cape Town - Pretoria 10:00 12:15 1 2 3 4 5 SA8672 Cape Town - Pretoria 15:00 17:15 6 SA8676 Cape Town - Pretoria 17:30 19:45 1 2 3 4 5 7 SA8675 Pretoria - Cape Town 06:45 09:15 1 2 3 4 5 SA8671 Pretoria - Cape Town 08:45 11:15 6 SA8677 Pretoria - Cape Town 11:15 13:45 7 SA8679 Pretoria - Cape Town 14:15 16:45 1 2 3 4 5

ER3 ER3 ER3 ER3

Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink

AR8 AR8 AR8 AR8 AR8 AR8 AR8

Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink

Durban - Bloemfontein - Durban SA8531 Durban - Bloemfontein 6:50 7:55 1 2 3 4 5 ER3 SA8533 Durban - Bloemfontein 12:00 13:25 7 J41 SA8535 Durban - Bloemfontein 15:15 16:40 7 J41 SA8537 Durban - Bloemfontein 16:35 17:40 1 2 3 4 5 ER3 SA8532 Bloemfontein - Durban 8:15 9:15 1 2 3 4 5 ER3 SA8534 Bloemfontein - Durban 13:45 14:50 7 J41 SA8536 Bloemfontein - Durban 17:00 18:05 7 J41 SA8538 Bloemfontein - Durban 18:00 19:00 1 2 3 4 5 ER3

Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink

SA8515 SA8514

Airlink Airlink

Durban - George - Durban Durban George

- George - Durban

9:40 11:50

11:30 13:15

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ER3 ER3

Durban - Nelspruit - Durban SA8507 Durban - Nelspruit 6:45 8:05 1 3 5 J41 SA8505 Durban - Nelspruit 13:45 14:45 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ER3 SA8508 Nelspruit - Durban 8:25 9:45 1 3 5 J41 SA8506 Nelspruit - Durban 15:10 16:10 1 2 3 4 5 6 ER3 SA8510 Nelspruit - Durban 17:40 18:40 7 ER3 Johannesburg Kimberley Johannesburg SA8427 Johannesburg - Kimberley 16:30 17:40 1 2 3 4 5 ER3 SA8428 Kimberley - Johannesburg 18:20 19:30 1 2 3 4 5 ER3

Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink Airlink

When planning your next flight, for business or pleasure, this flight schedule will come in handy. Take this FREE copy of Skyways with you.

Cape Town - George - Cape Town

Airlink Airlink

Airlink's REGIONAL AND DOMESTIC flights check-in Terminal B counters B89 - B101 at OR Tambo International Airport.

85 07 16


TIMETABLE effective 01 JULY 2016

F L I G H T S – Domestic FLIGHT

ROUTE

DEPARTURE

ARRIVAL

FREQUENCY

AIRCRAFT

OPERATED BY

When planning your next flight, for business or pleasure, this flight schedule will come in handy. Take this FREE copy of Skyways with you.

Johannesburg - Nelspruit - Johannesburg SA8823

Johannesburg

-

7:00

7:50

1

ER3

Airlink

SA8827

Johannesburg

- Nelspruit

Nelspruit

9:00

9:50

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ER3

Airlink

SA8843

Johannesburg

- Nelspruit

10:00

10:50

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ER3

Airlink

SA8841

Johannesburg

- Nelspruit

11:10

11:55

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

AR8

Airlink

SA8845

Johannesburg

- Nelspruit

15:30

16:15

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

AR8

Airlink

SA8829

Johannesburg - Nelspruit

16:30

17:20 7

ER3

Airlink

SA8849

Johannesburg

-

17:15

18:05

1

ER3

Airlink

SA8837

Johannesburg

- Nelspruit

18:05

18:55

1 2 3 4 5 7

ER3

Airlink

SA8838

Nelspruit

-

Johannesburg

6:55

7:50

1

2 3 4 5

ER3

Airlink

SA8824

Nelspruit

-

Johannesburg

8:25

9:15

1

2 3 4 5

ER3

Airlink

SA8836

Nelspruit

- Johannesburg

8:30

9:25 6

ER3

Airlink

SA8828

Nelspruit

- Johannesburg

10:10

11:05

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ER3

Airlink

SA8842

Nelspruit

- Johannesburg

13:35

14:25

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

AR8

Airlink

SA8830

Nelspruit

- Johannesburg

15:05

16:00 7

ER3

Airlink

SA8844

Nelspruit

- Johannesburg

15:45

16:40

1 2 3 5 6

ER3

Airlink

SA8846

Nelspruit

- Johannesburg

16:40

17:30

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

AR8

Airlink

SA8848

Nelspruit

-

18:25

19:20

1

ER3

Airlink

Nelspruit

Johannesburg

2 3 4 5

2 3 4 5

2 3 4 5

Johannesburg - Phalaborwa - Johannesburg

SA8851

Johannesburg

-

SA8853

Johannesburg

- Phalaborwa

Phalaborwa

6:25

7:35

11:45

12:55

SA8857

Johannesburg - Phalaborwa

16:00

SA8854

Phalaborwa

- Johannesburg

SA8858

Phalaborwa

-

Johannesburg

1

2 3 4

J41

Airlink

J41

Airlink

17:10 5

J41

Airlink

13:15

14:35

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

J41

Airlink

17:30

18:50

1

J41

Airlink

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

2 3 4 5

Johannesburg - Polokwane - Johannesburg

SA8801

Johannesburg

-

Polokwane

6:35

7:25

1

2 3 4 5

ER3

Airlink

SA8809

Johannesburg

-

Polokwane

10:50

11:40

1

2 3 4 5 7

ER3

Airlink

SA8809

Johannesburg

-

Polokwane

10:50

11:50 6

J41

Airlink

SA8817

Johannesburg - Polokwane

14:15

15:15 6

J41

Airlink

SA8815

Johannesburg

- Polokwane

16:30

17:30

1 2 3 4 5 7

AR8

Airlink

SA8802

Polokwane

-

7:55

8:50

1

ER3

Airlink

SA8810

Polokwane

- Johannesburg

12:00

12:55

ER3

Airlink

SA8810

Polokwane

- Johannesburg

12:10

13:05 6

J41

Airlink

SA8818

Polokwane

- Johannesburg

15:35

16:30 6

J41

Airlink

SA8816

Polokwane

- Johannesburg

18:00

19:05

AR8

Airlink

Johannesburg

2 3 4 5

1 2 3 4 5 7

1 2 3 4 5 7

Johannesburg - Pietermaritzburg - Johannesburg

SA8747

Johannesburg

-

Pietermaritzburg

7:00

8:00

1

2 3 4 5

AR8

Airlink

SA8735

Johannesburg

-

Pietermaritzburg

12:15

13:15

1

2 3 4 5 7

ER3

Airlink

SA8735

Johannesburg

-

Pietermaritzburg

12:15

13:15 6

AR8

Airlink

SA8743

Johannesburg

- Pietermaritzburg

15:30

16:30

1 2 3 4 5 7

AR8

Airlink

SA8741

Johannesburg

-

Pietermaritzburg

17:00

18:00

1

2 3 4 5 7

AR8

Airlink

SA8739

Johannesburg

-

Pietermaritzburg

18:15

19:15

1

2 3 4 5

AR8

Airlink

SA8730

Pietermaritzburg

-

Johannesburg

6:45

7:45

1

2 3 4 5

AR8

Airlink

SA8732

Pietermaritzburg - Johannesburg

8:45

9:45

1 2 3 4 5 6

AR8

Airlink

SA8736

Pietermaritzburg

-

Johannesburg

13:50

14:55

1

2 3 4 5 7

ER3

Airlink

SA8736

Pietermaritzburg

-

Johannesburg

13:50

14:55 6

AR8

Airlink

SA8744

Pietermaritzburg

-

Johannesburg

17:00

18:00

1

2 3 4 5 7

AR8

Airlink

SA8742

Pietermaritzburg

-

Johannesburg

18:25

19:25

1

2 3 4 5

AR8

Airlink

Johannesburg - Skukuza - Johannesburg

SA8861

Johannesburg

- Skukuza

10:00

10:50

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ER3

Airlink

SA8865

Johannesburg

- Skukuza

13:20

14:10

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ER3

Airlink

SA8862

Skukuza

- Johannesburg

13:30

14:35

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ER3

Airlink

SA8866

Skukuza

-

14:50

15:35

1

ER3

Airlink

Johannesburg

2 3 4 5 6 7

Johannesburg - Upington - Johannesburg

SA8761

Johannesburg - Upington

1 2 3 4

ER3

Airlink

SA8767

Johannesburg

- Upington

11:00

12:30

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ER3

Airlink

SA8769

Johannesburg

-

15:20

16:50

1

ER3

Airlink

SA8762

Upington

- Johannesburg

10:35

1 2 3 4

ER3

Airlink

SA8768

Upington

- Johannesburg

12:50

14:25

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ER3

Airlink

SA8770

Upington

-

17:10

18:45

1

ER3

Airlink

Upington

Johannesburg

7:10

9:00

8:40

2 3 4 5 7

2 3 4 5 7

Golf Bags: 1 bag at 15kg free baggage allowance – golf bags must be pre-booked with your booking agent.

86 07 16


TIMETABLE effective 01 JULY 2016

F L I G H T S – Domestic FLIGHT

ROUTE

DEPARTURE

ARRIVAL

FREQUENCY

AIRCRAFT

OPERATED BY

Johannesburg - Mthatha - Johannesburg Johannesburg

SA8753

Johannesburg - Mthatha

-

Mthatha

SA8755

Johannesburg

- Mthatha

SA8752

Mthatha

-

SA8754

Mthatha

- Johannesburg

SA8756

Mthatha

-

6:15

7:30

8:15

9:30 6

15:15

Johannesburg

16:30

7:50

Johannesburg

9:50 17:00

9:05

1

2 3 4 5

ER3

Airlink

ER3

Airlink

1 2 3 4 5 7

AR8

Airlink

1

ER3

Airlink

2 3 4 5

11:05 6

ER3

Airlink

18:15

1

2 3 4 5 7

AR8

Airlink

Johannesburg - Sishen - Johannesburg SA8771

Johannesburg

-

Sishen

6:30

7:50

1

2 3 4 5

ER3

Airlink

SA8779

Johannesburg

-

Sishen

15:20

16:40

1

2 3 4 5

ER3

Airlink

SA8772

Sishen

-

Johannesburg

8:25

9:35

1

2 3 4 5

ER3

Airlink

SA8780

Sishen

-

Johannesburg

17:05

18:15

1

2 3 4 5

ER3

Airlink

Port Elizabeth - East London - Port Elizabeth SA8480

Port Elizabeth

-

East London

7:00

7:45

1

2 3 4 5

J41

Airlink

SA8488

Port Elizabeth

-

East London

16:15

17:00

1

2 3 4 5

J41

Airlink

SA8481

East London

-

Port Elizabeth

8:05

8:55

1

2 3 4 5

J41

Airlink

SA8489

East London

-

Port Elizabeth

17:20

18:10

1

2 3 4 5

J41

Airlink

F L I G H T S – Regional FLIGHT

ROUTE

DEPARTURE

ARRIVAL

FREQUENCY

AIRCRAFT

OPERATED BY

Durban - Maputo - Durban SA8290

Durban

- Maputo

10:10

11:25

1 3 5

J41

Airlink

SA8291

Maputo

-

11:45

13:05

1 3 5

J41

Airlink

Durban

Johannesburg - Antananarivo - Johannesburg

SA8252

Johannesburg

- Antananarivo

10:00

14:10

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

AR8

Airlink

SA8253

Antananarivo

- Johannesburg

15:00

17:40

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

AR8

Airlink

Johannesburg - Beira - Johannesburg

SA8214

Johannesburg

- Beira

11:30

13:10

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ER3

Airlink

SA8215

Beira

- Johannesburg

13:30

15:20

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ER3

Airlink

SA8247

Beira

- Johannesburg

16:55

18:45 7

ER3

Airlink

Johannesburg - Bulawayo - Johannesburg

SA8110

Johannesburg

- Bulawayo

10:40

12:05

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

AR8

Airlink

SA8111

Bulawayo

- Johannesburg

12:50

14:25

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

AR8

Airlink

Johannesburg - Gaborone - Johannesburg

SA8458

Johannesburg

- Gaborone

17:05

18:00

1 2 3 4 5

ER3

Airlink

SA8459

Gaborone

- Johannesburg

18:30

19:25

1 2 3 4 5

ER3

Airlink

Johannesburg - Kasane - Johannesburg SA8306

Johannesburg

- Kasane

11:45

13:25

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

AR8

Airlink

SA8307

Kasane

- Johannesburg

13:55

15:45

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

AR8

Airlink

Nelspruit - Livingstone - Nelspruit SA8870

Nelspruit

- Livingstone

11:35

13:10

1 2 3 5 6

ER3

Airlink

SA8871

Livingstone

-

13:45

15:25

1

ER3

Airlink

Nelspruit

2 3 5 6

Johannesburg - Lusaka - Johannesburg

SA8160

Johannesburg

- Lusaka

6:35

8:30

1 2 3 4 5 6

ER3

Airlink

SA8164

Johannesburg

- Lusaka

15:45

17:40

1 2 3 4 5 7

ER3

Airlink

SA8161

Lusaka

- Johannesburg

9:00

11:05

1 2 3 4 5 6

ER3

Airlink

SA8165

Lusaka

- Johannesburg

18:20

20:25

1 2 3 4 5 7

ER3

Airlink

Johannesburg - Harare - Johannesburg

SA8100

Johannesburg

ER3

Airlink

SA8102

Johannesburg - Harare

-

Harare

16:25

18:15 3 4

AR8

Airlink

SA8102

Johannesburg

-

Harare

16:25

18:15

1

2 5 7

ER3

Airlink

SA8101

Harare

-

Johannesburg

8:50

10:35

1

2 3 4 5

ER3

Airlink

SA8103

Harare

- Johannesburg

18:45

20:30 3 4

AR8

Airlink

SA8103

Harare

-

18:45

20:30

ER3

Airlink

Johannesburg

6:30

8:20

1

1

2 3 4 5

2 5 7

When planning your next flight, for business or pleasure, this flight schedule will come in handy. Take this FREE copy of Skyways with you.

SA8751

Airlink's REGIONAL AND DOMESTIC flights check-in Terminal B counters B89 - B101 at OR Tambo International Airport.

87 07 16


TIMETABLE effective 01 JULY 2016

F L I G H T S – Regional FLIGHT

ROUTE

DEPARTURE

ARRIVAL

FREQUENCY

AIRCRAFT

OPERATED BY

When planning your next flight, for business or pleasure, this flight schedule will come in handy. Take this FREE copy of Skyways with you.

Johannesburg - Sikhupe - Johannesburg SA8080

Johannesburg

-

Sikhupe

06:50

07:40

1 2 3 4 5 6

ER3

Airlink

SA8082

Johannesburg

-

Sikhupe

10:05

10:55

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ER3

Airlink

SA8084

Johannesburg

-

Sikhupe

12:50

13:40

5 6 7

ER3

Airlink

SA8086

Johannesburg

-

Sikhupe

16:05

16:55

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ER3

Airlink

SA8081

Sikhupe

-

Johannesburg

08:10

09:15

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ER3

Airlink

SA8083

Sikhupe

-

Johannesburg

11:25

12:25

5 6 7

ER3

Airlink

SA8085

Sikhupe

-

Johannesburg

14:10

15:10

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ER3

Airlink

SA8087

Sikhupe

-

Johannesburg

17:25

18:20

1 2 3 4 5 7

ER3

Airlink

1

ER3

Airlink

Johannesburg - Maseru - Johannesburg SA8050

Johannesburg

-

SA8052

Johannesburg

- Maseru

Maseru

SA8060

Johannesburg

-

SA8062

Johannesburg

- Maseru

SA8051

Maseru

-

SA8053

Maseru

SA8061 SA8063

Maseru

6:40 9:45

7:35 10:40

2 3 4 5

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ER3

Airlink

ER3

Airlink

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ER3

Airlink

1

ER3

Airlink

ER3

Airlink

13:00

14:00 6 7

14:55

15:50

8:10

9:05

- Johannesburg

11:00

11:55

Maseru

-

14:35

15:45 6 7

ER3

Airlink

Maseru

- Johannesburg

16:10

17:05

ER3

Airlink

Johannesburg Johannesburg

2 3 4 5

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Johannesburg - Maun - Johannesburg

SA8302

Johannesburg

- Maun

10:25

12:05 6

ER3

SA8300

Johannesburg

- Maun

11:45

13:15

AR8

Airlink

SA8303

Maun

- Johannesburg

12:30

14:10 6

ER3

Airlink

SA8301

Maun

- Johannesburg

14:00

15:40

AR8

Airlink

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Airlink

Johannesburg - Nampula - Johannesburg

SA8230

Johannesburg

- Nampula

11:10

13:40

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ER3

Airlink

SA8231

Nampula

- Johannesburg

14:15

16:50

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ER3

Airlink

Johannesburg - Ndola - Johannesburg SA8152

Johannesburg

- Ndola

SA8156

Johannesburg

-

11:00

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

AR8

Airlink

16:00

18:10

1

ER3

Airlink

SA8153

Ndola

SA8157

Ndola

- Johannesburg

11:35

14:05

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

AR8

Airlink

-

18:40

20:55

1

ER3

Airlink

Ndola Johannesburg

8:30

2 3 4 5 2 3 4 5

Johannesburg - Nosy Be - Johannesburg – Effective 20 March 2016

SA8246

Johannesburg

-

Nosy Be

SA8247

Nosy Be

-

Johannesburg

9:30

14:00 7

ER3

Airlink

14:45

18:45 7

ER3

Airlink

Johannesburg - Pemba - Johannesburg SA8204

Johannesburg

- Pemba

11:30

14:20

1 3 4 5 6

ER3

Airlink

SA8205

Pemba

- Johannesburg

14:50

17:45

1 3 4 5 6

ER3

Airlink

Johannesburg - Tete - Johannesburg

SA8220

Johannesburg

-

Tete

10:35

12:40

1

2 3 4 5

ER3

Airlink

SA8221

Tete

-

Johannesburg

13:25

15:45

1

2 3 4 5

ER3

Airlink

Johannesburg - Vilankulos - Johannesburg

SA8260

Johannesburg

- Vilankulos

11:30

13:10

1 2 3 5 6

ER3

Airlink

SA8261

Vilankulos

- Johannesburg

13:45

15:30

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ER3

Airlink

Nelspruit - Vilankulos SA8258

Nelspruit

- Vilankulos

11:35

12:50 4 7

ER3

Airlink

ER3

Airlink

Cape Town - Windhoek - Cape Town SA8120

Cape Town

- Windhoek

6:45

7:50

SA8122

Cape Town

- Windhoek

8:30

9:35 6

SA8124

Cape Town

- Windhoek

SA8121

Windhoek

- Cape Town

ER3

Airlink

SA8123

Windhoek

- Cape Town

10:05

13:10 6

ER3

Airlink

SA8125

Windhoek

- Cape Town

17:00

20:05

1 2 3 4 5 7

ER3

Airlink

14:50 8:20

1 2 3 4 5

15:55

1 2 3 4 5 7

11:25

1 2 3 4 5

ER3

Airlink

ER3

Airlink

Cape Town - Maun - Cape Town – Effective 11 March 2016 SA8601

Cape Town

- Maun

10:35

13:05

1 3 5 6 7

ER3

Airink

SA8602

Maun

-

13:35

16:10

1 3 5 6 7

ER3

Airink

Cape Town

Day 1 = Monday, Day 7 = Sunday For reservations visit www.flyairlink.com, your travel agent or SAA Central Reservations on +27 11-978 1111 • Flight schedules subject to change • Contact your booking agent for these conditions

88 07 16

EXCESS BAGGAGE AND SPORTING EQUIPMENT: Refer to www.flyairlink.com Important information & Conditions of Carriage Clause 8 Baggage 8.3 Whilst every effort has been made to ensure accuracy of content of the published timetable, both operational and strategic issues cause timetable changes. Due to the forward lead time required for publication, these often cannot be duly reflected. Should this occur, Airlink and its agents are not responsible for any errors, omissions, losses or detriments arising from the publication.

MEMBER


Pemba

Lusaka Livingstone

Kasane Maun

Windhoek

Nampula

Harare

Tete

Bulawayo

Gaborone

Phalaborwa

Pretoria

Maseru

East London Cape Town George Port Elizabeth

Vilanculos

Pietermaritzburg Durban

Mthatha

to fly

Antananarivo

Skukuza Nelspruit Maputo Manzini

JNB

freedom

Nosy Be

Beira

Polokwane

Sishen Kimberley Upington Bloemfontein

33053

Ndola

Connecting 36 destinations in 9 African countries.

Jetstream 4100 - Regional Turboprop Airliner Number of aircraft Maximum Passengers Length Wing Span Height Fuel capacity Maximum Operating Altitude Cruising Speed

8 29 19.25m 18.29m 5.74m 2 600kg 25 000ft 500km/h

ERJ 135-LR - Regional Jet Airliner and Corporate Jet Number of aircraft Maximum Passengers Length Wing Span Height Fuel capacity Maximum Operating Altitude Cruising Speed

19 37 26.34m 20.04m 6.75m 5 000kg 37 000ft 800km/h

Avro RJ85 - Regional Jet Airliner Number of aircraft Maximum Passengers Seating Classes Length Wing Span Height Fuel capacity Maximum Operating Altitude Maximum Cruising Speed

12 83 2 28.60m 26.21m 8.61m 9 362kg 35 000ft 780km/h


to experience

freedom 3336 3

Connecting the City to the Bush. Experience the heart of the African bush with daily direct flights from Johannesburg and Cape Town to Nelspruit KMIA as well as the iconic Skukuza Airport, gateway to the Sabi Sand, The Kruger National Park and the private game lodges. A short apron transfer connects you onward to the doorstep of your safari destination on Airlink’s lodge link service to the Ulusaba, Arathusa and Londolozi Airstrips. You also have the freedom to enjoy a short open safari vehicle transfer from the Ulusaba and Arathusa Airstrips to adjoining private game lodges in the reserve. A short air transfer from the lodge airstrips or Skukuza Airport to Nelspruit KMIA connects you conveniently to Livingstone (Zambia) and Vilanculos (Mozambique), gateway to the Bazaruto and Benguerra Islands. Visit www.flyairlink.com or www.skukuzaairport.com or your Booking Agent.


LODGE LINK NETWORK PROGRAMME FLIGHT

ROUTE

DEPARTURE

ARRIVAL

FREQUENCY

CONNECTING FLIGHT OPTIONS Flight number

Routing

Departs

SA 8870

Nelspruit KMIA to Livingstone on Mon, Tue, Wed, Fri, Sat

11:35

SA 8258

Nelspruit KMIA to Vilanculos on Thu and Sun

11:35

Arrives

Arathusa lodge strip (ASS) servicing - Arathusa, Cheetah Plains, Chitwa Chitwa, Djuma Vuyatela, Elephant Plains, Nkorho, Simbambili Flights FROM Arathusa TO: SA 8950

Arathusa via Londolozi to Nelspruit KMIA

10:10

11:20

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

SA 8952

Arathusa to Nelspruit KMIA

12:00

12:40

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

SA 8664

Nelspruit KMIA to Cape Town

13:15

SA 8954

Arathusa to Skukuza

13:50

14:05

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

SA 8866

Skukuza to Johannesburg

14:50

14:30

14:45

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Flights TO Arathusa FROM: SA 8955 SA 8953 SA 8945

Skukuza to Arathusa Nelspruit KMIA to Arathusa Skukuza via Londolozi to Arathusa

13:05

13:40

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

SA 8651

Cape Town to Skukuza

13:05

SA 8865

Johannesburg to Skukuza

14:10

SA 8841

Johannesburg to Nelspruit KMIA

11:55

SA 8663

Cape Town to Nelspruit KMIA

12:35 10:50

11:15

11:50

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

SA 8861

Johannesburg to Skukuza

10:30

11:00

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

SA 8870

Nelspruit KMIA to Livingstone on Mon, Tue, Wed, Fri, Sat

SA 8258

Nelspruit KMIA to Vilanculos on Thu and Sun

11:35

Flights FROM Londolozi (LDZ) TO: SA 8950

Londolozi to Nelspruit KMIA

11:35

SA 8940

Londolozi to Skukuza

10:40

10:55

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

SA 8652

Skukuza to Cape Town

11:20

SA 8947

Londolozi to Skukuza

14:05

14:20

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

SA 8866

Skukuza to Johannesburg

14:50

Flights TO Londolozi FROM: SA 8945

Skukuza to Londolozi

11:15

11:30

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

SA 8861

Johannesburg to Skukuza

SA 8946

Nelspruit KMIA to Londolozi

13:00

13:30

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

SA 8507

Durban to Nelspruit KMIA on Mon, Wed and Fri

8:05

SA 8663

Cape Town to Nelspruit KMIA

12:35

SA 8948

Skukuza to Londolozi

14:40

14:55

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

10:50

SA 8841

Johannesburg to Nelspruit KMIA

11:55

SA 8651

Cape Town to Skukuza

13:05

SA 8865

Johannesburg to Skukuza

14:10

Flights FROM Nelpsruit KMIA - Kruger Mpumalanga International Airport (KMIA) (MQP) TO: SA 8953

SA 8946

SA 8932

Nelspruit KMIA to Arathusa

Nelspruit KMIA to Londolozi

Nelspruit KMIA to Ulusaba

13:05

13:00

12:55

13:40

13:30

13:25

1 1 1

2 2 2

3 3 3

4 4 4

5 5 5

6 6 6

7 7 7

SA 8841

Johannesburg to Nelspruit KMIA

11:55

SA 8663

Cape Town to Nelspruit KMIA

12:35

SA 8841

Johannesburg to Nelspruit KMIA

11:55

SA 8663

Cape Town to Nelspruit KMIA

12:35

SA 8841

Johannesburg to Nelspruit KMIA

11:55

SA 8663

Cape Town to Nelspruit KMIA

12:35

SA 8870

Nelspruit KMIA to Livingstone on Mon, Tue, Wed, Fri, Sat

11:35

SA 8258

Nelspruit KMIA to Vilanculos on Thu and Sun

11:35

SA 8870

Nelspruit KMIA to Livingstone on Mon, Tue, Wed, Fri, Sat

11:35

SA 8258

Nelspruit KMIA to Vilanculos on Thu and Sun

11:35

SA 8870

Nelspruit KMIA to Livingstone on Mon, Tue, Wed, Fri, Sat

11:35

SA 8258

Nelspruit KMIA to Vilanculos on Thu and Sun

11:35

SA 8870

Nelspruit KMIA to Livingstone on Mon, Tue, Wed, Fri, Sat

11:35

SA 8258

Nelspruit KMIA to Vilanculos on Thu and Sun

11:35

SA 8664

Nelspruit KMIA to Cape Town

13:15

SA 8842

Nelspruit KMIA to Johannesburg

13:35

Flights TO Nelspruit KMIA - Kruger Mpumalanga International Airport (KMIA) FROM: SA 8930

SA 8930

SA 8950

SA 8950

SA 8952

Ulusaba via Skukuza to Nelspruit KMIA

Skukuza to Nelspruit KMIA

Arathusa via Londolozi to Nelspruit KMIA

Londolozi to Nelspruit KMIA

Arathusa to Nelspruit KMIA

9:55

10:30

10:10

10:30

12:00

11:05

11:05

11:00

11:00

12:40

1 1 1 1 1

2 2 2 2 2

3 3 3 3 3

4 4 4 4 4

5 5 5 5 5

6 6 6 6 6

7 7 7 7 7

Flights FROM Skukuza Airport (SZK) TO: SA 8930

Skukuza to Nelspruit KMIA

10:30

11:05

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

SA 8861

Johannesburg to Skukuza

10:50

SA 8945

Skukuza to Londolozi

11:15

11:30

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

SA 8861

Johannesburg to Skukuza

10:50

SA 8945

Skukuza via Londolozi to Arathusa

11:15

11:50

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

SA 8861

Johannesburg to Skukuza

10:50

SA 8955

Skukuza to Arathusa

14:30

14:45

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

SA 8651

Cape Town to Skukuza

13:05

SA 8865

Johannesburg to Skukuza

14:10

SA 8651

Cape Town to Skukuza

13:05

SA 8865

Johannesburg to Skukuza

14:10

SA 8651

Cape Town to Skukuza

13:05

SA 8865

Johannesburg to Skukuza

14:10

SA 8948

Skukuza to Londolozi

14:40

14:55

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

SA 8933

Skukuza to Ulusaba

14:45

15:00

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Flights TO Skukuza Airport FROM: SA 8954

Arathusa to Skukuza

13:50

14:05

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

SA 8866

Skukuza to Johannesburg

SA 8940

Londolozi to Skukuza

10:40

10:55

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

SA 8652

Skukuza to Cape Town

11:20

SA 8947

Londolozi to Skukuza

14:05

14:20

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

SA 8866

Skukuza to Johannesburg

14:50

SA 8930

Ulusaba to Skukuza

9:55

10:10

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

SA 8652

Skukuza to Cape Town

11:20

SA 8934

Ulusaba to Skukuza

14:00

14:15

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

SA 8866

Skukuza to Johannesburg

14:50

14:50

Flights FROM Ulusaba lodge strip (ULX) TO: Ulusaba Rock, Ulusaba Cliff and Safari Lodge, &Beyond Leadwood and Exeter, Inyati, Leopard Hills, Dulini, Savanna, Idube SA 8930

Ulusaba to Skukuza

9:55

10:10

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

SA 8652

Skukuza to Cape Town

11:20

SA 8930

Ulusaba via Skukuza to Nelspruit KMIA

9:55

11:05

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

SA 8870

Nelspruit KMIA to Livingstone on Mon,Tue, Wed, Fri, Sat

11:35

SA 8258

Nelspruit KMIA to Vilanculos on Thu and Sun

11:35

SA 8866

Skukuza to Johannesburg

14:50

SA 8841

Johannesburg to Nelspruit KMIA

11:55

SA 8663

Cape Town to Nelspruit KMIA

12:35

SA 8651

Cape Town to Skukuza

13:05

SA 8865

Johannesburg to Skukuza

14:10

SA 8934

Ulusaba to Skukuza

14:00

14:15

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

12:55

13:25

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Flights TO Ulusaba FROM: SA 8932

SA 8933

Nelspruit KMIA to Ulusaba

Skukuza to Ulusaba

14:45

15:00

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Applicable fare rules apply. 20kg checked baggage, soft bag only. 7kg hand baggage, soft bag only. Free luggage storage facilities available at Skukuza Airport and Nelspruit KMIA. These exclusive services are restricted to applicable lodges and their guests.

91 07 16


Litho & Digital printing

Alternative angling

Three friends, several crazy ideas about the best way to catch fish and a BBC budget make for intriguing television

fishing EV

C

EL 1

ER

D

L

Impossible is a 10-part television series following three fishing fanatics – marine-turned-socialworker Jay Lewis, EasyJet pilot Charlie Butcher and marine biologist Tom Hurd (better known as The Blowfish) – who indulge elaborate hypotheses in their mission to catch interesting fish in new and creative ways while travelling the world.

TIFI

E

"We stuck to our guns even when things didn’t go according to plan.” – The Blowfish

The locations in which this series was filmed are often spectacular – British Columbia, the Bahamas, Norway, South Africa, Patagonia, Laos, Kenya and others. Were they chosen with a view to creating certain stories during the series? Tom Hurd (TH): The initial driving force was just our collective passion. We all have knowledge of the sea and river systems, but with different areas of interest. Charlie’s great with freshwater fishing, Jay knows a lot about spear-fishing and so on, so we made a list of the places we’d like to go and presented it to the production team. Some places were crossed off the list – they wouldn’t allow us to go there – but there was never any number-crunching reason behind picking a specific location. Charlie Butcher (CB): There were also sometimes environmental angles, like going somewhere because there was an invasive species that we wanted to try and catch.


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Trying to script such a project can be tricky, as there could obviously never be guarantees as to what direction the action would take on site, with changing weather conditions and uncooperative fishy co-stars. TH: Never work with children, animals or The Blowfish! The show was never set out like that, and because we were always trying strange things, like trying to lure sharks by playing bass-heavy music underwater, there was always something interesting going on. CB: We didn’t spend three weeks in a single spot, waiting to get exactly the right shot. That’s a better way to get predictable results, but it’s not what we were after. TH: We stuck to our guns even when things didn’t go according to plan, so I think what you see is an honest reflection of what happened. CB: In Argentina, we really struggled to catch anything and a bit of conflict built up – I remember Blowfish and I had to have some words. But on the other side, in Norway, when we were filming the last episode, there was a moment when we got quite emotional after getting through a number of challenges. TH: If Top Gear is ‘ambitious but rubbish’, maybe Fishing Impossible is ‘dangerous but sexy’. Ha!

The three of you came up with some pretty outlandish ways to catch fish before you began filming the series. What was the most ridiculous stunt of the lot? TH: I think the bit in Scotland was genius and stupid at the same time. CB: We were trying to prove that in certain conditions – very cold weather, in this case – it helps to drop the bait into a very specific place in the water, and to do that, we needed outside help. TH: Jay was using a flying machine to extract the fish, but he’s not a man capable of a lot of subtlety and it got a bit out of hand. He also built a mortar in Laos so we could get chum into the middle of a lake. So mostly, the daftness was Jay’s fault. CB: There was also a bear suit in Canada, and then in the Bahamas, a moment after I lost a bet where I had to walk down a beach packed with drunk American tourists wearing nothing but a leopard-print budgie-smuggler. Text | Bruce Dennill Photography | Supplied

Fishing Impossible runs until 27 July on Wednesdays at 9pm on BBC Brit (channel 120 on DStv). It will also be repeated on BBC Earth

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time | out

Media DVDs, music and books Précis

ED’S CHOICE

Trumbo

I Am They – I Am They A Nevada sextet armed with multiple acoustic guitars and delicately harmonised vocals, I Am They manage to feature, in every song on this debut collection, a sense of joy, which is a rare feature in contemporary music. The musicianship is first-class, with beautifully blended guitars, banjos and dobros augmented by keys and underpinned (on the more uptempo tunes) by a robust four-on-the-floor kick drum. The album contains no weak tunes, but perhaps the best of an excellent bunch are We Are Yours and Awaken My Love, the first two tunes on offer.

This is a film about one of Hollywood’s greatest ever screenwriters, Dalton Trumbo, and how American political paranoia and hubris attempted to quell both his creativity and the compassion, fairness and morality Trumbo’s stories had the potential to encourage. The background to the story is fascinating, taking in the rise of interest in communism in America during the Great Depression, how that was augmented during the alliance with the Soviets during World War II and then immediately grounds for suspicion and harassment once that coalition crumbled and the Cold War began. The story as a whole serves as a scathing reminder of the damage foolish leadership can inflict on the citizens of a country (and the echoes in contemporary South Africa are impossible to ignore). But it is a highly personal, emotional story, rather than soapbox grandstanding, and its sublime cast – Bryan Cranston as Trumbo, Diane Lane as his wife Cleo, Helen Mirren as self-serving gossip columnist Hedda Hopper, Louis CK as Arlen Hird, Michael Stuhlbarg as Edward G Robinson and John Goodman as unscrupulous film-maker Frank King among others – delight and appal viewers throughout. A film about a great writer has to be well written, and John McNamara’s script (based on the book by Bruce Cook) is perhaps the star of the show, which is saying something given the blanket brilliance of the acting. It bristles with aggressive, intelligent humour as well as allowing for moments of great tenderness. Not all viewers will have an interest in the coruscating way that Trumbo reveals the hypocrisy and expedience of Hollywood (or how such machinations are reflected in whatever business they may be involved in), but those with any breadth in their film knowledge will relish the revelations that come with each step of the protagonist’s story. This project makes clear the importance of Trumbo and his refusal to accept the oppressive status quo during an era – blacklisting people for their political beliefs in the so-called ‘land of the free’, and ruining their lives – that remains a black mark on American history and a warning for the present regime. And it highlights how different film as an art form might have been had the politicians and the back-stabbers had their way. This is film-making excellence on all levels. See it.

Hozier – Hozier

94 07 16

The mega-hit on this album, Take Me To Church, is already a modern standard, an achievement made more impressive by its unusual arrangement. There’s nothing else like it on the album, but

that’s not a negative. Hozier’s quality as a blues-, gospel- and roots-influenced musician is revealed, with Angel Of Death & The Codeine Scene, Jackie & Wilson (driven by a dirty, Jack White-ish guitar sound),

Someone New, and To Be Alone, which would work well on the soundtrack of a screen Western.

Sigh The Beloved Country by Bongani Madondo Bongani Madondo is a polarising

character, courtesy of his inability to pull punches on the one hand and a penchant for frenetic, bombastic prose on the other. Both of those facets are easy to like – unless, of course, you happen to disagree with him on whatever topic he’s writing about. Sigh The Beloved Country is a cache of gonzo perspectives on everything from black consciousness to celebrity culture via music and politics, standing on as many toes as possible along the way. It’s sometimes dense and always intense, but as a collection of essays, it’s possible to consume it in palatable bite-size chunks.

The Yearning by Mohale Mashigo Music fans will know Mohale Mashigo as singer-songwriter Black Porcelain, but that persona is put aside for this debut novel. It’s not a traditional story. For one thing, Mashigo uses parallel stories in the past and present to push the plot forward (helpfully presented in different fonts to help avoid confusion). There’s another juxtaposition, between the modern lifestyle of protagonist Marubini and that of her late father, a man who placed much stock in his ancestral roots. The Yearning is fiction, but it cleverly reveals the cultural conflicts many people influenced by more than one set of traditions must go through.


Proud to be building Africa

Did you See if you’ve mastered the art of answering quiz questions

Questions 1. What is the pseudonym of the Bristolian graffiti artist who branched into film in 2010? 2. Which pottery form takes its name from the Italian for ‘baked earth’? 3. Which painter was nicknamed ‘Jack the Dripper’? 4. Who created the famous sculptures The Thinker and The Kiss? 5. Which artistic movement was founded by Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso? swers Intermediate Challenging by KrazyDad, Volume 8, Book 8 by KrazyDad, Volume 8, Book 8 6. Sudoku Which natural facial Sudoku feature does the Mona Lisa not have? Sudoku #1 Sudoku #2 Sudoku #2 produced the famous painting The 4 8 7 9 5 7. 26 38What 64 1 7 nationality 1 4 8 6who 5 9 3 2 1was5 Edvard 3 2 7 Munch, 9 1 1 3 2 7 6 43 89Scream 95 5 2 8 in 9 6 4 8 3 2 1 5 7 2 1 1893? 4 7 6 5 6 5 9 1 8 37 42 7 1 2 4 3 6 5 8 9 8 7 1 5 6 9 3 4 2 5 Japanese 2 7 8 4 9art6 of paper folding? 8 9 4 2is1given 3 9 1 8 4 3 8. 65 2 7 What 5 6 78 name 3to1the 3 7 5 2 1 9. 92 64True 43 81 or6 false! 2 4refers 3 9 3 5 6 7 1 8 7 8 9 5 – ‘Salsa’ to a fusion of informal dance styles. 7 8 6 4 9 1 2 3 5 2 4 6 8 7 59 11 38 93 2 5 6 4 7 7 country of the tango? 8 6 1 3 9 10. 74 55 Which 3 9 2 is7 the 6 8home 4 3 2 29 46 7Latin 4 5 1 8 1 American 1 2 she 6 7 2 3 5 4 81 96 12 69 4 3 7 5 8 8 6 4 5 9 7 3 11. How old is Juliet when dies in Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet? 9 5 9 4 6 2 18 7 3 87 3 5 1 2 9 6 4 6 9 7 1 8 3 5 2 4 12. Which famous ballet is about a young girl’s broken Christmas present? Sudoku #3 #4 or left slipper? Sudoku 13. Did#4Cinderella lose Sudoku her right 2 3 1 4 5 65 82 97 79 1 6 4 3 8 2 9 3 1 6 8 4 7 5 1 14. “Fe, fi, fo, fum, I smell the blood of an Englishman” is a classic line from which 9 8 5 3 7 21 19 48 62 4 3 5 6 7 1 4 5 7 2 9 8 3 6 9 6 4 7 9 8 16 2 4 Christmas 1 9 2 33 5 7 5 8 pantomime? 6 7 8 4 5 3 9 1 2 6 4 9 6 2 3 72 57 15 81 3 9 6 8 4 2 9 5 7 1 6 4 8 2 15. Which play contains73the line “Now is the winter of our discontent”? 6 4 9 8 2 3 5 1 3 3 5 8 1 6 44 98 79 2 5 6 7 2 1 3

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Get the answer Clue to number 18 Sudoku

Easy Sudoku

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page 61

Battleship Easy

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Answers 1. Banksy 2. Terracotta 3. Jackson Pollock 4. Auguste Rodin 5. Cubism 6. Eyebrows 7. Norwegian 8. Origami 9. True 10. Argentina 11. 13 12. The Nutcracker 13. Left 14. Jack and the Beanstalk 15. Richard III

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talespin

S G N I T E E M

utual ngmparat odf a ncomemsittese andomm mit ted af ter bei

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‘com·mit·tee.

A group of persons appointed to perform some service or function.’ A better definition, to my mind, is: ‘A collection of the certifiable gathering to discuss the detailed at great length, emitting vast quantities of GH gases and spewing out plantations of paperwork.’ Men and women do things differently, so why make them do the same thing?

96 07 16

After exiting corporate life, I dusted meetings from my soles. No more hours closeted in stuffy conference rooms fighting off the urge to doze and battling to concentrate in the buzzword-filled air. It’s peculiar: people are employed for their ability to perform specific tasks, but once they’re signed up, endless hours are spent tied up sitting around tables in groups discussing all sorts of things but – practically – not getting anything done during that interval. And then I discovered The Committee. A school mom, I avoided the PTA, plunging into teams appealing to my interests and bound to be more fun – the slightly less worthy piety of the festival and environmental commitees. Setting up a recycling depot and organising a beer tent: what’s not to enjoy about those? Small towns appear to be run by committees, mostly because when you know a huge number of the other residents, it’s hard to miss the fact that one or the other is involved in something. I’m not writing under a pseudonym so I have to be careful, because as you read this a Nelspruit posse may be sending out invitations to a lynching party. Our town enjoys a good party, and

cracking a few cold ones around a captured non-weightpuller is as good an excuse as any other. To be fair, the committees are manned by people with big hearts who voluntarily give up oodles of time and energy to organise events and make circumstances better for many. Fundraising; caring for animals, children and the elderly; hosting lunches with ingredients sourced from local farmers for starters. And then there are the biggies, with our famous (to us!) Uplands Festival bringing national theatre acts to White River and the Lowveld Book Festival hosting award-winning authors. But for some reason – perhaps that dratted democracy – it’s considered etiquette to have a mixed-gender group of people organising an event when, in reality, one or two women could do the job in half the time with a quarter of the stress. And therein lies the rub, I think: mixed committees seem to be at odds with themselves. The Venusians grab each task with enthusiasm and get them done. Klaar. Ticked off. Now to fetch the kids, plan dinner and take the dog to the vet. Martians, meanwhile, do things in their own way. Laid-back sessions, heaps of talking and ideas, the odd phone call – it all adds up to not much action seen. Frustratingly, both planets eventually arrive at the finish line, but the stress on the hyper-efficient lasses is hard to bear. Check the WhatsApp messages between the ladies mid- and post-meeting if you need proof ... Men and women do it differently, to mutual frustration. Single-sex committees, anyone? Text | Tracey Brooks Photography | Shutterstock


GPS Co-ordinates: 26o 6' 1" S, 28o 4' 9" E

Investment opportunity

PRETORIA

Ideal for business development

Kyalami - Midrand - Gauteng

CENTURION

Situated at development node • 1.5 ha property (POA) • Part of top end secure lifestyle and equestrian estate

MIDRAND KEMPTON SANDTON RANDBURG JOHANNESBURG

5

min from GP Race track and International conference facilities

15

min from the Mall of Africa

5

top private schools within 5km radius

Email: property@hmm.co.za | Mobile: 083 252Space 1222 sponsored by


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